Podcasts about Biochemistry

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The study of chemical processes in living organisms

  • 1,160PODCASTS
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  • Oct 27, 2021LATEST
Biochemistry

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Best podcasts about Biochemistry

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Latest podcast episodes about Biochemistry

The Stand with Eamon Dunphy
Ep 1246: Covid-19 - Despite Vaccines, Reopening Is a Fingers Crossed Operation

The Stand with Eamon Dunphy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 39:01


Tomás Ryan talks to Eamon. Tomás is Associate Professor at the School of Biochemistry & Immunology, Trinity College Dublin, an associate of the Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience and a founding member of ISAG. The Stand is proudly sponsored by Tesco. Recorded on 26/10/21

MISSUNDERSTOOD with Kellie Rene Hall
61. Why Authenticity will Always Win: How I Won Miss America (ft. Camille Schrier)

MISSUNDERSTOOD with Kellie Rene Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 52:52


The LITERAL queen is on the podcast this week: reigning Miss America 2020, Camille Schrier. She's unique, smart, authentic, sassy, + not afraid to stay true to herself. When I watched Camille win Miss America back in December 2019, she truly stuck out to me because of her ingenious science demonstration on stage — something that had never been done before in pageant history. Since, I've followed her on social media in awe of her relatability + drive. Tune in to hear how she won (on her first try ever !!), who has supported her, how she's stays authentic, + why being a queen is not really about the crown. // (bio provided by MissAmerica.Org) Camille Schrier, 24, grew up In Bucks County, Pennsylvania, before moving to Virginia to pursue her undergraduate degrees. In 2018, Camille graduated with honors from Virginia Tech with dual Bachelor of Science degrees in Biochemistry and Systems Biology, and is currently pursuing a Doctor of Pharmacy at Virginia Commonwealth University. In June of 2019, Camille was named Miss Virginia after breaking from tradition to perform the “catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide” as her onstage talent. Her unique talent performance and focus on women in STEM has sparked a positive reaction of inclusivity for the program as a whole. Camille's story has been shared with hundreds of children and viewed by millions. She can be seen on national and international media outlets including The Today Show, Talk Stoop, CNN, BBC, The Kelly Clarkson Show, CBS This Morning, Inside Edition, The Weather Channel, Southern Living, Canada's CTV, Germany's RTL, and many more. On December 19, 2019, Camille earned the job of Miss America 2020 after competing live on NBC from Mohegan Sun Arena in Connecticut.

Triathlon Taren Podcast
Keys to Ultra Endurance Nutrition with Dr. Patrick Davitt

Triathlon Taren Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 75:42


Dr. Patrick Davitt knows his stuff when it comes to fuel and diet for endurance athletes.  Davitt is a Health Scientist and Exercise Physiologist with his doctorate in Nutritional Physiology and Biochemistry, and has spent time studying low carbohydrate/ketogenic dieting in ultra-endurance athletes. He is also a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. On the podcast this week, we talk about the keys to ultra endurance nutrition -- and what amateur athletes should and shouldn't be doing!

CapitalGeek
Peter Kirby - Technology Executive | Blockchain Pioneer | Laughter Enthusiast

CapitalGeek

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 31:35


Peter Kirby is a long-time entrepreneur and early pioneer in the blockchain space. He co-founded a Bitcoin hardware company in 2013 and a blockchain technology company in 2014. Peter also executed one of the earliest ICOs in 2015 as CEO of Factom, Inc. He has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, The Economist, Financial Times, and Forbes. He has been a featured speaker at The World Bank, Money 20/20, The US State Department, and The US Department of Homeland Security. Peter has a BS in Biochemistry from Lehigh University, an MBA from the Acton School of Business, AND is a certified laughter yoga instructor!

PharmaTalkRadio
J&J Vision on Progress in Eyecare and Meeting the Needs of Future Patients

PharmaTalkRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 23:00


About the Episode: What does the future of eyecare look like? How does a global company stay innovative? Listen to this podcast to hear Dr Xiao-Yu Song, Johnson & Johnson Vision, providing the latest information on J&J Vision's new products, and her approach to innovation.    Key Takeaways:  How to encourage innovation in a large, global company What the current and future eyecare needs are How Johnson & Johnson Vision is expanding and innovating their products, including a first-in-class drug delivery contact lens About the Speaker: Xiao-Yu Song is the Global Head of Research & Development for Johnson & Johnson's eye health business. She has overall R&D responsibility for new product development and life cycle management support as well as portfolio management and innovation governance across all platforms in Johnson & Johnson Vision. Xiao-Yu earned her Ph.D. in Biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, her M.S. in Biochemistry and Medical Degree at China Medical University, and completed postdoctoral training in autoimmunity and immunology at the U.S. National Institutes of Health.    For more information: About disruptive innovation in clinical research, click here. About drug delivery and partnerships, click here.  For more information about PharmaTalk Radio, visit theconferenceforum.org.

Biotech 2050 Podcast
76. Advancing immuno-oncology, Michel Detheux, President and CEO, iTeos Therapeutics

Biotech 2050 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 21:36


Michel Detheux is the co-founder, President, and CEO of iTeos Therapeutics, and has held the role of CEO since the company's inception in 2012. He previously served as a director at Ludwig Cancer Research from December 2010 to March 2012. Prior to that, Michel worked in various scientific and business development roles at Ogeda (f/k/a Euroscreen). He has also held roles concurrent to his time at iTeos, including Founder and Managing Director of MG6A Bioconsulting SPRL, Director of the Board at BioWin, and Board Member at Immune Health. He studied at Université Catholique de Louvain, receiving his undergraduate degree and his PhD in biochemistry there, before doing his post-doc in parasitology at University of Glasgow and receiving a business certificate from Solvay Brussels School. Michel holds a degree in biochemistry and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Université Catholique de Louvain and a business certificate from Solvay Business School.

Journeys of Scientists
Episode 52 - Bianca Serda

Journeys of Scientists

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 36:03


Bianca graduated from the University of New Mexico (UNM) in May 2020 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology. Bianca is originally from San Jose, California, and also has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from San Jose State University. As an undergraduate at UNM, Bianca was an NIH Maximizing Access to Research Careers (MARC) Scholar and NSF Louis Stokes New Mexico Alliance for Minority Participation (NM AMP) Scholar. Bianca's undergraduate research project focused on understanding plants' growth development, anatomical, and photosynthetic rates, Arabidopsis thaliana, in a microgravity environment, in Dr. David Hanson's laboratory. During her undergraduate degree at UNM, she did an internship in the Space Life Science Training Program at NASA Ames Research Center. Bianca is now a second-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Molecular Plant Sciences program. She is now a member of Dr. Thomas Sharkey's laboratory, where she studies the mechanism of the protective role of isoprene against ozone stress. In her free time, she is involved in the BMB Outreach program, Co-Outreach coordinator for MSU AMPSS, BMB Graduate Student DEI Representative, and on the Student Board for the American Society of Gravitational and Space Research. To keep up to date with WaMPS updates, you can follow @msuwamps on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, or visit our website https://www.wamps.org. If you would like to learn more about graduate school in physics and astronomy at MSU, check out https://pa.msu.edu If you would like to leave comments, questions, or recommend someone to be interviewed on Journeys of Scientists, you can email WaMPS outreach coordinator Bryan at stanl142@msu.edu

In The Round
Stephen Wilson Jr

In The Round

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 73:19


One of our favorite voices in town, Stephen Wilson Jr, joins Matt for Episode 83 Stephen comes from the small corn field town of Seymour Indiana. He grew up boxing, going to church and was in his own words 'the weird kid' at school. His story is incredible and includes time as a Scientist, member of an Indie Rock Band, encounters with ghosts and UFO's and more. We learn a lot about Stephen and talk about what he's got coming up in the future! For more on  Stephen Wilson Jr be sure to give him a follow on all the socials, check out his music and be on the lookout for tour stops near you!  Also give us a like and follow on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter! And don't forget to leave a rating and review, 5 stars only! And remember to check out one of ourBe sure to visit our friends at Trailside CBD for all your Delta-8 THC, Hemp and CBD needs! From oils and gummies to cartridges and flower they have it all! Use promo code 'ITR' at checkout for 20% off your order!Much love to our newest sponsors Saxman Studios here in Nashville TN! Grady and his team are a staple in the scene and do some of the highest quality work in town! Check them out on Facebook and Instagram!Big thanks to our media partners at Whale Tale Media. If you're looking for any type of photo or video work for music, events and weddings they are your GO TO TEAM!Don't forget to leave  a rating and review on the episode! 5 stars only baby! 

Beyond the Bench
40. Making Science Education Engaging with Tamara El-Hayek Ewing

Beyond the Bench

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 39:15


How can social media be used as a science education platform, and how can we improve science education at the high school and collegiate levels? Tamara El-Hayek Ewing, Lab Manager and Instructional Support in the CSUSM Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, discusses effective practices to inspire and engage chemistry students, her use of social media as a science communication tool, and her path to becoming a chemistry educator. Follow Tamara on TikTok @chemis.te and Instagram @chemis.te and @elementandmolecule. Learn more about the students producing this podcast and their science communication efforts by following us on Twitter @SciCommUCR and visiting our website.

Health and Medicine (Video)
Pandemic Burnout and Regeneration for Our New World: One Year Later

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 58:54


A panel of leaders in mental health and science discuss combatting pandemic fatigue, share short meditations, and revisit their previous discussion on personal and communal lessons and hopes for rejuvenating our lives, science and healthcare, self-care, and our earth. Panelists: Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD, Professor Emeritus, UCSF Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics; Eve Ekman, PhD, teaching faculty, UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine; Trudy Goodman, PhD, founder, InsightLA; Jack Kornfield, PhD, founder, Spirit Rock Meditation Center; Dan Siegel, MD, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, UCLA School of Medicine; founder, Mindsight Institute. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37476]

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)
Pandemic Burnout and Regeneration for Our New World: One Year Later

Mental Health and Psychiatry (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 58:54


A panel of leaders in mental health and science discuss combatting pandemic fatigue, share short meditations, and revisit their previous discussion on personal and communal lessons and hopes for rejuvenating our lives, science and healthcare, self-care, and our earth. Panelists: Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD, Professor Emeritus, UCSF Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics; Eve Ekman, PhD, teaching faculty, UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine; Trudy Goodman, PhD, founder, InsightLA; Jack Kornfield, PhD, founder, Spirit Rock Meditation Center; Dan Siegel, MD, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, UCLA School of Medicine; founder, Mindsight Institute. Moderated by Elissa Epel, PhD, Vice Chair for Adult Psychology, UCSF. Series: "Emotional Well-Being in Times of Crisis" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 37476]

KERA's Think
Plants have much to teach us

KERA's Think

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:35


We talk to our plants hoping our words will help them grow. So are they actually listening? Beronda L. Montgomery is MSU Foundation Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at Michigan State University and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Microbiology. She joins host Krys Boyd to discuss what plants “know,” how they overcome obstacles, and what we humans can learn from them. Her book is called “Lessons From Plants.”

Chemistry For Your Life
Fall Mini 02 - The biochemistry of sugar?

Chemistry For Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:35


Merch available here until October 21 -> ko-fi.com/store/chemforyourlife#116Let's hear more about sugar from the perspective of biochemist, Caibe Alves.Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show going AND free.How to start a podcast.

New Books Network
The Scholarly Journal: An Interview with Josh Schimel and Karl Ritz of "Soil Biology and Biochemistry"

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 79:03


Listen to this interview of Josh Schimel and Karl Ritz, Editors-in-Chief of Soil Biology and Biochemistry. We talk about the people who all scientists are, and we demonstrate why all that matters to your next submission. Karl Ritz : "It is definitely important that authors take seriously matters of text presentation and formatting. And one of the reasons, perhaps, people don't understand as to why it matters, as to why we need things in a specific format and following certain rules — the reason is that there are rules here that form the framework, and you can stick your creativity on top of that. Because if there's a consistency and coherence in the fonts and in the spacing and in the headings and in the structure of the manuscript — this makes the process for the editors and the reviewers considerably more straightforward, because then they know what they're dealing with in terms of the actual process part of the procedure versus the creative and the intellectual part of it. And if we have to mess around dealing with unusual formats or unusual colors or just a general lack of attention to formatting, then it just distracts us from being able to get to the nub of what needs to be assessed here in the manuscript." Daniel hosts Scholarly Communication, the podcast about how knowledge gets known. Email: writeyourresearch@gmail.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Running is Cheaper Than Therapy
Chris Tubbs: Triathlons - Why He Loves This Shi...

Running is Cheaper Than Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 54:57


People  fall into endurance sports for different reasons. For Chris Tubbs, physical activity was needed to turn his life around. He started training in his 40s and it has completely changed his attitude towards life. He says he's like a ‘joyful volcano' each time he hits the road. In this episode, Chris shares how he got into endurance sports, triathlons in particular, why he founded the Houston Childhood Walk for Apraxia of Speech, and how an unexpected diagnosis changed he outlook.  If you need inspiration for starting over, no matter your age, this episode is for you.  Episode Highlights: How Chris started endurance sports to turn his life around Training for the triathlons and hiring his first coach Overcoming mental blocks and imposter syndrome as a ‘new' triathlete Getting his PhD in Biochemistry at the University of Minnesota Founding the Houston Childhood Walk for Apraxia of Speech.  Prostate cancer and the importance of regular screening in men above 40 The link between proper nutrition and performance Guest Bio Chris recently found joy in training for and racing endurance triathlons. He doesn't have a strong background in athletics, and only found the sport when he hit a low point in his life. The training gave him focus and an outlet as he navigated becoming healthy again. He grew up between Chicago and Los Angles, then moved to North Carolina to attend North Carolina Central University, an HBCU. After graduation, he served as a bartender before being accepted into the PhD program North Carolina State University. Although his doctoral road was long and hostile, he was successful in becoming the first African American to earn a PhD in Biochemistry in the history of the university. Being a science nerd at heart, he's had the joy and the fortune to be a part of the discovery and development of new drugs that now cure diseases and address serious unmet medical needs. He's had the honor of founding the annual Houston Childhood Walk for Apraxia of Speech. He started the walk to be a resource that connects families and professionals that are supporting children who have to overcome this rare genetic disorder. He's also an active member of the Houston real estate investment community. Outside of work, the bulk of Chris' time is spent training for triathlons. After a year and a half he completed his first full distance Ironman in November 2020 at IronMan Florida. A few weeks later he underwent radical prostatectomy as a consequence of a prostate cancer diagnosis that he received one month before the race. Ironman training prepared him well for the difficult road back to racing. Exactly 6-months after his surgery, he ran is 1st race (an Olympic distance) and got a 40 min PR! His physician says that he  recovered way ahead of schedule. He'll test himself again at Lubbock 70.3. and is now focusing  on preparing for IMFL in November 2021. Connect with Chris Read his blog here Follow on Instagram   Did you enjoy today's episode? Please subscribe and leave a review. If you have questions, comments, or possible show topics, email runningischeaperthantherapyolb@gmail.com. To subscribe and review use one links of the links below  Apple Spotify Google  Get a copy of the book  Running Is Cheaper Than Therapy: A Journey Back to Wholeness

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition
Understanding the Power of Proteolytic Enzymes Supplement: Enzyme 17

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 24:15


Join Jonathan and Wade Lightheart dive deeper into understanding how enzymes are critical to your health and vitality. We really help you understand what you are looking for in an effective enzyme supplement. Tune in to understand what proteolytic means, the various enzymes needed in your digestive tract, the powerful punch of AstraZyme™, and why cultured enzymes matter.   About Wade Lightheart 3-Time Canadian All Natural Bodybuilding Champion who competed as vegetarian, former Mr. Universe Competitor, host of The Awesome Health podcast, Wade Lightheart is one of the world's premier authorities on Natural Nutrition and Training Methods. Having majored in Sports Science at the University of New Brunswick, he has authored numerous books on health, nutrition and exercise which have sold in over 80 countries. Wade also serves as an advisor to the American Anti-Cancer Institute. He's been in the health industry for over 25 years, coached thousands of clients, and is sought out by athletes and high-performance oriented individuals worldwide for his advice on how to optimize their health and fitness levels.   What Are Enzymes? ENZYME – noun BIOCHEMISTRY a substance produced by a living organism which acts as a catalyst to bring about a specific biochemical reaction. There are approximately 25,000 different enzymatic functions in the body The number of enzymes that you have present in your body is directly proportion to the amount of chemical reactions that you can engage in in the body. The difference between stones, plants, and people is enzymes, the amount and the role of those enzymes. They are the most critical component to all metabolic transactions.   Enzyme Bank It's like having a bank account. In other words, your ability to write metabolic checks, to build, to repair, to heal, to digest your food, to make your hormones work, to break down the smallest chemical reactions, to make your skin nice, you name it, requires an enzymatic pathway.   What is a PROTEOLYTIC enzyme? also called protease, proteinase, or peptidase, any of a group of enzymes that break the long chainlike molecules of proteins into shorter fragments (peptides) and eventually into their components, amino acids. Proteolytic enzymes are present in bacteria, archaea, certain types of algae, some viruses, and plants; they are most abundant, however, in animals. The two major groups are the exopeptidases, which target the terminal ends of proteins, and the endopeptidases, which target sites within proteins.   What to Look for in an Enzyme Supplement Loaded up with proteolytic enzymes Make sure it covers the various pH levels of digestion; 3.0, 4.5 & 6.0 Contains amylase to break down your carbohydrates Contains alpha galactosidase, which will help break down some of the sugars that you will find in food Contains glucoamylase, another one that'll cover the different range of sugars that you might consume inadvertently Invertase, maltase, to help with hidden sugars that cause interruptions and metabolic problems and blood sugar issues Contains lipase to break down fats Contains phytase to break down plant fibers Contains hemicellulose and the cellulase, which will actually break down those difficult proteins that are actually a fibrous protein Contains lactase for people that can't digest milk (it's because they don't produce lactase) Contains AstraZyme™ to bolster all the benefits Enzymes are cultured     What is AstraZyme™ We studied Chinese medicine and found out there is a particular root, called the astragalus root, that is used in almost every single Chinese compound. When we found out why it was used, that it turns out that that particular root actually activates and accelerates, it increases the potential of the enzymatic response. So, we took that extract through this into that formulation as well and precise dosages. And that gave a 30 to 60% boost depending on the enzyme and its effectiveness.   What is a Cultured Enzyme? A cultured enzyme means this is an enzyme grown on a very specific medium that allows you to increase the potency over a normal enzyme from 100 to 1000 times. This process takes about eight weeks to get that kind of potency. So just like if you were fermenting beer or wine or something, you've got to let it work for a period of time before you get that premium spirit. It's the exact same process inside of the enzyme formula. We're fermenting and creating a specific medium and then extracted enzymes.  No chemicals are used in the extraction process. So, you just get the pure working enzymes to deliver an incredible result.   What happens if I don't have the protease in my body to break down the all the protein that I'm ingesting? Gas Bloating Skin problems Brain fog The reason? Because you're feeding bad bacteria who are producing a variety of endotoxins inside the body that are interrupting your natural activity. Resources: Learn More about Organixx Enzymes 17 Shop Organixx Enzymes 17 Proteolytic Enzymes What Is the pH of the Stomach? National Center for Health Statistics Digestive Diseases Statistics for the United States Collagens: Hype or Healthy – Episode 15 Proteolytic Enzymes: What They Are & Why Your Body Needs Them to Live Why You Need Enzymes for Good Digestion & Health (+ 8 Signs You May Have an Enzyme Deficiency) Enzymes: Often Overlooked, but Critically Important  

College Commons
Rabbi Sergio Bergman: World Union for Progressive Judaism

College Commons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 21:51


Leading diverse progressive Judaism around the globe. Born in Buenos Aires in 1962, Rabbi Bergman holds a Bachelor's degree in Biochemistry and Pharmaceutics from the University of Buenos Aires, and three Master's degrees: in Education from The Hebrew University, in Hebrew Letters from Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion, Jerusalem, and in Jewish Studies from the Jewish Theological Seminary, Jerusalem. He was ordained at the Latin American Rabbinical Seminary of Buenos Aires in 1992, and HUC-JIR in Jerusalem in 1993. He is a member of the Central Conference of American Rabbi (CCAR) and a graduate of the Jewish Agency's Jerusalem Fellows program. Founder of the Arlene Fern Community School in Buenos Aires, Rabbi Bergman is well-known for his innovative and inspirational socio-educational and religious projects with Fundación Judaica. He serves as Rabbi at Templo Libertad, Argentina's first Synagogue. Rabbi Bergman began his career as a community leader at Emanu El, epicenter of Argentina's Reform Movement. In 2011, he became the first rabbi ever elected to public office in Argentina and served as representative of the City of Buenos Aires. In 2013, he was elected to represent the city at the nation's congress and in 2015, President Mauricio Macri named him Minister of the Environment and Sustainable Development, a position he held until the end of President Macri's term in 2019. Named one of the world's 100 most influential leaders in the fight against climate change, Rabbi Bergman has received numerous international distinctions and awards. He has authored seven books, is a distinguished speaker on issues of social justice and human rights, and a strong exponent of civil discourse. Rabbi Bergman is honored to have been appointed President of the World Union for Progressive Judaism, beginning in June, 2020. He is married and has four children.

Learnings from Leaders: the P&G Alumni Podcast
Keila Lazardi, Revlon Chief Scientific Officer

Learnings from Leaders: the P&G Alumni Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 44:57


“With so much uncertainty, all of us are now more aware, focused and socially conscious. We are going to do wonders with that.” Keila Lazardi is the Chief Scientific Officer of Revlon, responsible for global product innovation and strategies — across technologies and categories including skin care, color cosmetics, nail care, hair care, fine fragrances and deodorants. With 25 years of global experience in CPG & Health, she has an exceptional track record of delivering breakthrough innovation. Prior to leading at Revlon, Keila served as e.l.f. Cosmetic's VP of R&D, and previously held senior technical roles at Schiff Nutrition, Reckitt Benckiser, and P&G, where she got her start - in paper, hair, fabric and home care categories. Keila received her PhD in Biochemistry from the Venezuelan Institute of Scientific Research and a Masters in Biology from Universidad Central de Venezuela. You'll enjoy this candid conversation about the need for career transparency, authenticity, and perseverance - as well as a very optimistic take for the times that we live in.

Intelligent Design the Future
Francis Collins's Pseudogenes: An Icon of Evolution Now in Crisis

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 8:50


On this classic ID the Future, Casey Luskin discusses how theistic Darwinists Francis Collins and Karl Giberson rely on the argument that pseudogenes are junk, “broken DNA.” The pseudogene is their centerpiece evidence for common descent and macroevolution in their book The Language of Science and Faith. This leaves them hard-pressed as researchers discover more and more functions for non-coding DNA, including pseudogenes. Source

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.08.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 59:38


Raspberries, ellagic acid reveal benefits in two studies Oregon State University, October 1, 2021.    Articles that appeared recently in the Journal of Berry Research report that raspberries and compounds present in the fruit could help support healthy body mass and motor function, including balance, coordination and strength.   In one study, Neil Shay and colleagues at Oregon State University fed mice a high fat, high sugar diet plus one of the following: raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate, raspberry fruit powder, raspberry seed extract, ellagic acid (a polyphenol that occurs in a relatively high amount in raspberries), raspberry ketone, or a combination of raspberry ketone and ellagic acid. Additional groups of animals received a high fat, high sugar diet alone or a low fat diet.   While mice that received the high fat and sugar diet alone experienced a significant increase in body mass, the addition of raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate or ellagic acid plus raspberry ketone helped prevent this effect. Of note, mice that received raspberry juice concentrate experienced gains similar to those of animals given a low fat diet. "We hope that the findings from this study can help guide the design of future clinical trials," Dr Shay stated.   In another study, Barbara Shukitt-Hale, PhD, and her associates at Tufts University's Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging gave 19 month old rats a control diet or a diet enhanced with raspberry extract for 11 weeks. Psychomotor behavior was assessed during week 7 and cognitive testing was conducted during weeks 9-10.   Animals that received raspberry performed better on psychomotor coordination and balance, and had better muscle tone, strength and stamina than those that received a control diet. "These results may have important implications for healthy aging," stated Dr Shukitt-Hale. "While further research in humans is necessary, animal model studies are helpful in identifying deficits associated with normal aging."       Massage doesn't just make muscles feel better, it makes them heal faster and stronger Harvard University, October 6, 2021 Massage has been used to treat sore, injured muscles for more than 3,000 years, and today many athletes swear by massage guns to rehabilitate their bodies. But other than making people feel good, do these "mechanotherapies" actually improve healing after severe injury? According to a new study from researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the answer is "yes." Using a custom-designed robotic system to deliver consistent and tunable compressive forces to mice's leg muscles, the team found that this mechanical loading (ML) rapidly clears immune cells called neutrophils out of severely injured muscle tissue. This process also removed inflammatory cytokinesreleased by neutrophils from the muscles, enhancing the process of muscle fiber regeneration. The research is published in Science Translational Medicine. "Lots of people have been trying to study the beneficial effects of massage and other mechanotherapies on the body, but up to this point it hadn't been done in a systematic, reproducible way. Our work shows a very clear connection between mechanical stimulation and immune function. This has promise for regenerating a wide variety of tissues including bone, tendon, hair, and skin, and can also be used in patients with diseases that prevent the use of drug-based interventions," said first author Bo Ri Seo, Ph.D., who is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the lab of Core Faculty member Dave Mooney, Ph.D. at the Wyss Institute and SEAS. Seo and her coauthors started exploring the effects of mechanotherapy on injured tissues in mice several years ago, and found that it doubled the rate of muscle regeneration and reduced tissue scarring over the course of two weeks. Excited by the idea that mechanical stimulation alone can foster regeneration and enhance muscle function, the team decided to probe more deeply into exactly how that process worked in the body, and to figure out what parameters would maximize healing. They teamed up with soft robotics experts in the Harvard Biodesign Lab, led by Wyss Associate Faculty member Conor Walsh, Ph.D., to create a small device that used sensors and actuators to monitor and control the force applied to the limb of a mouse. " The device we created allows us to precisely control parameters like the amount and frequency of force applied, enabling a much more systematic approach to understanding tissue healing than would be possible with a manual approach," said co-second author Christopher Payne, Ph.D., a former Postdoctoral Fellow at the Wyss Institute and the Harvard Biodesign Lab who is now a Robotics Engineer at Viam, Inc.  Once the device was ready, the team experimented with applying force to mice's leg muscles via a soft silicone tip and used ultrasound to get a look at what happened to the tissue in response. They observed that the muscles experienced a strain of between 10-40%, confirming that the tissues were experiencing mechanical force. They also used those ultrasound imaging data to develop and validate a computational model that could predict the amount of tissue strain under different loading forces. They then applied consistent, repeated force to injured muscles for 14 days. While both treated and untreated muscles displayed a reduction in the amount of damaged muscle fibers, the reduction was more pronounced and the cross-sectional area of the fibers was larger in the treated muscle, indicating that treatment had led to greater repair and strength recovery. The greater the force applied during treatment, the stronger the injured muscles became, confirming that mechanotherapy improves muscle recovery after injury. But how? Evicting neutrophils to enhance regeneration To answer that question, the scientists performed a detailed biological assessment, analyzing a wide range of inflammation-related factors called cytokines and chemokines in untreated vs. treated muscles. A subset of cytokines was dramatically lower in treated muscles after three days of mechanotherapy, and these cytokines are associated with the movement of immune cells called neutrophils, which play many roles in the inflammation process. Treated muscles also had fewer neutrophils in their tissue than untreated muscles, suggesting that the reduction in cytokines that attract them had caused the decrease in neutrophil infiltration. The team had a hunch that the force applied to the muscle by the mechanotherapy effectively squeezed the neutrophils and cytokines out of the injured tissue. They confirmed this theory by injecting fluorescent molecules into the muscles and observing that the movement of the molecules was more significant with force application, supporting the idea that it helped to flush out the muscle tissue. To pick apart what effect the neutrophils and their associated cytokines have on regenerating muscle fibers, the scientists performed in vitro studies in which they grew muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) in a medium in which neutrophils had previously been grown. They found that the number of MPCs increased, but the rate at which they differentiated (developed into other cell types) decreased, suggesting that neutrophil-secreted factors stimulate the growth of muscle cells, but the prolonged presence of those factors impairs the production of new muscle fibers. "Neutrophils are known to kill and clear out pathogens and damaged tissue, but in this study we identified their direct impacts on muscle progenitor cell behaviors," said co-second author Stephanie McNamara, a former Post-Graduate Fellow at the Wyss Institute who is now an M.D.-Ph.D. student at Harvard Medical School (HMS). "While the inflammatory response is important for regeneration in the initial stages of healing, it is equally important that inflammation is quickly resolved to enable the regenerative processes to run its full course." Seo and her colleagues then turned back to their in vivo model and analyzed the types of muscle fibers in the treated vs. untreated mice 14 days after injury. They found that type IIX fibers were prevalent in healthy muscle and treated muscle, but untreated injured muscle contained smaller numbers of type IIX fibers and increased numbers of type IIA fibers. This difference explained the enlarged fiber size and greater force production of treated muscles, as IIX fibers produce more force than IIA fibers. Finally, the team homed in on the optimal amount of time for neutrophil presence in injured muscle by depleting neutrophils in the mice on the third day after injury. The treated mice's muscles showed larger fiber size and greater strength recovery than those in untreated mice, confirming that while neutrophils are necessary in the earliest stages of injury recovery, getting them out of the injury site early leads to improved muscle regeneration. "These findings are remarkable because they indicate that we can influence the function of the body's immune system in a drug-free, non-invasive way," said Walsh, who is also the Paul A. Maeder Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at SEAS and whose group is experienced in developing wearable technology for diagnosing and treating disease. "This provides great motivation for the development of external, mechanical interventions to help accelerate and improve muscle and tissue healing that have the potential to be rapidly translated to the clinic." The team is continuing to investigate this line of research with multiple projects in the lab. They plan to validate this mechanotherpeutic approach in larger animals, with the goal of being able to test its efficacy on humans. They also hope to test it on different types of injuries, age-related muscle loss, and muscle performance enhancement. "The fields of mechanotherapy and immunotherapy rarely interact with each other, but this work is a testament to how crucial it is to consider both physical and biological elements when studying and working to improve human health," said Mooney, who is the corresponding author of the paper and the Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS. "The idea that mechanics influence cell and tissue function was ridiculed until the last few decades, and while scientists have made great strides in establishing acceptance of this fact, we still know very little about how that process actually works at the organ level. This research has revealed a previously unknown type of interplay between mechanobiology and immunology that is critical for muscle tissue healing, in addition to describing a new form of mechanotherapy that potentially could be as potent as chemical or gene therapies, but much simpler and less invasive," said Wyss Founding Director Don Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., who is also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at (HMS) and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children's Hospital, as well as Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS.   Vitamin E could help protect older men from pneumonia University of Helsinki (Finland), October 7 2021.    An article that appeared in Clinical Interventions in Aging reported a protective role for vitamin E against pneumonia in older men.   For the current investigation, Dr Harri Hemilä of the University of Helsinki, Finland analyzed data from the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Cancer Prevention Study conducted in Finland. The trial included 29,133 men between the ages of 50 to 69 years who smoked at least five cigarettes daily upon enrollment. Participants received alpha tocopherol (vitamin E), beta carotene, both supplements, or a placebo for five to eight years.   The current study was limited to 7,469 ATBC participants who started smoking at age 21 or older. Among this group, supplementation with vitamin E was associated with a 35% lower risk of developing pneumonia in comparison with those who did not receive the vitamin.  Light smokers who engaged in leisure time exercise had a 69% lower risk compared with unsupplemented members of this subgroup. The risk in this subgroup of developing pneumonia by age 74 was 12.9%.   Among the one-third of the current study's population who quit smoking for a median period of two years, there was a 72% lower risk of pneumonia in association with vitamin E supplementation. In this group, exercisers who received vitamin E experienced an 81% lower pneumonia risk.   Dr Hemilä observed that the benefit for vitamin E in this study was strongest for older subjects—a group at higher risk of pneumonia.   "The current analysis of individual-level data suggests that trials on vitamin E and pneumonia on nonsmoking elderly males are warranted," he concluded.       Toxic fatty acids to blame for brain cell death after injury New York University, October 7, 2021 Cells that normally nourish healthy brain cells called neurons release toxic fatty acids after neurons are damaged, a new study in rodents shows. This phenomenon is likely the driving factor behind most, if not all, diseases that affect brain function, as well as the natural breakdown of brain cells seen in aging, researchers say. Previous research has pointed to astrocytes—a star-shaped glial cell of the central nervous system—as the culprits behind cell death seen in Parkinson's disease and dementia, among other neurodegenerative diseases. While many experts believed that these cells released a neuron-killing molecule to "clear away" damaged brain cells, the identity of this toxin has until now remained a mystery. Led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, the new investigation provides what they say is the first evidence that tissue damage prompts astrocytes to produce two kinds of fats, long-chain saturated free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholines. These fats then trigger cell death in damaged neurons, the electrically active cells that send messages throughout nerve tissue. Publishing Oct. 6 in the journal Nature, the study also showed that when researchers blocked fatty acid formation in mice, 75 percent of neurons survived compared with 10 percent when the fatty acids were allowed to form. The researchers' earlier work showed that brain cells continued to function when shielded from astrocyte attacks.  "Our findings show that the toxic fatty acids produced by astrocytes play a critical role in brain cell death and provide a promising new target for treating, and perhaps even preventing, many neurodegenerative diseases," says study co-senior author Shane Liddelow, Ph.D. Liddelow, an assistant professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Physiology at NYU Langone Health, adds that targeting these fats instead of the cells that produce them may be a safer approach to treating neurodegenerative diseasesbecause astrocytes feed nerve cells and clear away their waste. Stopping them from working altogether could interfere with healthy brain function. Although it remains unclear why astrocytes produce these toxins, it is possible they evolved to destroy damaged cells before they can harm their neighbors, says Liddelow. He notes that while healthy cells are not harmed by the toxins, neurons become susceptible to the damaging effects when they are injured, mutated, or infected by prions, the contagious, misfolded proteins that play a major role in mad cow disease and similar illnesses. Perhaps in chronic diseases like dementia, this otherwise helpful process goes off track and becomes a problem, the study authors say. For the investigation, researchers analyzed the molecules released by astrocytes collected from rodents. They also genetically engineered some groups of mice to prevent the normal production of the toxic fats and looked to see whether neuron death occurred after an acute injury. "Our results provide what is likely the most detailed molecular map to date of how tissue damage leads to brain cell death, enabling researchers to better understand why neurons die in all kinds of diseases," says Liddelow, also an assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at NYU Langone. Liddelow cautions that while the findings are promising, the genetic techniques used to block the enzyme that produces toxic fatty acids in mice are not ready for use in humans. As a result, the researchers next plan is to explore safe and effective ways to interfere with the release of the toxins in human patients. Liddelow and his colleagues had previously shown these neurotoxic astrocytes in the brains of patients with Parkinson's, Huntington's disease, and multiple sclerosis, among other diseases.   Clinical trial for nicotinamide riboside: Vitamin safely boosts levels of important cell metabolite linked to multiple health benefits University of Iowa Health Care, October 3, 2021   In the first controlled clinical trial of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a newly discovered form of Vitamin B3, researchers have shown that the compound is safe for humans and increases levels of a cell metabolite that is critical for cellular energy production and protection against stress and DNA damage.   Studies in mice have shown that boosting the levels of this cell metabolite -- known as NAD+ -- can produce multiple health benefits, including resistance to weight gain, improved control of blood sugar and cholesterol, reduced nerve damage, and longer lifespan. Levels of NAD+ diminish with age, and it has been suggested that loss of this metabolite may play a role in age-related health decline.   These findings in animal studies have spurred people to take commercially available NR supplements designed to boost NAD+. However, these over-the-counter supplements have not undergone clinical trials to see if they work in people.   The new research, reported in the journal Nature Communications, was led by Charles Brenner, PhD, professor and Roy J. Carver Chair of Biochemistry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in collaboration with colleagues at Queens University Belfast and ChromaDex Corp. (NASDAQ: CDXC), which supplied the NR used in the trial. Brenner is a consultant for ChromaDex. He also is co-founder and Chief Scientific Adviser of ProHealthspan, which sells NR supplements under the trade name Tru NIAGEN®.   The human trial involved six men and six women, all healthy. Each participant received single oral doses of 100 mg, 300 mg, or 1,000 mg of NR in a different sequence with a seven-day gap between doses. After each dose, blood and urine samples were collected and analyzed by Brenner's lab to measure various NAD+ metabolites in a process called metabolomics. The trial showed that the NR vitamin increased NAD+ metabolism by amounts directly related to the dose, and there were no serious side effects with any of the doses.   "This trial shows that oral NR safely boosts human NAD+ metabolism," Brenner says. "We are excited because everything we are learning from animal systems indicates that the effectiveness of NR depends on preserving and/or boosting NAD+ and related compounds in the face of metabolic stresses. Because the levels of supplementation in mice that produce beneficial effects are achievable in people, it appears than health benefits of NR will be translatable to humans safely."   The next step will be to study the effect of longer duration NR supplementation on NAD+ metabolism in healthy adults, but Brenner also has plans to test the effects of NR in people with diseases and health conditions, including elevated cholesterol, obesity and diabetes, and people at risk for chemotherapeutic peripheral neuropathy.   Prior to the formal clinical trial, Brenner conducted a pilot human study -- on himself. In 2004, he had discovered that NR is a natural product found in milk and that there is pathway to convert NR to NAD+ in people. More than a decade of research on NR metabolic pathways and health effects in mice and rats had convinced him that NR supplementation had real promise to improve human health and wellness. After consulting with UI's institutional review board, he conducted an experiment in which he took 1 gram of NR once a day for seven days, and his team analyzed blood and urine samples using mass spectrometry. The experiment showed that Brenner's blood NAD+ increased by about 2.7 times. In addition, though he reported immediate sensitivity to flushing with the related compound niacin, he did not experience any side effects taking NR.   The biggest surprise from his metabolomic analysis was an increase in a metabolite called NAAD, which was multiplied by 45 times, from trace levels to amounts in the micromolar range that were easily detectable.   "While this was unexpected, I thought it might be useful," Brenner says. "NAD+ is an abundant metabolite and it is sometimes hard to see the needle move on levels of abundant metabolites. But when you can look at a low-abundance metabolite that goes from undetectable to easily detectable, there is a great signal to noise ratio, meaning that NAAD levels could be a useful biomarker for tracking increases in NAD+ in human trials."   Brenner notes this was a case of bidirectional translational science; having learned something from the initial human experiment, his team was able to return to laboratory mice to explore the unexpected NAAD finding in more detail.   Brenner's mouse study showed that NAAD is formed from NR and confirmed that NAAD levels are a strong biomarker for increased NAD+ metabolism. The experiments also revealed more detail about NAD+ metabolic pathways.   In particular, the researchers compared the ability of all three NAD+ precursor vitamins -- NR, niacin, and nicotinamide -- to boost NAD+ metabolism and stimulate the activity of certain enzymes, which have been linked to longevity and healthbenefits. The study showed for the first time that oral NR is superior to nicotinamide, which is better than niacin in terms of the total amount of NAD+ produced at an equivalent dose. NR was also the best of the three in stimulating the activity of sirtuin enzymes. However, in this case, NR was the best at stimulating sirtuin-like activities, followed by niacin, followed by nicotinamide.   The information from the mouse study subsequently helped Brenner's team design the formal clinical trial. In addition to showing that NR boosts NAD+ in humans without adverse effects, the trial confirmed that NAAD is a highly sensitive biomarker of NAD+ supplementation in people.   "Now that we have demonstrated safety in this small clinical trial, we are in a position to find out if the health benefits that we have seen in animals can be reproduced in people," says Brenner, who also is co-director of the Obesity Research and Education Initiative, professor of internal medicine, and a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center at the UI.   Protecting the ozone layer is delivering vast health benefits Montreal Protocol will spare Americans from 443 million skin cancer cases National Center for Atmospheric Research, October 7, 2021 An international agreement to protect the ozone layer is expected to prevent 443 million cases of skin cancer and 63 million cataract cases for people born in the United States through the end of this century, according to new research. The research team, by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), ICF Consulting, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), focused on the far-reaching impacts of a landmark 1987 treaty known as the Montreal Protocol and later amendments that substantially strengthened it. The agreement phased out the use of chemicals such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that destroy ozone in the stratosphere. Stratospheric ozone shields the planet from harmful levels of the Sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation, protecting life on Earth. To measure the long-term effects of the Montreal Protocol, the scientists developed a computer modeling approach that enabled them to look to both the past and the future by simulating the treaty's impact on Americans born between 1890 and 2100. The modeling revealed the treaty's effect on stratospheric ozone, the associated reductions in ultraviolet radiation, and the resulting health benefits.  In addition to the number of skin cancer and cataract cases that were avoided, the study also showed that the treaty, as most recently amended, will prevent approximately 2.3 million skin cancer deaths in the U.S. “It's very encouraging,” said NCAR scientist Julia Lee-Taylor, a co-author of the study. “It shows that, given the will, the nations of the world can come together to solve global environmental problems.” The study, funded by the EPA, was published in ACS Earth and Space Chemistry. NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Mounting concerns over the ozone layer Scientists in the 1970s began highlighting the threat to the ozone layer when they found that CFCs, used as refrigerants and in other applications, release chlorine atoms in the stratosphere that set off chemical reactions that destroy ozone. Concerns mounted the following decade with the discovery of an Antarctic ozone hole. The loss of stratospheric ozone would be catastrophic, as high levels of UV radiation have been linked to certain types of skin cancer, cataracts, and immunological disorders. The ozone layer also protects terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, as well as agriculture. Policy makers responded to the threat with the 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, in which nations agreed to curtail the use of certain ozone-destroying substances. Subsequent amendments strengthened the treaty by expanding the list of ozone-destroying substances (such as halons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons, or HCFCs) and accelerating the timeline for phasing out their use. The amendments were based on Input from the scientific community, including a number of NCAR scientists, that were summarized in quadrennial Ozone Assessment reports. To quantify the impacts of the treaty, the research team built a model known as the Atmospheric and Health Effects Framework. This model, which draws on various data sources about ozone, public health, and population demographics, consists of five computational steps. These simulate past and future emissions of ozone-destroying substances, the impacts of those substances on stratospheric ozone, the resulting changes in ground-level UV radiation, the U.S. population's exposure to UV radiation, and the incidence and mortality of health effects resulting from the exposure. The results showed UV radiation levels returning to 1980 levels by the mid-2040s under the amended treaty. In contrast, UV levels would have continued to increase throughout this century if the treaty had not been amended, and they would have soared far higher without any treaty at all.  Even with the amendments, the simulations show excess cases of cataracts and various types of skin cancer beginning to occur with the onset of ozone depletion and peaking decades later as the population exposed to the highest UV levels ages. Those born between 1900 and 2040 experience heightened cases of skin cancer and cataracts, with the worst health outcomes affecting those born between about 1950 and 2000. However, the health impacts would have been far more severe without the treaty, with cases of skin cancer and cataracts rising at an increasingly rapid rate through the century.  “We peeled away from disaster,” Lee-Taylor said. “What is eye popping is what would have happened by the end of this century if not for the Montreal Protocol. By 2080, the amount of UV has tripled. After that, our calculations for the health impacts start to break down because we're getting so far into conditions that have never been seen before.” The research team also found that more than half the treaty's health benefits could be traced to the later amendments rather than the original 1987 Montreal Protocol. Overall, the treaty prevented more than 99% of potential health impacts that would have otherwise occurred from ozone destruction. This showed the importance of the treaty's flexibility in adjusting to evolving scientific knowledge, the authors said. The researchers focused on the U.S. because of ready access to health data and population projections. Lee-Taylor said that the specific health outcomes in other countries may vary, but the overall trends would be similar. “The treaty had broad global benefits,” she said.     What is Boron? The trace mineral boron provides profound anti-cancer effects, in addition to maintaining stronger bones. Life Extension, September 2021 Boron is a trace mineral found in the earth's crust and in water. Its importance in human health has been underestimated. Boron has been shown to have actions against specific types of malignancies, such as: Cervical cancer: The country Turkey has an extremely low incidence of cervical cancer, and scientists partially attribute this to its boron-rich soil.1 When comparing women who live in boron-rich regions versus boron-poor regions of Turkey, not a single woman living in the boron-rich regions had any indication of cervical cancer.2(The mean dietary intake of boron for women in this group was 8.41 mg/day.)  Boron interferes with the life cycle of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which is a contributing factor in approximately 95% of all cervical cancers.1  Considering that HPV viruses are increasingly implicated in head and neck cancers,3,4 supplementation with this ultra-low-cost mineral could have significant benefits in protecting against this malignancy that is increasing in prevalence. Lung cancer: A study conducted at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1995 and 2005 found that increased boron intake was associated with a lower risk of lung cancer in postmenopausal women who were taking hormone replacement therapy. Prostate cancer: Studies point to boron's ability to inhibit the growth and spread of prostate cancer cells.  In one study, when mice were exposed to boric acid, their tumors shrank by as much as 38%.6 One analysis found that increased dietary boron intake was associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer.7 Several human and animal studies have confirmed the important connection between boron and bone health. Boron prevents calcium loss,8 while also alleviating the bone problems associated with magnesium and vitamin D deficiency.9 All of these nutrients help maintain bone density. A study in female rats revealed the harmful effects a deficiency in boron has on bones, including:10 Decreased bone volume fraction, a measure of bone strength, Decreased thickness of the bone's spongy inner layer, and Decreased maximum force needed to break the femur. And in a study of post-menopausal women, supplementation with3 mg of boron per day prevented calcium loss and bone demineralization by reducing urinary excretion of both calcium and magnesium.8 In addition to its bone and anti-cancer benefits, there are nine additional reasons boron is an important trace mineral vital for health and longevity. It has been shown to:1 Greatly improve wound healing, Beneficially impact the body's use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D, Boost magnesium absorption, Reduce levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), Raise levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, Protect against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity, Improve the brain's electrical activity, which may explain its benefits for cognitive performance, and short-term memory in the elderly, Influence the formation and activity of key biomolecules, such as S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), and Potentially help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents. Because the amount of boron varies in the soil, based on geographical location, obtaining enough boron through diet alone can be difficult. Supplementing with low-cost boron is an effective way to maintain adequate levels of this overlooked micronutrient.

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
WHO recommends use of first ever malaria vaccine

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 5:47


Dr Anne Moore, Senior Lecturer in Biochemistry at UCC, discusses the WHO's decision to recommend a malaria vaccine for the first time.

Molecule to Market: Inside the outsourcing space
The life science dating agent

Molecule to Market: Inside the outsourcing space

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 46:22


In this episode of Molecule to Market, you'll go inside the outsourcing space of the global drug development sector with Martino Picardo, Chairman at Discovery Park. Your host, Raman Sehgal, discusses the pharmaceutical and biotechnology supply chain with Martino, covering: His ‘three careers' over the last few decades, mainly spent translating science into commercial entities that make a difference. Building Stevenage Bioscience Catalyst from the ground-up from the middle of the golden triangle through relationships, partnerships and networking. The ‘holy trilogy' of building incubators from a blank sheet to successful, thriving communities. Creating a life science village from a transitioning Pfizer R&D site in the UK into an ecosystem with 160 companies. Never being a better time to work in life sciences and for entrepreneurs to thrive in the ecosystem. Martino is Chairman of Discovery Park and an Independent Consultant. With a a PhD in Biochemistry, Martino spent almost a decade with Amersham International after his time in academia. He was the first CEO of the Stevenage Bioscience Catalyst an ambitious concept to develop an Incubator and Accelerator, which is now as world class Science Park. A former Entrepreneur in Residence at UMIP, Manchester and with the NHS, Martino is also on Board of BIONOW, and is Chairman of VisusNano Ltd and Evidential Ltd. Please subscribe, tell your industry colleagues and join us in celebrating and promoting the value and importance of the global life science outsourcing space. We'd also appreciate a positive rating! Molecule to Market is sponsored and funded by ramarketing. An international content, design and digital agency that helps companies in life sciences, get noticed.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Treating Covid-19: Ronapreve explained

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 9:43


The antibody drug Ronapreve is being reviewed by Medsafe to treat covid-19 patients in New Zealand. Described as an antibody cocktail, the World Health Organisation is recommending people who are most at risk of being hospitalised, and those with severe or critical Covid-19, who lack their own antibody response be treated with Ronapreve. It's already been cleared for use in the UK. Also known as Regeneron, it was previously used by former US president Donald Trump. Kathryn Ryan speaks with Infectious Diseases Physician and Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Otago, Professor Kurt Krause, who says these antibodies should be given early in the course of Covid to be most effective.

Hypermobility Happy Hour
35 - Miss America (Camille Schrier) Discusses Life as a Pharmacy Student with EDS

Hypermobility Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 79:14


Camille Schrier was diagnosed with classical Ehlers-Danlos as a child and went on to win the title of Miss America. She graduated with honors from Virginia Tech in 2018 with dual Bachelor of Science degrees in Biochemistry and Systems Biology. Camille is currently pursuing a Doctor of Pharmacy degree at Virginia Commonwealth University. In 2019 Camille earned the title Miss Virginia after performing a science experiment (the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide) as her onstage talent. In December 2019, Camille was named Miss America 2020, again after showcasing her science skills. Camille has also been featured on national and international media outlets including The Today Show, CNN, BBC, The Kelly Clarkson Show, CBS This Morning, Inside Edition, The Weather Channel, Southern Living, Canada's CTV, Germany's RTL, and many more. She also partnered with PBS to produce a web series called Cooking up Science with Miss America. Camille Schrier website: https://www.camilleschrier.com/ YouTube clip of Miss Virginia science experiment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fsYUYja7O4A Instagram: @CamilleSchrier Questions? Comments? Suggestions for future episodes? Email hypermobilityhappyhour@gmail.com

BBC Inside Science
Covid vaccine boosters; why we don't have a tail; cassowary domestication; Royal Society Science book prize shortlist

BBC Inside Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 33:13


Booster vaccines are now being offered to people in England most at risk of Covid, who had their second jab at least 6 months ago. Most people are getting an mRNA vaccine as a booster, mainly the Pfizer one. Dr Andrew Ustianowski, national clinical lead for the UK COVID Vaccine Research Programme, and infectious diseases consultant in Manchester, explains why people are not being offered new vaccines, specifically tweaked to prevent the current highly transmissible delta variant. And he talks about a trial with a new vaccine that works against more than just the spike protein. Why don't we have a tail? We share that absence with our primate cousins, the great apes. What made the difference genetically speaking has eluded scientists, until now. Professor Jef Boeke of NYU Langone Health tells Gaia Vince why it was a change in just one gene that caused us to lose our tail. New research just published in PNAS pushes back the origins of farming by thousands of years. Professor Kristina Douglass of Penn State University and team studied 18 000 year old eggshells of cassowaries, found in human shelters in New Guinea. She explains how the finds suggest that these Pleistocene people had domesticated these large flight less birds. And six authors this week learned that their books have made the shortlist of the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize for 2021. Chair of the judges, Luke O'Neill, Professor of Biochemistry at Trinity College Dublin, tells Gaia how the panel made their choices from the 350 books entered.

Deep State Radio
Head Case

Deep State Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 55:32


From Vietnam to Vienna, reported cases of Havana Syndrome are on the rise. Diplomats, intelligence officials and their families are experiencing debilitating symptoms including headaches, dizziness, nausea and memory loss. Dr. James Giordano, Professor of Neurology and Biochemistry at Georgetown University Medical Center, has been investigating Havana Syndrome since the first cases were reported and discusses what we know, and what we still need to learn, with Jeanne Meserve. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/deepstateradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Deep State Radio
Head Case

Deep State Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 55:32


From Vietnam to Vienna, reported cases of Havana Syndrome are on the rise. Diplomats, intelligence officials and their families are experiencing debilitating symptoms including headaches, dizziness, nausea and memory loss. Dr. James Giordano, Professor of Neurology and Biochemistry at Georgetown University Medical Center, has been investigating Havana Syndrome since the first cases were reported and discusses what we know, and what we still need to learn, with Jeanne Meserve. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/deepstateradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Thomistic Institute
Chance and Indeterminism in Biochemistry and Medicinal Chemistry | Prof. Tony Barbosa

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 41:28


This talk was delivered in June 2021 at the Third Annual Thomistic Philosophy and Natural Science Symposium, "Chance and Indeterminacy in the Natural World." For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. Prof. Tony Barbosa is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Ave Maria University. He earned his B.S. in Chemistry from Providence College, and received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from the University of Rochester. He has done extensive research into the chemistry and biochemistry surrounding new pharmaceuticals and treatments for various diseases.

The Ripple Effect Podcast
Episode 355: The Ripple Effect Podcast (Dr. Tom Cowan & Dr. Jessica Rose | Rethinking Everything You Thought You Knew)

The Ripple Effect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 98:30


Dr. Tom Cowan is a researcher, and author who has written many incredibly fascinating books that will challenge the way you look at the world, including the best seller "The Contagion Myth".  Dr. Cowan is also the host of the Conversations With Dr. Cowan podcast.Thomas S. Cowan, M.D., attended Duke University, graduating in 1977 Summa Cum Laud with a degree in biology. He then served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Swaziland, Africa, from 1977 to 1980, teaching gardening in a secondary school. It was in Swaziland where he encountered the work of Weston Price and Rudolf Steiner, two of the greatest influences on his career. After the Peace Corps he attended medical school in his home state of Michigan at the Michigan State College of Human Medicine. After graduating in 1984, he did an internship in family practice in Johnson City, New York. From 1985 until 2019. Dr. Cowan had a general medical practice, first in upstate New York, then for 17 years in Peterborough, N.H., and for 17 years in San Francisco, until his recent retirement from active practice. He formerly served as vice president of the Physicians Association for Anthroposophical Medicine and was a founding board member of the Weston A. Price Foundation. He continues to serve as its vice president.Dr. Cowan has given countless lectures and workshops throughout the U.S. on a variety of subjects in health and medicine. He is the author of six books. Five of these books spent time on the Amazon and/or Barnes & Noble bestseller lists, and each was ranked No. 1 in their respective categories, often for many months. Dr. Jessica Rose is an artist, musician, mathematician, professional surfer, biologist, researcher, data analysis, and one of the most interesting & honest people I have ever met. Dr. Rose has a Post Doc in Biochemistry at Technion Institute of Technology, Post Doc in Molecular Biology at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PhD in Computational Biology at Bar Ilan University, Master's in Medicine (Immunology) at Memorial University of Newfoundland, BSc in Applied Mathematics at Memorial University of Newfoundland. DR. THOMAS COWAN Website: https://drtomcowan.com/Website: https://www.DrCowansGarden.com/ Podcast: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh4jE8jPfd9H02FCAtR0muwFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/drcowansgarden/ Website: https://FourFoldHealing.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fourfoldhealing Dr. JESSICA ROSEWebsite: https://i-do-not-consent.netlify.app/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMY2tdFNkRUFELLOWSHIP donation link: https://ipaknowledge.org/joshua-kuntz-research-fellowship.phpMusic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HCeHbNjLUkReport on the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) of the COVID-19 Messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) Biologicals: https://www.publichealthpolicyjournal.com/clinical-and-translational-researchTHE RIPPLE EFFECT PODCASTWEBSITE: http://TheRippleEffectPodcast.comPATREON: https://www.patreon.com/TheRippleEffectPodcastPayPal: https://www.PayPal.com/paypalme/RvTheory6MERCH Store: http://www.TheRippleEffectPodcastMERCH.comROKFIN: https://rokfin.com/RippleEffectFringe.FM: https://fringe.fm/shows/the-ripple-effect-podcast/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/RvTHEORY6ODYSEE: https://odysee.com/@therippleeffectpodcast:dBITCHUTE: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/6bOtjURD1rds/FLOTE: https://flote.app/trepodcastRUMBLE: https://rumble.com/c/c-745505PARLER: https://parler.com/#/user/RvTheory6FACEBOOK: http://on.fb.me/1KaM0OgTWITTER: https://twitter.com/RvTheory6INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/rvtheory6/SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/4lpFhHI6CqdZKW0QDyOicJGOOGLE PLAY/PODCASTS: https://podcasts.google.com/search/the%20ripple%20effect%20podcastiTUNES: http://apple.co/1xjWmlFSTITCHER RADIO: http://bit.ly/1nWBXBYTHE UNION OF THE UNWANTEDLinkTree: https://linktr.ee/uotuwRSS FEED: https://uotuw.podbean.com/Merch Store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/union-of-the-unwanted?ref_id=22643&utm_campaign=22643&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_source=Union%2Bof%2BThe%2BUnwanted

Beyond the Platform
Dr. Trevor Kashey- Theory And Practical Application and Nutrition Science Vs Eating Behaviors

Beyond the Platform

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 77:04


In episode 29 on coaches corner, Paul is solo because Tony got attacked by an alligator while on a bike ride. He is joined by Dr. Trevor Kashey, PhD in Biochemistry and Owner of Trevor Kashey Nutrition. Dr. Kashey shares his athletic history, how he became interested in “creating superheroes” and the evolution of his coaching practice and business. They touch on the delineation of research, theory and practical application, nutrition as a science vs. eating behaviors and whether coaching and science can coexist. The big theme for the podcast was “coming to terms,” in other words, how to make sure effective communication can take place. Dr. Kashey also shares how he has grown his business over time and how his role within it has changed. Subscribe to iTunes, Soundcloud, Spotify, and Stitcher at Coaches Corner. If you like the podcast leave a review and a 5-star rating on iTunes. Share it with a friend and all over social media. Sponsors: subjectzerosupps.com -Code beyond10 for discount coachescorneru.com baconandbarbells.co -Code paul10 for discount 1-lifeinc.com

Voices In Validation
Revolutionizing Drug Production: A Shift to Continuous Manufacturing

Voices In Validation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 73:03


This week, Stacey is joined by Renee Phillips to discuss the pros and cons of transitioning to a continuous manufacturing system. Batch production is time-consuming yet remains a popular and time-tested method used in the pharma industry today - but some industry leaders, along with the FDA, have taken steps toward or are now contemplating a shift to continuous manufacturing. This means all stages of drug production run through to the final product, without a stop during its production, thus shut down of equipment between “batches” is required, which eliminates downtime.  CM  saves time and reduces the likelihood of human error, but is it realistic at this point in time? Resources for this episode: FDA issued draft guidance, Quality Considerations for Continuous Manufacturing Rogers, Luke & Jensen, Klavs F. (2019). Continuous manufacturing – the Green Chemistry promise?. The Royal Society of Chemistry. Green Chem., Volume 21, 3481-3498. Moore, Christine M. V., Garcia, Thomas P., Hausner, Douglas B., Ben-Anat, Inna. (2019) Holistic Control Strategies for Continuous Manufacturing. Pharmaceutical Engineering, May/June 2019 Srai, Jagjit Singh., Settani, Ettore., Aulakh, Parminder Kaur., Evaluating the Business Case for Continuous Manufacturing of Pharmaceuticals: A Supply Network Perspective. Continuous Pharmaceutical Processing, June 2020, 477-512 Van Arnum, Patricia. Pharma Industry Weighs in on Continuous Manufacturing. June 19, 2019 Manning, Richard., Sciacca, Rich., Continuous Manufacturing in Pharmaceuticals: Economic and Policy Issues. Bates White Economic Consulting, October 2018 About Our Guest: Renée L. Phillips is an Associate Director of Global Regulatory Affairs at Janssen Research &  Development,  LLC,  a  pharmaceutical company of  Johnson  &  Johnson.  Renée has responsibility for Chemistry Manufacturing & Controls for API's and marketed products. Previously she has held positions in Regulatory Affairs at Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies,  Wyeth  Consumer  Products,  a  small start-up pharma company, and an environmental chemistry laboratory.  Renée currently serves as an adjunct professor at Temple University School of Pharmacy where she teaches courses in good manufacturing practices and global drug registration requirements. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry from Georgian Court College and a Master of Science in Regulatory Affairs from San Diego State University. Voices in Validation brings you the best in validation and compliance topics. Voices in Validation is brought to you by IVT Network, your expert source for life science regulatory knowledge. For more information on IVT Network, check out their website at http://ivtnetwork.com. 

The Stand with Eamon Dunphy
Ep 1209: Covid-19 - Have NPHET and the Government a Winter Plan? If Not, Why Not?

The Stand with Eamon Dunphy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 41:20


Tomás Ryan talks to Eamon as the country lifts more restrictions. Tomás Ryan is Associate Professor at the School of Biochemistry & Immunology, Trinity College Dublin, and an associate of the Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience. He is also a founding member of the Independent Scientific Advocacy Group (ISAG). The Stand is proudly sponsored by Tesco. Recorded 20/9/21

The Mushroom Hour Podcast
Ep. 96: Hyphae Labs - The First Annual Oakland Psychedelic Conference (feat. Reggie, Ian and Tomás from Hyphae Labs)

The Mushroom Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 48:47


Get Your Tickets for the 1st Oakland Psychedelic Conference:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/oakland-psychedelic-conference-tickets-169188460239?ref=eios   Today on the Mushroom Hour Podcast we are beyond blessed to be joined by three members of Oakland's own Hyphae Labs, Ian Bollinger, Tomás Garret and Reggie who has joined us on the podcast previously. Inspired by early-life transformative experiences with psilocybin-containing mushrooms, Reggie has had a lifelong passion for mycology and now consults with the largest mushroom cultivators in the world. He is a also member of the Advisory Board for Decriminalize Nature and an avid activist for police reform and an ally of The Movement for Black LivesIan Bollinger is a dedicated researcher, scientist and host of the Understanding Entheogens Podcast.  Advising for harm reduction through education by working with the entheogen decriminalization movement in the SF Bay Area; Ian dedicates his time to churches, non-profits, and public benefit corporations to bring scientific insights from the growing entheogen space to the public through his writings, podcast, and outreachTomás is the head of operations for Hyphae Labs. His background is in analytical chemistry that began with food and drug testing in Wisconsin. He moved to California in 2018 and began pesticide and solvent testing for the cannabis industry.  Over the past few years he has become intertwined like mycelium with the vibrant Oakland psychedelic community.Formed by citizen scientists like these, Hyphae Labs works to connect cultivators and consumers to knowledge, data, and education that supports their community through harm reduction.  They are currently engaged with research around Tryptamine content in entheogenic organisms, providing lab and analytical support for the Psilocybin Cup. I am excited to learn more about their collective, their vision and the upcoming Oakland Psychedelic Conference.   TOPICS COVERED:   Hyphae Connection Between Ian, Tomás and Reggie Mission and Purpose of Hyphae LabsWhy is Testing Entheogenic Compounds Important?Testing Compounds in Psilocybin-Containing Mushrooms Legality of Testing Entheogens in Oakland  Connection Between Testing & Decriminalization  Wading into the Chemistry of Tryptamines  MAOIs in Mushrooms  Effects of Compounds Other than Psilocybin  The Hyphae Potency Spectrum  Inspiration & Goals of the Oakland Psychedelic Conference  Featured Speakers at the Conference  Building Community & Embracing Diversity  Future of Hyphae Labs as Psychedelics Go Mainstream  EPISODE RESOURCES:   Tickets for Oakland Psychedelic Conference: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/oakland-psychedelic-conference-tickets-169188460239?ref=eios  Oakland Hyphae: https://www.oaklandhyphae510.com/  Oakland Hyphae IG: https://www.instagram.com/oakland_hyphae/  Ian Bollinger IG: https://www.instagram.com/eyepsychonaut/  Understanding Entheogens with Ian Bollinger: https://www.critical.consulting/blog  Dictyonema (Fungus/Lichen): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dictyonema

That's Total Mom Sense
DR. ALPA PATEL: Clean Beauty That Heals Your Skin From the Inside Out

That's Total Mom Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 52:06


Dr. Alpa Patel is a pediatrician, who has retired from clinical practice, a biochemist, mother of 2, and now, CEO & CoFounder of Luvanya. After completing her Bachelors in Biochemistry, Alpa worked as a biochemist for a short time, learning to identify and separate chemicals in pharmaceutical waste for recycling, before going on to medical school and a pediatric residency. She and her husband, an Internal Medicine physician, settled in CT after marriage and started their family medical practice together. Unfortunately, during the 15 years she spent growing her medical practice and raising her two children, Alpa also dealt with rare, chronic medical conditions. After suffering for years with severe health issues, chronic illnesses, surgeries, and treatments, she was forced to close her pediatric practice over 4 years ago and move her family across the country. Once she realized that the treatments were doing more harm than good, and were also damaging her skin, she turned to researching botanicals, natural oils and ayurvedic ingredients to treat herself. By adopting a holistic lifestyle, using meditation, and nutrition Dr. Alpa regained the strength she needed. She used ayurvedic and plant based ingredients in both topical form to rejuvenate skin, as well as in homemade juices, to revive her health at the cellular level. By utilizing her biochemistry background, not only was she able to turn her skin back to life, but she was also able to formulate simple, safe skincare solutions for all of her family. That's when she knew she had something to share with the world, and there came the birth of Luvanya, a 100% clean, vegan, non – toxic skincare brand, made for the health of your skin, which combines Science with Nature for the most visible and effective results! Other than her efforts with Luvanya, Dr Alpa enjoys painting, meditating, spending time with family and spending time in nature. Meet My Guest: WEBSITE: Luvanya.com INSTAGRAM: @luvanyabeauty INSTAGRAM: @alpapatelmd FACEBOOK: /luvanyabeauty LINKEDIN: Dr. Alpa Patel Press BLUSH: Luvanya Beauty — Your Skin Deserves the Best INDEPENDENT AVENUE: Loving the Skin you're in with Luvanya GLOW & GREEN: Boss Series: Luvanya Beauty Founder: Alpa Patel Mom Haul: ABILLION: A brand new app that allows you to discover and review vegan brands, businesses and products from around the world

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
201 - Vascular Contributions to Alzheimer's Disease: July 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 22:18


Interested in how the 700km of blood vessels in the brain are linked to Alzheimer disease? Turns out there are a lot of common threads! In this episode, Elyn covers a series of clinical and preclinical papers exploring vascular risk factors, genetic risk factors like APOE, and signs of vascular damage that are linked to Alzheimer disease. Tune in for an exciting perspective on Alzheimer disease, outside of the classic amyloid cascade hypothesis!   Sections in this episode:  Clinical Studies: Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Cerebrovascular Pathology  (4:22)  Lymphatic/Glymphatic Drainage (13:48)  Preclinical Modelling (17:13)  -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1D5gk0AJn1USNw2hBXXL4MIxX_D4tF4NB/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastIf you have any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to contact us at: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more researchers is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Every episode of AMiNDR is the result of a huge team effort. Today's episode was scripted and hosted by Elyn Rowe, edited by Chihiro Abe, and reviewed by Jacques Ferreira and Ellen Koch. The wordcloud (wordart.com) was generated by Sarah Louadi and the bibliography was created by Jacques Ferreira. Big thanks to the sorting team for sorting all the papers published in July into themes for our episodes: Jacques Ferreira, Elyn Rowe, Ellen Koch, Christy Yu, Nicole Corso, Sarah Louadi, and Naila Kuhlmann. Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, and Jacques Ferreira, for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, creating bibliographies, and promotions. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

The Public Health Millennial Career Stories Podcast
070: Making Health Equity Actionable in Public Health + Healthcare with Dr. Lauren R. Powell, MPA, PhD

The Public Health Millennial Career Stories Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 96:31


Dr. Lauren R. Powell is the President & CEO Lauren R. Powell, MPA, PhD is the President & CEO of The Equitist  (a boutique health equity consulting firm helping moving health care organizations go from health equity in theory to action) as well as the Vice President for US Health Equity & Community Wellness at Takeda Pharmaceuticals. She received her Bachelors of Science in Biochemistry at Xavier University of Louisiana. She then worked in clinical settings for a few years and then got her PhD in Clinical & Population Health Research at University of Massachusetts Medical School. She got her Mid-Career Master of Public Administration at Harvard Kennedy School. She currently works as the President & CEO at The Equitist and Vice President of US Health Equity & Community Wellness. She was honored to be on the 2020 Fortune Magazine 40 Under 40 in Health Care list as well as on the the de Beaumont Foundation's inaugural 40 Under 40 in Public Health.Dr. Lauren R. Powell, MPA, PhD on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drlaurenrpowell/The Equitist Website: https://www.theequitist.coOmari on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/omari-richins-mphShownotes: thePHmillennial.com/episode70Support The Public Health Millennial: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/thephmillenialUse Code “thePHmillennial” for discount: https://thepublichealthstore.comWebsite: https://thephmillennial.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thephmillenial (@thePHmillennial)Email List: https://thephmillennial.com/signup/Support the show (http://paypal.me/thePHmillennial)

WebTalkRadio.net
Trees: Our Rooted Friends with Wojciech Grajkowski

WebTalkRadio.net

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021


My guest today is a fellow European. His name is Dr. Wojciech Grajkowski and he is from Warsaw, Poland. Wojciech and I have not met before this interview but thankfully, I discovered him online and because of his extraordinary work. He has a Master’s in Biology, a PhD in Biochemistry and presently works as a […] The post Trees: Our Rooted Friends with Wojciech Grajkowski appeared first on WebTalkRadio.net.

The Phil Ferguson Show
392 Professor Dave Explains, Super Shitty Fund

The Phil Ferguson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 94:13


Interview with Dave of the YouTube Channel "Professor Dave Explains". I learned of his channel because of the Italian grammar videos. You will love all of the Science content. Here are some of the subjects you can find in the more than 1,000 videos: Immunology, Mycology, Botany, Physics, Astronomy, General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, etc...... There are also 165 videos on Math!Investing Skeptically: Super Shitty fund from BlackRock. One fund to bind several really bad investing ideas.

Nemos News Network
The Silent War Ep. 6094: Tx Wins @ Abortion & Election Integrity, Vax Killed 20%+ of C19 Deaths

Nemos News Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 26:03


In this episode of The Silent War-  HIDDEN LAWS Enable Parents to CONTROL School BoardsPfizer Doses First Patient In Phase 2/3 Trial For Daily COVID PillVaccine Caused rogue antibodies (Antibody dependent enhancement?) involved in almost one-fifth of COVID deathsFormer Pfizer VP: "KNOWING WHAT I KNOW FROM 40 years TRAINING & PRACTISE IN TOXICOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY & PHARMACOLOGY, to participate in this extraordinary abuse of innocent children in our care can be classified in no other way than MURDER."Texas Legislature Passes Sweeping GOP Election Integrity Bill & Partial Abortion BanAll of this, and much more.Article links:https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-02337-5https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/former-pfizer-vp-the-gloves-are-off-u-k-govt-to-inject-all-12-15-year-olds-without-parental-consent/For breaking news from one of the most over the target and censored names in the world join our 100% Free newsletter at www.NemosNewsNetwork.com/newsAlso follow us at Gabhttps://gab.com/nemosnewsnetworkNemos News is 100% listener funded. Thank you for your support in our mission to Break the Cycle of Fake News.If you value our work please consider supporting us with our vetted patriot sponsors!www.NemosNewsNetwork.com/sponsorsShop Patriot & Detox the Deep State with www.RedPillLiving.com, Home of Sleepy Joe - the world's most powerful all natural sleep formula & The Great Awakening Gourmet Coffee for Patriots."Our Specialty, is Waking People Up."Other LinksJoin our Telegram chat: www.NemosNewsNetwork.com/chat

College Matters. Alma Matters.
About Majors: What is Biochemistry? With Prof. Dipali Sashital, Iowa State University.

College Matters. Alma Matters.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 72:19


Episode summary introduction: The goal of this series is to serve as a primer for High Schoolers about a Major, through our conversations with Faculty Experts in the various US Colleges and Universities. We continue this series with Biochemistry, with Professor Dipali Sashital, Associate Professor in the Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology at Iowa State University. In particular, we discuss the following with him: What is Biochemistry? A Brief History of Biochemistry Branches of Biochemistry Skills Needed to Study Biochemistry in College Opportunities for Biochemistry Majors Topics discussed in this episode: Introducing Prof. Dipali Sashital, Iowa State University [] What is Biochemistry? [] History of Biochemistry [] Impact of Biochemistry on Humanity [] Subfields of Biochemistry [] Hot Areas of Research [] BioEthics [] Skills to build in High School & College [] Is Biochemistry for me? [] Opportunities for a Biochemistry Major [] Prof Sashital's Biochemistry Journey [] Our Guest: Dipali Sashital is the Associate Professor in the Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology at Iowa State University. Prof. Sashital is the head of the Sashital Lab at ISU. Prof Sashital has Bachelor's degree in Chemistry and Biochemistry from the University of Michigan Ann Arbor, PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin Madison. She was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California Berkeley and The Scripps Research Institute. Memorable Quote: “...making discoveries, I think, is a very exciting feeling. And, you know, something that if you get to experience that in your career, it can be, it can be quite addictive.” Prof. Sashital. Episode Transcript: Please visit Episode's Transcript. Calls-to-action: Subscribe to our Weekly Podcast Digest. To Ask the Guest a question, or to comment on this episode, email podcast@almamatters.io. Subscribe or Follow our podcasts at any of these locations:, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, RadioPublic, Breaker, Anchor. For Transcripts of all our podcasts, visit almamatters.io/podcasts.

The Lessons in Real Estate Show
Episode 86: Making Long Distance Investment Work as a Real Estate Couple with Suzy and Michael

The Lessons in Real Estate Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 54:48


Today, we will get twice the value in lessons! Suzy and Michael are a Real Estate couple, not to mention Suzy is a rare female syndicator in an industry dominated by men. They make this all work while being based overseas 4,000 miles away! Unheard of. Michael is on active-duty Air Force stationed in England while he completes his Phd in Biochemistry at the University of Cambridge. Suzy works as a program manager in a Biotech company and has gone through every scenario possible as a military spouse. They both worked through juggling careers, dreams and their relationship into a successful Real Estate venture, recently closing 100 units at the end of June. Find out how they made it all possible in this episode. Click now on the link below to find how you can begin a success story just like this. In this episode, we explore: Active duty tour as a military PhD student Extreme long-distance investment How we go started in Real Estate Being Patient with Online Content Working as a Real Estate Couple Being a female syndicator Creating an Impact in the Community Leveraging training and career About Suzy and Michael: Suzy and Michael are the Founders of Adventurous Real Estate Investors. They specialize in Return on Impact. Through real estate investing they create immeasurable impacts; in their family, with their friends, in their community, with the families (residents) they serve, in the spaces where they want to be generous.... everywhere and anywhere! Snapshot Timestamps: 39:04 What is your number one failure in real estate? Thinking you had to start in single family homes What advice do you have for other military investors to be successful? Leveraging whatever military training you have What inspired you to serve your country? I wanted to give back and be part of something bigger than myself.. And leverage the opportunity from the military, education-wise. What is your dream? Travel, immerse and build schools. Implement education in a way that serves the community. Quotes: “Be very clear what your end goal is and work towards that every single day” 25:29 “Go five levels deep on your Why.. because that will help you propel through those tough times” 33:21 “When more women and men think about people first instead of profit first, you get so much more from it all” 43:28 Connecting with the Guest Website: https://adventurousrei.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adventurous.rei/ Facebook: https://web.facebook.com/adventurousREI?_rdc=1&_rdr LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/adventurous-real-estate-investors/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6a2b5QSuwVNM_zcsoIRe3w

Your Longevity Blueprint
Childhood Trauma Healing with Dr. Aimie Apigian

Your Longevity Blueprint

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 59:04


Childhood trauma is often stored in our bodies, starting in the first year of our lives. It doesn't even have to be a hugely traumatic experience - it could even come from a child's mother. Dr. Aimie Apigian joins us to talk about how childhood trauma affects our long-term health conditions and how we can accelerate the healing process to reclaim our health.   Biochemical Imbalances Caused by Genetics or Epigenetics Methylation Imbalance Copper & Zinc  Pyrrole Disorder   About Dr. Aimie Apigian Dr. Aimie is a Board-Certified Physician in Preventive Medicine and Addiction Medicine who specializes in recognizing and addressing the chronic effects of trauma on one's biology. After helping her foster-adopted son as he struggled with severe emotional and behavioral issues, she started to see how much of trauma is biology, not psychology.  She earned her medical degree from Loma Linda University, has a Masters in Biochemistry, and a Masters in Public Health.  2 years into her general surgery residency, she went from running marathons and being an avid cyclist to severe fatigue, autoimmune issues, was overweight and depressed.  Through her personal experiences, she has found we all live compromised due to stored trauma in our bodies.  Talk therapy is not the answer. Dr. Amie's mission is to share with others the ways to accelerate the healing journey to consistent high states of health, aliveness, and performance through leveraging our own very survival, and reward pathways.   Storing Childhood Trauma Dr. Amie Apigian shares her own personal experience with her adopted son to help explore her approach to trauma-informed therapy that focuses on our biology as well. Stored trauma often embeds in us before a child is 12 months old, even if that child hasn't had any traumatic experiences in life. But Amie explains how trauma can pass onto a child through its mother through attachment and subconscious signals. Even if the mother is experiencing stress in her day-to-day life, a baby can pick up on these queues and hold onto this as stored trauma. Of course, there are other ways of experiencing trauma that have even more of an impact. Childhood and stored trauma may not be something we notice as children or early adults, but as we age, we can develop chronic and long-term health conditions associated with this trauma.   Breaking Trauma Cycles Amie talks about how our bodies can get stuck in a state of “freeze,” rather than fight or flight followed by relaxation. There's a common misconception that pegs all these responses together, but Amie explains the difference between sympathetic responses (fight or flight) and parasympathetic responses (freeze) and why it's essential to return to that state of calm instead of holding onto the stress. Amie explains how we can start to break these trauma cycles that start in childhood. Referencing her son, it is possible to start alleviating symptoms really quickly when the approach, support, and breakthroughs are just right. While there is a lot of benefit in talking therapy, yoga, and meditation, Amie explains why healing has to start at a biological level to address the root cause of the trauma. She says our bodies need that neuroplasticity to bounce back to our level state of stress. Did you experience trauma as a child that impacts your adult life? Do you think your long-term health conditions could connect back to incidents from when you were a child? Call the Integrative Health and Hormone Clinic today and schedule your first appointment at 319-363-0033.   Quotes “Whatever our pattern in our nervous system, if we came out of our childhood with any insecurities in our nervous system, subconsciously, even after our best attempts not to let our past influence our parenting, it's going to come out because trauma is not verbal.” [18:48] “Many, many people are living in what I call a chronic, functional freeze state. They've given up. They're just going through life living in a bit of a daze and have lost their fight and fire for life because it's been hard. Their nervous system has gotten to the point where it's running on fumes. This low energy state helps us survive, but not live.” [32:59] “When we look at these points in our biology that are holding our nervous system back from being able to process things, heal, and rewire itself, those are leverage points that we get to use to accelerate the healing journey.” [47:17] “There are clear leverage points in our biology that when you combine that then with the trauma therapies and somatic work working directly with your nervous system, you can feel that charge come up. You can feel the discharge. It shows up as heat or even trembling. Somatic trauma therapy is such powerful work. You can, in real-time, learn how to shift your own nervous system.” [48:11]   In This Episode How childhood/stored trauma can cause disease later in life [8:00] How trauma gets stored in the body [9:00] The difference between parasympathetic and sympathetic responses [11:00] How to break attachment trauma cycles [21:00] Why our bodies need neuroplasticity [29:00] How to accelerate the healing journey [46:45]   Links & Resources Get 10% Off Adrenal Calm with Code: CALM Watch “Why Attachment is the Future of Health” Learn About Trauma Accelerated Healing The Biology of Trauma Summit Biology of Trauma Certification Course Roadmap Neuro-Optimize For Aliveness Find Dr. Amie Apigian Online Follow Dr. Amie Apigian on Instagram | Facebook | YouTube Find Your Longevity Blueprint Online Follow Your Longevity Blueprint on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | LinkedIn Get your copy of the Your Longevity Blueprint book and claim your bonuses here Find Dr. Stephanie Gray and Your Longevity Blueprint online    Follow Dr. Stephanie Gray on Facebook | Instagram | Youtube | Twitter | LinkedIn Integrative Health and Hormone Clinic Podcast Production by the team at Counterweight Creative    Related Episodes  Episode 57: 5 Keys To Raising Healthy Kids With Dr. Brian Stenzler Episode 47: Improving Parasympathetic Tone For The Ans With Dr. Tim Jackson Episode 21: How Trauma Affects Your Health With Dr. Keesha Ewers

Pharmacy Podcast Network
Expanding PGx Education Programs | PGX for Pharmacists

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 27:54


Implementing Pharmacogenomics into the Education of the PharmD  How do interested faculty start a program for PGx education at their own school? Today's episode builds on the experiences of David Hurley in developing a PGx program at the Gatton College of Pharmacy. His training provides ALL first year students with free PGx testing coordinated with Biochemistry coursework. As we will discuss, making a workable program starts with discovering what PGx resources are available at your institution. Careful understanding of faculty and student abilities and needs are the foundation for making PGx education successful. Our guest today, Dr. David Hurley, has democratized Pharmacogenomics education for his first year PharmD students. As a Biochemistry professor at the Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy at East Tennessee State University, Dave immerses pharmacy students with PGx training and free testing in their first semester of the curriculum. In two previous episodes, we've discussed how he accomplished this task and his surveys of student attitudes and interest. Today's episode will provide some of the lessons Dave learned about how to implement PGx education that might be useful for those of you who are starting your own program. David L Hurley, PhD Professor, Dept of Pharmaceutical Sciences Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy  20 Best Genomics Podcasts of 2021  https://welpmagazine.com/20-best-genomics-podcasts-of-2021/  Thank you RxSafe for sponsoring this episode See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ACS Research - TheoryLab
Catching the problem early: The early stages of lung cancer initiation & melanoma drug resistance

ACS Research - TheoryLab

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 31:49


Two American Cancer Society grantees—one with a recent publication on the early mechanisms of lung cancer initiation, the other with a new study out on the development of melanoma resistance during the earliest phases of treatment—joined the podcast for a conversation about catching the problem early. This conversation is geared for a scientific audience, until the last few minutes. Sabrina Spencer, PhD, is Associate Professor of Biochemistry at University of Colorado, Boulder. She recently published a study in Nature Communications on “Melanoma subpopulations that rapidly escape MAPK pathway inhibition incur DNA damage and rely on stress signaling:” https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-21549-x?elqTrackId=2842c2f36cc243139afc4151f4f48ee6. Xaralabos (Bob) Varelas, PhD, is Associate Professor of Biochemistry at Boston University School of Medicine. He recently published work in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America titled, “Aberrant epithelial polarity cues drive the development of precancerous airway lesions:” https://www.pnas.org/content/118/18/e2019282118. 1:08 – Dr. Varelas on his recent study, which offered insights into mechanisms that drive the onset of lung squamous cell carcinomas 4:20 – Dr. Spencer asks clarifying questions about how they disrupted the polarity… 5:08 – …and whether the Crumbs3 mutation occurs in patients or was a way to initiate the system 7:56 – A provocative question from Dr. Spencer: “would that mean that a precancerous lesion would be a candidate for treatment with some of these clinically approved drugs?” 9:25 – “Can you connect increased ERBB signaling to actual increased cell cycling?” 10:48 – Dr. Spencer talks about her interest in the origin of drug resistance in cancer and her recent paper, which focused on melanoma 20:15 – Dr. Varelas asks how broadly applicable these findings are to other cancers 22:10 – “Why do you think some of the cells escape? Is there an underlying difference in the cells to begin with? Or are some cells randomly taking on some kind of adaptive mechanism?” 28:11 – The impact of American Cancer Society funding on their research

Talking USMLE
USMLE Step 1 Drill Session (Biochem: Nutrition)

Talking USMLE

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 35:47


In today's high-yield USMLE Step 1 drill session, we're doing a 3-round drill session covering the Nutrition part of Biochemistry for your Step 1 exam.Get the FULL LIBRARY of Drills at USMLEDRILLS.comWant to work with us for your Step 1 exam prep? Visit https://usmle.onlineDon't forget to check out our YouTube channel... This is where we share our best USMLE Prep, Medical school survival, etc tips that will help you survive & thrive on your journey to your dream medical residency. Search "The USMLE Guys" to find us.Follow me on IG at https://instagram.com/realdrpaul

The Stand with Eamon Dunphy
Ep 1180: With Masks And Good Ventilation School Re-opening is Welcome, Done Badly It's Dangerous

The Stand with Eamon Dunphy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 51:41


Tomás Ryan, talks to Eamon about the success of the the vaccine rollout as the country prepares to reopen schools and colleges. Tomás is Associate Professor at the School of Biochemistry & Immunology at Trinity College Dublin, and an associate of the Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience. He is also a founding member of the Independent Scientific Advocacy Group. The Stand is proudly sponsored by Tesco. Recorded 24/8/21

Wellness Lately
Redefining Wellness and Rejecting Diet Culture with Melainie Rogers (Repost of Episode 33)

Wellness Lately

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 84:01


Note: The pod is on a short summer break and will return on 9/7! This conversation is a repost of episode #33. Why We Love Melanie: Melainie Rogers is a Certified Eating Disorder Registered Dietitian (CEDRD) and Supervisor and is dedicated to supporting others in their quest to achieve long-term recovery. She is the Founder and Executive Director of BALANCE eating disorder treatment center™ and melainie rogers nutrition, llc. Melainie received her education in Melbourne, Australia where she was born and raised. She obtained her Bachelor's degree in Biochemistry from Melbourne University and completed a Graduate Diploma in Sports Nutrition from Deakin University, Australia. Upon coming to the United States she earned her Masters Degree in Clinical Nutrition at New York University. Melainie developed her passion for treating clients with eating disorders while working at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Columbia Obesity Research Center in New York City. Her understanding of the research behind obesity gave her a unique perspective on eating behaviors and binge eating disorder specifically. In 2002, Melainie developed the largest private group nutrition practice specializing in eating disorders in New York City. As she saw a need for more services for eating disorders, she established BALANCE eating disorder treatment center™ in 2009. Melainie Rogers MS, RDN, CDN, CEDRD is a recognized expert on eating disorders. She is a dynamic speaker and educator and is the co-founder and first President of the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals (iaedp) New York Chapter and currently resides on the Advisory Board with Center for the Study of Anorexia and Bulimia (CSAB), as well as the Binge Eating Disorder Association (BEDA). On the Pod, We Discuss: Melainie's treatment center: the work her team does and who they help How she got into this line of work and the intersection with her own journey in recovering from an eating disorder The Redefining Wellness Project and the catalyst for creating it The #WakeUpWeightWatchers campaign and what makes dieting behavior so dangerous for children Diet culture, the $70 billion weight loss industry, and why there is still a lack of research around genetics, BMI and weight manipulation How wellness and self-care have been co-opted by diet culture and how focus has shifted to perfectionism and aesthetics How disordered eating can directly cause anxiety and how social media + modern imagery may also have potentially contributed What it's going to require to shift away from mainstream messaging around dieting as the solution and why we're only at the tip of the iceberg Melainie's initial fear of openly sharing her own eating disorder struggle and how her personal experience has impacted her ability to support people Diagnosed eating disorders vs. disordered eating The amount of time and mind space dedicated to thinking about food, exercise, diets and calories for people with disordered eating and clinical eating disorders (as opposed to the “average” person with food neutrality) Veganism, food morality, orthorexia, and how restrictive diets may not be as balanced in terms of essential nutrition How Melainie approached creating the treatment options and support services at BALANCE Why health and weight are not dependent upon one another, and the most recent research around BMI used as a health marker The common themes among people coming to seek treatment for eating disorders and what's going on under the surface The goal for Redefining Wellness and what we can do to support the mission and spread the anti-diet message Helpful Links: BALANCE Eating Disorder Treatment Center in New York City The free Redefining Wellness eBook: the diet-free guide for teens and families The #WakeUpWeightWatchers Twitter campaign Melainie's mentor, Carolyn Costin, MA, MED, MFT Follow BALANCE on Instagram and Facebook and Twitter Follow Redefining Wellness on Instagram Follow Melainie Rogers on Twitter Watch our free masterclass to learn 5 Simple Shifts to End Binge Eating Join our private Facebook group Set up a free Breakthrough Session to see if our coaching program is a good fit for you Learn more about Food Freedom Academy, our personalized Intuitive Eating Coaching Program

The Ripple Effect Podcast
Episode 346: The Ripple Effect Podcast (Dr. Jessica Rose | Exploring Ideas, History, The Future And More)

The Ripple Effect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 197:30


Dr. Jessica Rose is an artist, musician, mathematician, professional surfer, biologist, researcher, data analysis, and all around a super interesting & honest person. Dr. Rose has a Post Doc in Biochemistry at Technion Institute of Technology, Post Doc in Molecular Biology at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PhD in Computational Biology at Bar Ilan University, Master's in Medicine (Immunology) at Memorial University of Newfoundland, BSc in Applied Mathematics at Memorial University of Newfoundland.PLEASE SIGN & SHARE This Petition To Show Your Support For Making Masks Optional In Schools:  http://chng.it/FDdq8GLVMJAnd Watch This Episode of The Ripple Effect Podcast to Learn More: https://youtu.be/zX2rcHtY0CcDr. JESSICA ROSEWebsite: https://i-do-not-consent.netlify.app/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMY2tdFNkRUFELLOWSHIP donation link: https://ipaknowledge.org/joshua-kuntz-research-fellowship.phpMusic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HCeHbNjLUkReport on the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) of the COVID-19 Messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) Biologicals: https://www.publichealthpolicyjournal.com/clinical-and-translational-researchTHE RIPPLE EFFECT PODCASTWEBSITE: http://TheRippleEffectPodcast.comPATREON: https://www.patreon.com/TheRippleEffectPodcastPayPal: https://www.PayPal.com/paypalme/RvTheory6MERCH Store: http://www.TheRippleEffectPodcastMerch.comROKFIN: https://rokfin.com/RippleEffectFringe.FM: https://fringe.fm/shows/the-ripple-effect-podcast/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/RvTHEORY6ODYSEE: https://odysee.com/@therippleeffectpodcast:dBITCHUTE: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/6bOtjURD1rds/FLOTE: https://flote.app/trepodcastRUMBLE: https://rumble.com/c/c-745505PARLER: https://parler.com/#/user/RvTheory6FACEBOOK: http://on.fb.me/1KaM0OgTWITTER: https://twitter.com/RvTheory6INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/rvtheory6/SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/4lpFhHI6CqdZKW0QDyOicJGOOGLE PLAY/PODCASTS: https://podcasts.google.com/search/the%20ripple%20effect%20podcastiTUNES: http://apple.co/1xjWmlFSTITCHER RADIO: http://bit.ly/1nWBXBYTHE UNION OF THE UNWANTEDLinkTree: https://linktr.ee/uotuwRSS FEED: https://uotuw.podbean.com/Merch Store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/union-of-the-unwanted?ref_id=22643&utm_campaign=22643&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_source=Union%2Bof%2BThe%2BUnwanted

Shaping Opinion
The Baby Story

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 40:40


Dr. Lori Buzzetti joins Tim to talk about one of the most magical stories of all time, one we all think we know, but it's amazing what we don't. Lori is a board-certified physician in Obstetrics and Gynecology. She has served in private practice, and at a large medical center, where she was on the teaching faculty. Today, she is the founder and president of a nonprofit organization that serves expectant mothers called So Big. In this episode we're going to talk about one of the most basic questions you can think of. What actually happens in those nine months before we meet our babies? https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/The_Baby_Story_Full.mp3 We all have our own understandings of how babies are made based on what we may have read, or been told, or been taught in health class. And of course, based on our own experience as mothers … and as fathers. Or as family members. Today, we're going to assume none of that. We're going to start with a clean slate, and walk through the most amazing journey on the planet with someone who knows. We're going to learn about the baby. Just the baby. Not the mom, not the dad, and not so much the pregnancy per se. Just the baby. Links So Big, (Lori's nonprofit organization website) LynLeee Hope, Meet the Baby Who Was Born Twice, 'For Every Mom' Blog Extreme Preemie Born at 21 Weeks Young at Emory Decatur Hospital, Fox 5 Atlanta Pregnancy Week by Week, Mayo Clinic About this Episode's Guest Dr. Lori Buzzetti Dr. Lori Buzzetti is the founder and President of a nonprofit organization called So Big, which serves expectant mothers. So Big has established one Mountain House maternity home in Indiana with plans to expand in the near future. These homes would help expectant mothers meet their basic needs and connect with other programs that also serve pregnant women in need. Joining forces with others that have similar passion and goals will help us reach the women and children we want to serve and to do it more effectively. In the end it's about giving hope. It's about sharing God's love. She is married to Dr. Tony Buzzetti, with a daughter, Tessa and a son, Jake. They attend Traders Point Christian Church. She has a B.S. in Biochemistry from Iowa State University and M.D. from the University of Iowa. She completed her training in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Indiana University Medical Center. She is Board-certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology, and a former private practitioner on the south-side of Indianapolis. She is formerly employed by St. Vincent Hospital where she was a member of the teaching faculty and administration for the OBGYN residency program.

Finding Genius Podcast
Understanding the Role of Aging in Cancer with Dr. Ashani Weeraratna

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 26:20


As a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dr. Ashani Weeraratna, Ph.D. has established an environment that challenges researchers and facilitates cancer research. She is an expert on melanoma metastasis, the Wnt signaling pathway, and the effects of aging on melanoma metastasis. Dr. Weeraratna also serves as president of The Society of Melanoma Research. Click on play to learn: What happens to healthy cells that are surrounded by cancer cells. How age-related changes at the molecular level may affect tumor cells. How cells are affected if they are a localized cancer versus a metastatic niche. The Weeraratna lab is known for cancer biology research and is currently studying the molecular mechanisms that lead to metastatic progression and therapy resistance. Dr. Weeraratna has conducted research on the molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways to determine what causes cells to become more aggressive and develop into melanoma tumors. The goal is to understand the age-related changes at a molecular level and identify how those changes affect tumor cells making them behave aggressively. Research continues on the effects of the tumor microenvironment on metastasis and therapy resistance. Researchers seek to understand how the aging microenvironment influences metastasis and therapy resistance, specifically in melanoma. In the short term, Dr. Weeraratna hopes to use an inhibitor to enhance the response to targeted therapies in older patients who are not eligible for immune therapy. In the long term, studies are focusing on age-related modifications such as life-style changes and/or medications to increase the chances of surviving cancer. The ultimate goal is to treat cancer as a chronic disease. In December 2021, Dr. Weeraratna's book, Is Cancer Inevitable? will be released. The book includes the personal story of her journey to become a respected cancer researcher. It also discusses the research she has been involved in such as the effects of aging on skin and corresponding changes in tumor growth as well as seeking ways to treat and prevent melanoma. To learn more visit: Website:          research.jhu.edu/members/ashani-weeraratna                            jhu.bmb.phd.org/ashani-weeraratna Twitter:           @AshaniTW Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C