Podcasts about strangelove

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Best podcasts about strangelove

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Latest podcast episodes about strangelove

Strangelove of Movies
'The Fabelmans' is an INSTANT Classic!

Strangelove of Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 26:09


Strangelove is back and discussing a film we saw in theaters over Thanksgiving break, 'The Fabelmans!' The newest film by a lesser-known director, Steven Spielberg, is about his childhood, and Strangelove could not recommend it more. Go see it in theaters before listening because there are minor spoilers in the episode!!! Visit our Website Strangeloveofmovies.com and follow us on Instagram @Strangeloveofmedia

OWC RADiO
Tia Nolan – Advice for YOU from the Editor of Dr Strangelove in the Multiverse and Thunderforce

OWC RADiO

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022


Yes, It's a jungle out there, but Cirina Catania's conversation with Tia Nolan, editor of major hits such as Dr. Strange in the Multiverse of Madness and Thunder Force gives us some very candid advice about how to build a story with examples from her films. And for those of you who are thinking you might want to become an editor or are looking to get ahead in your career, she's also got some great advice for YOU.  Big thank you to OWC (Other World Computing) for sponsoring this show!   This episode was edited on Final Cut, and written with help from Lumberjack System's Builder with music "Roar" courtesy of George Gousis. Ted Limpert voices the OWC RADiO Intro and we are grateful to everyone on our team and the folks at OWC who make this show possible. You can find OWC RADiO on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, iHeart, and just about anywhere where great podcasts live. Please like and subscribe. We would appreciate it. If you enjoy our podcast, please subscribe and tell all your friends about us! We love our listeners. And, if you have ideas for segments, write to OWCRadio@catania.us. We are always up for new ideas! ABOUT OWC: Other World Computing, under the leadership of Larry O'Connor since he was 15 years old, has expanded to all corners of the world and works every day to create hardware and software that make the lives of creatives and business-oriented companies faster, more efficient and more stable.  Go to MacSales.com for more information and to discover an ecosystem that serves your needs. ABOUT CIRINA CATANIA: Cirina Catania, is a successful filmmaker, former Sr Vice President of Worldwide Marketing at MGM-UA and United Artists and one of the co-founders and former director of the Sundance Film Festival. She is the founder, CEO and Executive Director of the non-profit, High School Media Collective. Cirina is Founder/Lead Creative at the Catania Group est. circa 1989, Showrunner and Host of OWC RADiO and partner, Lumberjack System, as well as Tech Ambassador for companies such as Blackmagic Design.  Instagram:  CirinaCatania - LinkedIn:  LinkedIn.com/in/cirinacatania

The Sniff Perfume Podcast
S2 E20 - Oud perfumes with Strangelove

The Sniff Perfume Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 42:24


Strangelove make fragrances centred on oud. We discuss how a career in sustainable farming got founder, Elizabeth Gaynes, hooked on the scent and thinking about her own brand; how supermodel Helena Christensen got involved; and how perfumer Christophe Laudamiel helped bring the vision to life. If oud is your thing then this episode is a must!

Autumn's Oddities
Strange Love: Carl Tanzler & the Corpse Bride

Autumn's Oddities

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 19:00


Hey hey everyone, the flu is currently ravaging my household, so please enjoy an episode from the Patreon vault that was not previously released to the public. If you live in the US, enjoy your holiday with your family or your chosen family! This is a tale of unrequited love in life that bled into a one-sided romantic relationship with a corpse after her death. Beware, this episode contains depictions of necrophilia and just plain disturbing behavior.

Movie Mount Rushmore
TOP 10 Movies on a Plane (Season 5, Episode 38)

Movie Mount Rushmore

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 113:50


What are the TOP 10 Movies that take place on a plane?Join us for the latest instalment of the Movie Mount Rushmore Podcast as hosts Aj and Nico their individual TOP 10 Plane Movies and then debate what 4 should ultimately make the Final 4 (“Rushmore”).From international spectaculars like Con Air, grizzly stories like Red Eye, classics like Dr Strangelove, and award winners like Dunkirk, this list is more varied than you may realise!!Do you like the Movie Mount Rushmore podcast? Why not support us for LITERALLY less than the cost of your daily coffee at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/moviedudes #TOP10 #Movies

Cinematic Omniverse
040 - Catch Me If You Kahn

Cinematic Omniverse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 64:25


Scott and Marty skip a groove again, but end up landing comfortably on Madeline Kahn, the Teutonic Tit-willow. Core Connections:Paper Moon (1973, Dir. Peter Bogdanovich)Blazing Saddles (1974, Dir. Mel Brooks)The Muppet Movie (1979, Dir. James Frawley)Connective Cameos:ClueNixonJudy BerlinMidnight RunSilver StreakThe Darjeeling Ltd.Leon: The ProfessionalRain ManThe Last Picture ShowNational Lampoon's VacationThe GriftersDr. Strangelove, or How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the BombAirplane!The GunfighterThe Towering InfernoDjango UnchainedMinionsMuppet Treasure IslandThe Muppet Christmas CarolThe Great Muppet CaperE.T.: The Extra-TerrestrialHoward the DuckEmmet Otter's Jug Band ChristmasSpaceballsBy the SeaIt's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad WorldPlan 9 From Outer SpaceScarfaceThe Man Who Shot Liberty ValanceCatch-22The Third ManBig TroubleThe Spanish PrisonerDirty Rotten ScoundrelsAddams Family ValuesStrange BrewDead Men Don't Wear PlaidThree O'Clock HighBad Lieutenant Port of Call New OrleansKiss of Spider WomanThe Visitor, aka StridulumFast Times at Ridgemont High Linked Films to Date: 691

Bíóblaður
Bíóblaður áskrift #8 - Stanley Kubrick Part I með Teiti Magnús

Bíóblaður

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 10:27


— (BROT ÚR ÁSKRIFTARÞÆTTI) —   Kvikmyndagerðarmaðurinn Teitur Magnússon kíkti til Hafsteins til að ræða einn merkilegasta kvikmyndagerðarmann allra tíma, Stanley Kubrick.   Í þessum fyrri hluta fara strákarnir yfir fyrstu myndir Kubrick og ræða meðal annars Fear and Desire, Killer's Kiss, The Killing, Paths of Glory, Spartacus, Lolita, Dr. Strangelove og margt, margt fleira.     Þátturinn er 2 klukkutímar. Hægt er að horfa á hann eða hlusta í heild sinni með því að gerast áskrifandi á www.biobladur.is

Dr Zeus
Dr. Strangelove or how I stopped worrying and learn to love the bomb

Dr Zeus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 32:04


On November 22, 1963 Dr. Strangelove was to have its official screening… it was canceled due to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963 in Dallas. Tonight we discuss the film and the changes that were made to the film after the assassination. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/drzeusfilmpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/drzeusfilmpodcast/support

Matt Connarton Unleashed
Matt Connarton Unleashed: Erich Pilcher reviews Dr. Strangelove.

Matt Connarton Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 18:13


Let us THINK : By Dr.King  (Author of books on Yoga,Spirituality,Gardening...)

window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; function gtag(){dataLayer.push(arguments);} gtag('js', new Date()); gtag('config', 'G-8HXGBD0CVC'); [Quick links] [Pause]   Krishnawas now in Dwarika. He was no more the boy of Mathura. He had grown into an adult. Naturally, like all human beings he too fell for the cupid's arrows. That is, he too fell in love like a typical human being. But it was not a one-sided story. Nor was it a smooth love affair. Let us discuss this love story in this episode. p { margin-top: 0.42cm; margin-bottom: 0.25cm; direction: ltr; color: #00000a; line-height: 120%; text-align: justify; orphans: 2; widows: 2 }p.western { font-family: "Segoe UI Emoji", serif; font-size: 12pt; so-language: en-US }p.cjk { font-family: "Segoe UI Emoji"; font-size: 12pt; so-language: en-IN }p.ctl { font-family: "Segoe UI Emoji"; font-size: 14pt; so-language: ar-SA }a:link { color: #0000ff }

Dragon at the Movies
Episode 116 - Thirteen Lives

Dragon at the Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 76:24


Dragon on The Couch: The Dragon watched Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (Theatres), the latest Marvel film. She said it was exceedingly long, and found it to be alright. Next, she watched Tenebre (Shudder), an Italian Giallo film. She enjoyed it and liked Joe Bob talking about it as she watched it. She watched Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (rent), a dark comedy about the cold war. She loved it and found that it's still funny even after 60 years. Next the Dragon watched Guarding Tess (rent), an early Nic Cage film. She enjoyed it and felt it was surprisingly good. Finally, she watched The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (Hulu), a 90's sexy thriller. She thought it was interesting and enjoyed the film.   Berto on the Bed: Berto watched Don't Worry Darling (HBO), Olivia Wilde's latest film. He thought it started decently, but the twist was terrible and made the whole movie worse. Next, Berto watched The Pentaverate (Netflix), Mike Myers' mini-series. He thought it was ok, but had a few moments that had him laughing hard. Next, he watched Westworld (HBO), the film about an amusement park gone bad from the 70's. He thought it was a slow but enjoyable movie, and understood why so many people have reverence for it. Next for Joe Bob corner, Berto watched Nosferatu (Shudder), the silent film from the 1920's. He thought it was very good and enjoyed it. Finally, Berto watched Fire in The Sky (Discovery +), the 1990's film about a famous alien abduction. He thought it was a decent movie with some good drama.     Dragon at the Movies: This week's deep dive was the 2022 BOATS drama Thirteen Lives, currently streaming on Amazon Prime. 

Kapital
K52. José Luis Ferreira. Destrucción mutua asegurada

Kapital

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 123:42


Stanley Kubrick parodia en Dr. Strangelove la crisis de los misiles de Cuba de 1962. Peter Sellers interpreta en ella al matemático que asesora a los americanos en un potencial conflicto nuclear con los rusos. El personaje está inspirado en el profesor John von Neumann, padre de la teoría de juegos. Dicen los manuales que la bomba atómica debería reducir la probabilidad de guerra, ahora que el coste es inasumible. Aunque los modelos no siempre se cumplen con humanos no siempre racionales.Este podcast está patrocinado por Equito App.Muchos españoles no pueden invertir en inmuebles porque los bancos exigen un capital alto antes de conceder un préstamo. Equito App llega para cambiar esto. Nuestra aplicación te permite invertir en inmuebles desde tan solo 100 euros, en menos de 2 minutos y con tu móvil, para recibir rentas cada mes. Equito tokeniza los activos inmobiliarios para hacerlos accesibles a todos. Es muy simple darte de alta: te descargas la app, le sacas una foto a tu DNI, eliges el tipo de inversión que quieres, firmas tu contrato desde el teléfono móvil y mandas el dinero. La inversión se realiza por transferencia bancaria, tarjeta de crédito o incluso criptomoneda. Con el código NB543, obtén 10 euros por una primera inversión de 200 y 30 euros por una de 500. Entra en Equito.app para conocer todos los detalles del proyecto.Índice:1.26. Un bonito consejo de José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero.11.26. Los buenos estudiantes mantienen la curiosidad.26.01. ¿Qué es la teoría de juegos?39.40. El dilema del prisionero.49.32. La tragedia de los comunes.1.13.17. 12 hombres sin piedad.1.17.30. El juego de la gallina con Puigdemont y Tsipras.1.40.56. ¿Teléfono rojo? Volamos hacia Moscú.1.54.15. El equilibrio de Nash en el lanzamiento de penaltis.Apuntes:Game theory: an applied introduction. José Luis Ferreira.La historia más lúdica jamás contada: Von Neumann. José Luis Ferreira.La historia más lúdica jamás contada: Schelling. José Luis Ferreira.La historia más lúdica jamás contada: Aumann. José Luis Ferreira.The strategy of conflict. Thomas Schelling.Theory of games and economic behavior. John von Neumann.How the mind works. Steven Pinker.The logic of life. Tim Harford.

Institutionalized
Nuclear Weapons with Matt Kroenig

Institutionalized

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 51:36


This week we are joined by Matt Kroenig to discuss nuclear weapons, the likeliness of nuclear war and how we can avert it. Recommendations: 24 (TV show) Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb The Logic of American Nuclear Strategy: Why Strategic Superiority Matters by Matt Kroenig Arms and Influence by Thomas C. Schelling Questions? Comments? Email us at Institutionalized@nebulouspodcasts.com

The REAL David Knight Show
8Nov22 Election, Sedition, Persecution, Civil War — The Next 2 Months After Last 2 Years

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 181:38


OUTLINE of today's show with TIMECODESInfowars website staffer pleads guilty to storming the capitol. Alex Jones abandons and refuses to defend.2:15Equal treatment under the law? Leftist journalist John Sullivan and Trump supportive journalist Sam Montoya treated differently because of their politics.5:23The FALSE idea that journalism is EVER objective.11:55Sedition trial of Stewart Rhodes, Oath Keepers15:40Kroger must pay former employees $180,000 for attempted coercion against their religious liberty, then firing them32:49Canadian PPC Leader Maxime Bernie takes on the LGBT insanity without reservation35:36Why China's marriage crisis is an “existential threat”. 44:24Trad wives and patriarchy and why it goes wrong in totalitarian societies48:15Bayer ordered to pay $275 million for brain damage caused by Monsanto's PCBS — same people who brought you glyphosate (RoundUp)1:04:55Crime explodes in Ireland as migrants soar to 1/5 of population. Italian Prime Minister firmly refusing German NGO demands to off load migrants from ships dock in Italian ports1:07:21Listener comment on DNA, evolution & genetic modification vs. selective breeding1:11:48Election Officials Fear Counting Delays Will Help Fuel Claims of Fraud. And rightfully so. Why have computers and mail elections created chaos & corruption?1:15:39A county is being sued because they plan to count 100% of the ballots by hand.1:25:49Even though NY Gov Hochul is circling the drain, she can't give up on NO BAIL1:29:32New York City insiders say Mayor Eric Adams sees an opportunity to fight crime Hochul loses.1:33:05Reality imitates "Dr. Strangelove" down to the Russian "Doomsday" device (aka "Dead Hand") and American general pushing the idea that nuclear war is winnable1:42:55US nuclear forces chief says the war in Ukraine is a “warm-up” for the big one.1:51:51David welcomes Eric Peters.1:59:55If the left wins, what will be the determining factor?2:02:12The parallels between today's election and 1860.2:09:59Voting is an existential issue for Dominion — but what about the country and election integrity?2:14:07BigPharma & BigBureaucrats retreat to the talking point: vaccines "Help Protect"2:24:13Evolution of private transportation and automobiles has gone into reverse. We're headed back to it being only for the elite2:28:39NASCAR: video of a guy trying to pull off a WALL RIDE, only done before in a video game, for the win2:37:43Even Pelosi attacker's mugshot is kept secret and hidden by the police. Why is that?2:56:08Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 994 Kodak, TN 37764Money is only what YOU hold: Go to DavidKnight.gold for great deals on physical gold/silver

The David Knight Show
8Nov22 Election, Sedition, Persecution, Civil War — The Next 2 Months After Last 2 Years

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 181:38


OUTLINE of today's show with TIMECODESInfowars website staffer pleads guilty to storming the capitol. Alex Jones abandons and refuses to defend.2:15Equal treatment under the law? Leftist journalist John Sullivan and Trump supportive journalist Sam Montoya treated differently because of their politics.5:23The FALSE idea that journalism is EVER objective.11:55Sedition trial of Stewart Rhodes, Oath Keepers15:40Kroger must pay former employees $180,000 for attempted coercion against their religious liberty, then firing them32:49Canadian PPC Leader Maxime Bernie takes on the LGBT insanity without reservation35:36Why China's marriage crisis is an “existential threat”. 44:24Trad wives and patriarchy and why it goes wrong in totalitarian societies48:15Bayer ordered to pay $275 million for brain damage caused by Monsanto's PCBS — same people who brought you glyphosate (RoundUp)1:04:55Crime explodes in Ireland as migrants soar to 1/5 of population. Italian Prime Minister firmly refusing German NGO demands to off load migrants from ships dock in Italian ports1:07:21Listener comment on DNA, evolution & genetic modification vs. selective breeding1:11:48Election Officials Fear Counting Delays Will Help Fuel Claims of Fraud. And rightfully so. Why have computers and mail elections created chaos & corruption?1:15:39A county is being sued because they plan to count 100% of the ballots by hand.1:25:49Even though NY Gov Hochul is circling the drain, she can't give up on NO BAIL1:29:32New York City insiders say Mayor Eric Adams sees an opportunity to fight crime Hochul loses.1:33:05Reality imitates "Dr. Strangelove" down to the Russian "Doomsday" device (aka "Dead Hand") and American general pushing the idea that nuclear war is winnable1:42:55US nuclear forces chief says the war in Ukraine is a “warm-up” for the big one.1:51:51David welcomes Eric Peters.1:59:55If the left wins, what will be the determining factor?2:02:12The parallels between today's election and 1860.2:09:59Voting is an existential issue for Dominion — but what about the country and election integrity?2:14:07BigPharma & BigBureaucrats retreat to the talking point: vaccines "Help Protect"2:24:13Evolution of private transportation and automobiles has gone into reverse. We're headed back to it being only for the elite2:28:39NASCAR: video of a guy trying to pull off a WALL RIDE, only done before in a video game, for the win2:37:43Even Pelosi attacker's mugshot is kept secret and hidden by the police. Why is that?2:56:08Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 994 Kodak, TN 37764Money is only what YOU hold: Go to DavidKnight.gold for great deals on physical gold/silver

Weird Darkness: Stories of the Paranormal, Supernatural, Legends, Lore, Mysterious, Macabre, Unsolved
“NIGHT SKYES” and 5 More Stories of Fiction Written by Weirdo Family Members! #WeirdDarkness

Weird Darkness: Stories of the Paranormal, Supernatural, Legends, Lore, Mysterious, Macabre, Unsolved

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 62:24


Find Weird Darkness wherever you listen to podcasts: https://linktr.ee/weirddarkness. #paranormal #truestories #paranormalstories #ghoststories #horrorstories #truecrime #cryptidsIN THIS EPISODE: It's Thriller Thursday! And if I sound a little hoarse today it's because I've already been doing a LOT of voicework on another Thriller Thursday episode that is going to take me a long time to complete so I have to work on it in sections. For this episode, I thought it would be a great idea when looking for creepypasta stories to use some of the original creepypastas that have been sent in from Weirdo family members. I have six weirdo creepypastas for you tonight!SOURCES AND ESSENTIAL WEB LINKS…“Night Skyes” written by Danny Kennedy, (https://neotericknights.com, https://twitter.com/MirielKanan, https://www.instagram.com/MirielKanan/) “An Unknown Trible” by Adam Banks“Look at Me” by Tristan Nieto (https://www.instagram.com/intellectualismmmm/) “There Is Something at the Edge of the Woods” by Dylan Walker“What Is That Music?” by Bill Richardson“Dr. Strange Love's Potions” by Kelly Maida= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =Weird Darkness theme by Alibi Music Library. Background music provided by Alibi Music Library, EpidemicSound and/or StoryBlocks with paid license. Music from Shadows Symphony (https://tinyurl.com/yyrv987t), Midnight Syndicate (http://amzn.to/2BYCoXZ), Kevin MacLeod (https://tinyurl.com/y2v7fgbu), Tony Longworth (https://tinyurl.com/y2nhnbt7), and Nicolas Gasparini (https://tinyurl.com/lnqpfs8) is used with permission of the artists.= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =(Over time links seen above may become invalid, disappear, or have different content. I always make sure to give authors credit for the material I use whenever possible. If I somehow overlooked doing so for a story, or if a credit is incorrect, please let me know and I will rectify it in these show notes immediately. Some links included above may benefit me financially through qualifying purchases.)= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = ="I have come into the world as a light, so that no one who believes in me should stay in darkness." — John 12:46Trademark, Weird Darkness®, 2022. Copyright Weird Darkness©, 2022.= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

Better Body Academy Podcast
EP156: A Strange Love Affair With The Gym

Better Body Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 22:23 Transcription Available


The True Presbyterian
The Strange Love of Jesus

The True Presbyterian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 15:59


Ten years ago I sat on the floor in my parents' living room and promised my father that, when the day came, I would preach the homily at his funeral. On August 6, 2022 I was (barely) able to keep that promise. Thank you for your prayer and your support. Especially to Graham and all of my other patrons.  ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Cinema Drive
218. The Lost Boys (1987) and Fright Night (1985): A Cinema Drive Halloween

Cinema Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 54:27


Jason and Ryan are wishing everyone a Happy Halloween in the best way they know how: with the treat - no tricks! - of an all-new Cinema Drive episode! Tune in for a spooktacular celebration of the best vampire double-feature ever as these lost boys host their very own fright night..."for real".The Deep Question: What's a movie that kept you up at night?This Week's Features:2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)The Blair Witch Project (1999)Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)Fright Night (1985)The Lost Boys (1987)Paranormal Activity (2007)The Shining (1980)

Totally Reprise - Audio Entropy
Totally Reprise Has Always Been Cool Ep 42: Fuck Us Once, Shame On Us

Totally Reprise - Audio Entropy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022


This episode is for the women of Twin Peaks. How it is for the women is another story altogether. It's not all bad though! We got bimbos and more secrets revealed. We talk about: Jury Duty, DBeefZ, Werewolf Era, Dr Strangelove, Last of Us, Theme vs Exploitation, Fly On The Face, Body Of Peaks, Drapes, Chad Is The Worst, Dale Cooper Is A Bastard, Richard Sucks So Much, Time Weirdness, Lay That Pipe Brother, Candy Dissociates, Weird Deer, Log Lady Outro, Rebekah Del Rio, Silent Keyboard,TW: We talk about physical abuse and the nature of consent basically all throughout this episode.

Unchained: Your No-Hype Resource for All Things Crypto
Zaki Manian and Jack Zampolin on Why ATOM Is 'Dogecoin for Academics' - Ep. 406

Unchained: Your No-Hype Resource for All Things Crypto

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 58:48 Very Popular


Zaki Manian, cofounder of Sommelier Protocol and cofounder of Iqlusion and Jack Zampolin, founder of Strangelove Ventures, discuss everything about Cosmos, the new white paper, and how to improve MEV capture for ATOM holders.    Show highlights: how Jack and Zaki got involved with crypto and Cosmos what the Sommelier protocol is, the role of Iqlusion, and what Strange Love does the basics of Cosmos and application-specific blockchains (ASB) why would a project choose to be an ASB rather than an application on a blockchain whether Cosmos can achieve network effects the reasons behind launching a new white paper for Cosmos why the team decided to pursue interchain security whether there would be an increase in fees with so many chains relying on the Cosmos Hub for security how much economic value the Cosmos Hub will end up securing if the proposal gets passed how the Cosmos Treasury could be used to fund development the role of the Interchain Scheduler to capture MEV whether centralized exchanges are going to start trading against the customers the new issuance model proposed for ATOM the role of an active governance community to make Cosmos more decentralized what problems Liquid staking solves how USDC will launch on a consumer chain   Thank you to our sponsors! Crypto.com Ava Labs web3 with a16z Jack: Twitter Zaki: Twitter   Episode Links   Previous Coverage of Unchained on Cosmos: How Osmosis Is Trying to Improve the Crypto User Experience   New white paper Document Proposal   Interchain security Paper The Block article The DeFi investor thread   ATOM 2.0 Thread by Route 2 DeFi Youseff Amrain's thread Charlie Morris' thread   Other articles Vaneck's article: Why we are bullish on Atom Alex Valaitis article: A deep dive into Cosmos Liquid Staking Native USDC on Cosmos  

Unchained: Your No-Hype Resource for All Things Crypto
Zaki Manian and Jack Zampolin on Why ATOM Is 'Dogecoin for Academics' - Ep. 406

Unchained: Your No-Hype Resource for All Things Crypto

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 58:47


Zaki Manian, cofounder of Sommelier Protocol and cofounder of Iqlusion and Jack Zampolin, founder of Strangelove Ventures, discuss everything about Cosmos, the new white paper, and how to improve MEV capture for ATOM holders. Show highlights: how Jack and Zaki got involved with crypto and Cosmos what the Sommelier protocol is, the role of Iqlusion, and what Strange Love does the basics of Cosmos and application-specific blockchains (ASB) why would a project choose to be an ASB rather than an application on a blockchain whether Cosmos can achieve network effects the reasons behind launching a new white paper for Cosmos why the team decided to pursue interchain security whether there would be an increase in fees with so many chains relying on the Cosmos Hub for security how much economic value the Cosmos Hub will end up securing if the proposal gets passed how the Cosmos Treasury could be used to fund development the role of the Interchain Scheduler to capture MEV whether centralized exchanges are going to start trading against the customers the new issuance model proposed for ATOM the role of an active governance community to make Cosmos more decentralized what problems Liquid staking solves how USDC will launch on a consumer chain Thank you to our sponsors! Crypto.com Chainalysis web3 with a16z Jack: Twitter Zaki: Twitter Episode Links Previous Coverage of Unchained on Cosmos: How Osmosis Is Trying to Improve the Crypto User Experience New white paper Document Proposal Interchain security Paper The Block article The DeFi investor thread ATOM 2.0 Thread by Route 2 DeFi Youseff Amrain's thread Charlie Morris' thread Other articles Vaneck's article: Why we are bullish on Atom Alex Valaitis article: A deep dive into Cosmos Liquid Staking Native USDC on Cosmos

Bloody Awesome Movie Podcast

The Bloody Awesome Movie Podcast focuses on a single film per episode, usually a new release (hopefully theatrically at some point) giving a spoiler-free review. Then Matt Hudson (@wiwt_uk) from What I Watched Tonight and Jonathan Berk (@berkreviews) from Berkreviews.com will introduce a variety of movies or pop-culture-related topics in a series of segments. Review of Smile (2022) Directed by Parker Finn Written by Parker Finn Cast: Sosie Bacon as Dr. Rose Cotter Meghan Brown Pratt as 10-year-old Rose Kyle Gallner as Joel Caitlin Stasey as Laura Weaver Jessie T. Usher as Trevor Rob Morgan as Robert Talley Kal Penn as Dr. Morgan Desai Robin Weigert as Dr. Madeline Northcott IMDb.com Synopsis: After witnessing a bizarre, traumatic incident involving a patient, Dr. Rose Cotter starts experiencing frightening occurrences that she can't explain. Rose must confront her troubling past in order to survive and escape her horrifying new reality. 78% RT critic (79% audience), 68 Metascore, 7.0 IMDb user score, and 3.2/5 on Letterboxd, RELEASE location / DATE: Theaters Chuffed Headlines Movie/Pop culture news that caught our attention Matt's Headline: MCU Wolverine Casting Rumors Addressed By Zac Efron Jon's Headline: See Timothee Chalamet As A Lovestruck Cannibal In New Movie Media Consumption Movies, TV, Video Games, Music, Podcasts (not ours), etc that we use to pass the time Matt's others: Nightmare on Film Street - Children of the Corn, Films to be Buried with with Brett Goldstein - several episodes Deadstream, Blonde, The Woman King, Speak No Evil, Hellraiser (2022 thanks to the Hulu hoopla), Barbarian, Bones & All, Matilda Andor E4 & E5 Jon's others Blank Check - Dr. Strangelove or How I learned to stop worrying and love the bomb “Films to be Buried with” with Brett Goldstein - several episodes Halloween III, Cat People (82), Hitchcock, The Mummy, The Bride of Frankenstein, Smile, Bros, Hellraiser (2022), Don't Be Afraid of the Dark, Wyrmwood: Road of the Dead, House on Haunted Hill (1959), Trick R Treat, The Furies, Ouija: Origin of Evil, Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn, --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bloody-awesome/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bloody-awesome/support

The Brothers Grim Punkcast
The Brothers Grim Punkcast #361

The Brothers Grim Punkcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022


Episode 361... A little midweek short show for all the ones we couldn't fit in last episode. All 2022 finds and mostly stuff you can find on Bandcamp. Guttermouth in the background of course. Enjoy!Download and stream here with your smart device (iTunes and Google Podcasts as well):BROS MIDWEEK 361Airing Wednesdays 7pm PST on PUNK ROCK DEMONSTRATION. Also Fridays and Saturdays 7pm PST on RIPPER RADIO.Send us stuff  to brothersgrimpunk@gmail.com.Punk dogs...Phoenix Bastard Reality 1:05 Yellowcake Can You See The Future? UK I'm a Ghost 0:50 Tokyo Lungs Split 7in with Feral State Berlin Apocalyptic Noise 1:23 Nukelickers Lick The Nuke Indonesia We Are Bastards 2:11 Bloody Bastards Demo 2022 Burn It Down (bkgrd) 2:31 Guttermouth Shave The Planet Milwaukee Cliterature 1:38 Duerst The Wuerst 2021Buffalo THE WANT 1:29 Science Man NINES MECCA France Glitter Piss 1:25 California Dogs TIE AND DIE  France Prédateur 2:00 Bombardement Le Futur Est Là Old Man (bkgrd) 2:34 Guttermouth Got It Made - EP Hammond IN TOMORROW IS TODAY 1:31 DJINN “CASSINGLE” Austin TX No Flags Fly Here 1:39 NOSFERATU SOCIETY'S BASTARD Mexico Junko Recs NADA 1:40 Tercer Mundo Discografía 2012-2014 Philly Strange Love 1:56 CHEMICAL FIX One Scene Unity Vol. III Comp NYC Cybernetic Super Soldier 2:09 L.O.T.I.O.N. Multinational Corporation W​.​A​.​R. In The Digital Realm UK Lifer 3:18 Richter Scale Grout - EP II

FoodBev.com Podcast
FoodBev Weekly News Bulletin 07/10/22: JBS to discontinue US plant-based meat operation Planterra Foods; Solina to acquire Saratoga Food Specialties for $587.5m; Asahi acquires Australian adult soft drinks brand StrangeLove; and more.

FoodBev.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 3:11


FoodBev Media's Antonia Garrett Peel rounds up this week's food and beverage news, including: JBS to discontinue US plant-based meat operation Planterra Foods; Solina to acquire Saratoga Food Specialties for $587.5m; Asahi acquires Australian adult soft drinks brand StrangeLove; and more.

Programmed to Chill
Unlocked: CrackpotoberFest 1: Premium 47 - Novels as Spycraft 8 / Paranoiac Films 5 - Girl, Interrupted, or, Dr. Strangelove's Daughter on some MKULTRA Shit

Programmed to Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 92:20


Today's the first of four horror (or quasi-horror) films for CrackpotoberFest 2022 - Girl, Interrupted, both the memoir and the film. I discuss Susanna Kaysen and her father, a very interesting figure. I talk about McLean Hospital, Jim Watson, spies at McLean, and Kaysen's later career. Then, I go over some interesting themes that Girl, Interrupted the film injects into the narrative - some potentially spurious, some maybe not. To wrap up, I discuss the history of MKULTRA projects at McLean and the general area. CrackpotoberFest only gets weirder from here. Note: I make two mistakes in this episode. I think I conflate bipolar disorder and BPD which is not the fault of the film or memoir, and I also say that one of the characters kills herself to Downtown when it's a different song. My bad. Songs: Knockin' Round the Zoo by James Taylor White Rabbit by Jefferson Airplane Downtown by Petula Clark Angel Baby by Rosie & the Originals Merch: https://programmed-to-chill.myshopify.com/

Strangelove of Movies
An HONEST Review of 'Don't Worry Darling'

Strangelove of Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 19:11


'Don't Worry Darling' has been on everyone's minds the past month, and Strangelove finally saw it in theaters! Let's just say, Livia had some thoughts.... Visit our Website Strangeloveofmovies.com and follow us on Instagram @Strangeloveofmedia

What The Flux
Asahi buys Aussie brand StrangeLove | YouTube's wants to control your TV | Bye bye Juul: Big Tobacco re-enters vape city

What The Flux

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 5:38


Asahi, the beer and soft drinks behemoth, has acquired StrangeLove, the Australian, premium, low-calorie, soft drink company.   YouTube is in discussions with streaming broadcasters about a new product that it wants to launch in Australia, which could be interpreted as a cheeky attempt to control our home TVs.   Big Tobacco is re-entering the vaping industry as the maker of Marlboro cigarettes, Altria, ends its non-compete with Juul.   ---   Build the financial wellbeing of your team with Flux at Work: https://bit.ly/fluxatwork Download the free app (App Store): http://bit.ly/FluxAppStore Download the free app (Google Play): http://bit.ly/FluxappGooglePlay Daily newsletter: https://bit.ly/fluxnewsletter Flux on Instagram: http://bit.ly/fluxinsta Flux on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@flux.finance   ---   The content in this podcast reflects the views and opinions of the hosts, and is intended for personal and not commercial use. We do not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any opinion, statement or other information provided or distributed in these episodes.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Daly Fish
Dr. Strangelove. Daly Fish!

Daly Fish

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 64:22


Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Longbox Crusade
Monthly Monday Movie Muckabout - Episode 55: Dr. Strangelove

Longbox Crusade

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 67:04


Monthly Monday Movie Muckabout Episode 55: Dr. Strangelove Grab your cowboy hat, hold onto the nuke tightly, and let's keep the fighting to a minimum in the War Room, cause Rick and David are going to talk about Dr. Strangelove. #MonthlyMondayMovieMuckabout Let us know what you think! Email the show at contact@longboxcrusade.com This podcast is a member of the LONGBOX CRUSADE NETWORK: Visit the WEBSITE: http://www.longboxcrusade.com/ Follow on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/JeffRickPresent https://twitter.com/LongboxCrusade Subscribe on Apple Podcasts at: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-longboxcrusade/id1118783510?mt=2 Intro theme “Fall back“ by Joe November. Check out his site at: https://soundcloud.com/joseflin99 Thank you for listening and we hope you have enjoyed this episode of Monthly Monday Movie Muckabout. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/longbox-crusade/message

Monthly Monday Movie Muckabout
Monthly Monday Movie Muckabout - Episode 55: Dr. Strangelove

Monthly Monday Movie Muckabout

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 67:04


Monthly Monday Movie Muckabout Episode 55: Dr. Strangelove Grab your cowboy hat, hold onto the nuke tightly, and let's keep the fighting to a minimum in the War Room, cause Rick and David are going to talk about Dr. Strangelove. #MonthlyMondayMovieMuckabout Let us know what you think! Email the show at contact@longboxcrusade.com This podcast is a member of the LONGBOX CRUSADE NETWORK: Visit the WEBSITE: http://www.longboxcrusade.com/ Follow on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/JeffRickPresent https://twitter.com/LongboxCrusade Subscribe on Apple Podcasts at: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-longboxcrusade/id1118783510?mt=2 Intro theme “Fall back“ by Joe November. Check out his site at: https://soundcloud.com/joseflin99 Thank you for listening and we hope you have enjoyed this episode of Monthly Monday Movie Muckabout.

Blank Check with Griffin & David
Dr. Strangelove... with Sean Fennessey

Blank Check with Griffin & David

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 143:04 Very Popular


Gentlemen, you can't fight in here, Sean Fennessey is finally on our podcast! The Big Picture Pod host joins Griffin and David to talk about Kubrick's razor-sharp satire, the Peter Sellers tour-de-force that is “Dr. Strangelove”. We're asking all the questions - Could Sellers have played *every* character in this movie? Is the film paradoxically funnier because Kubrick isn't really a comedy guy? Would George C. Scott hate this podcast? Would you give “Tom Jones” a middling three stars on Letterboxd? And more! This episode is sponsored by: Decision to Leave brought to you by MUBI  Congratulations Join our Patreon at patreon.com/blankcheck Follow us @blankcheckpod on Twitter and Instagram! Buy some real nerdy merch at shopblankcheckpod.myshopify.com or at teepublic.com/stores/blank-check

The Nonlinear Library
EA - Strange Love - Developing Empathy With Intention (or: How I Learned To Stop Calculating And Love The Cause) by EdoArad

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 7:22


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Strange Love - Developing Empathy With Intention (or: How I Learned To Stop Calculating And Love The Cause), published by EdoArad on October 1, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. Tl;dr: if you are intellectually convinced that a cause is important, but you don't emotionally empathize with the people or animals affected, you can develop this emotional empathy intentionally. When Andrés Jiménez Zorrilla first heard that Charity Entrepreneurship wanted to incubate a charity devoted to shrimp welfare, he was pretty sceptical. He'd cared about animal rights for a long time, but this still seemed like a deeply weird idea. However, over the course of the CE incubation program, he learnt some things which shifted his perspective. He discovered that 350 billion shrimp per year are farmed for food. Even if there was only a tiny chance that shrimp are sentient, astronomical numbers like that meant that he should take the issue seriously. Andrés gradually became intellectually convinced that shrimp welfare could be a very important cause, but he was not yet emotionally invested. He decided that it was important to emotionally connect to the cause. When covid lockdowns lifted, he went to visit a shrimp farm and actually witness the beings he would be helping, an experience that he found extremely powerful. He now runs the Shrimp Welfare Project. He says that he feels deep empathy for shrimp, as well as being intellectually convinced that it is important to improve their welfare. He even has a shrimp tattoo on his arm! EAs sometimes say that they feel intellectually compelled by the arguments that they should care about the suffering of non-human animals, future people, digital beings, or some other group of sentients who are outside of our typical moral circle, but they struggle to have emotional empathy for the suffering of this group. However, in my experience, this is not a fixed fact about a person - you can work to develop empathy for beings who are very different to you, or distant from you in time or space. In this post, we offer some advice on how to do this. Why should I develop more empathy? It's not necessarily a problem to have a mismatch between your beliefs and your emotions. In Radical Empathy, Holden Karnofsky suggests that we should care intellectually about many beings and causes that we don't care about emotionally. The opposite is also true - in his book Against Empathy, Paul Bloom argues that our intuitive emotional caring might lead to bad choices. EAs are generally somewhat suspicious of ‘warm fuzzies', and it's a central aspect of EA that we should be guided more by our brains than our guts when it comes to altruism. However, there are some reasons why people might want their empathy to match their beliefs: Congruence: it's easier to decide what to do if our emotional intuitions and our considered beliefs line up. When they conflict, we are more unsure about how to act, or how to think about unfamiliar scenarios. Motivation: you might feel unmotivated to work on the causes you care about if you don't feel enough empathy for beings who benefit Understanding other EAs: even if you don't want to work on (for example) ending insect suffering yourself, developing some empathy for insects might help you better understand people who do This post is about aligning our intuitive emotional empathy with our cognitive, intellectual empathy. How can I develop more empathy? Here are some suggestions for how to develop empathy. In general, detailed knowledge creates empathy (particularly for people who are already empathetic by nature). If you want to empathize with a certain type of being, try to find out more about their lives and their troubles, or imagine in detail what it's like to be them. Learn more about the beings you want to empathize with

DJ Nocturna Presents Queen of Wands
Interview with Los Angeles Based Strangelove, The Depeche Mode Experience

DJ Nocturna Presents Queen of Wands

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 27:27


It was a pleasure speaking with Los Angeles based Strangelove, the Depeche Mode Experience who are accomplished musicians consisting of Leo Luganskiy as "Ultra-Dave,"  Brent Meyer as  "Counterfeit Martin,"  Julian Shah-Tayler as "Oscar Wilder,"  James Evans as "InTheFletch" and Chris Olivas "Chris -tian O-gner." "STRANGELOVE-The Depeche Mode Experience, a tribute band delivers a career spanning, pitch perfect “best of” concert that transports the listener through time and touches on several key points in Depeche Mode's 40+ year career. Songs from throughout the Depeche canon are lovingly recreated; from favorites on DM's debut Speak and Spell to the newest fare from ‘Mode's latest- 2017's “Spirit”. No detail of STRANGELOVE's presentation has been overlooked. The visual presentation with stage set pieces and in-show costume changes reflect different eras of Depeche Mode's story.""Their reverence and devotion to Depeche Mode's body of work has driven them to recreate every possible detail and bring the “Music To The Masses” in a concert setting that transcends a mere tribute production.  Accuracy and authenticity is a hallmark of the project, with the band employing as many authentic vintage synthesizers and samplers as possible in recreating the classic and widely varied sounds of Depeche Mode's discography. STRANGELOVE –The Depeche Mode Experience brings a thoroughly enjoyable and staggeringly authentic DM concert to concertgoers, and connects with international audiences, wherever the group performs. "The band continues to perform across the U.S. and will be performing throughout Australia in November 2022.https://www.depechetribute.com#StrangeloveTheDepecheModeExperience,  #Strangelove,TheDepecheModeTribute, #DepecheModeTributeBand, #ModsnapRadio, #DJNocturna, #Goth, #Darkelectronic, #Dark80s, 

DJ Nocturna Presents Queen of Wands
Julian Shah-Tayler' Album "Elysium" Is A Narrative On Meeting The Love Of Your Life

DJ Nocturna Presents Queen of Wands

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 26:16


Hailing from Leeds, England, and now based in Los Angeles, California Julian Shah-Tayler, AKA The Singularity Music is a singer, songwriter and producer.  He has recorded over 400 pieces of music and worked with many artists such as Peter Murphy and David J of Bauhaus, guitarists and musicians Mark Gemini Thwaite and Darwin Meiners, rock music collective, Beauty in Chaos and the Grammy Award-winning record producer Robert Margouleff who produced Stevie Wonders' most critically acclaimed albums Talking Book and Innervisions and Devo's 1980 studio album, Freedom of Choice producing the hit single, "Whip It."  One of the shows Julian Shah-Tayler scored won two Emmys: “Actors on Actors.” He won a "Golden Trailer" award for his work with Lana Del Ray on Disney's "Maleficent" Trailer. He is also a member of Los Angeles based Tribute band, Strangelove, The Depeche Mode Experience and David Bowie Tribute band called The Band That Fell To Earth and The Cured (The Cure tribute band). More recently he collaborated with Arden and the Wolves releasing Labyrinth tribute " At The End of Time." Julian Shah-Tayler is releasing a new album called  "Elysium" on October 14, 2022.  The album features David J. Haskins, Mark Gemini Thwaite, Christopher J. Olives and Robert Margouleff.   Here's a previous interview November 17, 2020.  https://www.buzzsprout.com/399616/episodes/6435271https://www.julianshahtayler.comhttps://thesingularitymusic.bandcamp.comhttps://www.depechetribute.com#JulianShahTayler, #TheSingularityMusic, #DJNocturna, #StrangeloveDepecheModeTribute, #StrangeloveTheDepecheModeExperience, #ModsnapRadio, #Goth, #Dark80s, #darkelectromusic, 

13 O'Clock Podcast
Movie Retrospective: Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

13 O'Clock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022


Tom and Jenny discuss Stanley Kubrick’s satirical masterpiece, a Cold War black comedy about mutually assured destruction starring Peter Sellers, George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden, and Slim Pickens. Audio version: Video version: Please support us on Patreon! Don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter and Instagram. And check out our cool … Continue reading Movie Retrospective: Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #530 - A Threesome with Death

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 163:25


In 2003, a trio of podcasters escaping a date with death take refuge in a hidden section of the more wholesome side of OnlyFans. But something from beyond the grave awaits them there. On Episode 530 of Trick or Treat Radio we discuss Saloum, a supernatural thriller from Senegal, directed by Jean Luc Herbulot! We also get french lessons, we talk about the hottest fictional 90s alternative country star, and we discuss why we're dreading next week's episode! So grab your English to French dictionary, eat up some bangers and mush, and strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast!Stuff we talk about: Being on the wrong side of an argument, Steve Martin, Pink Panther, “I would like to buy a hamburger”, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, Nipsey Russell, mermaids, crabs, Love is a Douche, beard grooming, The Undertaker, the left side of grayness, Andor, George Carlin, swearing in Star Wars, Fisher Price my first swear word, Star Wars Rebels, Cobra Kai, Ralph Macchio, b00bs, The Sandman, having a threesome with Death, cutting down a burning tree, John Constantine, Asgardians, John Constantine, 90s alternative country star Gavin deGraw of the band Gruntree, fish and chops, bangers and mush, King's X, dUg Pinnick, Jean Luc Herbulot, From Dusk til Dawn, the Senegal A-Team, Three Kings, The Munsters, Rob Zombie, Mockinbird Lane, getting Covid on purpose, Halloween, The Lords of Salem, the continuing adventures of the Hyenas, what did the five fingers say to the beard?, what does Halloween mean to you?, Gerald Dalton, Patrick Swayze, Roadhouse, porntreon, happy little vaginas, Ol' Dirty Bob Ross, what happens on OnlyFans, Explanation Point, and The Poet Laureates of Podcasting.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: discord.trickortreatradio.comSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show

Things I've Learned While Learning Other Things
Stanley Kubrick & His Arc of Excellence

Things I've Learned While Learning Other Things

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 30:31


Stanley Kubrick's 50 Year Career & Arc of ExcellenceDirectoral ControlDevil in the Details.  PerfectionismUnbelievable depth of ResearchNo formal TrainingAuto-didactScript writing 900 minutes of writing per 1 minute of film80+ Takes on a single scenePointillismLolita, The Shining,  Dr Strangelove,  Clockwork Orange,  Full Metal Jacket,  Paths of Glory 2001 Space Odyssey,  Eyes Wide Shut, Barry Lyndon

That Was Disappointing...

Episode 116 of That Was Disappointing is Live. We missed a golden opportunity to use Ride of the Valkyries as our intro music… Today's Topic: War. Shouldn't all our tax dollars go into cloning Chuck Norris for this endeavor? Join Art and Lex (no guests this time as they're all flower children) as they debate war… good thing neither of them has access to nuclear weapons. Hey, cooler heads will prevail in the world and we'll all join hands and sing “Kumbaya,” right? For the record, we're being facetious. But as long as one of us gets to ride an atomic bomb (*hat tip Dr. Strangelove*) in the end, can you really consider it a life wasted? TWD Tip of the Week: The Germans came close to developing plutonium during World War II. I did nazi that coming. *rimshot*

Strangelove of Movies
Strangelove was Just 'In Bruges' !!! (Rewatch With Us)

Strangelove of Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 19:47


Strangelove decides to review 'In Bruges' because we were just there on our summer vacation! We loved the city and the film and recommend you watch this underrated dark comedy from 2008! Visit our Website Strangeloveofmovies.com and follow us on Instagram @Strangeloveofmedia

Hotkeys Podcast
Hot+keys #155: Alter-Eagle

Hotkeys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 63:32


Listen to us talk about the 2022 NFL season, pickleball again, DuckTales, Moon Knight, Better Call Saul, The Usual Suspects, Good Night and Good Luck, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Us, Last Night in Soho, Dr. Strangelove, Bad Times at the El Royale, Manhattan Murder Mystery, Miller's Crossing, Con Air, and Fury. Starring David Parker, Landon Browning, and Mick Parker. Recorded August 27th, 2022.

New Books in Film
A MAD, MAD, World

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 59:11


The world lived under the shadow of the acronym MAD for forty years. Mutually Assured Destruction was no laughing matter, but Stanley Kubrick thought dark comedy was the only way to approach a topic as ridiculous as MAD. In this episode we compare and contrast Dr. Strangelove (1964) with Failsafe, a serious film about the same subject that came out the same year. We reveal just how spot on Dr. Strangelove was about MAD versus Failsafe's unwarranted optimism that limited nuclear war was possible. An army of political scientists and bureaucrats game theoried fighting and winning a nuclear war like it was just another social science problem. Civilians are the warmongers in our MAD films. Dr. Strangelove may be a deranged Nazi freak, but everything he said was seriously considered by real life MAD Men. Lia Paradis is a professor of history at Slippery Rock University. Brian Crim is a professor of history at the University of Lynchburg. For more on Lies Agreed Upon, go here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

New Books in Military History
A MAD, MAD, World

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 59:11


The world lived under the shadow of the acronym MAD for forty years. Mutually Assured Destruction was no laughing matter, but Stanley Kubrick thought dark comedy was the only way to approach a topic as ridiculous as MAD. In this episode we compare and contrast Dr. Strangelove (1964) with Failsafe, a serious film about the same subject that came out the same year. We reveal just how spot on Dr. Strangelove was about MAD versus Failsafe's unwarranted optimism that limited nuclear war was possible. An army of political scientists and bureaucrats game theoried fighting and winning a nuclear war like it was just another social science problem. Civilians are the warmongers in our MAD films. Dr. Strangelove may be a deranged Nazi freak, but everything he said was seriously considered by real life MAD Men. Lia Paradis is a professor of history at Slippery Rock University. Brian Crim is a professor of history at the University of Lynchburg. For more on Lies Agreed Upon, go here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in History
A MAD, MAD, World

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 59:11


The world lived under the shadow of the acronym MAD for forty years. Mutually Assured Destruction was no laughing matter, but Stanley Kubrick thought dark comedy was the only way to approach a topic as ridiculous as MAD. In this episode we compare and contrast Dr. Strangelove (1964) with Failsafe, a serious film about the same subject that came out the same year. We reveal just how spot on Dr. Strangelove was about MAD versus Failsafe's unwarranted optimism that limited nuclear war was possible. An army of political scientists and bureaucrats game theoried fighting and winning a nuclear war like it was just another social science problem. Civilians are the warmongers in our MAD films. Dr. Strangelove may be a deranged Nazi freak, but everything he said was seriously considered by real life MAD Men. Lia Paradis is a professor of history at Slippery Rock University. Brian Crim is a professor of history at the University of Lynchburg. For more on Lies Agreed Upon, go here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
A MAD, MAD, World

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 59:11


The world lived under the shadow of the acronym MAD for forty years. Mutually Assured Destruction was no laughing matter, but Stanley Kubrick thought dark comedy was the only way to approach a topic as ridiculous as MAD. In this episode we compare and contrast Dr. Strangelove (1964) with Failsafe, a serious film about the same subject that came out the same year. We reveal just how spot on Dr. Strangelove was about MAD versus Failsafe's unwarranted optimism that limited nuclear war was possible. An army of political scientists and bureaucrats game theoried fighting and winning a nuclear war like it was just another social science problem. Civilians are the warmongers in our MAD films. Dr. Strangelove may be a deranged Nazi freak, but everything he said was seriously considered by real life MAD Men. Lia Paradis is a professor of history at Slippery Rock University. Brian Crim is a professor of history at the University of Lynchburg. For more on Lies Agreed Upon, go here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Dance
A MAD, MAD, World

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 59:11


The world lived under the shadow of the acronym MAD for forty years. Mutually Assured Destruction was no laughing matter, but Stanley Kubrick thought dark comedy was the only way to approach a topic as ridiculous as MAD. In this episode we compare and contrast Dr. Strangelove (1964) with Failsafe, a serious film about the same subject that came out the same year. We reveal just how spot on Dr. Strangelove was about MAD versus Failsafe's unwarranted optimism that limited nuclear war was possible. An army of political scientists and bureaucrats game theoried fighting and winning a nuclear war like it was just another social science problem. Civilians are the warmongers in our MAD films. Dr. Strangelove may be a deranged Nazi freak, but everything he said was seriously considered by real life MAD Men. Lia Paradis is a professor of history at Slippery Rock University. Brian Crim is a professor of history at the University of Lynchburg. For more on Lies Agreed Upon, go here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann
The Moscow-Washington Hotline

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 12:12


Start your Tuesday morning with The Retrospectors - Olly & Arion's daily history show - which we present to you here in its full, ten minute glory. Today's episode focuses on the hotline from Moscow to Washington.On 30th August, 1963, a 10,000 mile transatlantic Washington-Moscow cable went live from the Pentagon to Red Square.In the public imagination (in part thanks to Kubrik's ‘Dr Strangelove'), it remains a red telephone - but it is, in fact, a pair of beige teletype machines that each required ten staff to operate.In this episode, Arion, Rebecca Messina (yes, that's Gillie to long-time Unwrappers) and Olly explain why, prior to this, diplomacy was often being skipped altogether in favour of inflammatory radio broadcasts; consider what the messages the two nations send each other can tell us about their cultural differences; and marvel at just how much geopolitics hinges on whether two particular world leaders like each other… Listen to The Retrospectors - Today In History every weekday at podfollow.com/retrospectors

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast
Lewis Black Encore

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 89:15 Very Popular


GGACP celebrates the birthday (August 30) of actor, playwright and Grammy-winning comedian Lewis Black with this ENCORE of an interview from 2020. In this episode, Lewis discusses the inventiveness of Pixar, the cinema of Barry Levinson, the timelessness of “Dr. Strangelove” and the political comedy of Mort Sahl, Dick Gregory, Paul Krassner and the Smothers Brothers. Also, Christopher Walken cracks a joke, Ruth Buzzi meets Michael Corleone, Ed Sullivan chews out Jackie Mason and Lewis tours the Middle East with Robin Williams. PLUS: Topo Gigio! Saluting Joe Grifasi! George Carlin leaves a message! The musical satire of Mark Russell! And Lewis sings the praises of the National Comedy Center! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 151: “San Francisco” by Scott McKenzie

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022


We start season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs with an extra-long look at "San Francisco" by Scott McKenzie, and at the Monterey Pop Festival, and the careers of the Mamas and the Papas and P.F. Sloan. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Up, Up, and Away" by the 5th Dimension. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, all the songs excerpted in the podcast can be heard in full at Mixcloud. Scott McKenzie's first album is available here. There are many compilations of the Mamas and the Papas' music, but sadly none that are in print in the UK have the original mono mixes. This set is about as good as you're going to find, though, for the stereo versions. Information on the Mamas and the Papas came from Go Where You Wanna Go: The Oral History of The Mamas and the Papas by Matthew Greenwald, California Dreamin': The True Story Of The Mamas and Papas by Michelle Phillips, and Papa John by John Phillips and Jim Jerome. Information on P.F. Sloan came from PF - TRAVELLING BAREFOOT ON A ROCKY ROAD by Stephen McParland and What's Exactly the Matter With Me? by P.F. Sloan and S.E. Feinberg. The film of the Monterey Pop Festival is available on this Criterion Blu-Ray set. Sadly the CD of the performances seems to be deleted. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs. It's good to be back. Before we start this episode, I just want to say one thing. I get a lot of credit at times for the way I don't shy away from dealing with the more unsavoury elements of the people being covered in my podcast -- particularly the more awful men. But as I said very early on, I only cover those aspects of their life when they're relevant to the music, because this is a music podcast and not a true crime podcast. But also I worry that in some cases this might mean I'm giving a false impression of some people. In the case of this episode, one of the central figures is John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas. Now, Phillips has posthumously been accused of some truly monstrous acts, the kind of thing that is truly unforgivable, and I believe those accusations. But those acts didn't take place during the time period covered by most of this episode, so I won't be covering them here -- but they're easily googlable if you want to know. I thought it best to get that out of the way at the start, so no-one's either anxiously waiting for the penny to drop or upset that I didn't acknowledge the elephant in the room. Separately, this episode will have some discussion of fatphobia and diet culture, and of a death that is at least in part attributable to those things. Those of you affected by that may want to skip this one or read the transcript. There are also some mentions of drug addiction and alcoholism. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things that causes problems with rock history is the tendency of people to have selective memories, and that's never more true than when it comes to the Summer of Love, summer of 1967. In the mythology that's built up around it, that was a golden time, the greatest time ever, a period of peace and love where everything was possible, and the world looked like it was going to just keep on getting better. But what that means, of course, is that the people remembering it that way do so because it was the best time of their lives. And what happens when the best time of your life is over in one summer? When you have one hit and never have a second, or when your band splits up after only eighteen months, and you have to cope with the reality that your best years are not only behind you, but they weren't even best years, but just best months? What stories would you tell about that time? Would you remember it as the eve of destruction, the last great moment before everything went to hell, or would you remember it as a golden summer, full of people with flowers in their hair? And would either really be true? [Excerpt: Scott McKenzie, "San Francisco"] Other than the city in which they worked, there are a few things that seem to characterise almost all the important figures on the LA music scene in the middle part of the 1960s. They almost all seem to be incredibly ambitious, as one might imagine. There seem to be a huge number of fantasists among them -- people who will not only choose the legend over reality when it suits them, but who will choose the legend over reality even when it doesn't suit them. And they almost all seem to have a story about being turned down in a rude and arrogant manner by Lou Adler, usually more or less the same story. To give an example, I'm going to read out a bit of Ray Manzarek's autobiography here. Now, Manzarek uses a few words that I can't use on this podcast and keep a clean rating, so I'm just going to do slight pauses when I get to them, but I'll leave the words in the transcript for those who aren't offended by them: "Sometimes Jim and Dorothy and I went alone. The three of us tried Dunhill Records. Lou Adler was the head man. He was shrewd and he was hip. He had the Mamas and the Papas and a big single with Barry McGuire's 'Eve of Destruction.' He was flush. We were ushered into his office. He looked cool. He was California casually disheveled and had the look of a stoner, but his eyes were as cold as a shark's. He took the twelve-inch acetate demo from me and we all sat down. He put the disc on his turntable and played each cut…for ten seconds. Ten seconds! You can't tell jack [shit] from ten seconds. At least listen to one of the songs all the way through. I wanted to rage at him. 'How dare you! We're the Doors! This is [fucking] Jim Morrison! He's going to be a [fucking] star! Can't you see that? Can't you see how [fucking] handsome he is? Can't you hear how groovy the music is? Don't you [fucking] get it? Listen to the words, man!' My brain was a boiling, lava-filled Jell-O mold of rage. I wanted to eviscerate that shark. The songs he so casually dismissed were 'Moonlight Drive,' 'Hello, I Love You,' 'Summer's Almost Gone,' 'End of the Night,' 'I Looked at You,' 'Go Insane.' He rejected the whole demo. Ten seconds on each song—maybe twenty seconds on 'Hello, I Love You' (I took that as an omen of potential airplay)—and we were dismissed out of hand. Just like that. He took the demo off the turntable and handed it back to me with an obsequious smile and said, 'Nothing here I can use.' We were shocked. We stood up, the three of us, and Jim, with a wry and knowing smile on his lips, cuttingly and coolly shot back at him, 'That's okay, man. We don't want to be *used*, anyway.'" Now, as you may have gathered from the episode on the Doors, Ray Manzarek was one of those print-the-legend types, and that's true of everyone who tells similar stories about Lou Alder. But... there are a *lot* of people who tell similar stories about Lou Adler. One of those was Phil Sloan. You can get an idea of Sloan's attitude to storytelling from a story he always used to tell. Shortly after he and his family moved to LA from New York, he got a job selling newspapers on a street corner on Hollywood Boulevard, just across from Schwab's Drug Store. One day James Dean drove up in his Porsche and made an unusual request. He wanted to buy every copy of the newspaper that Sloan had -- around a hundred and fifty copies in total. But he only wanted one article, something in the entertainment section. Sloan didn't remember what the article was, but he did remember that one of the headlines was on the final illness of Oliver Hardy, who died shortly afterwards, and thought it might have been something to do with that. Dean was going to just clip that article from every copy he bought, and then he was going to give all the newspapers back to Sloan to sell again, so Sloan ended up making a lot of extra money that day. There is one rather big problem with that story. Oliver Hardy died in August 1957, just after the Sloan family moved to LA. But James Dean died in September 1955, two years earlier. Sloan admitted that, and said he couldn't explain it, but he was insistent. He sold a hundred and fifty newspapers to James Dean two years after Dean's death. When not selling newspapers to dead celebrities, Sloan went to Fairfax High School, and developed an interest in music which was mostly oriented around the kind of white pop vocal groups that were popular at the time, groups like the Kingston Trio, the Four Lads, and the Four Aces. But the record that made Sloan decide he wanted to make music himself was "Just Goofed" by the Teen Queens: [Excerpt: The Teen Queens, "Just Goofed"] In 1959, when he was fourteen, he saw an advert for an open audition with Aladdin Records, a label he liked because of Thurston Harris. He went along to the audition, and was successful. His first single, released as by Flip Sloan -- Flip was a nickname, a corruption of "Philip" -- was produced by Bumps Blackwell and featured several of the musicians who played with Sam Cooke, plus Larry Knechtel on piano and Mike Deasey on guitar, but Aladdin shut down shortly after releasing it, and it may not even have had a general release, just promo copies. I've not been able to find a copy online anywhere. After that, he tried Arwin Records, the label that Jan and Arnie recorded for, which was owned by Marty Melcher (Doris Day's husband and Terry Melcher's stepfather). Melcher signed him, and put out a single, "She's My Girl", on Mart Records, a subsidiary of Arwin, on which Sloan was backed by a group of session players including Sandy Nelson and Bruce Johnston: [Excerpt: Philip Sloan, "She's My Girl"] That record didn't have any success, and Sloan was soon dropped by Mart Records. He went on to sign with Blue Bird Records, which was as far as can be ascertained essentially a scam organisation that would record demos for songwriters, but tell the performers that they were making a real record, so that they would record it for the royalties they would never get, rather than for a decent fee as a professional demo singer would get. But Steve Venet -- the brother of Nik Venet, and occasional songwriting collaborator with Tommy Boyce -- happened to come to Blue Bird one day, and hear one of Sloan's original songs. He thought Sloan would make a good songwriter, and took him to see Lou Adler at Columbia-Screen Gems music publishing. This was shortly after the merger between Columbia-Screen Gems and Aldon Music, and Adler was at this point the West Coast head of operations, subservient to Don Kirshner and Al Nevins, but largely left to do what he wanted. The way Sloan always told the story, Venet tried to get Adler to sign Sloan, but Adler said his songs stunk and had no commercial potential. But Sloan persisted in trying to get a contract there, and eventually Al Nevins happened to be in the office and overruled Adler, much to Adler's disgust. Sloan was signed to Columbia-Screen Gems as a songwriter, though he wasn't put on a salary like the Brill Building songwriters, just told that he could bring in songs and they would publish them. Shortly after this, Adler suggested to Sloan that he might want to form a writing team with another songwriter, Steve Barri, who had had a similar non-career non-trajectory, but was very slightly further ahead in his career, having done some work with Carol Connors, the former lead singer of the Teddy Bears. Barri had co-written a couple of flop singles for Connors, before the two of them had formed a vocal group, the Storytellers, with Connors' sister. The Storytellers had released a single, "When Two People (Are in Love)" , which was put out on a local independent label and which Adler had licensed to be released on Dimension Records, the label associated with Aldon Music: [Excerpt: The Storytellers "When Two People (Are in Love)"] That record didn't sell, but it was enough to get Barri into the Columbia-Screen Gems circle, and Adler set him and Sloan up as a songwriting team -- although the way Sloan told it, it wasn't so much a songwriting team as Sloan writing songs while Barri was also there. Sloan would later claim "it was mostly a collaboration of spirit, and it seemed that I was writing most of the music and the lyric, but it couldn't possibly have ever happened unless both of us were present at the same time". One suspects that Barri might have a different recollection of how it went... Sloan and Barri's first collaboration was a song that Sloan had half-written before they met, called "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann", which was recorded by a West Coast Chubby Checker knockoff who went under the name Round Robin, and who had his own dance craze, the Slauson, which was much less successful than the Twist: [Excerpt: Round Robin, "Kick that Little Foot Sally Ann"] That track was produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche, and Nitzsche asked Sloan to be one of the rhythm guitarists on the track, apparently liking Sloan's feel. Sloan would end up playing rhythm guitar or singing backing vocals on many of the records made of songs he and Barri wrote together. "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann" only made number sixty-one nationally, but it was a regional hit, and it meant that Sloan and Barri soon became what Sloan later described as "the Goffin and King of the West Coast follow-ups." According to Sloan "We'd be given a list on Monday morning by Lou Adler with thirty names on it of the groups who needed follow-ups to their hit." They'd then write the songs to order, and they started to specialise in dance craze songs. For example, when the Swim looked like it might be the next big dance, they wrote "Swim Swim Swim", "She Only Wants to Swim", "Let's Swim Baby", "Big Boss Swimmer", "Swim Party" and "My Swimmin' Girl" (the last a collaboration with Jan Berry and Roger Christian). These songs were exactly as good as they needed to be, in order to provide album filler for mid-tier artists, and while Sloan and Barri weren't writing any massive hits, they were doing very well as mid-tier writers. According to Sloan's biographer Stephen McParland, there was a three-year period in the mid-sixties where at least one song written or co-written by Sloan was on the national charts at any given time. Most of these songs weren't for Columbia-Screen Gems though. In early 1964 Lou Adler had a falling out with Don Kirshner, and decided to start up his own company, Dunhill, which was equal parts production company, music publishers, and management -- doing for West Coast pop singers what Motown was doing for Detroit soul singers, and putting everything into one basket. Dunhill's early clients included Jan and Dean and the rockabilly singer Johnny Rivers, and Dunhill also signed Sloan and Barri as songwriters. Because of this connection, Sloan and Barri soon became an important part of Jan and Dean's hit-making process. The Matadors, the vocal group that had provided most of the backing vocals on the duo's hits, had started asking for more money than Jan Berry was willing to pay, and Jan and Dean couldn't do the vocals themselves -- as Bones Howe put it "As a singer, Dean is a wonderful graphic artist" -- and so Sloan and Barri stepped in, doing session vocals without payment in the hope that Jan and Dean would record a few of their songs. For example, on the big hit "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena", Dean Torrence is not present at all on the record -- Jan Berry sings the lead vocal, with Sloan doubling him for much of it, Sloan sings "Dean"'s falsetto, with the engineer Bones Howe helping out, and the rest of the backing vocals are sung by Sloan, Barri, and Howe: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena"] For these recordings, Sloan and Barri were known as The Fantastic Baggys, a name which came from the Rolling Stones' manager Andrew Oldham and Mick Jagger, when the two were visiting California. Oldham had been commenting on baggys, the kind of shorts worn by surfers, and had asked Jagger what he thought of The Baggys as a group name. Jagger had replied "Fantastic!" and so the Fantastic Baggys had been born. As part of this, Sloan and Barri moved hard into surf and hot-rod music from the dance songs they had been writing previously. The Fantastic Baggys recorded their own album, Tell 'Em I'm Surfin', as a quickie album suggested by Adler: [Excerpt: The Fantastic Baggys, "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'"] And under the name The Rally Packs they recorded a version of Jan and Dean's "Move Out Little Mustang" which featured Berry's girlfriend Jill Gibson doing a spoken section: [Excerpt: The Rally Packs, "Move Out Little Mustang"] They also wrote several album tracks for Jan and Dean, and wrote "Summer Means Fun" for Bruce and Terry -- Bruce Johnston, later of the Beach Boys, and Terry Melcher: [Excerpt: Bruce and Terry, "Summer Means Fun"] And they wrote the very surf-flavoured "Secret Agent Man" for fellow Dunhill artist Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But of course, when you're chasing trends, you're chasing trends, and soon the craze for twangy guitars and falsetto harmonies had ended, replaced by a craze for jangly twelve-string guitars and closer harmonies. According to Sloan, he was in at the very beginning of the folk-rock trend -- the way he told the story, he was involved in the mastering of the Byrds' version of "Mr. Tambourine Man". He later talked about Terry Melcher getting him to help out, saying "He had produced a record called 'Mr. Tambourine Man', and had sent it into the head office, and it had been rejected. He called me up and said 'I've got three more hours in the studio before I'm being kicked out of Columbia. Can you come over and help me with this new record?' I did. I went over there. It was under lock and key. There were two guards outside the door. Terry asked me something about 'Summer Means Fun'. "He said 'Do you remember the guitar that we worked on with that? How we put in that double reverb?' "And I said 'yes' "And he said 'What do you think if we did something like that with the Byrds?' "And I said 'That sounds good. Let's see what it sounds like.' So we patched into all the reverb centres in Columbia Music, and mastered the record in three hours." Whether Sloan really was there at the birth of folk rock, he and Barri jumped on the folk-rock craze just as they had the surf and hot-rod craze, and wrote a string of jangly hits including "You Baby" for the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "You Baby"] and "I Found a Girl" for Jan and Dean: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "I Found a Girl"] That song was later included on Jan and Dean's Folk 'n' Roll album, which also included... a song I'm not even going to name, but long-time listeners will know the one I mean. It was also notable in that "I Found a Girl" was the first song on which Sloan was credited not as Phil Sloan, but as P.F. Sloan -- he didn't have a middle name beginning with F, but rather the F stood for his nickname "Flip". Sloan would later talk of Phil Sloan and P.F. Sloan as almost being two different people, with P.F. being a far more serious, intense, songwriter. Folk 'n' Roll also contained another Sloan song, this one credited solely to Sloan. And that song is the one for which he became best known. There are two very different stories about how "Eve of Destruction" came to be written. To tell Sloan's version, I'm going to read a few paragraphs from his autobiography: "By late 1964, I had already written ‘Eve Of Destruction,' ‘The Sins Of A Family,' ‘This Mornin',' ‘Ain't No Way I'm Gonna Change My Mind,' and ‘What's Exactly The Matter With Me?' They all arrived on one cataclysmic evening, and nearly at the same time, as I worked on the lyrics almost simultaneously. ‘Eve Of Destruction' came about from hearing a voice, perhaps an angel's. The voice instructed me to place five pieces of paper and spread them out on my bed. I obeyed the voice. The voice told me that the first song would be called ‘Eve Of Destruction,' so I wrote the title at the top of the page. For the next few hours, the voice came and went as I was writing the lyric, as if this spirit—or whatever it was—stood over me like a teacher: ‘No, no … not think of all the hate there is in Red Russia … Red China!' I didn't understand. I thought the Soviet Union was the mortal threat to America, but the voice went on to reveal to me the future of the world until 2024. I was told the Soviet Union would fall, and that Red China would continue to be communist far into the future, but that communism was not going to be allowed to take over this Divine Planet—therefore, think of all the hate there is in Red China. I argued and wrestled with the voice for hours, until I was exhausted but satisfied inside with my plea to God to either take me out of the world, as I could not live in such a hypocritical society, or to show me a way to make things better. When I was writing ‘Eve,' I was on my hands and knees, pleading for an answer." Lou Adler's story is that he gave Phil Sloan a copy of Bob Dylan's Bringing it All Back Home album and told him to write a bunch of songs that sounded like that, and Sloan came back a week later as instructed with ten Dylan knock-offs. Adler said "It was a natural feel for him. He's a great mimic." As one other data point, both Steve Barri and Bones Howe, the engineer who worked on most of the sessions we're looking at today, have often talked in interviews about "Eve of Destruction" as being a Sloan/Barri collaboration, as if to them it's common knowledge that it wasn't written alone, although Sloan's is the only name on the credits. The song was given to a new signing to Dunhill Records, Barry McGuire. McGuire was someone who had been part of the folk scene for years, He'd been playing folk clubs in LA while also acting in a TV show from 1961. When the TV show had finished, he'd formed a duo, Barry and Barry, with Barry Kane, and they performed much the same repertoire as all the other early-sixties folkies: [Excerpt: Barry and Barry, "If I Had a Hammer"] After recording their one album, both Barrys joined the New Christy Minstrels. We've talked about the Christys before, but they were -- and are to this day -- an ultra-commercial folk group, led by Randy Sparks, with a revolving membership of usually eight or nine singers which included several other people who've come up in this podcast, like Gene Clark and Jerry Yester. McGuire became one of the principal lead singers of the Christys, singing lead on their version of the novelty cowboy song "Three Wheels on My Wagon", which was later released as a single in the UK and became a perennial children's favourite (though it has a problematic attitude towards Native Americans): [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Three Wheels on My Wagon"] And he also sang lead on their big hit "Green Green", which he co-wrote with Randy Sparks: [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Green Green"] But by 1965 McGuire had left the New Christy Minstrels. As he said later "I'd sung 'Green Green' a thousand times and I didn't want to sing it again. This is January of 1965. I went back to LA to meet some producers, and I was broke. Nobody had the time of day for me. I was walking down street one time to see Dr. Strangelove and I walked by the music store, and I heard "Green Green" comin' out of the store, ya know, on Hollywood Boulevard. And I heard my voice, and I thought, 'I got four dollars in my pocket!' I couldn't believe it, my voice is comin' out on Hollywood Boulevard, and I'm broke. And right at that moment, a car pulls up, and the radio is playing 'Chim Chim Cherie" also by the Minstrels. So I got my voice comin' at me in stereo, standin' on the sidewalk there, and I'm broke, and I can't get anyone to sign me!" But McGuire had a lot of friends who he'd met on the folk scene, some of whom were now in the new folk-rock scene that was just starting to spring up. One of them was Roger McGuinn, who told him that his band, the Byrds, were just about to put out a new single, "Mr. Tambourine Man", and that they were about to start a residency at Ciro's on Sunset Strip. McGuinn invited McGuire to the opening night of that residency, where a lot of other people from the scene were there to see the new group. Bob Dylan was there, as was Phil Sloan, and the actor Jack Nicholson, who was still at the time a minor bit-part player in low-budget films made by people like American International Pictures (the cinematographer on many of Nicholson's early films was Floyd Crosby, David Crosby's father, which may be why he was there). Someone else who was there was Lou Adler, who according to McGuire recognised him instantly. According to Adler, he actually asked Terry Melcher who the long-haired dancer wearing furs was, because "he looked like the leader of a movement", and Melcher told him that he was the former lead singer of the New Christy Minstrels. Either way, Adler approached McGuire and asked if he was currently signed -- Dunhill Records was just starting up, and getting someone like McGuire, who had a proven ability to sing lead on hit records, would be a good start for the label. As McGuire didn't have a contract, he was signed to Dunhill, and he was given some of Sloan's new songs to pick from, and chose "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?" as his single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?"] McGuire described what happened next: "It was like, a three-hour session. We did two songs, and then the third one wasn't turning out. We only had about a half hour left in the session, so I said 'Let's do this tune', and I pulled 'Eve of Destruction' out of my pocket, and it just had Phil's words scrawled on a piece of paper, all wrinkled up. Phil worked the chords out with the musicians, who were Hal Blaine on drums and Larry Knechtel on bass." There were actually more musicians than that at the session -- apparently both Knechtel and Joe Osborn were there, so I'm not entirely sure who's playing bass -- Knechtel was a keyboard player as well as a bass player, but I don't hear any keyboards on the track. And Tommy Tedesco was playing lead guitar, and Steve Barri added percussion, along with Sloan on rhythm guitar and harmonica. The chords were apparently scribbled down for the musicians on bits of greasy paper that had been used to wrap some takeaway chicken, and they got through the track in a single take. According to McGuire "I'm reading the words off this piece of wrinkled paper, and I'm singing 'My blood's so mad, feels like coagulatin'", that part that goes 'Ahhh you can't twist the truth', and the reason I'm going 'Ahhh' is because I lost my place on the page. People said 'Man, you really sounded frustrated when you were singing.' I was. I couldn't see the words!" [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] With a few overdubs -- the female backing singers in the chorus, and possibly the kettledrums, which I've seen differing claims about, with some saying that Hal Blaine played them during the basic track and others saying that Lou Adler suggested them as an overdub, the track was complete. McGuire wasn't happy with his vocal, and a session was scheduled for him to redo it, but then a record promoter working with Adler was DJing a birthday party for the head of programming at KFWB, the big top forty radio station in LA at the time, and he played a few acetates he'd picked up from Adler. Most went down OK with the crowd, but when he played "Eve of Destruction", the crowd went wild and insisted he play it three times in a row. The head of programming called Adler up and told him that "Eve of Destruction" was going to be put into rotation on the station from Monday, so he'd better get the record out. As McGuire was away for the weekend, Adler just released the track as it was, and what had been intended to be a B-side became Barry McGuire's first and only number one record: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] Sloan would later claim that that song was a major reason why the twenty-sixth amendment to the US Constitution was passed six years later, because the line "you're old enough to kill but not for votin'" shamed Congress into changing the constitution to allow eighteen-year-olds to vote. If so, that would make "Eve of Destruction" arguably the single most impactful rock record in history, though Sloan is the only person I've ever seen saying that As well as going to number one in McGuire's version, the song was also covered by the other artists who regularly performed Sloan and Barri songs, like the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Eve of Destruction"] And Jan and Dean, whose version on Folk & Roll used the same backing track as McGuire, but had a few lyrical changes to make it fit with Jan Berry's right-wing politics, most notably changing "Selma, Alabama" to "Watts, California", thus changing a reference to peaceful civil rights protestors being brutally attacked and murdered by white supremacist state troopers to a reference to what was seen, in the popular imaginary, as Black people rioting for no reason: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "Eve of Destruction"] According to Sloan, he worked on the Folk & Roll album as a favour to Berry, even though he thought Berry was being cynical and exploitative in making the record, but those changes caused a rift in their friendship. Sloan said in his autobiography "Where I was completely wrong was in helping him capitalize on something in which he didn't believe. Jan wanted the public to perceive him as a person who was deeply concerned and who embraced the values of the progressive politics of the day. But he wasn't that person. That's how I was being pulled. It was when he recorded my actual song ‘Eve Of Destruction' and changed a number of lines to reflect his own ideals that my principles demanded that I leave Folk City and never return." It's true that Sloan gave no more songs to Jan and Dean after that point -- but it's also true that the duo would record only one more album, the comedy concept album Jan and Dean Meet Batman, before Jan's accident. Incidentally, the reference to Selma, Alabama in the lyric might help people decide on which story about the writing of "Eve of Destruction" they think is more plausible. Remember that Lou Adler said that it was written after Adler gave Sloan a copy of Bringing it All Back Home and told him to write a bunch of knock-offs, while Sloan said it was written after a supernatural force gave him access to all the events that would happen in the world for the next sixty years. Sloan claimed the song was written in late 1964. Selma, Alabama, became national news in late February and early March 1965. Bringing it All Back Home was released in late March 1965. So either Adler was telling the truth, or Sloan really *was* given a supernatural insight into the events of the future. Now, as it turned out, while "Eve of Destruction" went to number one, that would be McGuire's only hit as a solo artist. His next couple of singles would reach the very low end of the Hot One Hundred, and that would be it -- he'd release several more albums, before appearing in the Broadway musical Hair, most famous for its nude scenes, and getting a small part in the cinematic masterpiece Werewolves on Wheels: [Excerpt: Werewolves on Wheels trailer] P.F. Sloan would later tell various stories about why McGuire never had another hit. Sometimes he would say that Dunhill Records had received death threats because of "Eve of Destruction" and so deliberately tried to bury McGuire's career, other times he would say that Lou Adler had told him that Billboard had said they were never going to put McGuire's records on the charts no matter how well they sold, because "Eve of Destruction" had just been too powerful and upset the advertisers. But of course at this time Dunhill were still trying for a follow-up to "Eve of Destruction", and they thought they might have one when Barry McGuire brought in a few friends of his to sing backing vocals on his second album. Now, we've covered some of the history of the Mamas and the Papas already, because they were intimately tied up with other groups like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful, and with the folk scene that led to songs like "Hey Joe", so some of this will be more like a recap than a totally new story, but I'm going to recap those parts of the story anyway, so it's fresh in everyone's heads. John Phillips, Scott McKenzie, and Cass Elliot all grew up in Alexandria, Virginia, just a few miles south of Washington DC. Elliot was a few years younger than Phillips and McKenzie, and so as is the way with young men they never really noticed her, and as McKenzie later said "She lived like a quarter of a mile from me and I never met her until New York". While they didn't know who Elliot was, though, she was aware who they were, as Phillips and McKenzie sang together in a vocal group called The Smoothies. The Smoothies were a modern jazz harmony group, influenced by groups like the Modernaires, the Hi-Los, and the Four Freshmen. John Phillips later said "We were drawn to jazz, because we were sort of beatniks, really, rather than hippies, or whatever, flower children. So we used to sing modern harmonies, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross. Dave Lambert did a lot of our arrangements for us as a matter of fact." Now, I've not seen any evidence other than Phillips' claim that Dave Lambert ever arranged for the Smoothies, but that does tell you a lot about the kind of music that they were doing. Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross were a vocalese trio whose main star was Annie Ross, who had a career worthy of an episode in itself -- she sang with Paul Whiteman, appeared in a Little Rascals film when she was seven, had an affair with Lenny Bruce, dubbed Britt Ekland's voice in The Wicker Man, played the villain's sister in Superman III, and much more. Vocalese, you'll remember, was a style of jazz vocal where a singer would take a jazz instrumental, often an improvised one, and add lyrics which they would sing, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross' version of "Cloudburst": [Excerpt: Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross, "Cloudburst"] Whether Dave Lambert ever really did arrange for the Smoothies or not, it's very clear that the trio had a huge influence on John Phillips' ideas about vocal arrangement, as you can hear on Mamas and Papas records like "Once Was a Time I Thought": [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Once Was a Time I Thought"] While the Smoothies thought of themselves as a jazz group, when they signed to Decca they started out making the standard teen pop of the era, with songs like "Softly": [Excerpt, The Smoothies, "Softly"] When the folk boom started, Phillips realised that this was music that he could do easily, because the level of musicianship among the pop-folk musicians was so much lower than in the jazz world. The Smoothies made some recordings in the style of the Kingston Trio, like "Ride Ride Ride": [Excerpt: The Smoothies, "Ride Ride Ride"] Then when the Smoothies split, Phillips and McKenzie formed a trio with a banjo player, Dick Weissman, who they met through Izzy Young's Folklore Centre in Greenwich Village after Phillips asked Young to name some musicians who could make a folk record with him. Weissman was often considered the best banjo player on the scene, and was a friend of Pete Seeger's, to whom Seeger sometimes turned for banjo tips. The trio, who called themselves the Journeymen, quickly established themselves on the folk scene. Weissman later said "we had this interesting balance. John had all of this charisma -- they didn't know about the writing thing yet -- John had the personality, Scott had the voice, and I could play. If you think about it, all of those bands like the Kingston Trio, the Brothers Four, nobody could really *sing* and nobody could really *play*, relatively speaking." This is the take that most people seemed to have about John Phillips, in any band he was ever in. Nobody thought he was a particularly good singer or instrumentalist -- he could sing on key and play adequate rhythm guitar, but nobody would actually pay money to listen to him do those things. Mark Volman of the Turtles, for example, said of him "John wasn't the kind of guy who was going to be able to go up on stage and sing his songs as a singer-songwriter. He had to put himself in the context of a group." But he was charismatic, he had presence, and he also had a great musical mind. He would surround himself with the best players and best singers he could, and then he would organise and arrange them in ways that made the most of their talents. He would work out the arrangements, in a manner that was far more professional than the quick head arrangements that other folk groups used, and he instigated a level of professionalism in his groups that was not at all common on the scene. Phillips' friend Jim Mason talked about the first time he saw the Journeymen -- "They were warming up backstage, and John had all of them doing vocal exercises; one thing in particular that's pretty famous called 'Seiber Syllables' -- it's a series of vocal exercises where you enunciate different vowel and consonant sounds. It had the effect of clearing your head, and it's something that really good operetta singers do." The group were soon signed by Frank Werber, the manager of the Kingston Trio, who signed them as an insurance policy. Dave Guard, the Kingston Trio's banjo player, was increasingly having trouble with the other members, and Werber knew it was only a matter of time before he left the group. Werber wanted the Journeymen as a sort of farm team -- he had the idea that when Guard left, Phillips would join the Kingston Trio in his place as the third singer. Weissman would become the Trio's accompanist on banjo, and Scott McKenzie, who everyone agreed had a remarkable voice, would be spun off as a solo artist. But until that happened, they might as well make records by themselves. The Journeymen signed to MGM records, but were dropped before they recorded anything. They instead signed to Capitol, for whom they recorded their first album: [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "500 Miles"] After recording that album, the Journeymen moved out to California, with Phillips' wife and children. But soon Phillips' marriage was to collapse, as he met and fell in love with Michelle Gilliam. Gilliam was nine years younger than him -- he was twenty-six and she was seventeen -- and she had the kind of appearance which meant that in every interview with an older heterosexual man who knew her, that man will spend half the interview talking about how attractive he found her. Phillips soon left his wife and children, but before he did, the group had a turntable hit with "River Come Down", the B-side to "500 Miles": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "River Come Down"] Around the same time, Dave Guard *did* leave the Kingston Trio, but the plan to split the Journeymen never happened. Instead Phillips' friend John Stewart replaced Guard -- and this soon became a new source of income for Phillips. Both Phillips and Stewart were aspiring songwriters, and they collaborated together on several songs for the Trio, including "Chilly Winds": [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Chilly Winds"] Phillips became particularly good at writing songs that sounded like they could be old traditional folk songs, sometimes taking odd lines from older songs to jump-start new ones, as in "Oh Miss Mary", which he and Stewart wrote after hearing someone sing the first line of a song she couldn't remember the rest of: [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Oh Miss Mary"] Phillips and Stewart became so close that Phillips actually suggested to Stewart that he quit the Kingston Trio and replace Dick Weissman in the Journeymen. Stewart did quit the Trio -- but then the next day Phillips suggested that maybe it was a bad idea and he should stay where he was. Stewart went back to the Trio, claimed he had only pretended to quit because he wanted a pay-rise, and got his raise, so everyone ended up happy. The Journeymen moved back to New York with Michelle in place of Phillips' first wife (and Michelle's sister Russell also coming along, as she was dating Scott McKenzie) and on New Year's Eve 1962 John and Michelle married -- so from this point on I will refer to them by their first names, because they both had the surname Phillips. The group continued having success through 1963, including making appearances on "Hootenanny": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "Stack O'Lee (live on Hootenanny)"] By the time of the Journeymen's third album, though, John and Scott McKenzie were on bad terms. Weissman said "They had been the closest of friends and now they were the worst of enemies. They talked through me like I was a medium. It got to the point where we'd be standing in the dressing room and John would say to me 'Tell Scott that his right sock doesn't match his left sock...' Things like that, when they were standing five feet away from each other." Eventually, the group split up. Weissman was always going to be able to find employment given his banjo ability, and he was about to get married and didn't need the hassle of dealing with the other two. McKenzie was planning on a solo career -- everyone was agreed that he had the vocal ability. But John was another matter. He needed to be in a group. And not only that, the Journeymen had bookings they needed to complete. He quickly pulled together a group he called the New Journeymen. The core of the lineup was himself, Michelle on vocals, and banjo player Marshall Brickman. Brickman had previously been a member of a folk group called the Tarriers, who had had a revolving lineup, and had played on most of their early-sixties recordings: [Excerpt: The Tarriers, "Quinto (My Little Pony)"] We've met the Tarriers before in the podcast -- they had been formed by Erik Darling, who later replaced Pete Seeger in the Weavers after Seeger's socialist principles wouldn't let him do advertising, and Alan Arkin, later to go on to be a film star, and had had hits with "Cindy, O Cindy", with lead vocals from Vince Martin, who would later go on to be a major performer in the Greenwich Village scene, and with "The Banana Boat Song". By the time Brickman had joined, though, Darling, Arkin, and Martin had all left the group to go on to bigger things, and while he played with them for several years, it was after their commercial peak. Brickman would, though, also go on to a surprising amount of success, but as a writer rather than a musician -- he had a successful collaboration with Woody Allen in the 1970s, co-writing four of Allen's most highly regarded films -- Sleeper, Annie Hall, Manhattan, and Manhattan Murder Mystery -- and with another collaborator he later co-wrote the books for the stage musicals Jersey Boys and The Addams Family. Both John and Michelle were decent singers, and both have their admirers as vocalists -- P.F. Sloan always said that Michelle was the best singer in the group they eventually formed, and that it was her voice that gave the group its sound -- but for the most part they were not considered as particularly astonishing lead vocalists. Certainly, neither had a voice that stood out the way that Scott McKenzie's had. They needed a strong lead singer, and they found one in Denny Doherty. Now, we covered Denny Doherty's early career in the episode on the Lovin' Spoonful, because he was intimately involved in the formation of that group, so I won't go into too much detail here, but I'll give a very abbreviated version of what I said there. Doherty was a Canadian performer who had been a member of the Halifax Three with Zal Yanovsky: [Excerpt: The Halifax Three, "When I First Came to This Land"] After the Halifax Three had split up, Doherty and Yanovsky had performed as a duo for a while, before joining up with Cass Elliot and her husband Jim Hendricks, who both had previously been in the Big Three with Tim Rose: [Excerpt: Cass Elliot and the Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] Elliot, Hendricks, Yanovsky, and Doherty had formed The Mugwumps, sometimes joined by John Sebastian, and had tried to go in more of a rock direction after seeing the Beatles on Ed Sullivan. They recorded one album together before splitting up: [Excerpt: The Mugwumps, "Searchin'"] Part of the reason they split up was that interpersonal relationships within the group were put under some strain -- Elliot and Hendricks split up, though they would remain friends and remain married for several years even though they were living apart, and Elliot had an unrequited crush on Doherty. But since they'd split up, and Yanovsky and Sebastian had gone off to form the Lovin' Spoonful, that meant that Doherty was free, and he was regarded as possibly the best male lead vocalist on the circuit, so the group snapped him up. The only problem was that the Journeymen still had gigs booked that needed to be played, one of them was in just three days, and Doherty didn't know the repertoire. This was a problem with an easy solution for people in their twenties though -- they took a huge amount of amphetamines, and stayed awake for three days straight rehearsing. They made the gig, and Doherty was now the lead singer of the New Journeymen: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "The Last Thing on My Mind"] But the New Journeymen didn't last in that form for very long, because even before joining the group, Denny Doherty had been going in a more folk-rock direction with the Mugwumps. At the time, John Phillips thought rock and roll was kids' music, and he was far more interested in folk and jazz, but he was also very interested in making money, and he soon decided it was an idea to start listening to the Beatles. There's some dispute as to who first played the Beatles for John in early 1965 -- some claim it was Doherty, others claim it was Cass Elliot, but everyone agrees it was after Denny Doherty had introduced Phillips to something else -- he brought round some LSD for John and Michelle, and Michelle's sister Rusty, to try. And then he told them he'd invited round a friend. Michelle Phillips later remembered, "I remember saying to the guys "I don't know about you guys, but this drug does nothing for me." At that point there was a knock on the door, and as I opened the door and saw Cass, the acid hit me *over the head*. I saw her standing there in a pleated skirt, a pink Angora sweater with great big eyelashes on and her hair in a flip. And all of a sudden I thought 'This is really *quite* a drug!' It was an image I will have securely fixed in my brain for the rest of my life. I said 'Hi, I'm Michelle. We just took some LSD-25, do you wanna join us?' And she said 'Sure...'" Rusty Gilliam's description matches this -- "It was mind-boggling. She had on a white pleated skirt, false eyelashes. These were the kind of eyelashes that when you put them on you were supposed to trim them to an appropriate length, which she didn't, and when she blinked she looked like a cow, or those dolls you get when you're little and the eyes open and close. And we're on acid. Oh my God! It was a sight! And everything she was wearing were things that you weren't supposed to be wearing if you were heavy -- white pleated skirt, mohair sweater. You know, until she became famous, she suffered so much, and was poked fun at." This gets to an important point about Elliot, and one which sadly affected everything about her life. Elliot was *very* fat -- I've seen her weight listed at about three hundred pounds, and she was only five foot five tall -- and she also didn't have the kind of face that gets thought of as conventionally attractive. Her appearance would be cruelly mocked by pretty much everyone for the rest of her life, in ways that it's genuinely hurtful to read about, and which I will avoid discussing in detail in order to avoid hurting fat listeners. But the two *other* things that defined Elliot in the minds of those who knew her were her voice -- every single person who knew her talks about what a wonderful singer she was -- and her personality. I've read a lot of things about Cass Elliot, and I have never read a single negative word about her as a person, but have read many people going into raptures about what a charming, loving, friendly, understanding person she was. Michelle later said of her "From the time I left Los Angeles, I hadn't had a friend, a buddy. I was married, and John and I did not hang out with women, we just hung out with men, and especially not with women my age. John was nine years older than I was. And here was a fun-loving, intelligent woman. She captivated me. I was as close to in love with Cass as I could be to any woman in my life at that point. She also represented something to me: freedom. Everything she did was because she wanted to do it. She was completely independent and I admired her and was in awe of her. And later on, Cass would be the one to tell me not to let John run my life. And John hated her for that." Either Elliot had brought round Meet The Beatles, the Beatles' first Capitol album, for everyone to listen to, or Denny Doherty already had it, but either way Elliot and Doherty were by this time already Beatles fans. Michelle, being younger than the rest and not part of the folk scene until she met John, was much more interested in rock and roll than any of them, but because she'd been married to John for a couple of years and been part of his musical world she hadn't really encountered the Beatles music, though she had a vague memory that she might have heard a track or two on the radio. John was hesitant -- he didn't want to listen to any rock and roll, but eventually he was persuaded, and the record was put on while he was on his first acid trip: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Want to Hold Your Hand"] Within a month, John Phillips had written thirty songs that he thought of as inspired by the Beatles. The New Journeymen were going to go rock and roll. By this time Marshall Brickman was out of the band, and instead John, Michelle, and Denny recruited a new lead guitarist, Eric Hord. Denny started playing bass, with John on rhythm guitar, and a violinist friend of theirs, Peter Pilafian, knew a bit of drums and took on that role. The new lineup of the group used the Journeymen's credit card, which hadn't been stopped even though the Journeymen were no more, to go down to St. Thomas in the Caribbean, along with Michelle's sister, John's daughter Mackenzie (from whose name Scott McKenzie had taken his stage name, as he was born Philip Blondheim), a pet dog, and sundry band members' girlfriends. They stayed there for several months, living in tents on the beach, taking acid, and rehearsing. While they were there, Michelle and Denny started an affair which would have important ramifications for the group later. They got a gig playing at a club called Duffy's, whose address was on Creeque Alley, and soon after they started playing there Cass Elliot travelled down as well -- she was in love with Denny, and wanted to be around him. She wasn't in the group, but she got a job working at Duffy's as a waitress, and she would often sing harmony with the group while waiting at tables. Depending on who was telling the story, either she didn't want to be in the group because she didn't want her appearance to be compared to Michelle's, or John wouldn't *let* her be in the group because she was so fat. Later a story would be made up to cover for this, saying that she hadn't been in the group at first because she couldn't sing the highest notes that were needed, until she got hit on the head with a metal pipe and discovered that it had increased her range by three notes, but that seems to be a lie. One of the songs the New Journeymen were performing at this time was "Mr. Tambourine Man". They'd heard that their old friend Roger McGuinn had recorded it with his new band, but they hadn't yet heard his version, and they'd come up with their own arrangement: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "Mr. Tambourine Man"] Denny later said "We were doing three-part harmony on 'Mr Tambourine Man', but a lot slower... like a polka or something! And I tell John, 'No John, we gotta slow it down and give it a backbeat.' Finally we get the Byrds 45 down here, and we put it on and turn it up to ten, and John says 'Oh, like that?' Well, as you can tell, it had already been done. So John goes 'Oh, ah... that's it...' a light went on. So we started doing Beatles stuff. We dropped 'Mr Tambourine Man' after hearing the Byrds version, because there was no point." Eventually they had to leave the island -- they had completely run out of money, and were down to fifty dollars. The credit card had been cut up, and the governor of the island had a personal vendetta against them because they gave his son acid, and they were likely to get arrested if they didn't leave the island. Elliot and her then-partner had round-trip tickets, so they just left, but the rest of them were in trouble. By this point they were unwashed, they were homeless, and they'd spent their last money on stage costumes. They got to the airport, and John Phillips tried to write a cheque for eight air fares back to the mainland, which the person at the check-in desk just laughed at. So they took their last fifty dollars and went to a casino. There Michelle played craps, and she rolled seventeen straight passes, something which should be statistically impossible. She turned their fifty dollars into six thousand dollars, which they scooped up, took to the airport, and paid for their flights out in cash. The New Journeymen arrived back in New York, but quickly decided that they were going to try their luck in California. They rented a car, using Scott McKenzie's credit card, and drove out to LA. There they met up with Hoyt Axton, who you may remember as the son of Mae Axton, the writer of "Heartbreak Hotel", and as the performer who had inspired Michael Nesmith to go into folk music: [Excerpt: Hoyt Axton, "Greenback Dollar"] Axton knew the group, and fed them and put them up for a night, but they needed somewhere else to stay. They went to stay with one of Michelle's friends, but after one night their rented car was stolen, with all their possessions in it. They needed somewhere else to stay, so they went to ask Jim Hendricks if they could crash at his place -- and they were surprised to find that Cass Elliot was there already. Hendricks had another partner -- though he and Elliot wouldn't have their marriage annulled until 1968 and were still technically married -- but he'd happily invited her to stay with them. And now all her friends had turned up, he invited them to stay as well, taking apart the beds in his one-bedroom apartment so he could put down a load of mattresses in the space for everyone to sleep on. The next part becomes difficult, because pretty much everyone in the LA music scene of the sixties was a liar who liked to embellish their own roles in things, so it's quite difficult to unpick what actually happened. What seems to have happened though is that first this new rock-oriented version of the New Journeymen went to see Frank Werber, on the recommendation of John Stewart. Werber was the manager of the Kingston Trio, and had also managed the Journeymen. He, however, was not interested -- not because he didn't think they had talent, but because he had experience of working with John Phillips previously. When Phillips came into his office Werber picked up a tape that he'd been given of the group, and said "I have not had a chance to listen to this tape. I believe that you are a most talented individual, and that's why we took you on in the first place. But I also believe that you're also a drag to work with. A pain in the ass. So I'll tell you what, before whatever you have on here sways me, I'm gonna give it back to you and say that we're not interested." Meanwhile -- and this part of the story comes from Kim Fowley, who was never one to let the truth get in the way of him taking claim for everything, but parts of it at least are corroborated by other people -- Cass Elliot had called Fowley, and told him that her friends' new group sounded pretty good and he should sign them. Fowley was at that time working as a talent scout for a label, but according to him the label wouldn't give the group the money they wanted. So instead, Fowley got in touch with Nik Venet, who had just produced the Leaves' hit version of "Hey Joe" on Mira Records: [Excerpt: The Leaves, "Hey Joe"] Fowley suggested to Venet that Venet should sign the group to Mira Records, and Fowley would sign them to a publishing contract, and they could both get rich. The trio went to audition for Venet, and Elliot drove them over -- and Venet thought the group had a great look as a quartet. He wanted to sign them to a record contract, but only if Elliot was in the group as well. They agreed, he gave them a one hundred and fifty dollar advance, and told them to come back the next day to see his boss at Mira. But Barry McGuire was also hanging round with Elliot and Hendricks, and decided that he wanted to have Lou Adler hear the four of them. He thought they might be useful both as backing vocalists on his second album and as a source of new songs. He got them to go and see Lou Adler, and according to McGuire Phillips didn't want Elliot to go with them, but as Elliot was the one who was friends with McGuire, Phillips worried that they'd lose the chance with Adler if she didn't. Adler was amazed, and decided to sign the group right then and there -- both Bones Howe and P.F. Sloan claimed to have been there when the group auditioned for him and have said "if you won't sign them, I will", though exactly what Sloan would have signed them to I'm not sure. Adler paid them three thousand dollars in cash and told them not to bother with Nik Venet, so they just didn't turn up for the Mira Records audition the next day. Instead, they went into the studio with McGuire and cut backing vocals on about half of his new album: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire with the Mamas and the Papas, "Hide Your Love Away"] While the group were excellent vocalists, there were two main reasons that Adler wanted to sign them. The first was that he found Michelle Phillips extremely attractive, and the second is a song that John and Michelle had written which he thought might be very suitable for McGuire's album. Most people who knew John Phillips think of "California Dreamin'" as a solo composition, and he would later claim that he gave Michelle fifty percent just for transcribing his lyric, saying he got inspired in the middle of the night, woke her up, and got her to write the song down as he came up with it. But Michelle, who is a credited co-writer on the song, has been very insistent that she wrote the lyrics to the second verse, and that it's about her own real experiences, saying that she would often go into churches and light candles even though she was "at best an agnostic, and possibly an atheist" in her words, and this would annoy John, who had also been raised Catholic, but who had become aggressively opposed to expressions of religion, rather than still having nostalgia for the aesthetics of the church as Michelle did. They were out walking on a particularly cold winter's day in 1963, and Michelle wanted to go into St Patrick's Cathedral and John very much did not want to. A couple of nights later, John woke her up, having written the first verse of the song, starting "All the leaves are brown and the sky is grey/I went for a walk on a winter's day", and insisting she collaborate with him. She liked the song, and came up with the lines "Stopped into a church, I passed along the way/I got down on my knees and I pretend to pray/The preacher likes the cold, he knows I'm going to stay", which John would later apparently dislike, but which stayed in the song. Most sources I've seen for the recording of "California Dreamin'" say that the lineup of musicians was the standard set of players who had played on McGuire's other records, with the addition of John Phillips on twelve-string guitar -- P.F. Sloan on guitar and harmonica, Joe Osborn on bass, Larry Knechtel on keyboards, and Hal Blaine on drums, but for some reason Stephen McParland's book on Sloan has Bones Howe down as playing drums on the track while engineering -- a detail so weird, and from such a respectable researcher, that I have to wonder if it might be true. In his autobiography, Sloan claims to have rewritten the chord sequence to "California Dreamin'". He says "Barry Mann had unintentionally showed me a suspended chord back at Screen Gems. I was so impressed by this beautiful, simple chord that I called Brian Wilson and played it for him over the phone. The next thing I knew, Brian had written ‘Don't Worry Baby,' which had within it a number suspended chords. And then the chord heard 'round the world, two months later, was the opening suspended chord of ‘A Hard Day's Night.' I used these chords throughout ‘California Dreamin',' and more specifically as a bridge to get back and forth from the verse to the chorus." Now, nobody else corroborates this story, and both Brian Wilson and John Phillips had the kind of background in modern harmony that means they would have been very aware of suspended chords before either ever encountered Sloan, but I thought I should mention it. Rather more plausible is Sloan's other claim, that he came up with the intro to the song. According to Sloan, he was inspired by "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures: [Excerpt: The Ventures, "Walk Don't Run"] And you can easily see how this: [plays "Walk Don't Run"] Can lead to this: [plays "California Dreamin'"] And I'm fairly certain that if that was the inspiration, it was Sloan who was the one who thought it up. John Phillips had been paying no attention to the world of surf music when "Walk Don't Run" had been a hit -- that had been at the point when he was very firmly in the folk world, while Sloan of course had been recording "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'", and it had been his job to know surf music intimately. So Sloan's intro became the start of what was intended to be Barry McGuire's next single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] Sloan also provided the harmonica solo on the track: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] The Mamas and the Papas -- the new name that was now given to the former New Journeymen, now they were a quartet -- were also signed to Dunhill as an act on their own, and recorded their own first single, "Go Where You Wanna Go", a song apparently written by John about Michelle, in late 1963, after she had briefly left him to have an affair with Russ Titelman, the record producer and songwriter, before coming back to him: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] But while that was put out, they quickly decided to scrap it and go with another song. The "Go Where You Wanna Go" single was pulled after only selling a handful of copies, though its commercial potential was later proved when in 1967 a new vocal group, the 5th Dimension, released a soundalike version as their second single. The track was produced by Lou Adler's client Johnny Rivers, and used the exact same musicians as the Mamas and the Papas version, with the exception of Phillips. It became their first hit, reaching number sixteen on the charts: [Excerpt: The 5th Dimension, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] The reason the Mamas and the Papas version of "Go Where You Wanna Go" was pulled was because everyone became convinced that their first single should instead be their own version of "California Dreamin'". This is the exact same track as McGuire's track, with just two changes. The first is that McGuire's lead vocal was replaced with Denny Doherty: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Though if you listen to the stereo mix of the song and isolate the left channel, you can hear McGuire singing the lead on the first line, and occasional leakage from him elsewhere on the backing vocal track: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] The other change made was to replace Sloan's harmonica solo with an alto flute solo by Bud Shank, a jazz musician who we heard about in the episode on "Light My Fire", when he collaborated with Ravi Shankar on "Improvisations on the Theme From Pather Panchali": [Excerpt: Ravi Shankar, "Improvisation on the Theme From Pather Panchali"] Shank was working on another session in Western Studios, where they were recording the Mamas and Papas track, and Bones Howe approached him while he was packing his instrument and asked if he'd be interested in doing another session. Shank agreed, though the track caused problems for him. According to Shank "What had happened was that whe