Podcasts about kpis

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Best podcasts about kpis

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Latest podcast episodes about kpis

Brave + Boss: The Podcast
Black Friday Cyber Weekend eCommerce Wrap up

Brave + Boss: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 20:05


“Spend some time looking at your sales over last weekend. Pull those days that match up to Black Friday from last year and check out your growth. look at the KPIs that would be most important for this and start to track them because that's where we start to see where the opportunities are in the brand for growth and for performance.” - Kristi Soomer Welcome to Brave and Boss with Kristi Soomer. In this solo episode, we get the scoop on Black Friday, how come many felt like sales were down while others saw growth? We discuss the possible factors that played a role in sales, or a lack thereof and what you can do going forward into the holiday season to finish 2022 strong. Find links, resources mentioned and full show notes at: https://www.kristisoomer.com/blogs/retail/black-friday-cyber-weekend-ecommerce-wrap-up Don't forget to subscribe-rate-review. It's super easy and helps me to reach MORE creative entrepreneurs just like you! Connect with me on Twitter: https://bit.ly/39NSqno YouTube: https://tinyurl.com/yypc4b5a LinkedIn: https://tinyurl.com/y4g2ddyw Pinterest: https://tinyurl.com/yxpna4qc Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kristisoomer/

Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever
JF2652: CEO Reveals Exclusive Look on Managing a Multi-Generational Real Estate Investment Firm with Daniel N. Farber

Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 24:34


Who makes the decisions in a family-run business? What metrics are used to evaluate the CEO? What kind of challenges do they face? Daniel N. Farber helps answer all these questions in today's episode by pulling back the curtain on what being a CEO for this type of investing firm is like. From what his KPIs are to who he reports to, Daniel gives the Best Ever listeners an insider look at how this multi-generational real estate investment firm is run. Daniel N. Farber Real Estate Background CEO of HLC Equity  HLC Equity is a multi-generational real estate investment firm that has owned and operated real estate in over 25 states throughout the USA, having owned and managed over 7,000,000 gross square feet of commercial, residential, and development land. Prior to real estate, he served in the Israel Defense Forces as a Staff Sergeant in an elite infantry unit. Based in Pittsburgh, PA  Click here to know more about our sponsors: Deal Maker Mentoring | PassiveInvesting.com | FollowUp Boss

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
How to Get Over Trust Issues and Retain Agency Clients Longer

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 20:08


Do your clients have trust issues with your agency? How can you go about creating an honest rapport to build trust? Working at a larger agency Bob Bailey started to notice a trust problem. Clients are losing trust in their agencies. This trend has actually increased over time, with clients moving to in-house services. This is the opportunity he and his partners saw when they created their agency Truth Collective. They wondered "wouldn't it be great if a marketing agency could thrive by just telling the truth?" Then they set out to have honest conversations about strategy, creativity, and relationships. In his conversation with Jason, Bob spoke about all-time low trust levels in agencies, how he tries to build trust with potential clients from the first meeting, how he has built leadership teams in his agency, and why agency owners must themselves from being the fixer to empower their teams. 3 Golden Nuggets Honest rapport with clients. Trust in agencies has hit all-time lows, according to Bob. That's not a place any of us would want to be. So how to gain back client trust in agencies? Especially in a time when more and more clients are moving to in-house many services. Bob believes the key to building trust starts with the initial conversation. He makes it a point to treat it as a conversation, not a pitch, and makes it about them. “I feel like squaring the meeting centrally right on their business and what they need is the place to be,” he assured. Also, he's seen the positive effect of knowing who you are as a business and how you can help their business, instead of trying to do everything, which comes across as just wanting more money. Building leadership. As we always say, you can get to the million-dollar mark almost by accident. But to be a multi-million-dollar agency you'll need to start building a structure, starting with your leadership team. Bob didn't always get that right, in some cases because the people weren't quite right. But also because they weren't quite ready as new owners to really understand what that meant. They really had to look themselves in the mirror when the company hit a cap at $3.8 million and start to get serious about leadership. They needed more structure, so they selected a group and shared everything about the business with them. “If these guys are going to lead, they need all the information to become leaders too,” he acknowledges. Try to not be a fixer. How can you help your leadership team grow? Prepare them to solve issues and trust them. Bob and his partners started organizing weekly meetings with their leadership team to discuss new business leads and prospects, financial forecasts, what they call remarkable creative briefs and opportunities, they also talk about employees or client issues and possible solutions. This way, they started to prepare the leadership team and shared the information and metrics they may need to do their jobs. Ultimately, it is always about trusting that they are capable to face any issues that may come up. Agency owners normally get to where they are because they are very good at solving problems, but at some point it should be your team's responsibility to do so. Sponsors and Resources Sharpspring: Today's episode is sponsored by Sharpspring, an all-in-one revenue growth platform that provides all of the marketing automation, CRM, & sales features you need to support your entire customer lifecycle. Partner with an affordable marketing automation provider that you can trust. Head over to sharpspring.com/smartagency to enjoy an exclusive offer for podcast listeners. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Creating an Honest Rapport With Your Clients to Address Low Trust Levels in Agencies Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk here. I have another great episode and we're not going to talk about frou-frou shit. We're going to talk about rebuilding trust in our industry, and we're going to go over some really cool things. And I didn't know, he was telling me in the pre-show Bob was telling me that agency trust is ranked between Congress and I think something else. He'll tell us, I can't remember, but like it's pathetic. So we're going to talk about what you can do in order to build trust. And if you have that trust, you can make more money, scale faster. and have the life that you want, where you have the freedom. So let's go ahead and get into the show. Hey, Bob. Welcome to show. Bob: [00:00:49] Hey, Jason. What's up, man? Thanks for having me. Jason: [00:00:51] I almost forgot which buttons to hit. We were talking about frou-frou stuff before. I'm so messed up. Bob: [00:00:58] I'm just going for the ride. Jason: [00:00:59] Yeah. Tell us who you are and what you do. Bob: [00:01:02] Jason, my name is Bob Bailey. I am one of the three founding partners of a creative company called Truth Collective. And my role here is the CEO, which I have sort of reframed from chief executive officer to the chief everyone officer. And I don't know if that's frou frou stuff to you or not. But for me, it sort of keeps me focused on, you know, my most important thing and that's my team. So thanks for having me. Jason: [00:01:27] Yeah. As long as you're having fun and you guys are doing impact, I don't care what you call it. So how'd, you guys get started in this crazy industry that we're in? Bob: [00:01:38] It's a good question. I've been listening to some of your shows and you know, a lot of folks, they tend to see a, a problem or a gap out there and they feel like they can fill that. And it was, it was similar with us. We were working together at a, at a larger agency. And at the time, like there was just getting hard. Like it was, it was getting really, really hard. And we started seeing these patterns where consumers were trusting brands less. Agencies… clients were trusting their agencies less. And even like inside the agencies, people trusting each other less. And so we said, man, like… Wouldn't it be just really easy and wouldn't it be awesome if a marketing agency could thrive by just telling the truth? Like, what if you were just honest about everything? What if you weren't like out there inflating case studies, inflating agency credentials presentations? What if you could just go out there and like be yourself and tell people the information that's going to really help them? And it was a really like novel, like silly idea at the moment. But we really got behind it and, um, we've built, we built a business on that. And so it's been really fun. Jason: [00:02:47] Well, how do you separate yourself? Because there's lots of agencies out there that are full of shit and they're not truthful. But they say they are. So how do you guys do that? Like, tell me about the stat that you were talking about in the pre-show. And I kind of teased in the intro, like the agency industry is between Congress and what for…? Bob: [00:03:12] Yeah. It's, Gallup does this annual survey on like trusted industries and they go through all of them and there is like pretty far down the list used car salespeople, advertising industry, Congress. So we're sandwiched between those two, those two industries. And like, I don't, if like, for me, like that's not a place that I want to live and after eight years or so, it, hasn't not only as it hasn't gotten better. I think it's actually probably getting a little bit worse. I mean, especially when you look at how clients are responding to it and in housing, everything. And it's really, it's a pretty interesting situation. And so I think we have some stuff to fix. Jason: [00:03:55] Well, you know, when, when we chat and we interview agencies to join our mastermind, we ask lots of questions around their delivery and the results that they give to their clients. And you'll be so surprised about how many that they don't know it. And they started by accident. They took a Facebook course on ads, and then they started like, they were really good marketers, but they could never deliver their own service efficiently. And like, it just blows me out of the water that, and people always ask me, what's the one thing you have to do to scale your agency? I'm like, well, you have to do something really well for your clients. Bob: [00:04:34] Yeah, for sure. I think that the work that we tend to do tends to focus on something we actually changed during COVID. But we got really focused in, on the stuff that we love to do and the stuff that we're truly like sort of brilliant at: creative strategy, insights, and big idea platforms. And we really tend to focus on like high-impact tactics, like the stuff that's going to really like move the brand forward. Sort of gradually moving away from a lot of the activation kind of things. But, um, for us, it's really important that, you know, we're setting up. How are we going to know if this works? How are we going to be happy? Like, yeah, there's the qualitative stuff. But a lot of times there's not business metrics in place. There's not foundational stuff in place on the client-side. And so we do all that we can to build those baselines so that we know for if we're helping them improve their business brand and in the behaviors of the customers. It's all we care about. Jason: [00:05:32] What are some keys in order to build trust with your clients? Bob: [00:05:37] I think it starts from the initial conversation. And I think that that conversation has to be different than anything that they felt from other agencies. I don't have a PowerPoint that I use to introduce me or my agency to clients. I have a conversation. I feel like if you show up with your deck, then the meeting is about me and not them. And so I feel like squaring the meeting centrally right on their business and what they need is the place to be. And you'd be surprised how different that actually is. So I think it starts there and, you know, it sort of quickly goes into the things that we do and the things that we will not do. And so, you know, I think that's also been a disarming thing where clients will, they'll say, you know, well, I know, you know, as the owner, like you want to do all my stuff. Uh, because you know, you're money motivated and I'm like, well, actually, no, like I don't want to do a thousand banner ads. I don't want to do all, I don't want to do your emails. I don't want to do those things. Like I want to help your internal team be successful with that stuff. I think there's just like those sort… of known who we are and being okay with just like being okay with having a conversation about that. But I think it really just sets a tone for this is the kind of partnership that we're after, and this is how we're going to help you be most successful and help the other agencies in your network be more successful too. Jason: [00:07:03] Yeah. You know, I always use the analogy of the creepy guy in the conference. Like, do you have the creepy guy in the conference come up to you and they just start throwing up on you about how cool their company is and how amazing he is. All that. You're like, you're the creepy dude. Get away from me. The other guy comes up to you and starts asking you questions. And by asking questions, the whole attention is on them. People are going to like that conversation because it's about them. And that's what we always liked when we would come and have initial calls with our prospects. We were the same way. And I, and I always hate when agencies are like, well, we don't have our portfolio or our deck ready. What is that…? I'm like, you don't need that shit. The companies that want that, that means you're going to be doing an RFP, which really stands for request for fucking punishment. You shouldn't be doing that. So I love that approach. Let's kind of switch focus a little bit and talk about because you have over 30 people, um, you know, multimillion dollar agency. A lot of people can hit the million mark by accident. But when you start getting in the multiple millions, you have to get a lot of things right. I mean, you still haven't figured out everything. I don't have everything figured out. No one does. If they do, you should shoot them with a water gun and be like, you're lying. But how are you building better leaders? Because I feel that in order to get to the level that you're at, you have to build a really amazing team, which it starts with the leadership. Bob: [00:08:43] Totally. You're right, man. Like we, gosh… We've been in business for eight years now and you know, I always think about us like a version. You know, the current version of Truth Collective, and you know, we've been through, we've been through a few and we've tried some things and we didn't get it exactly right. Whether it was, you know, you talked about the leaders and the leadership team. I think in some cases like the people weren't quite right. But then also we weren't quite ready as sort of new owners to really understand what that even meant. We were very much in a mindset of like we're modeling the behaviors we expect and why don't you just understand that stuff? And that's not fair to anybody. And it also, you know, to your point, like you'll hit a cap and the cap… Our cap was like right around like three and a half to 3.8 million where… We can do that. Like kind of with any team, with any set of clients, like that's, that was what we were. And we, you know, we did that and we said, geez, you know, it's us. Like we looked in the mirror and said, okay, like we got to get out of the way here. And we got to get really serious about the leaders on the team, but how we going to do it? And it was about the people, but we also just needed some real structure and we were growing and growing rapidly, but we weren't growing in like an organized way. We started as an account guy, a strategist and a creative guy. And as we grew, like, we just hired more people like us. But what we weren't doing is growing from the standpoint of like the functions of the business. Like I wasn't, we weren't thinking about, okay, how are we going to staff new business growth? How are we going to staff client service? How are we going to staff creative? How are we going to staff the administrative stuff? And, you know, people just looked at all three of us all the time for decisions. And we were just, we just became the bottleneck that was holding it back. Jason: [00:10:50] Is your agency struggling to deliver real revenue growth results to your clients. You know, agency marketers can consolidate data and align marketing and sales teams goals to achieve real results for your agency and clients asing revenue growth platforms. SharpSpring is an all-in-one platform built for agencies like yours to optimize digital marketing strategies with simple, powerful automation. Manage your entire funnel all in Sharpspring. Now for a limited time, my smart agency listeners will receive your first month free and half off onboarding with SharpSpring. Just visit sharpspring.com/smart agency to schedule your demo and grab this offer. That's sharpspring.com/smart agency. Yeah, you were the toll booth. I always like to kind of say. Bob: [00:11:43] Yes, you've talked about that before. Jason: [00:11:44] Yeah, and you kept mentioning a keyword: how? You're like, how do we do this? How do we do this? When did you start realizing who? And giving them the power in order to make the decision? Bob: [00:11:58] Yeah. It was actually in the fall of 2019. So we, we decided we needed to try the leadership team again. We selected people, you know, not by title. But by, like, if you run a function in the agency, you're on the team, like that's how we made the decision. So it was very clear and specific. We got that group together, we got super transparent. We shared everything about the business. All the numbers. So no more like close to the vest ownership. If these guys are going to lead, like they need to know stuff and they need all the information so that they can also learn how to become leaders too. So we started sharing that we met weekly every Monday, same agenda for 90 minutes and we just, we got into a cadence. And thankfully we did because, you know, we all know like what happened in March, you know? So we had made about six months, five months worth of momentum together as a team when, uh, when COVID hit and sort of through everything… Um, hit the brakes on everything. And so we had to respond to that. Jason: [00:13:05] You said you meet once a week on Mondays for 90 minutes and the same structure. And what was that structure of that meeting? Bob: [00:13:12] The structure was, it was actually, are you familiar with a organization called EOS? Jason: [00:13:18] Yep. There's lots of mastermind members and I've had Gino on, on the show a number of times. Bob: [00:13:24] Yeah. We adopted that, that framework in the beginning, just because we needed a consistent framework. And that seemed to be, it seemed to make a lot of sense. It was pretty straightforward and simple. And so it's you come in and you talk about like, what are the key? You know, you have a scorecard and so our scorecard is new business leads and prospects. It's how are we doing on our financial forecast today? You know, month and quarter, how are we doing? Um, we measure our, we call like remarkable creative briefs and opportunities, like of all the work in the shop how many of those have the potential to be really remarkable? And then we, um, there's some, some accounting metrics that we measure. And so we sort of quickly hit those. We talk about any employees, uh, or client issues that are going on. And then we devote about an hour of it to like issue, discussion and resolution. And so some weeks there's a handful of stuff that you have to move through some weeks. There's one thing. But the whole point is to use that brainpower in a really concentrated focused way to, to keep us moving in the right direction. Jason: [00:14:32] I love it. I love how, you know, and thanks for going over some of the KPIs or I guess what they call rocks or, or, um, I don't know what they call it. But I get the gist of it because there's a lot of people that don't really know what to measure and they just go into a meeting. Hey, how's it going? And, uh, really kind of it. I's like none of them, what's the agenda that you have for the week and let's, let's rock and roll. So… Bob: [00:14:59] We went from having no sort of across-the-board KPIs to implementing way too many. Jason: [00:15:07] Yeah, yeah. Bob: [00:15:10] To getting it down to like now there's like five, that really matter. You know what I mean? Like, and if you get enough insight from those five to, to hit like 90% of the business. So we're, we're learning as we go, like, it gets you really hands-on. But now we've especially with COVID like, I think when she had the right team and the right sort of flow… I think letting go is actually been like a key and helping us grow and scale. You were talking about that a few minutes ago. Jason: [00:15:38] Yeah. It's very challenging. We had our digital agency experience at my house in Colorado, a couple, uh, two weeks ago. And a lot of the agencies here, multimillion, they have a hard time letting go on stuff. I'm like, you just got to trust your team! Like, it's kinda like your baby, like let the baby fall and then they'll learn to walk. If you're going to be the crutch and you're always going to catch them, well, expect to catch them for the rest of your life. Bob: [00:16:09] It's true. You know, a lot of people, and I think a lot of agency owners, you know, you start an agency because you were really good in another agency or like maybe you were the fixer. And you know how to fix it and you know how to move on, but that only gets you so far, right? You can't be the fixer, like you have to, to your point, like you got to like help him walk. You got to coach them, not do. You got to direct, not fix. And so that's, that's been a real, it seems really subtle and it seems really obvious, but it's not so easy. Um, but it's been a real game-changer, like you said. Jason: [00:16:43] Yeah. And when it happens too you get depressed, cause then they're doing the decisions and doing all the stuff without you, they don't need you anymore. And then you're like, what do I do? And you're like, well now you're the CEO, dummy. This is your new role. And this is what you're doing. Bob: [00:16:57] Yeah, figure out what's next. Jason: [00:17:00] Yeah, exactly. So I went through that and I always make fun of my mastermind members when they go through that. I'm like, hey, dummy, this is what you wanted now. Let's, let's do it this way. Life will be better. Bob: [00:17:15] It is, you know, I love it when people bring stuff that I would've never done or couldn't have done. My whole goal is I want Truth to be something that I couldn't make. I want it to outgrow me personally. And I, like, I think that's when you're really into some exciting, like durable stuff as a business. So it's fun when that happens. It is intimidating though, sometimes. Jason: [00:17:39] Oh yeah. Well, Bob, this has all been amazing. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience? Bob: [00:17:45] I think agency owners like... You put out a LinkedIn post the other day about you made a game out of it, but like, there was like… Jason: [00:17:53] Yeah. Never have I ever? Bob: [00:17:56] Yeah, yeah, yeah. And like, I've done all that. Every one of them I've done… Jason: [00:18:00] Multiple times. Bob: [00:18:02] Right. Habitually, right? I think like a key to happiness as an agency owner and the growth is like just, you know the answer. You know the answer is not to chase that stupid thing. You know the answer, you know what I mean? But the industry wants you to do that. Like there's so much crazy industry inertia out there. I think follow your gut. You know, I just, I think have the courage to follow your gut because you're going to be way happier. You're going to make room for the stuff that you really want to be doing instead of falling into those old traps. And you're going to wind up differentiating your agency as results. So your post got me really thinking about that. And I think that's helpful for it's been helpful for me. Jason: [00:18:48] Goog. Well, that's what it was designed for. What's the agency website URL people can go and check out the agency? Bob: [00:18:55] Sure it's truthcollective.com. All one word is until the truth. It's not like some weird UFO tracking organization. It's not some church, you know, we, we'd get all kinds of crazy stuff, but truthcollective.com and we're all over social. Jason: [00:19:13] Awesome. Well, thanks so much, Bob, for coming on the show, we really enjoyed it. If you guys liked that episode, make sure you like subscribe, tell a friend, tell a fellow agency owner that you'll help them out because look, we all know we're struggling a lot of the times they will help out. And if you want to be around amazing agency owners on a consistent basis and really what they're doing in order for you to scale faster. And you know, sometimes it's a shrink session. Sometimes it's a fun session. Sometimes it's like, oh my God, this is the best strategy I've ever heard. I'd like for all of you to go to digitalagencyelite.com and check out the mastermind. See if it's right for you. If you feel it is, apply. We'll have a conversation and we'll go from there. And, uh, so go to digitalagencyelite.com. And until next time have a Swenk day.

State of Demand Gen
220 - Why You Should Be Thinking of Marketing and Sales as One Team | Dave Gerhardt

State of Demand Gen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 53:57


Dave Gerhardt, Chief Brand Officer at Drift, joined Chris for another Demand Gen Expert Session, this time on the topic of "Marketing and Sales as One Team." Obviously, Marketing and Sales are quite different. But at the end of the day, their end goal should be revenue. By thinking of the two as working together rather than working towards completely separate goals, both teams are better able to drive results for the business. Dave and Chris discussed this in depth as well as where a Chief Revenue Officer and RevOps come into play. They also hosted a live Q&A, answering questions about SDRs, Customer Success, benchmarks, and KPIs. Thanks to our friends at Hatch for producing this episode. Get unlimited podcast editing at usehatch.fm.

Digitally Overwhelmed
Connecting KPIs to your SEO goals / ep216

Digitally Overwhelmed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 17:42


Struggling to understand how SEO efforts will impact your high level goals in your small business? In this episode, We review how to connect specific SEO and website actions to KPI business goals. Specific examples and ideas included. Full episode shownotes + extra tips here: https://digitalbloomiq.com/seo/seo-kpis Get email updates on all podcast episodes (+ SEO tips, behind the scenes, and early bird offers) : here: https://digitalbloomiq.com/email

CFO Thought Leader
756: Start-ups, SPACs, and Street Fights | Michael Levine, CFO, Payoneer

CFO Thought Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 48:03


Start early, stay late, be prepared, and don't shy away from the street-fight environments surrounding start-up companies. These methods have helped Michael Levine to bound up an unconventional leadership ladder en route to the CFO office of Payoneer, the global B2B digital commerce company that he helped to take public in June of this year via a special purpose acquisition company (SPAC). According to Levine, Payoneer's decision to go with a SPAC rather than a traditional IPO was influenced by his ability to share forecasts with prospective investors amid the pandemic's digital commerce boom. Levine followed an untraditional path to the CFO office, from his start as an investment banker to his swift rise up through the ranks in the commercial banking, telecommunications, and healthcare software sectors. Fresh from Wharton, Levine recalls, he would wait at the end of the line queued up outside the vice chairman's office each evening in hope of a brief audience. On occasion, he might eventually snag a precious few minutes after 8:00 p.m. to chat with the senior leader about his day and the investment bank itself. Now, a decade after joining Payoneer, Levine starts his work at [5:30] each morning with a breakfast of payments volumes, fee revenue, take rates, customer acquisition costs, and other KPIs. Thanks in part to his long days, rigorous preparation, and “beyond what?” focus on why the numbers are what they are, Payoneer has grown from 100 employees and $13 million in revenue in 2011 to approximately 2,600 employees and revenue north of $345 million today. Before each board meeting, Levine preps by asking and answering every question that the board might ask. His hard work lets him skate to where the puck is going to be, which his board appreciates: At times, they've asked Levine to help CFOs at their other companies to sharpen their board communications skills.

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – The Rule of 26 For Service-Based Businesses: Three Steps to Doubling Website Revenue by Michael Buzinski

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 28:31


The Rule of 26 For Service-Based Businesses: Three Steps to Doubling Website Revenue by Michael Buzinski Buzzworthy.biz Have you ever asked yourself, “Self, why is digital marketing so complex for service-based businesses?” Digital marketing is made complex by two main factors. The intricacies marketing agencies create to measure success for large enterprise companies. The plethora of tactics and tools available to obtain enterprise marketing goals. Neither completely pertains nor scales down to the needs of small or medium-sized businesses, and less so for service-based businesses. Michael Buzinski shows you the path to doubling your website revenue using the Rule of 26. In this easy-to-read guide to simplifying your website marketing plan, you will learn... The only three key performance indicators (KPIs) you need to track when marketing your website. The three clear objectives that will double your website revenue. How to leverage both earned and paid website marketing tactics without needing to be a marketing genius. Simple strategies that increase your revenue without proportionately increasing your workload. Stop guessing about how to make your website work for you. Leverage the Rule of 26 to grow your business by working smarter, not harder. Using Michael's clear and precise three-step website marketing plan will drastically increase the leads garnered from your website and help you get paid what you are worth.

Digitale Optimisten: Perspektiven aus dem Silicon Valley
Hear Us Grow Staffel 2: Die neuen Gründer

Digitale Optimisten: Perspektiven aus dem Silicon Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 92:31


Der Start der zweiten Staffel: Setz dich auf den Beifahrersitz von 3 hungrigen Start-Ups, die das nächste Unicorn werden wollen. Einmal im Monat berichten Discoeat, Wayvs und Jobmatch.me von ihren Höhen und Tiefen. ****Alle Infos auf www.digitaleoptimisten.de****Herzlich Willkommen bei Digitale Optimisten. Ich bin Alex, und wir sind in diesem Podcast auf der Suche nach der nächsten Generation von Elon Musks, die mit ihren bahnbrechenden Ideen noch ganz am Anfang stehen. Auf diese Folge freue ich mich schon seit vielen, vielen Wochen, und es ist auch eine ganz besondere Folge. Heute fällt der Startschuss für die zweite Staffel von Hear Us Grow. Hear Us Grow ist die erste Podcast-Doku, die 3 Start-Ups über 6 Monate lange begleitet. Einmal im Monat hören wir also von diesen 3 Gründerinnen und Gründern, welche Pitches sie gewonnen oder verloren haben, wie sich ihre KPIs entwickeln, wie ihre Finanzierungsrunden laufen und welche Produktfeatures sie gelaunched haben. Mit diesem Format sitzen wir also auf dem Beifahrersitz von diesen Start-Ups und kriegen jeden Monat tiefe Einblicke mit welchen Herausforderungen die Gründerinnen und Gründer kämpfen. Und diese 3 Gründerinnen und Gründer haben es wirklich in sich, wir haben eine Revolution in der Gastronomie, die neue Hype-Dating-App und den Stellenmarkt der Zukunft in dieser Staffel. Aber genug der Vorrede: Wir haben 3 wirklich herausragende Gründerinnen und Gründer am Start, die in ganz unterschiedlichen Bereichen aktiv sind. Fangen wir an mit dem ersten Teilnehmer von Hear Us Grow: Moritz Heininger ist Co-Founder und CEO von Discoeat. Wenn du ab und zu mal bei Gründerszene vorbeisurfst dann hast du wahrscheinlich schon ein paar Mal von Moritz und Discoeat gehört, vllt. als sie ihre letzte millionenschwere Finanzierungsrunde abgeschlossen haben oder durch als sie in einem PR Stunt einen autonomen Roboter Pizza haben ausliefern lassen. Aber genug der Vorrede, lasst uns jetzt den Gründer Moritz und sein StartUp Discoeat kennenlernen. In der nächsten Folge hören wir wieder von Moritz, jetzt geht's hier weiter mit Franzi. Franzi ist Co-Founderin von Wayvs, einer Dating-App. Meine Tage auf Dating-Apps sind zwar schon lange vorbei aber seit Tinder und Bumble boomt der Markt für Dating natürlich enorm, und viele auch aus meinem Freundeskreis schreien nach einer besseren Lösung. Franzi hat Wayvs Mitte 2021 gelaunched und seitdem schon ein ziemliches Presse-Echo ausgelöst, sie war in der Süddeutschen Zeitung, Welt, Gründerszene und noch viele mehr, und hat - wie ich finde - ein wahnsinng spannende Geschichte zu erzählen. Deshalb: war ist Franzi und was macht ihr Start-ups Wayvs - hören wir rein! Auch von Franzi hören wir natürlich wieder in der nächsten Folge von Hear Us Grow, jetzt geht's erstmal weiter mit unserem dritten Gründer hier bei Hear Us Grow. Es ist Felix, der ein Thema besetzt, was mich ganz fundamental interessiert. Es geht darum, wie in einer alternden Gesellschaft, in der Arbeitnehmer zunehmend zum knappen Gut werden, Jobs an den Mann oder an die Frau gebracht werden können. Kurz: Wie findet man heute in kurzer Zeit seinen nächsten Job? Das macht Jobmatch.me, so heißt Felix' Startup nämlich, in den 3 Branchen, in denen der Arbeitsmarkt massiv angespannt ist: Im Gesundheitswesen, in der Logistikbranche und in der Gastronomie. Vielleicht erinnerst du dich an das Chaos in Großbritannien Mitte 2021 nach dem Brexit, als es einfach keine Trucker mehr gab, die Waren nach England fahren konnten - vielleicht droht uns ja sowas hier in Deutschland auch, ohne Angebote wie das von Jobmatch.me. Ein Hinweis noch - in weiteren Folgen werden wir mit Daniel sprechen, dem Founder und CEO, der dieses Mal aber leider gesundheitsbedingt absagen musste. Hören wir rein, was macht Felix beir Jobmatch.me? Das waren die 3 Gründer mit ihren StartUps, wir haben also diesmal die Digitalisierung der Restaurantszene, eine neue Dating-App und ein Stellenmarkt 2.0. Übrigens: wenn du eine Frage an die Start-Ups hast dann schreib mir einfach eine Mail an alexander@digitaleoptimisten.de und wir stellen sie in der nächsten Folge. Ich freue mich sehr auf die nächsten Folgen, in denen wir checken, wie es denn so läuft. Wenn dir dieser Podcast gefällt, dann gib mir doch bitte 5 Sterne bei Apple Podcasts und empfehle einer weiteren Person von dieser Serie - das hilft sehr, damit mehr Menschen diese Gründergeschichten hören. Weiter geht's in 2 Wochen mit einer regulären Interview-Folge, bis dahin und bleib gesund!*** Übrigens: wenn du selber ein Start-Up hast und Interesse hast, in diesem Format gefeatured zu werden, schreib einfach eine eMail an alexander@digitaleoptimisten.de. Schreib mir auch gerne, wenn Du Ideen für ein Fokusthema hast, über das ich mit den Start-Ups sprechen soll.***In zwei Wochen kommt die nächste Folge von Digitale Optimisten mit einem langen Interview.

The Nifty Thrifty Dentists
Episode 214: DENTAL DOMINATION: Taking The Guesswork Out of Getting New Patients, Having Current Patients Return, and Outshining Your Competition with Adam Zilko of Firegang

The Nifty Thrifty Dentists

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 37:28


SHOW NOTES:   This week, Dr. Glenn Vo sat down with Adam Ziko (founder and owner of Firegang marketing). Let's just say he's crushing Every practice owner gets told by marketing agencies how to land leads—whether it be digital, via direct mail, or whatever technique they believe to be the key.Hint: the key lies in converting leads—not landing them.Converting leads is something Firegang marketing knows a thing or two about—especially Adam Ziko.With over 18 years of digital marketing experience under his belt, Adam is already a force to be reckoned with. Even better, he's been in the dental industry for a whopping ten years!Adam can tell you something for certain: every practice is different. He's got a knowledge of all the tactics you need to successfully market your unique businessLearn about:DSOs get a bad wrap, but what are they doing right?What can Adam do to help you and/or your practice's situation?What are the layers of marketing, according to Adam? And how can you pull levers to take your marketing game to the next level?What are the drivers of success?What sort of products is Adam extra versed in marketing?What can Adam and the Firegang team do to boost your KPIs?Why does Dr. Glenn Vo appreciate Adam's specific (“legit”) marketing methods?What's the problem with reverse-engineering a dental marketing strategy?What are the most successful digital marketing strategies Adam has observed?In Adam's eyes, what makes a good marketing partner?What's the problem with being too cocky (when it comes to marketing)?How does Adam differ from those unrelatable Fortune 500 companies?Hint: he knows all about start-ups!What's the importance of emphasizing customer service?So many solutions, important lessons about a good marketing mindset, and more!And don't forget to buy his new book, Practice Growth For The Future-Focused Dentist; How Firegang Dental Marketing is KILLING IT for our customers (and what those results are); a complimentary strategy session and assessment on their current marketing strategies.Send him a friend request on Facebook!   NIFTY DEAL:   Free copy of Practice Growth For The Future-Focused Dentist dental marketing playbook and an accompanying Complimentary Strategy Call for the first 20 dentists. This will allow dentists to finally eliminate all the guess-work out of growing their practice the right way, doing so quickly, and with tremendous ROI. Visit https://www.firegang.com/nifty to get the deal

Digital Dive Media
Episode 02: How to Measure Digital Marketing ROI

Digital Dive Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 5:49


In this episode, Kelli shares standard KPIs to measure the success of your digital marketing efforts and the specific goals you need to have for your digital marketing campaigns. ------------------------ If you enjoyed today's show, please share, follow and leave a review. Thank you for listening to the brndMethod Media Podcast and I'll see you in the next episode. ------------------------ brndMethod Media Group is a digital marketing agency and we help our clients amplify their digital presence based on strategies that align with their conversion goals. Our service offering includes digital strategy & consulting, website design, podcast production and content marketing. Here is how you can work with us here at brndMethod: ⚡️CHECK OUT OUR WORK: www.brndMethod.com ⚡️BOOK A DISCOVERY CALL: https://hello.dubsado.com/public/form... Connect with us on Social Media: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brndmethod/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/brnd... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brndMethod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/brndmethod Don't forget to Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL3X…

CELab: The Customer Education Lab
Episode 69 - Next-Level Instructional Design with Mike Di Gregorio

CELab: The Customer Education Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:41


Photo by Martin Adams on Unsplash We’ve covered Instructional Design 101 topics on CELab before, but what about more advanced techniques? Once you’ve covered the basic frameworks, what are other evidence-based concepts that you can incorporate into your learning programs? In this episode, Mike Di Gregorio, PhD, Director of Client Onboarding at Top Hat, walks us through how he incorporates advanced instructional design techniques to educate an audience of higher education professionals. We discuss the differences and similarities between traditional Instructional Design and the more modern face of Learning Experience Design, and how each of them play into the Customer Education world. We also discuss one of the key skills for any instructional designer: managing cognitive load for your learners, and making sure that they are not overwhelmed with too much information to process. We cover techniques that enhance learning transfer – in other words, getting learners to actually do what you taught them to do – and how you can incorporate them into your learning design. And finally, we talk about everyone’s favorite topic: Assessments! Specifically, how to go beyond “smile sheets” and how assessments can inform the way you iterate on content and drive your KPIs.

Dear Handmade Life
131: Running Your Business Like a CEO

Dear Handmade Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 41:19


Running Your Business Like a CEO with Agency+Team Operations Coach Tatiana O'Hara. Tatiana and I discuss what first steps you can take right now to begin to be the CEO of your business, the roadblocks that may be standing in your way, how to start assessing your business using KPI's, how to give critical feedback and more.

The Membership Guys Podcast with Mike Morrison
333 - KPIs Every Membership Owner Should Be Tracking

The Membership Guys Podcast with Mike Morrison

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 17:19


Every successful membership site owner knows their numbers. If you don't know how your business is performing in key areas, then you have no basis for growth and making improvements, or any idea of whether or not your membership site is doing well or if it's in trouble. Worryingly, our Online Membership Industry Report revealed that 14% of membership site owners aren't tracking their KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) at all. And an even greater number only track a few key metrics!  This is something that needs to change.  So if you're currently not tracking metrics on your site or are measuring some, but are not sure if they're the ones you should be focusing on, then this episode of The Membership Guys podcast is for you. Join us as we explore KPIs that every membership website should be tracking.  Essential Learning Points: Different metrics to focus on for analyzing website traffic and activity  Why you need to have an in-depth understanding of your conversion rates How your churn rate impacts member retention and why you should aim for 5% to 10% Why it's crucial to measure the percentage of trial participants who become paid members How to measure the lifetime value of your members Recommended tools for reporting on member engagement Why you should track customer acquisition cost  Important Links & Mentions: https://www.membershipacademy.com/ (Membership Academy) https://www.themembershipguys.com/membership-benchmarks/ (Biggest Takeaways from the Online Membership Industry Report) https://www.themembershipguys.com/tools-reducing-membership-churn/ (The Most Effective Tools for Reducing Your Membership Churn) https://www.themembershipguys.com/member-lifetime-value/ (Why Member Lifetime Value is More Important Than Churn Rate) Key Quotes: “If you don't know how your business is performing in key areas then you have no basis for growth, for making improvements or knowing whether or not your membership site is doing well or if it's in trouble” “Member retention is as important, if not more so, than acquiring new members.” “What really matters in business is the overall profit that you're making. As the old saying goes, turnover is vanity, profit is sanity.” “Knowing that lifetime value means that when planning, advertising campaigns or any of the marketing spend, you can more accurately assess your return on investment.” 

Lunch With Norm - The Amazon FBA & eCommerce Podcast
Grow Faster with Financial KPI‘s and Accounting w/ Rob Te Braake - Ep.220 - Lunch With Norm

Lunch With Norm - The Amazon FBA & eCommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 51:58


Experienced entrepreneur and Founder of Insight Matters Rob te Braake comes on to Lunch with Norm to discuss why reporting and financial KPIs should matter. In this episode we discuss the consequences of not taking care of your finances. We try to outline how financial literacy can help owners make better decisions and grow faster. Find out why cash flow is the #1 undervalued metric, and recommended steps to get a hold of your finances. Rob helps online business owners achieve their goals based on financial insights by giving the right value to accounting & reporting and improving decision making within the company. This episode is brought to you by Global Wired Advisors Global Wired Advisors is a leading Digital Investment Bank focused on optimizing the business sale process. Our approach combines decades of merger and acquisition experience with online and e-commerce expertise to increase the transactional value of your greatest asset. Maximizing the value of your company in a business sale is achieved through the full expression of its future potential. Choosing the right representation to provide this vision to the right buyer, means putting your future in focus. For More information visit https://globalwiredadvisors.com/ This episode is also brought to you by Sellerise. Take a deep dive into your business processes to make data-driven decisions and outperform the competition in an innovative way. Sellerise is a comprehensive solution for your everyday business needs with innovative tools like the PPC Dashboard, Smart Alerts, Review Requester, and Keyword Tracker. Everything you need to grow and scale your business is just one click away. Stand out from the crowd and conduct business whenever, wherever. Innovate your effort and work smarter, not harder. The difference is amazing. Sellerise is for professionals at every level of the business journey. Simply select the capabilities that best fit your needs. Visit https://www.sellerise.com This episode is brought to you by Zee Are you a private label seller looking to expand into larger markets internationally or need an experienced  import partner to keep growing? Zee makes selling your Amazon products abroad easy with excellent import knowledge, door-to-door solutions, customer service and scalability. Streamline your import process with Zee today to increase profit margins and continue to scale. Ready to expand your ecomm empire and take your Amazon FBA Business global? Visit https://zee.co to learn more! This episode is also brought to you by .CLUB Domains .CLUB is the most used new top-level domain name and the perfect web address for your membership or subscription-based startup or business. Why? Because your customers are your CLUB! Grow your business with a domain name that instantly means membership and subscriptions. There are a lot of great domain name choices today, but if your business is about building a community of members around a product or service, there's no better URL than YourName.club. With 1.3 million registrations worldwide, there are already thousands of e-commerce sites using .CLUB. - great subscription businesses like Soap.club, Firstleaf.club and Coffee.club. You too can join the .CLUB today. Visit https://www.get.club. On today's show, we have Rob te Braake, Founder of Insight Matters. We will be talking about why financial KPIs and accounting should matter and the consequences of not taking care of it. Find out how to make better decisions and grow faster, and the recommended steps to get a hold of your finances. Rob is an experienced entrepreneur finance guy that helps  online business owners achieve their goals based on financial insights with advice in reporting and accounting to get the information they need. This episode is brought to you by Global Wired Advisors, Sellerise, Zee & .CLUB Domains.

Impact Pricing
How to Design an Effective Sales Compensation Plan that Motivates People and Boosts Sales with Jennifer Kerr

Impact Pricing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:26


Jennifer Kerr is a results-driven professional with a proven track record of delivering top and bottom-line profitability. She is a strategic thinker with the ability to create a strategy, vision, and execute to promote business growth. With a focus on capturing customer value, she consistently delivered projects on time and on budget.    In this episode, Jennifer talks about designing your sales compensation plan and structure to drive behavior and incentivize salespeople appropriately.       Why you have to check out today's podcast:    Discover how to use sales compensation to motivate salespeople to bring in more revenue for your company     Learn how to use KPIs to motivate your sales team to close deals at higher prices by incorporating them into your compensation structure   Find out how salespeople can sell value rather than price        "Value-based pricing has to meet value-based selling in order to be effective."   - Jennifer Kerr      Topics Covered:    01:25 - What led to a pricing role for Jennifer  02:24 - How the pricing tool she created impacted the company  04:34 - A general overview of sales compensation    08:26 - Strategic initiative that is a win-win for both the company and the salesperson  08:50 - How to drive better performance from salespeople  13:27 - The importance of sales compensation base salary to incentivize salespeople  17:23 - What you can do when salespeople don't close any deal after taking the necessary steps   18:38 - Framing an incentive plan side-by-side with value-based selling  20:21 - What is selling value all about  21:40 - Why do salespeople not able to articulate value selling naturally?  25:08 - Leveraging behavioral economics and behavioral insights on salespeople  25:27 - Sharing a tip on how she's using behavioral economics   28:46 - Salespeople wanting a path of least resistance and why they do and how not to let them lead with price      Key Takeaways:    "When you think about more program-based selling, if you're a company or an organization that are on a more mature level, then I think you might want to stop considering widget-based pay, which, in and of itself, could be the lever to pull to get salespeople to sell deals at higher prices and get more margin." - Jennifer Kerr    "If you have four or five steps, and you're not aware, then the design might be off. I go back then to, is the plan design right? I mean, plan design harder." - Jennifer Kerr    "Sales are hard. And that's where I think as pricers, we can certainly help frame up that value base, that value pitch, and flip it into value-based selling. And I think organizations that really focus on that end up winning more than they end up losing." - Jennifer Kerr    "When I say selling value, I think it's how does my product, how does my service impact the P&L of the person I'm selling that to whether it's B2B or how does it impact the household that I'm selling this to. To me, that's value selling because you're not starting with price. And if you start with price, you've already lost in the war of price." - Jennifer Kerr    "Price the product based on its value and the value to the customer. And then go value-base sell it. That's transformational for any organization." - Jennifer Kerr      Connect with Jennifer Kerr:       Email: kerrjennifer63@gmail.com  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jennifer-kerr63/      Connect with Mark Stiving:       Email: mark@impactpricing.com  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stiving/ 

State of Demand Gen
216 - The Biggest Mistake Most B2B Marketers Are Making RIGHT NOW | The MarTech Podcast

State of Demand Gen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 15:30


Marketers love to hate on "vanity" metrics, and rightfully so. But the problem is, they are misdiagnosing vanity metrics and using the real vanity metrics to make strategic decisions. I'm talking about MQLs, eBook downloads, website visits, blog views, etc. These may have been important KPIs back in 2011 when marketing's only goal was to find fit and feed leads to sales. But this isn't 2011. Sales teams can have tools like Zoominfo to find contacts that have fit. Marketing needs to shift their focus to intent. The new goal is to generate demand at the highest level of the funnel—the level you're not even playing in right now. In this episode, Chris talks about what metrics you need to start looking at and how to turn those metrics into revenue. Thanks to our friends at Hatch for producing this episode. Get unlimited podcast editing at usehatch.fm.

GROW B2B FASTER
Ep 43 - Jim McAvoy - How Cold Calling B2B Leads Can Be Better Than Going to the Dentist ;)

GROW B2B FASTER

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 68:02


In today's episode with Jim McAvoy, President at JWMcAvoy & Company Ltd, you will learn:1. How to generate warm, semi-warm and cold leads through effective outreach strategies2. Why you should frame cold calling as a game and leverage your competitive spirit3. The most effective benchmarks and KPIs to track your outreach performance4. A step-by-step guide to formulating a compelling value proposition and mastering engaging cold-call dialogues 5. The tools and tactics that will help you gain an edge in starting cold callsAbout JimJim is an enthusiastic and highly experienced sales professional, striving to find qualified leads for client sales and to support the entrepreneurial world. He has more than 30 years of experience in marketing and sales in diverse areas. Previously, Jim worked for companies such as The Forum Corporation and Communispace Corporation, before founding  his own sales firm in 2004, where today he serves as president. Besides, he is guest lecturer at Chicago Booth and Kellogg Business School for the Entrepreneurial Selling course and author of #LEADS to SALES, focusing on how to reliably qualify leads. In his spare time, Jim is an active member of his local community, enjoys sports and spending time with his wife and three children.About JWMcAvoy & Company LtdFounded in 2004, JWMcAvoy & Company Ltd. focuses exclusively on boosting sales by identifying qualified leads for their clients. Since 1987, founder Jim McAvoy has steadily refined the most effective process for successfully developing qualified leads, quickly converting into revenues. Leveraging this process, JWMcAvoy & Company Ltd. today offers a wide range of lead generation services, such as retainer relationship management and on-site team training designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the front-end portion of the sales function within an organization. About the host Sammy Sammy is Managing Partner and founder of SAWOO.  SAWOO helps companies with Social Marketing and Lead Generation to leverage the power of LinkedIn in a sustainable way. No spam, no bots but building real Human 2 Human connections between you and your B2B buyers. ShownotesFind Jim on LinkedIn(https://www.linkedin.com/in/jim-mcavoy-290b524/)Reach out to Jim via jim@mcavoyleads.com or 610-374-2443 Jim's company JWMcAvoy & Company Ltd.(http://www.mcavoyleads.com/)Jim's book #LEADS to SALES(https://www.amazon.com/LEADS-SALES-tweet-Book01-Qualified-ebook/dp/B005KLSP7O)Jim's favorite business book: The Richest Man in Babylon by George S. Clason Jim's favorite business leader: Warren Buffet

FULL COMP: The Voice of the Restaurant Industry Revolution
Episode 156 - Winning the Restaurant Game: Dana Shertz, of the RMD Group

FULL COMP: The Voice of the Restaurant Industry Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 33:21


I'm always amazed when someone with absolutely no prior experience in our industry can open a place and dominate the market. Today we chat with Dana Shertz of the RMD Group who did just that. In our conversation he shares how he was able to take the lessons he learned while scaling Calloway Golf and leverage them to create a hospitality empire. TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [3:16] Lessons from the sports industry: unpacking the fundamentals of business with Dana Shertz [5:22] Building a relationship-focused business: How to leverage your vendors for success [7:02] Pivoting to restaurants: the road that led a sports professional into the hardest industry on earth [8:17] How to create a banger out of the gate: getting your financial house in order [10:25] The top KPIs to keep track of and optimal review frequency [12:30] The overlap between consulting and operating [13:35] Pandemic drama: thriving through challenges [14:53] Pulling in a crowd: the art and science of tapping into demand [17:07] To compete or play your own game: the mentality of success [21:04] The universal issues: what a consultant sees when they can see everything [21:51] The benefit of mentoring others: learning how to work and think in different ways [24:04] Cultural shifts: changing your mindset to align with generational values [26:38] A philosophy of mutual investment: how to get the best out of your people [28:11] A mentor's mentors: the people who shaped and influenced Dana Shertz [29:52] What will change and what won't: the bird's eye view [31:28] Keeping a focus on what's important: camaraderie in the industry For more on the RMD Group go to https://rmdgroupsd.com

Get Paid For Your Pad | Airbnb Hosting | Vacation Rentals | Apartment Sharing
How to Build Your Team to Scale Your Airbnb Business

Get Paid For Your Pad | Airbnb Hosting | Vacation Rentals | Apartment Sharing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 43:11


When Eric and I started building an Airbnb business together, our hiring process was arbitrary. We would recognize the fact that we needed help, reach out to our network and then hire the first person available. We didn't have clear expectations around what the role would entail. It was impossible to hold team members accountable or help them improve.On this episode of Get Paid for Your Pad, Eric and I explain how creating a job score card for each role, giving an example of how we use key performance indicators (or KPIs) to hold everyone accountable—from our cleaners to the CEO.Listen in for insight on what you need to know about yourself before you start hiring and learn how the ‘hire slow, fire fast' approach will help YOU find the right team members to scale your Airbnb business!Topics Covered Creating a job score card for each roleCommunicate expectations with description of tasks and KPIsOffer feedback, review culture questions at monthly check inHow we use a job score card for the cleaners on our STR teamExpectations clear with KPIs (5-star review for every turnover)Track and offer feedback at review, identify if need support Benefits of conducting monthly performance reviewsCreates intentional space to communicate with team regularlyEasier to have honest conversation within structure of reviewHire team members who are a good culture fitAlign around core values for decision-makingDiverse global team all committed to world-class experienceWhat you need to know about yourself before you hire a STR teamUnderstand individual skill set and how you perceive worldHire team with complementary skills or different perspectiveResources Overnight Success Flying Cat Marketing Who: The A Method for Hiring by Geoff Smart and Randy Street Scaling Up: How a Few Companies Make It … and Why the Rest Don't by Verne Harnish Traction: Get a Grip on Your Business by Gino Wickman Eric on The Sam Skelly Show EP201Legends X STR AcceleratorSTR Legends Mastermind Review GPFYP on Apple Podcasts Subscribe to the GPFYP NewsletterEmail jasper@getpaidforyourpad.com Sponsor Hostfully [Discount Code PAD] See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Resilient Recruiter
How to Achieve Excellent Staff Retention and Sustainable Recruitment Agency Growth, with Neil Dickins, Ep #105

The Resilient Recruiter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 56:28


One of the biggest problems in our industry is the high level of staff turnover and attrition. This can have negative implications on profits, branding, and continuity of service. How do you overcome this? Neil Dickins, the founder of Intellectual Capital Resources, shares how they have achieved excellent employee engagement and retention for the last 21 years. This correlates with them achieving 86 profitable quarters in a row! Founded in 1999, IC Resources now employs over 70 people with 7 offices across the UK, Germany, Austria, China and the USA. They've made over 12,000 placements and are the pre-eminent ‘deep tech' recruiter in the UK and Europe.  In this episode, Neil shares their approach to hiring, organic growth, culture and KPI management, and how ‘letting go' can be a challenge but beneficial in the long run. Enjoy! Episode Outline and Highlights [1:30] Neil reveals how he ended up in the UK and how he fell in love with recruiting. [5:22] Top key factors to IC Resources' success.  [11:58] Being part of the business community: Neil reveals examples of how you can be part of the industry you find yourself in. [21:05] Building a strong business by having no unwanted staff turnover. [22:56] Creating a high level of staff retention [25:00] IC Resources' approach on dynamic KPIs  [28:49] Give your team autonomy and let go. Neil discusses the challenge and benefit of ‘letting go.' [32:12] Discussion on organic growth and promoting from within. [36:37] How to manage your team members who are working remotely. [43:37] Neil's number one message to his teams: hear about the ten-second rule. [46:14] Don't just do it for the money  Neil shares the ‘worst mistake' they ever made. [52:00] Temp checking on your teams: when to support and when to let go. Critical Success Factors for Sustainable Growth and Profitability I reached out to Neil because IC Resources were listed in the Hot 100 List of the Recruiter Magazine. Out of 30-40,000 recruitment firms in the UK, they are 33rd in terms of billings per employee. This is on top of them having 86 straight profitable quarters! Such an incredible feat has a lot of contributing factors. But I asked Neil to boil it down to the key components. Neil mentioned two: Taking the long term view and commitment to both your clients and employees Being actively involved within the business community that you serve Avoiding Unwanted Staff Turnover As we went through our conversation, it was clear that what significantly contributed to IC Resources' strong business is retaining talent and reducing staff turnover. “For 21 years...we almost had no unwanted staff turnover” is how Neil puts it. What are their practices to have such high staff retention? Neil said, “It is a combination of culture and lack of greed.” He laid out some of their employee practices which I believe you will find interesting: Having targets that are reasonable, fair, and achievable. Having a sense of responsibility and achievement. Day to day enjoyment and satisfaction. All of the abovementioned factors are founded on how they manage their KPIs. Their approach to having dynamic and custom KPIs for each person is genius! Learn more about it while listening. The Ten-Second Rule I've noticed that many successful leaders have certain phrases or key messages they repeat over and over to their team until it becomes part of the DNA of the organization.  I asked Neil what message he finds himself repeating when communicating with his team.  He shared a nugget of wisdom that we could all adopt as a fundamental principle in doing business; let's call it the ‘ten-second rule'. This is how he puts it: “People know within 10 seconds of a phone call if you see them as a person or as a pound sign.” How does that impact the overall end-to-end hiring process? Listen to this episode of The Resilient Recruiter to hear Neil explain this philosophy in detail. Our Sponsors This podcast is proudly sponsored by i-intro®.  i-intro® is an end-to-end retained recruitment platform. Our technology and methodology allows recruiters to differentiate themselves from the competition, win more retained business, bigger fees and increase their billings. Be sure to mention Mark Whitby or The Resilient Recruiter for a 25% discount. Book your free, no-obligation consultation here: www.recruitmentcoach.com/retained  Neil Dickins Bio and Contact Info Fell in love with theatre at McMaster University, graduated 1st Class Hons Psych & Drama while running two University businesses. Came to England to study Shakespeare at LAMDA, became ensnared in the thorns of an English rose and stayed in the UK. Helped Chris Benham start Orion Electrotech prior to co-founding Intellectual Capital Resources. Founded in 1999, IC Resources is now 70 people and the pre-eminent ‘deep tech' recruiter in the UK and Europe. Also covering high-level software and supply chain, we can startups full skills coverage outside of legal and accounts. We manage blue-chip relationships through an account management team. Neil makes early-stage investments (Anorak Investments), performs in theatre, runs a weekly poker club and attempts to keep up with the youth on the basketball court. Neil on LinkedIn Intellectual Capital Resources website link IC Creative website link IC Resources on Facebook IC Resources on Twitter @icresourcesteam Victoria's Promise website link - a non-profit organization supported by Neil Connect with Mark Whitby Get your FREE 30-minute strategy call Mark on LinkedIn Mark on Twitter: @MarkWhitby Mark on Facebook   Subscribe to The Resilient Recruiter

Sports Maniac - Digitale Trends und Innovationen im Sport
#312: Inside Exasol: Kann ein Sponsor die DFB-Elf besser machen?

Sports Maniac - Digitale Trends und Innovationen im Sport

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 29:40


Ist es möglich, den nächsten Messi anhand von Datenmustern zu erkennen? Dieser ambitionierten Frage geht Exasol nach. Das Nürnberger IT-Unternehmen ist im vergangenen Jahr beim Deutschen Fußball-Bund (DFB) als Sponsor eingestiegen. Gemeinsam gehen sie nun konkreten Fragestellungen nach auf Grundlage von Daten. Strukturierten Daten. Doch auch Sponsor Exasol ist mit universellen Herausforderungen des Sponsorings konfrontiert. Wie messe ich den Erfolg des Engagements? Der Datenspezialist verrät jedoch relevante KPIs für datenbasierte Entscheidungen. Im Sports Maniac Podcast sprechen wir mit Global Director Sports Marketing Carl Monteiro über die Sponsoringstrategie von Exasol, bekommen anschauliche Einblicke in innovative Cases aus den Zusammenarbeiten mit dem DFB und dem 1. FC Nürnberg und erfahren, warum Lothar Matthäus als Testimonial ideal besetzt ist.  Das sind die Themen im Überblick: Ziele des Sponsorings beim 1. FC Nürnberg Sponsoring Cases beim DFB Insights zur Aktivierung bei der EURO2020 Lothar Matthäus als Testimonial Datenkomplexität der Formel 1  ungenutztes Potenzial der ex-post Analysen Haltung zur WM in Katar   Wir brauchen DICH!

How To Buy Giant Apartment Buildings
9 KPIs Every Investor Should Know...

How To Buy Giant Apartment Buildings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 30:29


Gary is the Co-Founder of the Asset Management Summit, host of the Real Estate Asset Management Podcast, and Co-Author of the book Best In Class. In this episode, we talk about 9 Key Performance Indicators that every investor should know!

No Hacks Marketing
The ROI of SEO-driven Content With Maeva Cifuentes

No Hacks Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 37:24


Maeva Cifuentes, CEO of Flying Cat, has helped companies like Hotjar, Stonly, Operto, and Avantio reduce their dependence on paid ads and turn organic search into a leading revenue channel through scalable SEO content.In today's episode, we tried to answer if it's really possible to measure the ROI of SEO-driven content. Maeva shared her insights on how to handle common SEO objections and which specific KPIs to track to justify how impactful your SEO efforts are. Links in this episode:https://flyingcatmarketing.com/masterclass-keyword-stacking/https://www.linkedin.com/in/maevaeverywhere/If you learned something new today, we would appreciate it if you can leave us a review on your favorite podcast platform.

FULL COMP: The Voice of the Restaurant Industry Revolution
Success by the Numbers: Anne Gannon, founder of the Largo Group

FULL COMP: The Voice of the Restaurant Industry Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 29:53


There are a thousand roads that can lead to success in our industry but only one road that leads to profitability. Today we're talking numbers with Anne Gannon, founder of the Largo Group. In our chat today we're going to explore what the formula for success looks like by examining some of her most successful clients and unpacking the tactics, tools and strategies they've used to achieve massive profitability. TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [2:56] How to stop playing catch-up: The trends worth tracking weekly. [4:20] Analyzing your restaurant. [5:26] The labor crisis: an economic perspective and evaluation. [7:01] Bottom line revenue: budget and operational inefficiencies [8:15] The reality of labor: You can't have it both ways. [9:55] Lessons from the best: where passion and practicality collide. [11:51] Profitability: you are in control of your own destiny. [13:50] An industry comparison: where we can shift, and what we can embrace. [15:33] The KPIs you should be tracking and the tools to do it with. [17:24] Nauseating, but necessary: what we really should be considering when we invest in a POS. [19:28] What we shouldn't return to: the hidden dysfunction in the successes of 2019. [21:43] Cashflow is king: remembering the pain of being top-heavy. [23:53] Setting yourself up moving forward. [25:25] Financial aid resources you don't know about yet. (Here, have some money. You're welcome.) [26:56] What we don't know we don't know: Accounting doesn't actually suck (really!). [28:20] Congratulations are in order. For more on her company go to https://www.thelargogroup.com

SuperFeast Podcast
#142 Honouring Masculine Strength and Spirit with Aaron Schultz

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:06


Today's episode is one of the most important conversations we've had on the podcast all year. In this first of our Brovember episodes, Mason chats with Aaron Schultz, the founder of Outback Mind, A mental health and wellbeing programme that helps men from regional Australia manage anxiety and develop the right skills to stay healthy in the body, mind, and spirit. Growing up in regional Australia himself, experiencing the downward spiral of mental health issues, unfulfillment, and toxic environments, Aaron knows first hand the challenges men can face. A healing journey ignited by an introduction to Buddhism and self-love, Aaron has spent the past 20 years building a career around helping men to become more conscious and connected to their true selves. Today, Aaron is a leading Anxiety Management teacher, meditation/yoga teacher, and a specialised mind/body coach, with a great ambition to help others; Particularly men from regional areas. Aaron works to bring about a level of consciousness and understanding to a whole collective of men, born into an environment where a natural trajectory is to work for the economy and serve the colonial system; With little to no cultural ideologies in place that nurture them connecting to their true purpose. His organisation, Outback Mind; Focuses on creating a culture and lifestyle that gives these men the tools and solid foundation needed to deal with emotions and realise their heart purpose. In this soul-centred conversation, Aaron talks a lot about untying the embedded emotion of fear in society. An emotional response instilled in most of us; Fear permeates the colonial structure and has become a default operating system for so many. Fear of judgment, being different, or being vulnerable inhibits a lot of men from discovering their true purpose and potential. This is a beautiful conversation about masculinity, vulnerability, and the destructive cultural ideologies placed upon men. Mason and Aaron dive into Men's holistic health, the changes we need to make in society so men can thrive, and why we can't wait for a system that's not serving us to bring about the changes we need. If we want to change, we have to activate it ourselves by supporting each other and our communities in the areas that matter. This episode honours the strength, spirit, and wellbeing of men and is a much larger conversation about humanity. Tune in.     "It's so important to be able to give guidance and be strong within yourself so you can be a light to others, because that's really what the world needs right now more than ever. I believe my job here is to try and create light so these men can start to become more conscious and take autonomy within themselves". -Aaron Schultz     Host and Guest discuss:   Men's circles Yin Yoga for men. Men's mental health Self love and acceptance. Resources for a purposeful life. Processing anger in a healthy way. Learning from indigenous cultures. Using physical exercise to process anger. Compassion for ourselves and each other. The prison system as an industry to make money. Developing a relationship with the masculine and feminine. The power of daily routine for a purposeful and productive life. Getting in flow with the seasons, cycles and our circadian rhythm.   Who is Aaron Schultz? Aaron Schultz is a leading anxiety management teacher, speaker, and private coach. He focuses on practical solutions to help individuals improve mental wellbeing and overcome anxiety. Aarons vision is to empower people to take a proactive approach to wellbeing, feel safe and supported, and become free of physical and mental illness by building healthy lifestyle behaviours that help individuals become self-aware, live more consciously, and thrive. Aaron is the founder of Outback Mind, a yoga, and meditation teacher (with over 5000 hours of practical teaching experience) specialising in Yin, Hatha, and Kundalini Yoga and transcendental meditation. Aaron also has extensive experience training individuals and groups in high-stress industries to manage anxiety in and out of the workplace. Aaron was recently awarded the People's Choice Award at the Queensland Men's Health Awards for his work creating a healthier future for men and boys.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Shen blend Cordyceps Deer Antler Ashwagandha Eucommia Bark Outback Mind website Outback Mind podcast Yin Yoga with Anatomist Paul Grilley     Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:00) Aaron, thanks so much for joining me, mate.   Aaron Schultz: (00:02) Pleasure, Mason. Thank you for having me.   Mason: (00:03) Yeah, well, yeah, my pleasure. My pleasure. Good. Do you want to just like give everyone a little up to date, little download on what you're doing at the moment, where you're focused at the moment is, and what the grander vision is for yourself and likewise, Outback Mind.   Aaron Schultz: (00:19) Yeah, thank you. I guess I come from a rural background in country Victoria. I was brought up traditionally, getting all the trauma that the education system sort of laid upon me, and that took me into poor lifestyle behaviours and believing what the TV told me. So, I started drinking and doing all the wrong things, and I disconnected from my real purpose and my soul pretty early because of the way society was sort of gearing me. So, sort of went into those poor lifestyle behaviours, and I knew underneath all that there was something greater, but I had to follow the breadcrumbs society had sort of laid out for me and worked hard, did all the things, bought the houses, and had the material stuff, and all that too.   Aaron Schultz: (01:15) And yeah, basically ended up a bit of a mess in my thirties and had to redirect myself. But following that, I've sort of had a real vision to be able to help guys like myself from rural communities to be able to find out who they really are and follow that. Everyone's got something inside them that maybe they haven't had the courage to dive into. So, I've been able to help others through my own experience to fast track that basically by giving them some tools and some guidance and advice around following their true purpose in this lifetime, I guess, at the end of the day, and not having to go through all the shit that I went through, but that's also beautiful in its own essence because we do learn from that sort of stuff. But to be able to help a young man or to help someone get some direction, I think's my real purpose here, and to be able to explore all the beautiful things that humanity has to offer without going into all the negative stuff that takes us away from our true alignment at the end of the day.   Mason: (02:27) With this young, colonised Australian culture that we've got here, I mean, especially in the tribe, what do you see as the biggest thing? You are a part of that culture, and you and others are emerging to fill these gaps that are allowing such big mental health challenges, or just generally not being able to get onto your purpose and everything that kind of comes with that. If you look overall at our culture, what do you think is the biggest thing that we're yearning for, or that's lacking, or there's a blockage around that's enabling all these things that you're solving? What's enabling it to become an issue to start with?   Aaron Schultz: (03:11) Yeah, really. I always say to people "What are traps that are holding you back?" And it's primarily the underlying fact that is fear. We get put into fear early and that pretty much becomes our default. You always keep going back to fear all the time. But to be able to help people understand what helps them feel calm, I need to be able to create a culture and a lifestyle around that because that's really the heart purpose and the soul journey, I guess, at the end of the day which a lot of guys, including myself, never understood or don't understand, and I don't like seeing people go through the whole lifetime without having that connection.   Aaron Schultz: (03:58) I think we've all got something within us which is our true purpose and our true calling. We've got a job here to do, many of us, and to be able to find what that is, to be able to direct your life around that I think's really, really important to be able to make it simple to people. I go back to my own sort of journey. I was sort of messed up in my thirties, and I went to a doctor, and all he wanted to do was tie me up in knots. But I basically just had to take direction for myself and then start to work on myself again and get back to that little boy that was never really nourished, I suppose, at the end of the day.   Aaron Schultz: (04:35) So, that sort of resonates with guys when you talk to them because they sort of see that within them when you're done, and to be able to give them real-life experiences and stories about it but to do it vulnerably I think's really important. I was never courageous enough to be vulnerable about the way I felt as a human, come from a very judgemental environment which most rural communities are. It can be very much like that. And you touch on the colonial model. The colonial model is pretty much all about fear, force, and control, and ourselves are really penetrated with that early on. To be able to release that I think is really important. It's our birthright to feel that freedom, I guess, at the end of the day.   Mason: (05:23) When you work, so especially, I mean this isn't just going to be rural community, but that's where you are predominantly working, when you're working in rural communities with the lads and you start looking at purposefulness, soul journey, I'm sure there's different for them, they resonate with different ways of the connecting with that, and talking about that, I'm sure you've got lots of ways of approaching, what's the outcome? Do you find that it's different where you go? Everything's going to be unique, but for some people, is that purposefulness something that's a big life goal? Are you seeing at the moment, is it just them dealing with some inner turmoil so that they can just do their job purposefully and enjoy where they're at? What do you see the biggest outcome of how they actually feel their purpose, and what does it look like? I'm just thinking for some blokes and women, but blokes that are listening that are like, "What is that?" Is that, all of a sudden, I know my purpose is ABC or how does it look?   Aaron Schultz: (06:23) Yeah, yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (06:25) Men are confused, to be perfectly honest to you. We're educated to support the economy really at the end of the day. We come out of school, we go into uni or work, and we sort of have lost that real connection with our true self. That takes us into poor lifestyle behaviours, getting into relationships which we aren't aligned with. Really, once you start to explain this to people in a men's circle or one on one or whatever it is, people start to actually realise that not so much that they're fucked up, but they've actually taken themselves away from their true alignment to be able to do what society's expected of them or what their community's expected of them, and I was very much like that. I was always trapped in this thing of what other people thought about me and a lot of guys are the same.   Aaron Schultz: (07:21) They're very much at that entrapment of expectation of others. To be able to start to give them tools, to unpack that so they can feel safe within themselves because a man very, very rarely feels safe with who he actually is, to be able to develop a relationship with this masculine, feminine energy too, which took me a lot of work to be able to understand that as well, to be able to release anger, but then also to be comfortable with that anger too so you can develop a relationship with both sides of you and humanity, I guess, at the end of the day. But I think we have this lack of awareness within ourselves about who we truly are, and we're not just put in on this planet to be able to work, pay taxes, get a super, and die, and to be able to bring that back into real-time for people so they can start to work towards their true alignment.   Aaron Schultz: (08:24) One thing that really changed me a few years ago was going and talking to old men at the end of their life about had they had a successful life and nine out of 10 said no because they were never able to reach not so much their potential, but who they really wanted to be and be able to follow their passions because of expectation of fear, judgement , all that type of stuff in these rural communities where I come from. So, that's been said to me. I'm not going to wait. I want to try and fulfil my life well and truly before then, but also to help others do the same. We've all got that ability within us. It's just about sort of untying the knots and the tangles to be able to get some structure on how we live our lives a bit more functionally and freely moving forward, I guess, yeah.   Mason: (09:11) You brought up men's circles. It's an offering. It's an ancient happening. It's something logical, and to be honest, something I've been engaged in a lot, but have kind of just a bit, I think, steered clear of a little bit, while especially the Byron Bay scene kind of figures out without the political correctness, just open a space where you can truly explore what it is for you as a man, without dictating the outcomes and trying to say what a man is necessarily. But just how important are these, not just in rural communities, in metropolitan cities? Is this just a novelty, something we're doing in Bali and Byron? Just how important is this to the emerging and evolving culture of Australia and around the world?   Aaron Schultz: (10:10) Yeah, and you think about it because I had a good core group of friends in primary school, right? It's just been high school, the egos and everything open up, right? You just become cynical, critical, judgemental, all those sorts of things, right? But at the end of the day, strip everything away, you've got a heart connection with your brotherhood, I guess. When you see the egos of others and their judgements and opinions of the mind and all those sort of things, but once you strip away that, all the work's got to be done in the privacy of their own heart.   Aaron Schultz: (10:47) I start a men's circle with a meditation, and I take them on a journey for 11 minutes, and I stripped them away from big citation of the mind and all the things that are going on. We get back to this true purpose again. Okay. After that 10 minutes, we're de-escalated and we're right, and then we can start to open up about what's going on here. So, what I'll do is I'll talk, I'll bring a topic in. I'll pair people up. They'll go and talk about that topic, come back, then they're de-escalated even further. Then we go into a circle and we talk about what's going on in our lives to be able to unpack that and have that support of others as well. So, the vulnerability is the biggest thing for a man actually be able to be vulnerable. As I said, it was a tough thing for me.   Aaron Schultz: (11:33) When new people come along, I'll talk about that sort of stuff so they actually feel safe. That's the thing with a man. We're in this protection mode consistently. We're in this fight and flight, this fight mode. Once we can be free of that protection and start to open up, that's when we can start to unload and start to unpack some of the challenges that we have going on within ourselves, and a great way to do that is to express that around other men, to be able to be vulnerable, but also to be able to tap into the feminine side which we don't understand, which can really help us create great levels of self-awareness at the end of the day which many of just don't have.   Aaron Schultz: (12:13) As I said, we're constantly on chasing the bread crumbs and all the material things that society now thinks that we need to help us feel good. But once we sort of get away from that and start to talk about the way things are and the way things are going on with us, I just think we can start to be more conscious about the way we live our lives at the end of the day.   Mason: (12:36) I mean, it is quite simple. It's amazing, but when you dip in, when you sink into that space, even just that intention, and you can just see. Sometimes, yes, whether it's a group of mates that we have, or if you have a partner, it's incredible to be able to be vulnerable to that partner and share. There's sometimes so much to unpack, it doesn't feel like it's overly appropriate for your lover to be that person that has to cop all of it and hold it, and that's the biggest thing. Having a group of men, strong men, men that can be soft as well just to feel supported in that, that you don't have to bottle it in to protect the people around you as well.   Mason: (13:21) Then also, you mentioned anger. I think it went from that culture where men are just aggressive and angry to that's bad and that's toxic, and then to this point now where no, it needs to be felt. If you've bottled it up that long, it's going to be raging and wanting to come out, and to know that you're in a space of other men that understand it, and ideally a space where you feel you're not going to get judged for it, it feels, yeah, it's obviously very sacred. And just going through your website, I've just gone, "You know what? That's really something that could be healthy for me right now."   Aaron Schultz: (14:01) Yeah, yeah. I appreciate that. I just share a bit about my own journey. I had these little traumas going on in my childhood which I've never dealt with, and that sort of took me into drinking and masking all that sort of stuff. When I hit 37, I was at the stage where I could take my life or I could change and move through that. So, I had that seesaw going on, and the easy thing was to go, "Okay, I've had enough of this. I'm out of here." And that's what happens to lot of guys. I lost my job and I felt worthless because I was attached to that title and that outcome, and yeah, as I said, I've never got to know myself.   Aaron Schultz: (14:51) So, put my foot into the gym and fitness, and a lot of that anger came out with the fitness and lifting more and more chin-ups, and all that sort of stuff, and I went from an average body into a pretty strong, fit body, and all the accolades and everything that came with that. Then I started to win things, and then I started to do these unbelievable athletic pursuits. And I had this moment where I could have went further and went to America and done all this sort of great stuff, or I could have said to myself, "Okay, Aaron, you've done well here. You don't need to do that anymore." That's what I did. I didn't keep pushing.   Aaron Schultz: (15:32) So, that took me into Buddhism, and Buddhism taught me to be kind to myself and be vulnerable. That's where the healing started to happen. With men, we'll keep pushing. That masculine side is very strong. That was the opportunity and the learning curve for me to be able to retreat from that, and then start to find that side of myself which had never been explored or never understood. To fast track things a bit, yin yoga was the thing for me which basically helped solve a lot of problems that I had because it just taught me to settle down, slow down, be accepting of myself, and then to be able to, yeah, learn how to use the body to settle the mind at the end of the day, to be able to develop a relationship with yin and the yang of life.   Aaron Schultz: (16:32) So, if I hadn't kept pushing fitness, that would've pushed me into this yang space, and the ego would've been dominant. To be able to understand the ego and become teammates with the ego, rather than just living that mindset consistently because I think that's what a lot of us try to do. We just think we've got to be a performer consistently to be able to have the vulnerability which was very hard for me with yin yoga because my body was so tight and that. But over time, I just had to keep showing up, and now I teach others, but also, it's part of my daily practise to be able to use the yang and use the yin together and have that harmony to develop that neutrality, I guess, at the end of the day and a high level of awareness.   Aaron Schultz: (17:22) Your mind, the way you are feeling on a basis changes, but if you can provide yourself with the practical tools to manage that better, I think you're not only going to be a better individual personally, but that's going to help spread light to others as well.   Mason: (17:41) How does that go down when you... I know we were talking just before we jumped on the podcast and when you're working in the prison system. Are you still working in the prison systems?   Aaron Schultz: (17:49) Oh, well not really. I don't work for the government, but I was going and teaching yoga in the prisons and doing some self-awareness training for prisoners. That may change now that we've got to be double jabbed so I'm not too sure about that one. Yeah. So, what we do is I'll just talk or the guy from WA will go and help guys come out, put them into a job, and then give them that pathway so they haven't got that vulnerability when they're out. The whole system is about bringing people from punishment or trauma, giving them more punishment, and then they're on their own when they get out. That doesn't work. We actually are able to go in, help identify the right people to match them up with the right employer, give them stability, but my role is to be able to keep them self-aware through mindfulness practises before they're released, so they come out and they've got a daily practise they can tap into so they can keep their job, don't get caught up with all the old belief systems and stay on track.   Aaron Schultz: (18:54) So, we don't get funding for any of this. We're trying to create something here which is going to help humanity in many ways, and that's something I'm really passionate about. That's primarily helping guys that have got lots of issues. We're punishing people consistently for trauma that's not their fault. To be able to help guys identify that, to help them feel safe, and it's okay, they can start to rebuild their lives again, this is something that's groundbreaking, that hasn't been explored before. So, to be able to take a young 25-year-old that's had a terrible life to help them reinvert that or a 55-year-old which has had this constant cycle of incarceration to be able to feel sacred in themselves, to learn some of the life skills which can keep them balanced is really beautiful at the end of the day because everyone's got a purpose in this lifetime and be able to help them become more stable and self-aware about their emotions, I think it's really important, and that's something that I want to try and do more of over the next period.   Aaron Schultz: (20:06) But I've got higher things that I want to do later on. It's just the stepping stone, and I keep getting downloads about this when I do my meditation in the morning that this is my journey and this is my purpose for this time. So, trying to be true to that, I guess, at the end of the day, rather than chasing money and all those sorts of things because I think if you're working in alignment with yourself, then everything else will take care of itself.   Mason: (20:33) What do you see is the biggest consequence here with the trauma? Obviously, the same is happening in various ways for women, but sticking to men, this lack of capacity or want or willingness or ability of our culture, the system, especially the corporate system to identify with a lack of initiations, a lack of support to identify traumas, having men being comfortable in themselves, what's the biggest... When you look at our country and our world, what do you see is the consequences that are rolling out of this being the case of us having this unwillingness and deficiency to support men to get in touch and on that path?   Aaron Schultz: (21:19) Yeah, yeah. Yeah, look, I just think that the whole system is working against this at the end of the day. You say, for example, that someone is experiencing self-doubt consistently. Well, as soon as they drive around a corner, they're seeing a billboard to drink beer. It's going around the other side, they're seeing a billboard to eat junk food, all this type of stuff. So, we're getting mixed messages consistently. Your body is smarter than you. Your body's always trying to give you the truth, but we're blocking that consistently because of the domination of the mind. We haven't been taught how to read what's going on below the shoulders and the message that that's consistently sending us.   Aaron Schultz: (22:06) So, yeah, to be able to find ease within yourself and ease with that trauma, some of the things that have held you back, this has happened for a reason, whether it be good or bad, and then to be able to accept that, and self-acceptance is such a hard thing because we are so geared to keep consistently beating ourselves up. We're consistently beating ourselves up, and I have that issue, not so much now, but I know it pops in every now and then. That is not a bad thing because it's there to protect me and keep driving me in some ways, but sometimes I really need to recheck myself and be kind to myself at the end of the day, and that's a skill that we're lost that ability to be able to nurture ourselves and be kind of to ourselves I think's so important because we've got the foot on the pedal consistently where we're not actually taking that off.   Aaron Schultz: (23:03) So, yeah, to be able to dive into some of those traumas, through my meditation practise now, I'll go into some things that happened to me when I was younger which gave me trauma, and then I'll be able to say thank you to that because it actually helps me move forward. That's a big thing for a guy that's new to this sort of stuff to learn, but you can give them simple things that actually help them on a journey of self-acceptance, then all of a sudden, they're on a pathway to transformation rather than being stuck in the old patterns all the time, if that makes sense.   Mason: (23:39) I mean, it completely makes sense. I mean, it's funny. I know I can go really sinister right now and talk about the motives of a keeping a culture this way and keeping everyone kind of huddled down, and kind of like a commodity, as long as they're just designed and as long as it's all working to design, just working, being in the workforce, and doesn't matter. We can deal with all the issues. And then you add the confusion of there's a lot, and some of it kind of rightfully, some that's gone absolutely too far is the bastardization of men and masculinity kind of thrown in there at the moment, and I'm not sure what your position is around this. It's something that's been obviously going on for years and super prevalent at the moment.   Mason: (24:29) I'm just saying with that perfect storm, for the efficiency's sake, for the resources's sake of our country and our culture, it makes complete sense to put energy in into this, and I guess I can just say for people listening as well, I get the sinister intentions and also get the fact that you're looking, I don't know, looking through the matrix and being like... Even if you guys can't see that this is the greatest thing to bring love, getting people on purpose, men on purpose, better for families, better for women, better for everyone yet you're fighting for funding.   Mason: (25:08) I mean, it always perplexes me, but then it doesn't because I go, "I know if I can have a..." I don't know why it's surprising, but it does still. It's baffling because the yield of benefit from... You imagine rolling out what they've done with PCR testing and vaccination, what they've done in such a small amount of time, if they rolled out with half of that, a quarter of that resource and intention towards let's get everyone properly rehabilitated, feeling purposeful, and getting over the traumas, the amount of efficiency that would be put into our culture, the amount of stress that would come off our medical system from all these mental health... Suicide comes off. All of a sudden, you got all the stress that goes into families when that happens. It really kind of brings it. It makes me really quite emotional. With the work you're doing, I'm sure you feel the gravity of it. Just how much, the utopia, that we're knocking on the door of?   Aaron Schultz: (26:20) I don't get angry about it. I see with compassion because I know there's such a better way. So, the whole government model is keeping people DDC which is dumb, docile, and compliant. Right? The whole system is around keeping people unhealthy because it's good for the economy. We've actually fucking become topsy-turvy here with the way that we really should be directing humanity. You're right. Giving people the tools and skills to be able to deal with those things rather than pushing it the other way is really the key to that.   Aaron Schultz: (26:54) Now, I believe that there's going to be a moment in time over the next, maybe 10, 20 years where there will be a real shift. We can't keep going down this role of basically pushing people away from what we're meant to be doing here as humans. You think about it. At the end of the day, it's only been the last 20, 30, 40 years that we've had so much domination. People were living in those days where they were sharing. Things were much more aligned with the way we're meant to be functioning here as humans, but they've taken away our vegetable gardens, our fruit trees, all those sorts of things to direct us to go to the supermarket. Convenient has become so much more common these days because really, at the end of the day, what it is mostly is it's the economical support and stimulus that goes with it.   Aaron Schultz: (27:49) So, if you look at a person that's incarcerated, that's an industry. The prisons have become an industry. The junk food has become an industry. All these different things have popped up. When I was a young fellow, pubs closed at 10 o'clock. Now, they're free for all because they realise they can keep more people employed. There's emergency services that are going to be employed to compliment all the pisspots, all those sorts of things. So, keeping people mentally unbalanced and physically unwell has become an industry, an entity of its own so that's continually stimulating the economy. But you're right, the counterbalance that is to be able to create a wellness culture which is going to be so much more beneficial at the end of the day, they can't see that at that level. The whole draconian thinking and the draconian model is really wrong.   Aaron Schultz: (28:45) My job here and I believe your job here is to try and create light so people can start to become more conscious and take autonomy within themselves so they can actually start to think, "Well, maybe what I've been fed is bullshit. Now, I'm going to put some decent fertiliser onto my body, and around me that's going to help nourish me," rather than sort of punishment at the end of the day because we're really directed into a world now of self-punishment. Most people are feeling like a shithouse on a daily basis, physically and mentally, and that's the only way that they know. So, where I live, there's a coffee cart. People are lining up there consistently to get their energy. I'm going down and I'm doing meditation on the beach and getting energy from the earth and the sun. People don't see that because the TV's telling them to go and get their fill of coffee, and then at the end of the day, drink beer to find that balance, and I was brought up in that.   Aaron Schultz: (29:42) So, I understand what it's like, but I see that with compassion. I see these people that are making decisions with compassion. I spend time in Parliament House in Canberra, and I've been around the government, and I understand how it all works. I have people that are in fairly high-level roles come to me consistently because they're actually empty and lost with themselves. They're putting energy into all the stuff that they think is real and right, but at the end of the day, it's taking away from their true alignment, and I don't want to see them get to the end of their lives and think what if. We can actually create a culture of self-autonomy and well-being now for them. That's why it's so important to be able to give guidance and be strong within yourself so you can be a light to others because that's really what the world needs right now more than ever.   Mason: (30:38) I mean, you brought up again, getting to the end of your life, whether or not there's regret or whatever. I always like to sprinkle in that it's going to be diverse, I imagine very diverse in terms of little regrets and tweaks, or was I on track or not. It's not just black and white. But I was just thinking, for everyone listening, especially the boys listening, tracking to the end of their life which I think you've been with your meditation practise. I'm sure there's a lot of work in acknowledging your death and the impermanence, and I always find that most of the time, ultimately, my most rewarding and favourite part of my own inner practise is facing my own mortality and always going into that darkness and seeing what emerges.   Mason: (31:32) But I always love thinking about that, either that deathbed or my 80-year-old self, and using that as a lighthouse, and that always gives me insights, and can I map somewhat or an understanding of the terrain. Well, I can feel it. I can feel the terrain and how many things are going to change in all those years. For you in your work, for the guys listening, when they think about themselves kind of on that deathbed, or when they're an elder, hopefully an elder, and they're tracking back, what resources would you recommend for them to have in place which would be the fertiliser to give the capacity for that rich garden of a purposeful life to come about?   Aaron Schultz: (32:15) Absolutely. Look, we're only on this journey in this body for a period of time, but primarily, if you can keep yourself in routine on a daily basis, you will not age. Physically, you may change, but mentally and spiritually, you will stay coherent. So, to be able to utilise a physical body in a manner where it's being nourished on a daily basis, externally by movement, those types of things, to be able to nourish it with the right nutrients externally that come into the body to be able to help it survive and thrive really well.   Aaron Schultz: (32:57) But also, to be conscious and connected to nature and all the things that are beyond that, I think that that will hold you in high regard so you don't leave this life feeling unfulfilled because every day for me is an opportunity to have an opportunity that I've ever had before and I've got to remind myself consistently that every day has been different, and I'm grateful for the days that have gone before because yeah, once you've got that, you will not have any regrets, and every opportunity, every moment is unique, and it's something that we've actually become disconnected with because we're so dominated by the mind and what we think is real.   Aaron Schultz: (33:45) Humans are the only creatures on this planet which are working away from our alignment. Look around at everything else and they know what they're doing. They're sourcing the food. They're doing all the things that nature intended and provided for them, but humans have become disconnected and lost from that. There's so much we can learn from our indigenous cultures that can give us that connection again. You and I are on this land through other entities, by people that have come from other lands that have come here and created us so we've actually lost a sense of purpose as men as well because we haven't got that connection with something.   Aaron Schultz: (34:27) I've learned so much of indigenous people from when I was a young boy, but to also what I'm doing now to be able to really connect and learn from them, and I'm helping indigenous guys connect back to their culture because that's the most powerful gift that they could have while they're in these bodies in these times primarily at the end of the day because that is human, isn't it? You know where you're living, you're living in a community, you're sharing, you're in a tribe, all that type of stuff. This is what I believe we're meant to be doing as humans. We're actually just lost touch with that at the end of the day. To be able to be grounded on a daily basis is so important.   Mason: (35:06) Yeah, I think it's kind of one of those things. I've done a few podcasts lately with some... I just did one with Jost. So, I don't know if Jost from-   Aaron Schultz: (35:17) No.   Mason: (35:17) He's a German Daoist and acupuncturist and can go in all kinds of direction. And again, in this podcast, we just came back to sleep in terms of the ultimate thing to bring that armour in terms of what's going on in the world at the moment and love. It's so often, and that racing part of my mind is like, "All right. So, what's that thing?" And asking you that question, you're like, "All right," that consistency through your day, that routine through your day so that you're grounded. It just landed again. I've tightened it up so much this year, and I'm one of those people that I'm like, "Oh no," if I've got that scheduled dialled and I'm refining it and it's all scheduled and locked in, it means I'm not free, and I've got that little Peter Pan syndrome kind of going on.   Mason: (36:03) But I've just watched what happened to my mental health this year when I just dialled in to that calendar and not really respecting, when I have a meeting, respecting the clock, respecting that I've put that in my schedule for a reason, and keep on refining, don't get down on myself. I can't believe what's happened to my mental health and stability just through that, with movement, with breathwork, with meditation. And again, I'm one that stumbles a lot in that and it quite often doesn't go well, but then just to not give up and just remember, that is the key. You've just given us that that's the key for when you're an old codger. That's what will get you feeling really purposeful when you get there. I find that potent.   Aaron Schultz: (36:48) Yeah, absolutely. It's called [inaudible 00:36:53] on a daily basis if you can do something for 10% of your day. I like to do it early in the morning so you can get connected. If you can have a practise every morning which grounds you, then you get rid of all the uncertainty, the fears, the worries, all that sort of stuff, and get back to okay, this is what it's all about, and then you start to live more from your heart. Yeah, I just think that is ancient wisdom which is much needed in modern times. All the ancient traditions talk about it. And in Kundalini yoga, we talk about juts, so just repeat. You repeat on a daily basis., you've got that foundation for your life. It's so important. It's so easy to get up in the morning and go to the coffee machine and get stimulated straightaway. The average man's going to the TV or the radio, and they're putting the fear in the first five minutes of their day, But if you can say, "No, I'm disconnecting from that. I'm going to do something which nourishes myself." That's turning inward primarily to be able to connect.   Aaron Schultz: (37:56) Physical movement is a great way of doing that. I had to do it through fitness to really push my body and learn to connect with myself again. But really, that took me into meditation. It took me into okay, now I've got rid of all my anger, now I can be still. That stillness, it's come from yin yoga now to be able to help the mindset also. I used to be really rigid on a daily basis with regards to what I had to do, but now I wake up and I have all these tools that I can use. So, I wake up and okay, this is how I feel. This is what I'm going to do, and my practise every morning goes for a couple of hours or more, depending on what's happening on that particular day. But that's my rock and my foundation that I've worked on over the last sort of 10 or 12 years.   Aaron Schultz: (38:48) It's a journey because most guys, they want to get to the end of the marathon before they start. The whole thing is to be really in love with the journey. Don't worry about the outcome. Really be in love with the journey and what's happening because every day is unique, and it's a new opportunity to learn about yourself and others. You've got new experiences going on in your day on a daily basis. So, to be able to be in love with that, rather than the outcome, we're so attached to the outcome. I want the beautiful wife. I want this and that and the other, but just be in mind and love with yourself and work within your own truth, and everything else will take care of itself I guess at the end of the day.   Mason: (39:35) And quite often, I mean, in my experience, it's still those things which you perceive to be superficial in terms of your wanting. They're still there. They are created in your life with substance. Beautiful partner, the ability to get on purpose, get some cash in the bank, build some assets, maybe be a provider, maybe not fall into... Whatever it is, it's still that superficial stuff. From what I could see, it's still there. It's just got something in the middle of it.   Aaron Schultz: (40:09) Oh, a hundred percent. It's really interesting. I'm not huge with social media, but I have these memory popups come up, right? And what I was doing three years ago, five years ago, eight years ago, it's amazing. This is one thing that we don't understand as men, right? I believe that we have this cyclic thing going on within us that we're actually engaged in this type of stuff at particular times of the year. I looked at these popups that have been coming out recently. They're exactly how I'm feeling now. These are just reminders of what's happened at the same time throughout a year in years gone. So, these seasons and cycles that we're going through, we actually don't have any awareness and consciousness around that to be able to be in alignment with that.   Aaron Schultz: (41:00) I think that is something that's really powerful and next level with regards to reaching our potential as humans, but also to be able to be more responsive and conscious of what's going on within our lives at any particular moment throughout the calendar year or whatever that may be. It's been a real light bulb for me to actually observe that. That's been a gift as a reminder to show me those sorts of things. And when your emotions and so forth are out of check, it's usually probably a lot to do with what's going on in nature which we don't really understand that much. The mental health industry doesn't probably understand that much about either because it's all about interventions rather than proactive solutions I guess at the end of the day.   Aaron Schultz: (41:50) So, they're the things I want to try and help people understand. Maybe you're feeling like this because of this reason. How many men know about moon cycles and how that works? None. That's the feminine side of them that they don't want to have anything to do with, but if we could start to educate guys more about this sort of stuff, and how this might be affecting their sleep and their circadian rhythm, and all those types of things which we're unconscious of, I think that's really, really important. That's how we can start to be proactive about mental health rather than being reactive like the whole model is currently because that model is about making money out of people.   Mason: (42:34) Isn't it just? So, you've just touched a lot on circadian rhythm connecting to the land. Something I've been, yeah, saying for a few years now is that it's just very obvious and has been obvious for many people for a long time, and there's somewhat many diversions, but there's especially a diversion. I can see a diversion in the genetics and the way that people want to live right now. One I see is those communities wanting to keep at least a foot but two feet grounded on the earth, and then those that I think I kind of see more going up into the cloud, and wanting to plug into a smart city in a technological way of living that doesn't abide by any connection to nature and circadian rhythm.   Mason: (43:20) I mean, we don't have too much longer. I'm sure you've got some resource, or if you want to quickly share your practises for staying tuned in to that natural rhythm so that you can stay tuned into reality, and maybe the reality of what's going on with you. But I also just wanted to touch, and you mentioned mob indigenous culture, any indigenous lads listening, you've already recommended, it's the number one thing. It's kind of in the faces, connect back to culture, connect back to the song and your dance and language. For the Western lads listening because I kind of find it still a little bit icky around here in terms of still a little bit of spiritual just taking of indigenous culture.   Mason: (44:08) Have you got recommendations or just a reminder of how we can also, through connecting with the land, also connect or respect or learn about indigenous culture in a way that... It's energetically. You can feel it's still like a hive there. There's karmic stuff there. Obviously, there's a lot of developing and forming that energetic relationship where we're living harmoniously together. It's still unravelling. Have you got any tips for guys to how approach it, how approach that?   Aaron Schultz: (44:43) Yeah, definitely. A lot of us have had no connection with spirituality because it's combined with religion, and a lot of us have had religious trauma. So, a lot of this stuff that we believed was right about connection is probably not really filling us anymore. So, to be able to, I wouldn't say disregard that, but just to let go of that now what your beliefs probably were, to be able to be more aware of the universal consciousness is key. What's in this life and what's beyond this life is taking your awareness and dimension to another level.   Aaron Schultz: (45:26) And for me, that came from pushing my body really hard and going running early in the morning before the sun come up because I had no noise. It was no life. All you heard or all you saw was the sky and silence. So, I'd go running at 4:00 in the morning, and lot of the ancient traditions talk about the ambrosial hours as being the best time to connect with yourself because you've got no domination from anything. Yeah, so for me as an individual, it was actually using that time in the day to get grounded. You hear a kookaburra wake up at five o'clock, and then all of a sudden, life starts to evolve. You start to realise that life's so much bigger than yourself, once you actually have got that time for connection.   Aaron Schultz: (46:18) So yeah, if anyone's wanting to challenge themselves, let's say get up in the ambrosial hours. Get outside. Do some meditation, whatever it may be. Get connected with the land somehow so that it can actually give you an appreciation of the gift that we've actually in this lifetime. To be human in this lifetime's a pretty unique opportunity and a unique gift. As I mentioned before, we're going about life incoherently to what was really expected of us or what we're meant to be doing here. So, to be able to connect with the fundamental things I think are really key because that'll keep you grounded on a daily basis, and once you've got that foundation, then the rest of your life will evolve around that.   Aaron Schultz: (47:04) We have this innate connection with ourselves, but also humanity. Once you start to get out of the lower levels of consciousness of fear, shame, guilt, greed, and get into the higher levels of consciousness of gratitude, love, kindness, compassion, all those sorts of things, if you can start to tune into those sorts of things on a daily basis early, then that will spread, and you'll have that connection with yourself but also connection with others as well. I think that's really key, and they're the skills that we don't know as men, we don't understand as men because we've been pushed the other way to be sort of in those lower levels of consciousness of society, as I mentioned.   Aaron Schultz: (47:45) But we think that happiness comes from greed and all those sorts of things where really the happiness comes from love and kindness and compassion and all the things that we're meant to be doing here as humans. We're not meant to be in fear all the time. It's a small part of our life, rather being a major part of our life. That fear's here protect us occasionally, but we're not meant to be living in it consistently. So, use the time you have early in the morning if you can to be able to become connected to what's really important. Then, you do this consistently, and over time, you'll develop these habits which become part of your foundation, part of your strength moving forward.   Mason: (48:26) I love it, man. The little simple reminders that are just how profound the outcomes are there. It's just a beautiful, beautiful reminder.   Aaron Schultz: (48:38) Yeah.   Mason: (48:39) For everyone listening. I mean, outbackmind.com.au is your website. Where are you currently at with your offerings and how people can engage with you, besides your podcast, Outback Mind podcast, is that right? Yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (48:55) Yeah. You know, mate, there's not much really. It's something I'm not really strong at. I probably need to be able to do more in this space to offer up things for people. So, really at the moment, we're trying to set up the Outback Minds and foundation side to be not for profit. What we want to do, I've got a friend here that's helping set up a training platform. So, we want to be able to develop men's circles in regional communities throughout all Australia to be able to train guys in those communities so they can run these heart-based circles of men's circles for many years. And I ran them in Victoria and Tassie, and a lot of them are very ego-driven. It's very much in the masculine which is okay, but I just think if we can actually start to build capacity for people through these things, rather than using it as a tool to get things off our chest, to actually be okay to explore what's been going on with their own lives, but also to be able to build our capacity, and that helps us as a man, but also helps us as a family member and members of our community at the end of the day, and that's a proactive way that we approach mental wellbeing, I guess, to be able to provide people with tools.   Aaron Schultz: (50:09) So, yeah, I bring meditation. I bring yin yoga into the men's circles. So, to be able to train guys with some of the simple tools on how to do this, and that I think's really important to be proactive in that space, yeah, so to do that. And I guess I want to get out into regional communities and talk more, try and get into places where they don't have access to great advice or help. The online stuff's been really good for that, but hopefully, once things open up more, I can get out and start to connect with more people out there.   Aaron Schultz: (50:51) Yeah, as I mentioned to you earlier, my real vision is to be able to set up a Vipassanā centre where I can help people come and be still inside for three and 10-day retreats so they can reconnect with themselves because I believe that's a functional thing for humans. It's just to be silent and still for parts of our year. If we can do that twice, three times a year, that's got to be good for our mental wellbeing. We've got to be able to give our mind a rest, and the mind isn't king here. The heart is king. If you can reconnect with the heart, that's really what it's all about. That's how we can improvements health in Australia rather than be too dominated by what's going on above the shoulders.   Mason: (51:30) I love it, man, and I love your work. Encourage everyone to go and at least subscribe to the podcast, stay tuned in on that way, and yeah, it looks like you've got lots of things kind of planned. I can see there's little life experience, adventures there, and workplace wellbeing, all kinds of things. So, yeah, exciting to see the rollout.   Aaron Schultz: (51:51) Yeah. That's the other thing. The workplace has got such a strong opportunity to be able to help people. We're not just going there to get a paycheck. I want to try and engage more with more of our better employers that are ethical to be able to help people, particularly men in their workplace to feel safe, feel secure, feel supported and really valued in the workplace because that's a problem that a trap we've had as humans is to be able to use people by paying them money, but not really give them any care and support, and that's a huge problem with regards to understanding ourselves and our mental health because if we're not feeling good about ourselves in the workplace, then we take that home with us and that creates issues with domestic violence and drinking, and all that sorts of things.   Aaron Schultz: (52:45) So I just think the more employers that I can engage with to be able to help builds a culture I think's really important. My background, I ran labour hire companies. So, I worked with lots of organisations and industries throughout Australia, and I didn't see many employers that were doing it well. So, now, starting to connect with more employers and give them platforms on how to be able to develop a culture which is coherent in the workplace and starting their day with meditation, and all these sorts of things so people can feel grounded before they start their work, rather than just going there, and working to lunchtime, and then going and finishing their day off just to get home, but you actually feel part of something I think's really important. That's [crosstalk 00:53:33] improved capacity for sure.   Mason: (53:36) Yeah. Integrating the workplace back into cultivating a society and a culture that isn't just... Yeah. It's a funny dynamic. I'm an employer, and the amount of energy that needs to go in at each new evolution of the business, all of a sudden, it's not the same as when you were just a small little crew where all your values and these principles just seem automatically known. There needs to start being an unravelling of some structure so that there can be that flow of humanity and that flow of purposefulness, and there needs to be little checks in place. It needs to be integrated into a HR department. For a lot of people, it's beyond what they can handle. I don't endorse it, but I definitely can see how companies get to that point, and they go, "You know what? There's no actual cultural requirement of me to do this. So I'm just going to go to the efficiency route or the easiest route and just do the whatever culture thing." And you just end up using people. It's crazy.   Aaron Schultz: (54:48) Yeah. That's what it's all about. The whole model to do with MBA and human resources, and that's really about what can you get out of people, all the fear you can put into them, all that type of stuff. Oh, there's an EAP at the end of that. If we fuck them up. I'm saying organisations, and I have been for years, that is a last resort. You've got to be really proactive rather than reactive. If you're fair dinkum about what you're doing, if you can look after people, the results will take care of itself.   Aaron Schultz: (55:17) It's the same as with our wellbeing. If we can show up at a value basis as individuals and do things which nourishes, then the results will take care of itself. So, don't worry about the outcome. You worry about the journey. Help people on the journey and then things will evolve. That's where I believe at sports clubs. I've done a lot of work with sports clubs as well to be able to help them become successful, but not worrying about the outcome. If this is the process that we've got to do, so you can start to tune in with what's really real here, and enjoy the process of the journey rather than the outcome at the end of the day.   Aaron Schultz: (55:51) I've worked for businesses. It's all about KPIs and budgets and all that type of stuff. If people are really in flow and intuitive and enjoying what they're doing, then everything will take care of itself because they're engaged, and the output is significant that way rather than sort of worrying about the results so much, you know?   Mason: (56:13) Yeah, and what I've experienced is when the culture is put in place, all of a sudden, something like a KPI or a budget doesn't have that disciplinary... This is a very hard line. To have optics through the business, like a KPI, have them available so that everyone in the team can see what's going on in other departments and for the benefit of the person who's in that, say, my position as a CEO to have those things be present and then to have it entrenched, not just say it, but so it's felt this isn't about making me wrong or bad. This is genuine feedback loop and genuine neurofeedback so that I'm aware of what my team is doing. I'm aware of whether I'm in a place where I'm flowing or not.   Mason: (57:07) And if, this is the hard one, if there's enough trust that you're not getting in trouble, but if there's something starts not going well, it's really great for us to know it so that we can all rally and be like, "What's happening here? Do you need some support?" It seems simple, but my goodness, it's a bit of a difficult task, I think just because we're all so programmed to be like, "I'm being judged. If I don't get the answer right, I'm marked wrong, and I don't get given other opportunities." It's a pretty insidious little parasite of the culture.   Aaron Schultz: (57:54) Get excited, and if you can get rid of that competition or that competitive nature, and give back more compassion, that's where you can grow. I've worked with business. It's all about achievements on a monthly basis and you're competing against others and all those sorts of things. It's really wrong. Yeah, being able be supportive and nourishing of yourself and nourishing your others, I think that's work.   Mason: (58:17) Because when you don't enlist them, them, me, people, whatever in competition, for me, this competitiveness from this jovial place and this playful place, and often, quite a serious place for me, I can drop into the gravity of which I enjoy around, look, in terms of my life vision, this is what's actually on the cards right now in terms of whether I get this project done in time or not. I've only got a certain amount of time here, but that's an emergence, that competitive charge. I'm not trying to beat down anyone else. That's something I think we've got wrong. We try and project something which is going to get us the result, like competition onto a company structure which then brings about reprimanding kind of culture, therefore for fear verse hey, it's really takes a lot of vulnerability to get this feedback and be vulnerable to your team and how you're performing and how you're doing.   Mason: (59:15) But if you come from a place of trust and you give trust willingly or have conversations to get yourself there to where you give trust, all of a sudden, that natural and organic, that's the fertiliser, then that competitive edge, appropriate for you and your nervous system, can rise up and then go back down as well when it starts getting a little unhealthy. It's a hell of a thing, business culture. I'm aware of the time though. I think we'll go on with this for ages.   Aaron Schultz: (59:46) Just remember, it's a friendly universe and everything's trying to work for us, not against us. If we can just work with that, the flow of everything, then everything will be okay, will take care of itself. When we're forcing where we're getting forced against and that's what competition does, it really does put us into a short-term fix, but really the long-term outcome is not great, but the more you can be able to work with the universal charge, if you've got a product, you let products go without any attachment. You've got something great. You're not producing it because you want to get these outcomes. You're producing because it's something which is going to help people. If you've got that belief, that energy goes into that product, and then it goes out and expands.   Mason: (01:00:40) Yeah. That faith, I mean, I've got a bit of trauma around religion, going to a Catholic school as well, but then when I've reconnected to the natural state of faith for me versus institutional faith, as you said, I'm like, "Oh wow. What freedom." I've got an intention and I trust my intention around herbs and education, and I'm sure you have the same experience, and watch it open up as long as you give it... When you keep on turning up and staying consistent within it. Yeah. It's fun. It is fun. It's a great reminder. And I love your work. I really appreciate you coming on and chatting to all of us during Brovember.   Aaron Schultz: (01:01:26) Thank you, mate. I've given a listen to it and we really appreciate what you've done and what you've created here and the great products that you have. I've only started using Mason's Mushrooms and I'm not consistent. I'm only using them every few days. Maybe I need to have it more up, but I like it with cold water rather than hot.   Mason: (01:01:46) In a smoothie. You got the tropical fruit up there I think coming on at the moment. Yeah, it's all good, goes with it. Whatever, a bit of mango, a bit of mango sorbet.   Aaron Schultz: (01:01:57) They'll be out in a couple months so I be into there, I reckon for sure. So, appreciate it.   Mason: (01:02:00) Yeah, well, yeah. It is that consistency with the mushies and the tonic herbs and even do a little bit more than you think you should be doing. Go up the dose a little bit. With your meditation practise, You'll definitely have a greater capacity for the dose.   Aaron Schultz: (01:02:18) Yeah. Yeah, awesome, mate. I appreciate that. I haven't used any drugs for 25 years, marijuana, or any of that sort of stuff. I've never used magic mushrooms and everyone else around the same seems to. Yeah, this sort of stuff is new to me. I was a raw vegan guy for a long time. So, I know it's like to feel dialled in. It felt amazing consistently, but I just couldn't get the product to keep myself sustained. So, I have to find different things now that can help me, I give it a stab.   Mason: (01:02:51) Nice one. Yeah. That was me. I was raw vegan basically, and a yin yoga teacher, funnily, when I was like, yeah, yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (01:03:01) Unreal.   Mason: (01:03:03) Yeah. So, I definitely relate to what you're saying. My wife is a yin yoga teacher and goes over and studies with Paul and Suzee Grilley, yeah.   Aaron Schultz: (01:03:10) Yeah, yeah. Cool. It's interesting. I was to go over there in 2019, but that got stuffed up, and I've done training with four, five other teachers that have all studied with Paul, but I haven't actually gone and studied with him myself. So, yeah. It'll happen at some stage, I reckon, but yeah.   Mason: (01:03:32) For sure.   Aaron Schultz: (01:03:32) Yeah. [inaudible 01:03:33]. It's been something like I come from Bikram yoga to hatha to Kundalini to yin so I've gone through all those journeys. The Kundalini yoga is very powerful as far as creating connections and that type of thing. It's amazing what the energy that comes from the practise actually can do for you. Yeah, so I was really grateful to sort of fall into that too, but it's all these tools that have sort of popped up over the journey.   Mason: (01:04:03) Yeah, they all fit into a piece of the puzzle.   Aaron Schultz: (01:04:06) That's true. Clearly.   Mason: (01:04:09) Beautiful mate. Well, I look forward to chatting to you on your podcast, and yeah. I'll keep an eye up for everything you're up to. Thanks for coming on.   Dive deep into the mystical realms of Tonic Herbalism in the SuperFeast Podcast!

Wholesaling Inc
WIP 819: 4 KPI's Every Wholesaler Should be Obsessed with in Their Business

Wholesaling Inc

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 11:56


There are metrics that you should always monitor in your business and KPI's are one of the most important of them. You need to track enough numbers so you have data to work with. By understanding your KPIs, your sales will improve, you'll become more efficient, and your business will grow exponentially. In this episode, Lauren will give you the 4 KPIs that are most important to track for your business, as well as tips on what you should be doing in order to track them so you have a better understanding of how the KPIs will help you to increase profit in your business and how tracking them will help you make better decisions in the future. RESOURCES: Virtual Investing Mastery Lauren on Instagram

CFO Thought Leader
751: The March Goes On | Dave Damond, CFO, March of Dimes

CFO Thought Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 29:09


When does a mission-driven CFO initiate a crucial turnaround of an erstwhile nonprofit that's been losing money for years and has a legacy pension plan dragging down its balance sheet? Before he's even been offered the job. At least that's how you take care of business if you're March of Dimes Senior Vice President and CFO Dave Damond. “I came in with a change management plan,” reveals the former KPMG auditor, who was a finance executive with American Red Cross before launching himself into his current role in 2018. “In fact, when I was interviewing, they showed me what the current table of organization looked like. And I said, ‘Yeah, that's wrong – here's what it should look like.” Damond got the job, and immediately implemented his plan, which included replacing a 30-year-old legacy ERP installation with a cloud-based system (within a year), hiring new talent (including a controller) and addressing that drag on the balance sheet as interest rates fortuitously plummeted. “We saw a lot of organizations were actually doing buyouts [of defined benefits pension plans],” Damond says while detailing the mechanics of his change plan. “It was something that we had to jump on right away, and we took that opportunity to offer buyouts to all of our people who were already retired.” The move saved the organization $20 million, adds Damond who also shares his take on cashflow analytics, fundraising KPIs, how he managed through COVID and the AI solutions that his finance group is considering investing in.

(in-person, virtual & hybrid) Events: demystified
50: Being Prepared for the Unexpected ft Mahoganey Jones (Events Specialists)

(in-person, virtual & hybrid) Events: demystified

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 32:46


During today's episode we are honored to be joined by Mahoganey Jones, CMP, DES, HMCC - founder and CEO of Events Specialists, a Canadian turnkey event management and production company. Our conversation today focuses around hybrid event experiences, event metrics and KPIs, being prepared for the unexpected, holistic event budgets for hybrid productions, risk management, and much more. Make sure to tune in! “Events: demystified” Podcast is brought to you by Tree-Fan Events and your Unicorn Podcast host is Anca Trifan. ————————— You can find Mahoganey on LinkedIn, or on social @mahoganeyjones ————————— For event and podcast updates, tips, and tricks of the trades, follow us on these social channels: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/eventsdemystifiedpodcast Become a Patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/eventsdemystified ————————— Tree-Fan Events offers Hybrid Event Production Services: https://treefanevents.com/hybrid-event-services/ ————————— If you like our podcast, please show us some love by subscribing to this podcast on your favorite listening platform and following us on Instagram. By leaving a great review and hitting the 5 stars, you make this Podcast visible to other listeners with the same interests as you. Until next time! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/eventsdemystified/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/eventsdemystified/support

Turmeric and Tequila
118. The Power Of Community

Turmeric and Tequila

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 24:51


“One of the marvelous things about community is that it enables us to welcome and help people in a way we couldn't as individuals.”  – Jean Vanier   I am so excited for this one! We are fresh off Podfest Origins, a podcast-based multimedia expo in Florida, and I have my first pod-connect, Peter Ong. Peter is coming to us live from Kuala Lumpur, a Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. That is right, we are worlds apart and yet share the love of podcasting! In a divide world, now more than ever we need unity. What better way to unite than for our love of podcasting and the podcasting community? Peter is a podcaster (obviously), Japanese speaking online marketer, coach, and animation video creator. We talk about Peter's journey into business and podcasting and how we both embraced the Chris Krimitsos, Founder and Creator of Podfest, motto, Start Ugly! It's not easy to get on the mic and share your voice, but it is necessary. You can learn from our journeys that it can be a work in progress (podcasting or any new challenge/ adventure) just begin and be open to evolution as you go. Who knows, you might end up with friends around the world at the very least! Community is everything and finding yours is easier than ever- use your voice, share your words, and make friends… the world needs your individuality to unite accordingly (aka niche communities = family:). Everything is easier when you have the supportive efforts of the fam!   Highlights: Entrepreneurship. Podcasting and the podcasting community. Crossing paths because of common ground. The power of community, support, and chasing the dream. Questioning a better way and using your voice. Starting ugly and imposter syndrome. Branding and marketing. Connection.   Peter Ong: As Digital Media Specialist -Developed and activated comprehensive digital media plans based on individual client needs and campaign objectives. -Identified strategic and tactical opportunities that best fit the goals and KPIs of the campaign. -Collaborated with other internal and external teams in a cross-functional capacity to ensure alignment of campaign objectives and expectations. -Analyzed campaign results to determine optimizations and recommendations for future flights. -Evaluated media partners using 3rd party tools to determine relevancy to target consumer profile.   Podcast Name: ‎創業早點明StartUp Step Into The Startup for Better Self-- Delivers inspiration and strategies for founders to startup their entrepreneurial journey. Podcast Website: podpage.com/chuang-ye-zao-dian-ming-startup LinkedIn Profile: linkedin.com/in/peterongkl   Connect with T&T: IG: @TurmericTequila Facebook: @TurmericAndTequila Website: www.TurmericAndTequila.com   Host: Kristen Olson IG: @Madonnashero Tik Tok: @Madonnashero Email: Info@KOAlliance.com Website: www.KOAlliance.com        

Inside Outside
Ep. 272 - Dave Parker, Author of Trajectory: Startup on Ideation to Product Market Fit

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 36:41


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Dave Parker, five-time founder, and author of the new book Trajectory: Startup. Dave and I talk about a range of topics for helping founders go from ideation to product market fit. And this conversation was part of our IO Live Series recorded during Startup Week Lincoln. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger, Founder of InsideOutside.io. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat to what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started. Interview Transcript with Dave Parker, Five-time founder and Author of Trajectory StartupBrian Ardinger: I wanted to thank our sponsors for this event. We are part of the Techstars Startup Week here in Lincoln. So, we wanted to give a shout out to them and Startup LNK for making this all possible.Also Inside Outside is sponsored by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. As many of you may know about the Kauffman Foundation, they run 1 Million Cups and a variety of other things, but they're a private, non-partisan foundation based in Kansas City. They seek to build inclusive prosperity through entrepreneurship- led economic development. So, we're super excited to have them as partners with us here. And you can find out more about them at kaufman.org or follow them on Twitter at Kaufman FDN on Facebook or Twitter. So, thank you again to the sponsors. Thank you, Dave, for coming on, we had set this up when your book was coming out and I said Hey, I've got the perfect time to do this during startup week. When we might have some startup founders who may be having some questions. You and I met eight or nine years ago through Up Global. We were with Startup America. And you were based in Seattle. You also helped found Code Fellows and you're a five-time founder, so you've got a lot of experience in this particular space. Eight years ago, the startup ecosystem, and what it was like was a little bit different than is today. So, what has been the biggest trends or things that you've seen that it's changed over the course of the few years that we've known each other? Dave Parker: Well, let me go a little further back. I started my first company in 98 in Seattle. And believe it or not bill gates and Jeff Bezos weren't really giving back to the startup community at that time. Oh, wait, they haven't yet. I mean, Bill gives back to like global change the world stuff. Right. But the idea there was, wow there's a bunch of us doing this startup thing, but there's not really anybody to give much advice. So, we did a peer cohort. Which was my first thing. And after a while I was like, wow, we need to level up our city. All of us tend to think of the next city bigger than us as like, oh, we want to be more like, Seattle doesn't want to be like Vancouver, Canada. We want to be like San Francisco. Where Portland's like, well, we want to be more like Seattle.Because I grew up in Portland and then moved here to go to college and never went back. First startup in 1988. Built a software distribution company called license online. The company went from zero to 32 million in sales in 4 years. Which was ridiculously fast. And we went from 3 employees to 150 and in four years. And then we sold the company in 2002.So then in 98 to 2002, if you remember back there, there was a tech bubble in there and there was 9/ 11 in there. So, it was an interesting time. Wasn't a great time to sell a company now, too. But got it sold anyway. And that was my first startup. First of five. Three of them sold. Two of them failed. One in a rather epic crater fashion. Which is funny. Because it was after the first one, that actually worked. So, you know, people were like, I wouldn't do this again. And they're like working on the next one? I'm like obviously got a serial glutton for punishment. So, 16 exits total. So as a founder board member advisor. So, my day job is helping companies and founders sell their companies. Which allows me to my 20% time to work on community building and giving back.Which kind of got me to Startup Weekend and Up Global. Up Global was the merger of Startup America and Startup Weekend. And we did about 1,265 events worldwide, my last full year there, before we sold to Techstars. Including launching Startup Week globally. And we launched it in 26 cities globally, the second year. I ran it in Seattle.Andrew Hyde started it in Boulder. And we ran it in six cities, the first year. And 26 cities the second year. So, startup communities stuff is awesome. And I love it. It's, as you know, though, it doesn't pay, so you have to have a day job. You have to have a side hustle, so you can keep your community building job, right. Or vice versa.Brian Ardinger: Exactly. Yeah. I think we're nine years here at the Startup Week in Lincoln. We got grandfathered in when Techstars made it a global deal. But we found it very helpful to have these conversations, even if it's just once a year to get people connected and reengaged with why it's important to have a startup and why a startup ecosystem is so important in your own backyard.So, you've got a great book out called Trajectory Startup. I would encourage you to take a look at this. There's a lot of books about startups out there. What made you say, I want to take a different take in this and give back to the community by writing a book about startups Dave Parker: Two big things about the book gap that I saw in the marketplace is one, I mean, you, you know, Brian, you've been around Startup Weekend. I'd see people coming out of Startup Weekend and they're like, woo. I met my co-founder, Charles. We're going to leave at eight and then go start our start up. And I'm like, yikes. Like, there are some things you can know before you leave your day job and your benefits and all those things, which allow you to really look at what do I want to know so I can de-risk this as the first semester, right. So, I got to do the market research and competitive analysis and look how big the market is and like, and how do I do that? The book's really focused on, the original title was Six Month Startup. And then I started delivering it in different formats and I'm like that doesn't work for the brand. So, it became Trajectory Series. But the program now is focused on a five-month program that takes you from ideation to revenue. And the idea there is, if you can't get to revenue in six months, it's probably not a great idea. There are exceptions to that rule. Like if you're a B2B or B2B enterprise and you need to build a really robust product, like that's an exception. Or biotech. Or you're doing B to C and you're competing with clubhouse and you're really about growth of users, right? You won't get to revenue in six months. But in general, you should be able to validate or invalidate your idea in six months was the goal. The second thing that came out of it, I kind of backed into was somebody came to me during my time at Startup Weekend. And they're like, hey, can I have your financial model?I'm like, well, yes, you can have it. But yours is a business consumer marketplace and mine's a business- to- business subscription. And those are fundamentally different. I mean, we use the same lingo. And as you know, in startup land, we have our own language, which is knowing how to work the system for sure.But the key there was how many templates would there be. So, I reached out to Crunchbase at the time and the CEO of Crunchbase and said, hey, can you give me a list of every seed funded company in the last 18 months globally. Ends up being twenty-six hundred and fifty-four companies. So hired a team. My son who was in college at the time was my project manager.And we basically looked at all twenty-six hundred and fifty-four websites and where they didn't have a pricing model or a revenue model, that was obvious, I reached out to them and said, Hey CEO, I'm doing this research project on revenue models. How do you monetize? So, we ended up breaking down 2,600 companies into the logical revenue models and there were 14. And that was it.So, I would say the most unique part of the content of the book is really the breakdown of the 14 revenue models that are successful in tech. And how you monetize them. So, the basic unit economics of what are the key metrics and KPIs of each of the 14 revenue models. Consequently, I became super geeky about pricing and revenue.When somebody now gets to give a pitch and they're like, hey, we're doing a blah, blah, blah. I'm like, oh, you're a marketplace that monetizes this way. And people are like, how did you know that? And I'm like, it's actually not a secret. There's 14 just like pick from the list. Right. So, I think for first time founders, the question then becomes what you're building I hope is unique, but how you monetize it is almost never unique. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn. Brian Ardinger: That's an important point, because I think a lot of times we think about the features or the problem we're solving, but we don't necessarily think about the business model itself and you don't have a business without a business model. So, that's so critical to think even at the earliest stages. It may pivot. It may change based on what you find in the marketplace, but at least going in with here's our initial assumption of how we might make money. And the model that we need to... Dave Parker: And that, let me break down the business model in three parts for you, because I think one of the things that all of us look at and we're like, oh, it's in our business model. Kind of like this. It's a black box and it's a secret thing. And one of the things I discovered in the process was here are the components of the business model. So, think about it as a Venn diagram. The top circle is really creating value and how you create value is your product, your service, and your team. And those are the costs associated with creating a product or a service.So, if you're in a service business, if you and I were lawyers, God forbid. We would bill out on an hourly basis. We'd have a pay rate and a bill rate, and that differential would create gross margins. It's a service business. In a product business it's a little harder to predict because we build the software once and we have thousands of users. So, it's not like, oh, every time we build it, we have to create a new and separate version, right. But the cost of building that product, whether it's the six engineers in six months or three years, depending on what it is, is a cost associated with creating value. The value created is the product or the service. There's a cost associated with creating a value. Circle Number Two is the cost of delivering value. And that is your pricing. Because that's a variable, right. That I can adjust. It's my revenue model. How I monetize. It's my marketing and my sales. I fixed the cost to build. I have now fixed the cost to sell. And there's lots of variables in there. There's lots of marketing things you can test. There are a few sales models, not a lot. Marketing is the most creative, and obviously it can be the most expensive in some ways too. And then what you have leftovers, the third bubble which is your top line revenue and your gross margin and hopefully net profit. Those are outcomes. You don't get to control those. You get to control your cost to build it, and you get to control your cost to sell it and the price. But when you think about it, that way, you're like, oh, there's only so many variables I get to be in control of. And since those are the ones that you control of, then I'm a strong advocate of like, know what the levers are you can pull. I talk to a lot of founders and some of the research was interesting. It basically showed that most founding teams don't change their price at all in the first three years. Which is when you think about it kind of crazy. But us as founders, were like, oh, I know all the product detriments and you know, it was kind of like, I would liken it to, if you said, hey, show me a picture of your son, Brandon, I'd be like, oh, I can show you a three-year-old picture of Brandon.He's a super cute kid. He's 28 today. Plays lead guitar in a metal band. Tatted up and you know, with sleeves and gages in his ears. It would be true, but I just want it to be accurate. Right. And I think that as founders, one of the challenges we have is how do I continue to reprice my product as a product feature set goes.So, one of the things I always recommend to founders is having a pricing council, you do once a quarter. Not that you're going to change price every quarter, but you are, you should really think about it. Brian Ardinger: Well, and you can also do tests around it as well. I remember a story, Eric Ries was talking about. He was working in a corporate environment, but they were saying like, this is the price. And he said, well, have you ever tested it? Do you know if you can go higher? And they said, no, no, because you know we know our customers and blah, blah. And he said, well, why don't we just run a test? And let's, you know, throw out a different price and see what happens. So, they ran the test. And it worked. And they said, well, why don't we do it again? Let's bump up the price again. And they ran a test and it worked again. And they realized like all these years they were leaving all this money on the table, so to speak. Because they had never even tested it. They never test to see if they could extract more value out. Dave Parker: There was a company in Seattle and I'm blanking on the name, that I was trying to see if they pull up real quick. So, they were doing a competitor for PowerPoint. It would look at contextually what the content was, and it would make the image suggestions for you. When they launched the product, the product is all the same price, and they came back at one point, and they just doubled it. And they had zero churn. Right. Which makes you think like, oh my God, how long ago could we have done that? Like nobody left. Everybody's like, yeah, makes sense. Like it would have paid more for it all along.Brian Ardinger: So, what are the most common questions that you get from founders at the earliest stages? What are most founders struggling with when they come to you? Dave Parker: When we think about the go to market strategy is definitely a question. So, I'm a product person or I'm an engineer and I'm new to like go to market. There's still a little bit of that theory of like, well, if I get on Tech Crunch, I'll just go viral. And the answer is, no, it doesn't work that way. Right. I mean, it would be awesome if it did. And we see some examples of companies going viral and there's a misattribution Brian of like, well, I'm going to go to market like Clubhouse.I'm like you're B2B and only B to C companies get a chance to go viral. Like B2B companies get good word of mouth maybe but going viral is math. Right. There's probably three big things in startups that are mysteries, but when you peel them back, they're actually not a mystery. It's just math. Going viral means it's called a K factor.So, if you have a K Factor of greater than two, I'll give you this base formula. Every customer I buy, I generate two additional paid customers. So, if you think about WhatsApp right or clubhouse, the answer is I'm in a business model there that actually doesn't require a business model. So, I call it new media.And what you're trying to do is grow your customer base so fast that at some point you'll monetize it through advertising. Not a surprise. Facebook, WhatsApp, et cetera. At some point you'll monetize it through advertising. So Clubhouse, you're starting to see some of those things, Tik TOK with pre roll. And people apply that revenue model or lack of revenue model to like a B2B business and B2B companies don't go viral.There's been two examples of things that went close, right? So Slack super close to viral. Interestingly enough, Slack before their pivot was a gaming platform. The game sucked but the communication platform was great. So that's one example of a B2B company kind of going viral, but it's really just group invitations.And the second one was LinkedIn for a very short period of time, about nine months, early, early on. And they built a tool that allows you to upload your entire contact database. And for that nine-month window, they went viral for every paid customer, they got more than two. So that's what viral means. The second one is traction or product market fit.And one of the things you'll hear from investors all the time. And I work as a venture capitalist now for a fund out of Atlanta. People are like, well, when you get traction, come see us again. Which is really the VC patting you on the head and saying, you're really cute. Like, let me know how it goes. And most first-time founders are walk away from those and go like, oh, that was an awesome meeting.And I'm like, actually, no, it wasn't, you're going to get ghosted. This is just like, they just swipe left or right. Or I don't know, I don't use dating apps. So whichever way they swipe, they swipe. Wrong way. Traction and product market fit is just math as well. Right. So, when people are like, oh, it's a mystery. Like we'll know it when we see it. I'm like a VC saying it's like porn, like that's crazy. Right. But product market fit is really not a mystery, it's math. So, when I think about the method Product Market Fit, there are early indicators of Product Market fit and there's trailing indicators. And the trailing indicators are easy. Churn. Surveys of, hey, if you didn't get use our product, what would it be like and how much disappointed would you be? And lack of customer retention through either contracts going down in value versus contracts going up in value. Those are lagging indicators. The early indicators are really things around like, is the traffic at the top of your site going up, right? Are the number of people downloading your app? Is that going up? Is the time to close going down? Is the conversion from demo to customer going up? And is my average contract value going up? When I put those five factors together. Right? So, closing ratios are improving. Traffic is improving. Demos are improving. Time to close is going down. And average contract value is going up.It's like the miracle of compound interest. If you don't have any of those indicators moving the right way, maybe you have product market fit, but it's too early to tell. If you do have those indicators coming together, then the answer is right, good on you, man. This is, this is exciting. And as an investor, that's where I get excited about writing the check. Because I'm like... Brian Ardinger: Because you know your money is going towards the fueling of that growth versus building something or guessing. Dave Parker: It's the early shift between risk capital and growth capital. And typically, what I see in the early stages are people like, well, we're not spending any money, we're just doing organic growth. And that's okay. But the big question is, okay, how do you scale it with paid growth so that organic growth can go fast. Oh, I'm just doing it through my network today. So I think about it as 10, 100, 1000 customer rule, right?The first 10 customers as the founder, you're going to go hand-to-hand combat. Go get them yourself. The first hundred, you probably can't do that. You're going to need to hire a salesperson or two. And you need to get good at making them, your value proposition clear. You need to get good at getting your pricing, right.But that's when you start to scale and as the first investor for you as the founder, that's good news, right? Because it's starting to scale past what I would call the Binary Risk Stage. Right? It's a zero or one it's going to succeed. Right. And angels will invest in you because we like you, right? I'm like, oh, writes you a check for $10,000 and you know, maybe be a board advisor, right, as an angel. When I'm ready to check for the fund, our average check is $650,000. I'm looking for like numbers and math. Right. And I can help the founders see it. But typically, what happens in venture is if a VC sees the math before you do, they're going to get a really good deal because they're going to put a check in and go like, Ooh, we saw the math before the founder did. And I'm not good at that. So, when I talk with founders, I'm like, here's the math you should be looking for. And one of the funds I used to work for, it was like, why are you telling them that? And I'm like, because I think better trained founders is always a good thing. So, if you're geeky about math and numbers and unit economics, you'll love the book.If you're new to that. And don't know, you're like Dave, you're speaking a foreign language and I recognize it is English. You'll learn the lingo with the book as well. Brian Ardinger: Well, I do think that's vitally important. Especially as you go out and want to go that more venture capital type of route, because these are the things you have to be able to talk to and understand and know, like you said, the levers and that, that you have to pull to make that work. The other question I want to talk about is early-stage solo founders. One of the biggest things they've got to figure out is how to build that team and the culture and things along those lines. What kind of advice or insights have you seen at the early stage of how do I build that team create it.Dave Parker: I'm going to give you a little contrarian advice. It frustrates me at times when people pontificate around stuff that they don't actually know. So you'll hear VCs often say culture matters is the most important thing. What they mean by that is personality. When you have a two-person founding team or a three person founding team, you don't actually have culture.Like there are few repeat entrepreneurs or people come from organizational development, or maybe you're in the services business. And you're like, we're going to build our company on a services culture, and that we really understand. If you're building a product, your first milestone is product market fit. Because if you get the culture wrong, you can fix it. But if you don't get product market fit, your culture doesn't matter. You don't have a company. Right? Right. So, the first milestone is product market fit. So, in VC you say, oh, culture really matters. What they're really talking about in a three-person startup is do they like you from a personality standpoint or are you an ass?Right? So, cause if the answer is, I don't think you'll listen to feedback, I'm probably not going to write a check. If I'm like the average investment for me as an angel is probably eight years to exit. So, if I don't like you, I'm probably not going to write a check. Right. So, there's, the things I'm looking for there from a personality profile type tends to be, then there's totally from views, right?There's the Introvert view, right? Bill gates did okay. Jeff Bezos, I don't think it was really an extrovert. But people will over-index on charisma or salesmanship when the answer is maybe, right. So ultimately, I kind of look at it first and say, is this the right founder? Is it Founder Market Fit? Are they the right people to solve this problem or not?So, I remember with Mitsui when I was there at one point. I was with a big fund out of Silicon Valley for three years. We got invited to invest in this deal, that was like spin the bottle where 70% of the attendees were girls and 30% were boys. And it was like late teenagers, early twenties. I'm like, we can't invest in this. This is just creepy. We're a bunch of old guys by comparison. It's just weird. Like, wait, this is the wrong investor fit for us. So, I'm looking at the founders and going, are they the right founders for this market and for this product first off. Brian Ardinger: And I think that's an important point for the founders to understand is like not every angel or not every fund is the right fit for you. And it's not necessarily, they don't like you or don't think it's great or whatever, sometimes it's an industry that they don't invest it. Dave Parker: For sure, like the fund that I'm supporting out of Atlanta, is called the Fearless Fund. So Fearless Fund is two African American women were the founders of the fund. They launched the fund with a $5 million exploratory fund. For all the wrong reasons. It blew up, right George Floyd, et cetera. And they're going to close on $30 million. We invest exclusively in black and brown women. And when they recruited me on it, I was like, oh, hell yeah, this is like, so on-mission right. Because 3.1% of all venture capital over the last 20 years is went to white dudes named Dave. Now I just want to pinpoint Jims are worse than the Daves. They got 3.4%. 2.8% went to all women. 0.8% went to people of color. Like if I could spend the next chapter of my life helping to level that playing field, I'm in. Like, it's kind of a no brainer. But if you came to us and said, hey, I'm a black and brown woman, but I'm based in London.We would be like, sorry, I can't do it. It doesn't matter how good your ideas because we have what's called an LP Agreement. An LPA. The LPA says we invest in these things, US-based companies, black and brown women founders. And if you're not in that mix, it doesn't matter how good your idea is. And people tend to take it personally. They're like, I can't believe you told me. No, my idea is brilliant. And I'm like, you're not in our thesis. Right. And if you're not in our thesis, we can't invest in it. So, know that that's pretty common for a lot of venture capital funds. Some VCs are opportunistic by definition and the answer is they can invest in a very broad category and angels can invest in the stuff that they love. Right. I like you as a founder. And I think it's a cool idea. I give it a shot. Brian Ardinger: Yeah. At Nelnet where I do some investing, obviously on our venture capital side, we are a lot more opportunistic or we'll take different bets based on community or other things, rather than things that are always in our sweet spots, so to speak. So corporate venture is a lot different as well. So, it pays to understand who has the money. Why do they want to invest for sure? What are they looking for? Dave Parker: One of the chapters, I break down what the investor profiles are and why they invest. So, if you think about this as an enterprise sales process, if you, as a founder are out raising money, the question is, is like what stage appropriate capital. Right? So as a corporate VC, you're probably not investing in early risk stage capital. But you're investing in markets you want to keep an eye on usually. Because you're like, oh, that's a super interesting development. Let's put some money over there and see how that works and we'll follow on with it. Brian Ardinger: So, Andrew has a question in the chat. He says, I work with very early-stage VC funding, pre prototype presales. I've noticed this new trend where companies are being trained in their pitch to propose who they might be acquired by in the coming years. Do you feel this as a legitimate trend and if not, how we advise founders to prepare for acquisition? Dave Parker: So, I've done 16 exits. So, I definitely have an opinion on this one. I would say the first thing you need to focus on is like focus on building a great product and a great company. Right? And then your acquisition thing becomes a lot easier to discuss. Like I will say my general default is I like products and companies that have logical upmarket buyers.Right. So there's like, oh, it makes sense that they've and people like, oh, Google's going to buy me. I'm like, actually you can, there's a Wikipedia page. Every acquisition that Google has ever made. And in most cases I will tell you, they're not going to buy you. Now, I know aspirational, you want them to buy you and that's super cool. But there's a big difference between oh, Microsoft will buy us or it's like, actually, no. Right. So, we're selling a company right now. They're doing about $10 million runway and run rate and revenue. And at one point I was talking with the CEO and he's like, Salesforce will buy us. I'm like, no Salesforce, isn't going to buy you. You have to be way over 10 million in revenue to have Salesforce actually be interested.So, they bought Slack for, you know, something incredible in the billions of dollars. But they have to do an acquisition that moves the needle in the billions, not in the oh, it's 10 or 20 million. Right. It doesn't mean you're a bad company, it just means you have limited buyer set. So, from a founder perspective, I think if they're asking you the question there may or may not be the right investor because we don't typically look to flip deals.I know I'm going to be in the deal 7 to 10 years. But I do like where there's a logical upmarket buyer who has a track record of doing acquisitions. So, I would say it's a bit of a Catch 22. By contrast, I will tell you I've been on the board of the company for 17 almost 18 years. That we're the largest player in our space. Which means the company today is a great, you know, kicks off great dividends. We do really well with it, but there's no easy exit for it because we're the biggest player in that kind of niche market. Which gets you back to the market sizing and why you want to go after a market, that's a much bigger market than a niche market for sure. Brian Ardinger: Andrew says. Thanks. Great insight. Thank you for that. Question around what are some of the trends that you're seeing and what are you excited about when it comes to startups?Dave Parker: I think one of the ones that I'm aspirationally looking for, and I can't get myself to get off the bench and go do myself, is I think there's going to be a shift in the social platforms, not just solely based on the fact that watching Facebook stab themselves has been awkward. But the idea of platforms that empower the creatives and creators is super interesting to me.Like when I look at Sub Stack and things like that, it's like the revenue models are still flipped. Where it's too much of the money, goes to the platform and not enough money goes to the creator. So, I think there's probably a really interesting opportunity that says, hey, how do you flip that model, where the creators make most of the money and the platforms making less.You know, obviously Facebook's the extreme version of that. But Tik TOK is a good example of, hey, somebody gets on to try to monetize something and finds that they made quite a bit. I think we'll see more platforms develop that empower the creatives. Creative class. I think that's super exciting. Brian Ardinger: That's interesting too. The whole no-code low-code movement has really changed over the last five years where again five or six years ago, you, at some point had to have a development team or a, or a developer on your team to start building product. And nowadays I tell most founders, there's probably enough out there with low-code no-code tools that you can at least get your MVP some early insight without having to have that developer co-founder on board. Dave Parker: Yeah, I think that's super exciting as well. It's one of the categories we're following. And I think low-code no-code is the equivalent of what AWS was to buying servers. So, I've raised $12 million and exited $85 million. In my first startup, we had to buy servers and racks and build them ourselves and put them in a, an Exodus Data Center.And people were like Exodus, what was that? It was one of the biggest epic fails of all time. And when AWS came along and they didn't have to, I could just turn up a virtual server. I didn't have to order something from Dell. It fundamentally changed the cost of doing a startup. Low-code no-code I think will be the same. And my cost of actually doing it.Now, I still have to learn how to do that. But from a founder perspective, I can learn how to do that in months and not years. And then not have to build the development team. So, using Bubble or Air Table, for sure. Monday, I would say is the expensive version of Bubble or Air Table by comparison, from a founder perspective.Brian Ardinger: What I like about it is it allows for greater customer discovery and experimentation around your product earlier to get that feedback, to see if you're on the right stage and figure out what features you do need to build or scale or optimize. Dave Parker: Yeah. Yeah, that one's great. I think in a revenue model side, one of the things we're seeing is in the marketplace components. As we're seeing marketplace shift from transaction fees only to subscription fees, plus transaction fees. I would tell you watching revenue models over the last seven years, ish, total, there's been a few changes in them. One, if you remember Groupon, there's thousands of competitors to it because at a fundamental level, I would say revenue models aren't, they're not defensive. Revenue models, so think of they're very public domain. So even Google and pay-per-click copied that model from Yahoo. Lost the lawsuit against them. Yahoo had bought a company from Idea Lab who'd had actually patented the pay-per-click model. Yahoo ended up being a great holding company for Alibaba and Google stock, right at the end of the day.Revenue models are defensible, but if you look at all the copycats of Groupon, you see, most of those went away. Groupon is still alive in a public company, but they traded 0.49 times trailing 12 revenue. So, if you take the market cap of the company divided by sales, I would say that it's 50 cents on the dollar. Right. So as far as what they trade at. Now, compare that to a subscription business. Well, maybe the next step up would be you and I do a consulting business for a million dollars. That company is worth roughly a million dollars. It's worth one times revenues. So, because if you remember Groupon booked the top line sales of what they sold you for that certificate, but they really only made the margin on the, you know, the 10 or 15% on the margin of it.So, if you and I had a consulting company for a million dollars, it'd be worth roughly a million dollars. If we did a million-dollar subscription company, it would be worth somewhere between 12 and $15 million. And one of the new models that really came out in the last five years was the idea of a metered service company.So Twilio is a great example, AWS, if it was pulled out of Amazon is a pay as you go model. It is predominantly is B2B, but those companies traded really 35 times, right? So, if you think about, okay, if I'm going to do a startup, which revenue model should I use, I would tell you to think about again, if you're going to go back to Andrew's question about the exit multiple, I would be interested in less than who's going to buy it. More interested in the revenue model and the multiple of sales. So, I'd be like go for a metered service company for sure, or subscription at very least. Brian Ardinger: I wanted to ask around the topic of founders. It's obviously a very lonely, difficult journey at the very early stage. Do you have any advice for early-stage founders to how to get better connected and deal with the mental challenges of building a company?Dave Parker: Yeah. Great question. It was probably my most read blog post ever is I wrote about my personal battle with depression. And then I hit publish and I thought, what the hell? What did I do? What was I thinking? And I got more positive comments on it than I could have imagined. Brad Feld, who used to be on my board, as you know. Brad sent me a note with one word, and it just said brave. I think that the challenge there from a founder perspective is, you know, you're always trying to be positive. You're trying to, I was trying to be upbeat. If it's motivate the team or motivate investors. And so consequently leads to a lot of isolation.And I think that's one of the things that, like, one of the things we're doing here in Seattle is we run a cohort program for founders. We don't take any equity. There's no cash. They don't pay for it. And it's really about us up leveling the community of founders 25 to 30 founders twice a year, which is our math.And we're really helping them navigate the ecosystem, here in Seattle in six months instead of 18 months, which improve their odds of success. But also connecting them with other founders. Because other people are asking the same questions you're asking. They're not competitive. They're going through the same challenges.And by putting them in community, it serves one of those two purposes. One is we want to help them navigate the ecosystem, but we also want to help them connect with other founders like them at the same stage, which we think has two benefits. One is personal connection and not being in isolation for sure.And second is really helping them think about reinvesting in the community over time. So, if you think about classically, it was the PayPal mafia and then reinvested in each other. So, Reed Hoffman and Elon Musk and Peter Thiel, et cetera. And then it's now become the Uber mafia, right? All the people that were at Uber that are now launching other companies that are reinvesting in each other. We've never had that in Seattle. And most cities don't. It's one of the biggest gaps. So that's our secondary benefit is we think if we have them in community and at five years, but when we launched this as a program, which through the Washington Technology Industry Association. And I went back to the CEO. I'm like, this is a ten-year plan. Right. I'm like you can't judge it at three years or four years. And we're coming into our fourth year right now. And I'd say it's worked out better than we thought. But as I told him, I'm like, you don't get actually judge on it for 10 years. We've had some exits; we've had a bunch of fundraising. Our teams do it a lot faster than other teams. So, it's become a program. People are like, I want to get in. So, we just actually, Brian took it and put it into an document for a national scale-up grant for the Department of Commerce, with the State of Washington. So, we actually have those documents set up now. If somebody wanted to take it to Nebraska and say, Hey, we want to replicate all of this programming.We've opened source all the programming, we've open sourced, the narrative doc and the fundraising docs. So, somebody could turn around and say like, okay, we're going to go launch this program here as a, as a copycat with, with pride. Like we want you to knock it off. Brian Ardinger: Well, that's interesting. That may be an interesting model to explore now with COVID and the whole virtual remote angle of it. Or even in communities like Lincoln, where again, just by the pure numbers, we're not going to have thousands of founders. So how do you scale that? Dave Parker: For sure. And we're basically taking a program we were running in Seattle now and run it in Kent, Washington and Yakima. And Vancouver, Washington, and Tacoma. And we're trying to provide it from an access perspective. Like we want to make sure that we provide people with access that didn't have access to that before.But also, with a path to funding, because if you give people access to programming, but no, they can't ship an MVP at the end because they don't have any money. That's still a problem. So, we're trying to address that problem next. But the grant was a $750,000 grant over three years. Which means we'll kind of be able to take the show on the road and obviously virtual too. I think the nice thing about if there's a positive outcome of the whole COVID thing is place matters a lot less than it used to.Like the good news is I don't have to get on a plane to come be on stage with you. I'd like to be. That'd be kind of fun, because we could go have a beer afterwards and have dinner. But that that'll happen too. But I think from an efficiency standpoint, I've been doing programs for the Middle East, like six or seven cities in the middle east over the last two years. And I fly out Thursday night to Abu Dhabi for four days. And I'm like, it's kind of a fast turn for Abu Dhabi. Could do it just virtually. And be fine. More InformationBrian Ardinger: I wanted to thank you again for coming on. Here's Dave's book Trajectory Startup. Pick it up at any place you buy books. I'm going to put it in a call to action. He also is giving away some free stuff on his website. So let me share that right now. You can download his free resource guide on 14 successful Tech Revenue Models to check that. And then I also, again, I want to thank all our sponsors for bringing this today. And I encourage folks to also sign up for Inside Outside.io. Our newsletter and our podcast, where we bring these types of things whenever we can. So that's the link to that. Thanks for coming out. Thanks for all the audience for being here. Thanks for the great questions and looking forward to doing this again, at some point. And maybe having you come and see us in real life. So, I appreciate your time. And thank you again, Dave. If people want to find out more about yourself or your book, what's the best way to do that?Dave Parker: Yeah, they can find all the information is on my blog, DKparker.com. If you don't want to buy the book, you just have to figure out how to navigate all the blog posts in order. But that should be, you know, there's only 180 blog posts there. So DKparker.com, you can find the book and more information. The 14 revenue models.You can also find me on social media. I'm at Dave Parker CA for Seattle, when you find, you know, LinkedIn, Twitter. I'm not on Facebook anymore. I just finally had to just say, no. I'm still on Instagram because I want to see what my kids are doing. But Daisy, my dog has more followers on Instagram than I do at this point. But so yeah, you can find me on social media, and you can find me on DK parker.com. Brian Ardinger: Excellent. Well, thank you again, Dave. We're looking forward to having future conversations. And go out and have fun everyone at Startup Week Lincoln, and we'll see you around the neighborhood. Thanks very much for coming out.That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

How Did They Do It? Real Estate
SA300 | Strategic Ways to Raise Capital and Acquire More Rental Properties with Daniel Kwak

How Did They Do It? Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 42:57


Financial hardships can have devastating effects on your investing business, but in this episode, you'll be inspired by how Daniel Kwak has motivated himself to grow more despite difficulties. Tune in to discover strategies to acquire more investment properties, raise capital, and make an impact on other aspiring real estate investors.Key Takeaways To Listen ForSignificant steps to start your own real estate businessPractical ways to teach people how to build financial successThe mindset you need in raising capitalHow to identify great opportunities and attract passive investors in real estateUnderstanding the concept of equity fund managementTips in developing KPIs to meet investor's expectations and standardsResources Mentioned In This EpisodeFree Apartment Syndication Due Diligence Checklist for Passive InvestorAbout Daniel Kwak Daniel Kwak first immigrated to the United States with his family at the age of 5. Due to a financially disadvantaged upbringing at the age of 20 he had a negative amount of 187.65 in his bank account. Motivated by continued financial hardship throughout his life he started learning about Real Estate Investing. The first two years he learned everything he could and at the age of 22 he did his first deal. By age 23 he had 83 rental units, along with having raised millions of dollars in capital and also having done a variety of different deals and strategies. At age 26, Daniel founded Miotti Partners Capital, a core satellite fund that has introduced the equities fund management model into the Real Estate space for the first time. He has also traveled across the country training and mentoring hundreds and thousands of aspiring real estate investors. Daniel and his brother currently run an online financial education company, along with a Youtube channel (The Kwak Brothers) that currently has over 200k subscribers.  Overall, Daniel aspires to be a great husband, friend, and to be someone who just loves people.Connect with DanielWebsite: Miotti Partners Capital; The Kwak BrothersYoutube: The Kwak BrothersEmail: daniel@thekwakbrothers.comTo Connect With UsPlease visit our website: www.bonavestcapital.com and please click here, to leave a rating and review!SponsorThinking About Creating and Growing Your Own Podcast But Not Sure Where To Start?Visit GrowYourShow.com and Schedule a call with Adam A. Adams

Practice Acceleration Podcast
Episode 213: 3 Ways to Make Profit Whilst on Holiday

Practice Acceleration Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 11:41


The holidays are upon us, and it's the season to think about taking a break from work. However, most healthcare practice owners are swamped with work during this time thus, they can't enjoy the festivity. As entrepreneurs, one of our biggest desires is for our practice to not become too dependent on us, so we can enjoy a tiny bit of freedom. Honestly, holidays for us can be so stressful, because even if we are away, we still think of our practice, our employees, and our clients. In this episode, we're here to tell you how your practice can make a profit while you are enjoying that lovely vacation. It involves having a system in place for every single team member to follow. Implementing a system means each employee is aware of your company goals, they track their KPIs, and they know what is expected from them. Therefore, when you are on your trip, the practice is still running smoothly and continuously earning profit. In this episode of the Practice Acceleration Podcast you'll learn: Role and expectation awareness for employees The importance of accountability Advantages of assigning daily reports to someone It's important for practice owners to trust their team, but you can only do this when you have established a great system. This way, your business is still gaining momentum while you are indulging on your vacation.   If you haven't listened to our previous episode that tells you 4 Facebook Mistakes To Stop Making Right Now go back and check out Episode 212. P.S If you want to learn more tips about how to get new patients, chat to one of our expert coaches at practiceacceleration.com/meet and see how we can help you!  Thanks so much for joining us this week. We hope you love it! Have some feedback you'd like to share? Leave us a review on iTunes! If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave an honest review for The Practice Acceleration Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are super helpful and greatly appreciated as it helps us expose this show to a wider audience- plus, we read each one of them! 

Multifamily Live
Smiling and Dialing into Multifamily (with Greg Helbeck)

Multifamily Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 33:07


Hey! Pili Yarusi here.Greg Helbeck may be 26 years old…But he's flipped and wholesaled over 100 houses in two of the hardest markets in the USA.He currently holds 6 rental units and continues to add more to his portfolio.He's sharing some of his key takeaways since getting started including:Why he jumped into real estate…Leveling up in your business…Unleashing your potential…The importance of tracking/KPIs…What he looks for in properties…And so much more!Listen in now!Connect With Greg HelbeckWant to connect with Greg? Find him @Grego_37 on Instagram!Want to Learn More About Multifamily Real Estate Investing?If you're an experienced real estate investor and you're ready to get around a community of active multifamily real estate investors who will support you, hold you accountable, and push you to set goals that inspire you as you grow your business, check out 7 Figure Multifamily and see if it looks like a good fit. If it is, I invite you to join in. If you have any questions, please reach out!- CLICK HERE: https://7fm.7figuremultifamily.com/7fmgroup====================Want to continue your multifamily real estate journey? Here are a few more resources to check out...Multifamily Live Podcast: Subscribe and get more episodes like this one delivered to you every week! Click Here: https://www.7figuremultifamily.com/multifamily-live-podcastFacebook Group: We've built a community of serious investors who are learning and growing their businesses together. Join the Group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/multifamilylive/7FigureMultifamily.com: Learn more about who we are, our mentoring groups, upcoming events, and the causes we support at our website. Plus, grab some free downloads and other materials to help you on your real estate investing journey! Click Here: https://www.7figuremultifamily.com/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom
The Best Way To Triple Your Business in The Fastest Way Possible

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 16:04


Today Ryan takes you through the viral growth strategy that venture capitalists use to achieve exponential growth without inbound leads, paid ads, and without cold outbound prospecting! Apply for a Revenue Growth Consulting Session With Ryan Staley- https://www.scalerevenue.io/4-schedule-page1611678914248 KEY TAKEAWAYS Having not one but two referral systems with KPIs is the number one way to double or triple your business in the fastest way possible. Some of the biggest companies in the world have remarkably effective referral systems that drive sales. Dropbox and Tesla are among the two greatest examples of this. In the past three years there has been an explosion of online services. In 2019, more information was submitted to the internet than in the entire history of the internet preceding it. When we trust a voice, we are far more likely to respond when it asks us to buy. Build trust and activate your referral system in order to generate far larger sales and growth. BEST MOMENTS 'I am a big, big student of the game' '84% of buyers now kick off their buying process with a referral' 'People use referrals as a shortcut to make decisions' '9 out of 10 decisions are made upon pure recommendations' VALUABLE RESOURCES The Scale Up Show - https://omny.fm/shows/the-scale-up-show  Apply for a Revenue Growth Consulting Session With Ryan Staley - https://www.scalerevenue.io/4-schedule-page1611678914248 ABOUT THE SHOW How do you grow like a VC backed company without taking on investors? Do you want to create a lifestyle business, a performance business or an empire?  How do you scale to an exit without losing your freedom? Join the host Ryan Staley every Monday and Wednesday for conversations with the brightest and best Founders, CEO's and Entrepreneurs to crack the code on repeatable revenue growth, leadership, lifestyle freedom and mindset. This show has featured Startup and Billion Dollar Founders, Best Selling Authors, and the World's Top Sales and Marketing Experts like Terry Jones (Founder of Travelocity and Chairman of Kayak),  Andrew Gazdecki (Founder of Microacquire), Harpaul Sambhi (Founder of Magical with a previous exit to Linkedin) and many more This is where Scaling and Sales are made simple in 25 minutes or less. ABOUT THE HOST Ryan is a Founder, Podcast Host, Speaker, Loving Father, Husband and Dog Dad. He is a 18x award winner and grew a business unit from 0-$30M in Annual Recurring Revenue while he adding $30M in capital revenue in less than 6 years.  He did this all with only 4 sales people and without demand generation.  Whether you are a new Founder,  VP or CEO who is already generating  6, 7 or even multiple 8 figures annually, you are going to gain knowledge about sales you didn't know existed. CONTACT METHOD Ryan Staley - https://ryanstaley.io/podcast/ LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryan-staley/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/ryanstaleysales Support the show: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryan-staley/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever
JF2623: Managing the Manager and the Use of KPIs with Gary Lipsky #SkillsetSunday

Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 28:12


Serial entrepreneur, Gary Lipsky, started his entrepreneurial journey in college with a meal delivery service. Now, he has $41M of multifamily assets under management. Today, Gary is talking with us about the KPIs he uses for assets and employees, how to effectively manage your staff, and his favorite accountability tools to keep his team on track. Gary Lipsky Real Estate Background:  Full-time, 19 yrs, active syndicator in multifamily GP on 4 properties, and an LP on another 7 properties $41MM AUM in multifamily, as well as some single family flips ($7MM) Based in Manhattan Beach, CA Say hi to him at: www.aptcapitalgroup.com    Click here to know more about our sponsors: Deal Maker Mentoring | PassiveInvesting.com | FollowUp Boss

Cloud Accounting Podcast
School of Rock CFO Schools Accountants

Cloud Accounting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 21:57


GuestJohn Cappadona, Chief Financial Officer @ School of Rockhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/johncappadona/Need CPE? Subscribe to the Earmark Accounting Podcast: https://podcast.earmarkcpe.comGet CPE for listening to podcasts with Earmark CPE: https://earmarkcpeGet in TouchThanks for listening and for the great reviews! We appreciate you! Follow and tweet @BlakeTOliver and @DavidLeary. Find us on Facebook and, if you like what you hear, please do us a favor and write a review on iTunes, or Podchaser. Interested in sponsoring the Cloud Accounting Podcast? For details, read the prospectus, and NOW, you can see our smiling faces on Instagram! You can now call us and leave a voicemail, maybe we'll play it on the show. DIAL (202) 695-1040Need Accounting Conference Info? Check out our new website - accountingconferences.comLimited edition shirts, stickers, and other necessitiesTeePublic Store: http://cloudacctpod.link/merchSubscribe Apple Podcasts: http://cloudacctpod.link/ApplePodcasts Podchaser: http://cloudacctpod.link/podchaser Spotify: http://cloudacctpod.link/Spotify Google Play: http://cloudacctpod.link/GooglePlay Stitcher: http://cloudacctpod.link/Stitcher Overcast: http://cloudacctpod.link/Overcast Full Transcript Available Upon Request - info@cloudaccountingpodcast.com

How Did They Do It? Real Estate
SA297 | Leveraging Capital Structure Strategy in Real Estate with Stewart Heath

How Did They Do It? Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 30:15


Today, Stewart Heath joins us to talk about how he rebuilt his real estate portfolio from a financial loss and reversed his net worth in a short amount of time. Dive into this episode to uncover the hidden strategies!Key Takeaways To Listen ForWhat kind of protection do financial reserves provide?Internal Rate Return (IRR): What it is and when to useThe importance of capital structure in real estate investingWhy real estate is the best asset class to leverage debtRisks and benefits of bidding above asking priceIs Nashville a good market for commercial office spaces?Resources Mentioned In This EpisodeFree Apartment Syndication Due Diligence Checklist for Passive InvestorAbout Stewart Heath Stewart Health is an entrepreneur that enjoys working with others to solve problems. He was involved in many aspects of the company, from marketing to technology. He recognized the importance of good business and efficient operations, and always looking for new business opportunities, speaking engagements, and ways to serve the community. His favorite topics to discuss include the importance of adequate capitalization and the identification of key performance indicators (KPIs) for managing any organization.Connect with Stewart Website: Harvard Grace CorporationLinkedIn: Stewart HeathTo Connect With UsPlease visit our website: www.bonavestcapital.com and please click here, to leave a rating and review!SponsorThinking About Creating and Growing Your Own Podcast But Not Sure Where To Start?Visit GrowYourShow.com and Schedule a call with Adam A. Adams

2X eCommerce Podcast
S06 EP45: Creative and Creators

2X eCommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 54:12


Today's episode is an expert panel discussion from the Commerce Accel Conference. The session was hosted by Kurt Elster, with an expert panel consisting of Savannah Sanchez, Claudiu Cioba, Sherice Banton and Moshe Saraf.Ever since the democratization of ad platforms, the Creative has become the key differentiator for marketers. The Creative, and by extension the Creator are both crucial to the success of any ad campaign. But what does it truly take to get this right? Is it Art? Is it Science? Well, it's both. How well you marry both these elements determines the outcome. In this episode, you'll discover how brands, agencies and creators think about creatives. You'll hear everything from why content matters, how to avoid content fatigue, how creators price their work to what mistakes brands make and which KPIs you should track. This is a great episode for marketers and anybody interested in knowing more about the nitty-gritties of performance marketing.This event was sponsored by our good friends at: Juni - The financial companion that tracks returns on your entire business in one place. Measure all your ROI at juni.coEmarsys -The omnichannel customer engagement platform of choice for more than 1,500 companies worldwide. Do more at emarsys.comPostscript - Making SMS for eCommerce easy. Automate your SMS marketing at postscript.ioRecart -Sell more with FB Messenger Marketing. Reduce abandoned carts at recart.comOmnisend -Increase your sales not your workload. Take the shortcut to revenue growth at omnisend.com Bolt - Connecting retailers and millions of shoppers in a unified network. Your shoppers are one  click away -bolt.comBeProfit - Get all your ecommerce profits at a glance. Track all your expenses at beprofit.com-----------SPONSORS:This episode is brought to you by:Klaviyo This episode is brought to you by Klaviyo – a growth marketing platform that powers over 25,000 online businesses. Direct-to-Consumer brands like ColourPop, Huckberry, and Custom Ink rely on Klaviyo.Klaviyo helps you own customer experience and grow high-value customer relationships right from a shopper's first impression through to each subsequent purchase, Klaviyo understands every single customer interaction and empowers brands to create more personalized marketing moments.Find out more on klaviyo.com/2x.  RewindThis episode is brought to you by Rewind - the #1 Backup and Recovery App for Shopify and BigCommerce stores that powers over 80,000 online businesses.Direct-to-Consumer brands like Gymshark and MVMT Watches rely on Rewind.Cloud based ecommerce platforms like Shopify and BigCommerce do not have automatic backup features. Rewind protects your store against human error, misbehaving apps, or collaborators gone bad with Automatic backups!For a free 30-day trial, Go to Rewind Backups, reach out to the Rewind team via chat or email and mention '2x ecommerce'GorgiasThis episode is brought to you by Gorgias, the leading helpdesk for Shopify, Magento and BigCommerce merchants. Gorgias combines all your communication channels including email, SMS, social media, livechat, and phone, into one platform.This saves your team hours per day & makes managing customer orders a breeze. It also integrates seamlessly with your existing tech stack, so you can access customer information and even edit, return, refund or create an order, right from your helpdesk.Go to Gorgias.com and mention 2x ecommerce podcast for two months free.CloudwaysCloudways is the hosting platform of choice for thousands of ecommerce merchants, SMBs, and agencies all around the globe. They offer a high-performing custom stack, top-notch security, the choice between 5 cloud solution providers, ease of scalability, affordable pricing plans, and so much more.Cloudways also offers support for all PHP-based applications like Magento, WooCommerce, WordPress, Laravel, and others.Experience an unbeatable managed cloud hosting experience with Cloudways today. For a $20 Free Hosting Credit use the Coupon code: **BOOSTMAG**

The Daily Mastermind
It's Time To Go All In for Your Best Life

The Daily Mastermind

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 17:09


Episode #472: It's Time to go all in for your best life.   What's been holding you back? Is there something you've been wanting to do for a while now? Is there something missing in your life? Maybe you don't know what it is but you know it's time for change... What is the reason you are hesitating and procrastinating? fear of failure fear of others thoughts circumstances not negative, but other reasons...backups, opportunities   Failure is NOT TAKING ACTION REGRET is the worst kind of Emotion   Time to GO ALL IN...right now   Steps to take action right now...3 Specific Steps 1-Make a Commitment decision commitment resolve public commitment Burn the Boats... If you want to take the island, you need to burn the boats You may have heard story of Cortes and burning his ships...this is source of quote Cortez arrived in the New World with 600 men and upon arrival, made history by destroying his ships.  This sent a clear message to his men:  There is no turning back.  Two years later, he succeeded in hs conquest of the Aztec Empire.   Create certainty...Create forward vision for Yourself and Your Team.   Safety nets are keeping you from success NOTE-it doesnt mean you cant course adjust or correct... ...it simply means you won't look back or go backwards.   2-Create Certainty surround yourself with the right people learn your craft...MASTERY create a vision, plan, strategy visualize the end goal daily (affirmations, visual, verbal) create validation and small wins   3-Massive Action productivity vs activity KPIS accountability mentoring, support, partners, mastermind   It's never too late to create your best life, business, success, wealth, relationships Heard an analogy the other day...haven't seen movie but loved the quote   QUOTE "This is my letter of resignation.  This is my obituary.  The young girl who worked for you for the last seven years is dead and buried.  She leaves behind a lifetime of indecision, hesitation and fear.  She will not be missed.  She will not be mourned.  Because she was really never alive to begin with.  But she is now.  And she has her entire life in front of her.  An entire life just waiting to be filled."  

Secrets of Staffing Success
[Interview] Brad Block, Chief Operations Officer of Staffing the Universe

Secrets of Staffing Success

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 44:07


Very few companies successfully transition from one generation to the next. And far fewer make it to the third generation. But at Staffing the Universe, family is at the heart of the business—and one of the biggest reasons this company has been so incredibly successful for the past 40 years.    In this episode of Secrets of Staffing Success, we have Bradley Block LIVE from Staffing World* as we learn all about:    The core values that provide the foundation for the family and the business.  The secrets to Thanksgiving dinner (AKA – how to balance work and family…and Monti's quiet way of letting everyone know when there's been “enough” business talk).  The unique way the company has been structured to diversify and support growth.  Keys to Staffing the Universe's ability to grow (hint: it's not just about revenue and KPIs; this is truly a values based business!).  How the family build a strong leadership team and successfully integrated professional management into their operations.  The importance of actively pursuing diversity of thought.  COVID silver linings.  And why Brad loves coming to Staffing World.    If you'd like to know more about Brad and Staffing the universe, here's how you can connect:    Connect with Bradley on LinkedIn  Visit Staffing the Universe     Secrets of Staffing Success is brought to you by Haley Marketing. 

Design Systems Podcast
38. Gina Calcaterra Bhawalkar from Forrester: Lorem ipsum won't help your design system

Design Systems Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 39:30


Gina and Chris discuss the importance of real-deal content in your designs, defining “good design” for your company, and how to set effective, meaningful KPIs for design work.Guest: Gina is the Principal Analyst, Design and Accessibility, at Forrester Research. Her research focuses on experience design organizations, scaling design, accessibility, and inclusive design. You can find Gina on Forrester's blog, on Twitter as @ginabhawalkar, and on LinkedIn.Host: Chris Strahl is co-founder and CEO of Knapsack, host of @TheDSPod, DnD DM, and occasional river guide. You can find Chris on Twitter as @chrisstrahl and on LinkedIn.Sponsor: Knapsack is a design system platform rooted in code for shipping consistent apps in half the time. Design once, build once, use everywhere. Learn more at knapsack.cloud.View the transcript for this episode.

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
564: Paul Wright, Seven Critical Mistakes Which Reduce Profits, Increase Stress and Chain You to Your Health Business

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 46:22


In this episode, Creator of Practiceology, Paul Wright, talks about 7 critical mistakes that healthcare professionals can make that can hurt their bottom line and their business in general. Today, Paul talks about Perfectionist Syndrome, the implications of discretion, and doing your own PnL. What is the true role of your business? Hear about the danger of falling in love with your product, packaging an outcome-driven solution, and maintaining effective recruitment and internal systems, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “If it's [your business] robbing you of your life, it's not what it's there for.” “Find the hungry market and satisfy that need.” “If you're not embarrassed by the first launch of your product, you've launched too late.” “To the blind man, the one-eyed man is king.” “If you haven't upset someone by midday every day, you haven't said anything really important.” “One of the single biggest and most effective things you can do in your practice is to tighten up the reporter findings conversation.” “Remove discretion at the operating level of your business.” “Once you are the only person that has that program, you can't be compared on price.” “You can't put a monetary value on family time.” “There's no such thing as quality time with your family. Family time is quantity time.”   More about Paul Wright Paul Wright is a Physiotherapist and former owner of multiple allied health clinics in Australia (which he rarely visited). He is the author of the Amazon Best Seller "How to Run a One Minute Practice", founder of the Practiceology™ health business freedom program, and has helped thousands of allied health business owners across 57 countries, earn more, work less, and enjoy their lives.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Physiotherapy, PT, Business, Practiceology, Supply, Demand, Mistakes, Solutions, Healthcare, Entrepreneurship,   Resources: Get a hard copy of "How to Run a One Minute Practice" ($4.95AUD. Use promo codes below) Promo Codes: Non-Australian Buyers: KARENOS (Get $15 OFF) Australian Buyers: KARENAUST (Get $5 OFF) Register for the next Practiceology demonstration   To learn more, follow Paul at: Website:          PhysioProfessor.com                         HealthBusinessProfits.com                         OneMinutePractice.com LinkedIn:         Paul Wright   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript:  00:02 Hey Paul, welcome to the podcast. I'm happy to have you on.   00:06 Absolute pleasure to be here. What a boss.   00:09 I know it's so we're doing a little podcast swap here which I love. I love being able to swap podcasts with other hosts where you come on mine I come on yours and we get to know each other better. So it's been really great leading up to these podcasts. And today, you are going to talk about seven critical mistakes that healthcare practitioners can make. That can really hurt their bottom line and their business in general. But before we get to that, can you tell us your story of your career and how you ended up where you are so the listeners get a better idea of who you are?   00:52 Well, I'm I was born for a young Karen. Now I'm from from a small country town. I'm obviously Australian by my accent. I live in beautiful Newcastle but an hour north of Sydney. But I grew up in a small town about seven hours northwest of Sydney in the middle of the outback. They talk about Australia next so I'm in the outback. And what does what does a young kid do as in a small country town he Bhikkhu like sport, he becomes a physical education teacher. Because that was all I thought you could do as as a kid. I love sport. So I went to Newcastle University studied my physio, field education qualification, and then didn't even know what a physio was, but I met a physiotherapist at a party. And I liked anatomy I liked physiology. I thought, gee, that sounds cool. I don't think I could be a teacher for a long time I had an entrepreneurial streak I think so I didn't know I could work for someone else for my rest of my life. So I'll get into this physio course went to Sydney Uni did my physiotherapy degree and within two years after graduating I had started my first practice I then ended up with six of them in Sydney, one in Newcastle and five in Sydney. And I think my claim to fame Karen is I as I went through this journey I didn't go to them I was fortunate that I stumbled across the E myth by Michael Gerber very early in my business career and and I'm trading at my window counter in my practice and and looking out on the road that goes past in Sydney and there's a bus keeps going past one on the side of the bus why most small businesses fail and what to do with that is on the side of the bus and I'm getting there watching the sun come up in the morning watching the sun go down like most most help business owners and this bus kept going past and I'm getting better now I wasn't good there but I'm better now that the universe was telling me something followed up with this with this he ended up getting it to a Michael Gerber seminar read the book EMF and then I created then systematize the practice and as I said eventually had six didn't go to any of them and I then sold them which is a lesson for all of you guys the major role of a business is eventually to sell it and then started teaching other health business owners how I did it how I was able to run the remotely and how how you can still be a great health professional and have a successful business and still have a great quality of life which I think most of us miss out   03:19 yeah that's a great point talking about quality of life and I think that we'll probably get into that throughout this interview so without yeah without further ado, why don't you share with us these seven critical mistakes that can reduce your profits increase your stress and really not allow you to live your life outside of your business. So let's start with number one.   03:47 Well the first one having said I've done all of these by the way so you have earned the right to   03:52 I can't I kind of I kind of assumed that so I've done   03:57 I've done all of them but the smart people learn from other people's mistakes so hopefully you'll listen to what's happening now. That Mistake number one that I identified early is failing to understand carrying the true role of your business and if you think about what what does what does your business do for you and if it's robbing you of your life it's not what it's there for the role of your business is to serve you it's your certain needs to give you more life yet when you ask most health business owners why they started this I I wanted to be my own boss or I wanted to make my own decisions or the guy was working for before was an idiot. Whatever they like to say but is this really happening now and as Gerber talked about when I first read it you're now doing the hands on work of the practitioner plus you're also doing the business stuff the marketing the recruitment in any wonder we get overwhelmed so early. And and that's why Gerber talks about it's true. I was probably better off opening a plumbing business because I couldn't do it. plumbing work I was better off opening a business that I couldn't physically do then I could list run the business and that's the whole idea of this. My brother who's a plumber would be staggered because I'm hopeless with power tools and I he's banned me from using any sort of manual labor things but the idea of the businesses to serve you and one thing I suggest you look at guys, his his work out what I call your freedom score. And your freedom score is simply how many hours per week on average? Do you spend treating patients at your practice? How many hours per week do you spend physically treating patients and if you're telling me that we've done this in seminars, 50 6070 I've heard I've had one guy doing it five hours. And they're still trying to run the business, you just, you just can't do that. So and we talk about this thing between practice ology, right is law, which is, which is as your number of team members increases, your freedom score must decrease, you can't keep adding team members to your roster, because they time suck, they have to take energy out of you, and still see all the patients, there's going to be this balance. And that was how I was able to run it. But when that being said, you have the choice of how you run your business. Now my model was to replace myself, get therapists in do the work for me. So I had freedom of time and freedom of money. But some of our clients have a Mr. X. Mr. X is the guy that runs healthcare practice, but he runs it on his own terms or her own terms. Doesn't work, school holidays, start at nine finishes at two sets his own hours or her own hours charges, what they feel it. And guys I'm thinking about that don't even have sometimes receptionist though, sometimes if the surfs up, they don't turn up at the practice, they just gave surfing. But the patients know that's the deal. If you want to see this person, that's the model. But even in that case, Karen, the business is still serving that person. It's, it's it, you're the master, but not the other way around. And I don't know if you've ever made that. But that's understand what you want your business to do for you. And make sure it does it. Otherwise it'll suck the life out.   07:17 Yeah, and I think that's why when you look at your business, whether you're just starting, you've been in it for a couple of years, you've been in it for 20 years, if you've never written down what your goals are for your life, not what your business goals are, but you know, do you want to spend, do you want to be able to watch a movie a week workout five days a week, spend dinner with friends, pick up your kids from school, drop them off, you have to write those goals down while you're looking at your business. Because that's that's how you're going to have that freedom. And that's how you're going to have your own life outside of the business.   07:58 And the natural recourse for all health business owners is typically to see more patients, regardless of what happens in their business. Regardless, they need more money, they see more patients, team member leaves, I'll see more patients. So that that's that's the recourse their natural recourse is to go back to what they know. We teach our clients sometimes that's the worst thing you can do. You need to do something exactly the opposite. And one point also to this is that this is probably one of my worst moments. You've got understand to the concept of current bank and future neck when you think about your business. Now I had a current bank business meeting. I had one of my practices earlier was inside a fitness center. So I had a physiotherapy practice inside a fitness center in Sydney. And it was a good business. It was a cash cow. But what I didn't realize at the time was it was fragile. So it was it was making me lots of money at the time. How I knew was fragile. I got a phone call from one of my clients would have been a Thursday night. He said, Paul, I've got some news for you. The owner of the gym I've heard hasn't paid rent for three months. Okay, this is a $300,000 business like I'm running here. Oh, that's the good so I ring the owner who when you will do the gym tonight what's the deal? He said it'll be sold out Don't worry about Okay, I arrived at the practice the next day cancer that patient list hard to track proceeded to put everything inside the trap that day. So by Friday, five o'clock, I've been everything inside the event saying what are you doing wrong? What are you doing? Well, I said I'm taking everything out because I don't know what's happening here. This is all a bit unstable because I went to give the owner the gym my rent check for the month and he didn't accept it. He said hold on to that for a second. Roger, you might need it. So okay, the writing's on the wall, drove off in the truck and everyone's saying Ronnie, another another gym Chad's gonna buy this place, you'll be back open on Monday. So when I open on Monday, I'll bring the truck back and I'll check everything back in then I'll be fine. But I'll tell you, I never again set foot inside that building. It shut that day and I never will went back in there. So overnight, a business goes from 300 grand to zero. What's the lesson I had a current bank business, there was nothing. I was relying on someone else's rent someone else's tenancy. If you're leasing a space in a Medical Center in a fitness center in something else, you think you've got a business you can you can sell. There's no real future banking, that you are at the mercy of your landlords. So it's not a bad way to test the market to see if there's available market. But that's not your long term gig. Because there's a problem with it, and I've suffered badly. Anyway, yeah, yeah, start number one.   10:41 Big mistake, mistake number one. So let's talk about Mistake number two.   10:46 All right, we do this all the time. We fall in love with our product. We fall in love with the idea of being a therapist, like I fell in love with the idea of being a physio, but I didn't know was there a market for that? Was there a need for more physios, I just wanted to be one. But we do that all the time, we fall in love with our product of therapy, what we got to fall in love with is, is the market, you got to fall in love with the market once, so you might have a passion for trading on that elbow pain in one arm. Gullfoss, that might be your passion. But if there's not enough one arm golfers out there, you're not going to do any good. So the market doesn't care what you want, find what the market wants. So your job is to listen to all of your patients, listen to the doctors, listen to the community, what's missing, your job is to fill the need. And if you do that, you'll be successful in business. My favorite one, hope you guys watch Shark Tank, you guys have shark tech in the States. That's shark tank with a my favorite one is the guy that turned up with the pad for guys shirts. So now that so you put up your stick to pads on the ROM so your shirt didn't get all sweaty, there was his product. The Sharks wouldn't touch it. I said I'm not really interested. And they said how many have you sold? I've been doing it for seven years now. I've sold about 500 so in seven years, and out the back the entity in there. So what are you gonna do now he said, Our, I believe in this, I'm gonna keep going I fell in love with this product, the market had already said they didn't want to move on. So find the hungry market and satisfy that need. If you do that, you will be okay. And you see that lock county if people so they open a practice in, in a country town or regionally because they might have identified there's a market for that service. So they've done well. But the part that missing is the available labor supply. Because there's two drivers of every business available market available labor, you haven't got enough labor, you're going to be staffing that thing yourself for the rest of natural life. And that happens all the time. So be very aware, don't, don't fall in love with a product, fall in love with the market, what's the desperate need in your community? solve that and you'll be halfway there. And that's that's kind of what I did in my second my next career because I I knew help business owners struggle with business and finance and marketing and other things. And it happened to marry up with something I liked and was good at. So that was a fortunate thing. But you've got to find the hungry crowd first.   13:18 Yeah, do your research. If you don't do your research first. You're in big trouble.   13:22 I had a guy come to me once and he said, Paul, I want to open seven practices on the northern suburbs of Sydney That's what he said to me in the seminar. I said oh is there is there enough market for that automatically sell so i think so he said he just he cuz he wanted to do it. Karen he wanted to open I saw Kenya available. I was a bit tired. Can you staff those seven practices? Will you find your start? I'll just advertise. There's a guy with his head in the sand. It's not funny. But I think the key thing I want to do I want to do this. Now that's okay, if that's a passion project. But if you want to generate a revenue and a business successful and you can sell it down the track if that's what you want to do, solve solve the desperate problem. Yeah, yeah,   14:14 turn it around. It's not about you. It's about you, but it's not about you all the same time, right.   14:21 If you get married up, it's great if you can find that that thing but be careful of what you do. So make sure there's a hungry market for an audit this we found out in one of our practices, there was a real market for lymphedema treatment. So massive market lymphedema and we had a guy who knew all about it the therapist and knew all about it. So we got him doing the lymphedema program. It was great. But But don't be Dora here didn't get him to train everyone else on how to do you know what happened? The guy leaves. Three years after we're still getting phone calls from people wanting lymphedema treatment and every time they rang it killed me. So Solve the desperate problem. Yes. But then protect yourself with the viable labor supply if you're doing something like that.   15:06 Yeah, absolutely. That's a great example. Okay, what's number three. So we've got failing to understand the true role of your business falling in love with your product, your product number two, what's number three,   15:18 we'll do this falling in love or falling victim to our own perfectionist syndrome. I was probably fortunate, I had some good mentors early in my career, and they'd tell me, Roddy, it's better to be 80% and out the door than 100%. And in the drawer. And it's so true, we just worry so much about putting something out there, because it's not quite perfect yet. Reed Hoffman, I think, was the founder of LinkedIn. one of the founders, he said, if you're not embarrassed by the first version of your product, you've launched too late. If you're not embarrassed by the first version of your product, you've launched too late. Meaning put your put something out there and you see if it's got traction, is it going to get some market share? Is it going to work for me? If it does, then you can then do version two, then do version three. But so many health professionals I get so caught up in making it perfect. I just want to do this, I just want to finish this, I just want to do this. And they end up not doing it. They wait that long, and they just slowly implement. Maybe it's because we're analytical thinkers, we're sometimes slow to implement, and we just, we drag the China bit. And I like this expression to, to the blind man, the one eyed man is king. But one of my mentors said to me, Roddy, you don't have to be the best in the world. You just got to be the best in their world. Say there might be a nice specialist down the road, who's who's a superstar does all the courses and is on all the all the seminars and other things and you've got your own new program. That's great. But don't let that stop you from what you're doing. Just be the best in your clients world at it. You don't have to be as good as that guy. You just have to be the best in the client's world. And, and that also, I think, Karen, sometimes maybe it comes from our universities that that we want to be anointed or we want to be awarded, or we want to wait for someone else to recognize me. Don't Don't wait to be anointed by your profession. Don't that's too slow, anoint yourself. Someone. Someone says to me, Roddy, who's the best health business mentor in the world? Well, I want to do wait for the National Association of physical therapists to make the announcement I'm not going to wait for that I am. And I think we're going to have some balls do that. But people take you at your own appraisal aren't going away in? And if not, that's your choice. But that's it again, don't wait to be annoyed because it's just too slow to do it that way. So don't fall victim to perfectionism because it's just a curse   18:12 for us. Yeah, very, very common. Especially I think I see it more in women than men. Men will often center feel like I'm just gonna do it and see what happens and women are more like, okay, it needs to be like this, it needs to be perfect. And I think sometimes our women judged more harshly than their male counterparts for things. There aren't as many women in leadership positions so you don't have that person that looks like me in those leadership positions as a point of reference, and so I think oftentimes women tend to keep putting things off because it's got to be as almost perfect before it goes out because we don't want to get judged harshly on something. And I see that consistently. Again and again. And a lot of men will just throw shit out there and it's like, yeah, this is fine. Who cares and women are like a   19:12 you got to remember littering once I was I did electric in the fitness industry years ago and in the in the personal training space. And I remember doing anatomy lecture one day to a group of trainers and I in the audience was my anatomy tutor from uni, like a superstar like this person, you everything about everything and I'm at the front talking anatomy and and it was a pivotal moment for me because I'm so self conscious about what I'm saying in front of this, this mentor. But no one asked her any questions. They all asked me the questions. I was at the front of the room. I had the clicker. I was in charge. I was the best in their world. She was the best in mind, but I was the best. There's that's it. I'll leave all of you to make the comments about Gaza girls, I can't say that sort of stuff. So knock yourself out cam   20:05 Yeah, yeah, I'm just that's just what I've seen, you know, over and over again, is, is that women tend to be a little more hesitant at putting themselves out there. And I get it, you know, as someone who has and who does put themselves out there, the criticism is harsh people can be mean, mean spirited, especially when it comes to social media can be a little toxic and, and you are judged very harshly and people say really mean things. So you have to grow a thick skin, I think if you're going to want stepping into kind of those leadership positions   20:43 that was published one of the key things, I think my management style of the business that you had to have a thick skin to work for us. I mean, maybe I was more suited to being an owner back then that I would be now I don't think I'd be as quite as sensitive as I'd need to be now. Anyway, that's if one of my mentors said to. And I love that when I say this, if you haven't upset someone by midday every day. You haven't said anything really important. What everyone's gonna agree with you You don't you don't have different doesn't have to agree with you. You just you haven't you have the right to have your opinion in this, but I think you need to do you'd have to agree with me, that's just what it is. But if everyone's agreeing with you, are you really saying anything of any importance possum?   21:24 Right, right? Very true. Very true. You don't want to surround yourself with Yes, people all the time, that's for sure. Because then you'll never move forward because you're never kind of grow and challenge yourself. Okay, let's, let's move on to number four.   21:40 Number four, ineffective, non existent. And unsupervised internal systems. You we've seen it, we've seen it, countless times someone goes to a seminar or they or they get an idea and they launch it into their practice. And, and they seem so excited about it. But the team have seen this before they've seen you come in with an idea and they've seen you launch it and they know you'll just it'll blow over. Once you get you'll see more patients and get busy so so that sometimes they do it for a while and you can see this owner because you'll say to them, do you have for example, you have a follow up system in your practice? I think we did here we look we did do something like that. Ryan, are we still doing that follow up system so that they haven't followed up and measured it. So one of the best things give you the tip, one of the single biggest and most effective things you could do in your practice is to tighten up the report of findings conversation. That's that's after I've done your history of January, your examination, and I'm saying what we're going to do to fix you that's the chiropractic wellness report the findings in their words, it's the action plan or it's our treatment plan, get get that script, right? Get that conversation, right? Write it down, sit the person next to you and write it down Mary to get you back running in that marathon in two weeks time. You need to see me three times a week for the next two weeks. I'll reassess you then and we'll get you ready for that race. How does that sound like that? Does that conversation that that currently is not done? Well in most practices? And and because I'm an analytical guy can often How do I measure that? How can I control that conversation. So I created an action plan a written plan. And, and the penny dropped for me when there is a number at the bottom. So the numbers at the bottom was how many how many sessions, how many times a week for how many weeks. So that's three times a week for two weeks, I had a number six, so that person needs at least six sessions before the next assessment. So I then made it mandatory that every patient would walk out at the front counter with that sheet that would give it to the admin person who and would verbally hand over that patient current to get married back to her run in two weeks time she's doing a marathon she's gonna do it really well. She needs to make three appointments for the next three weeks for the next two weeks and we'll get there admin to person books in in. And then I then got a spreadsheet that we created that has consults on plan. So that would be a six, the column next to it, consults booked. So you recommended six and how many were booked. Now if I if I then log into that spreadsheet and I see that my therapist has recommended six and a booking one so 616151 to one with it's a one on that on that booking column. I've either got a therapist problem or I've got an admin problem. Has the therapist not been good enough to get the confidence in the patient or is the admin under pressure and hasn't got time to book those sessions in advance. And you will know the dangers of a session by session appointment diary. It's just it's a recipe for disaster it's but that's that's an example of a system Karen you've got to put in to your business that you can then measure and stay on top. And you'll love this. So in true Polaroid style there was only one time in All of my practices where the therapist did not have to do one of those sheets written physical shit. And I get them all in a room and say guys, what's the only time that you can get away without doing one of these things? And they'd say, the person need to go and see a specialist or I ran at a time or whatever else that said, Now none of those things. The only reason I'll accept the no completion of this form is if the patient dies during the consultation and they've got a chuckle it's a chocolate gets a check. I want to talk about it now. But there's an element of truth to it. Everyone else gets one. Now that's that's the problem with most health businesses, we don't enforce our systems, we don't put them in and we don't make them mandatory. One of the keys to business success, remove discretion at the operating level of your business. Remove discretion, remove the chance for seminar I was going to give them a plan but I didn't think they needed it or the Garda see the surgeon or like, I want to look at the that report and say, Okay, what happened with Mrs. Johnson yesterday said news about Mrs. Johnson. She didn't make it through the consultation. And the therapists were Hi, can I get it ready? And then I can say, Man, I've noticed Mrs. Jones didn't get an action plan either. What's happening here is, is something that I'm wanting to do not sinking in, is there, imbalance here? And if it happens a third time we're gonna have a serious discussion. Now that's that may be used multiple that's hardcore. But   26:37 would you tolerate a therapist turning up without a shirt on? Would you tolerate that? horrifically bad breath? Would you tolerate them being late all the time? What are you going to tolerate? removed discretion?   26:53 Yeah, yeah, she just, Yep. Yep. That's a great system. Yeah. So really making sure that you've got systems in place that work for your practice, because every practice is different. And so you have to know what works for you. What are the KPIs that work for your business?   27:12 And quints of non compliance? What if you don't do it? Unfortunately, can we notice it now with with available library a bit short? Too many owners don't enforce this systems because they worried the therapists will leave so they're trapped they're trapped because they can't enforce this system. So what if they leave Well, what are they costing if they stay you know there's a cost for them to stay you're happy to where the cost make the decision. We've got a client in practice soldier now he's got an admin person just off sorry, a therapist, but just might want follow that action plan system to the letter, but he's got a labor supply issue. We know our numbers, we know what she's worth to the practice. We just made a decision to tolerate it for the moment that we could jump on if one day but it's not worth the fight because we're gonna have trouble with that off. Better Off fighting our battles in the right order. But it's a decision. It's a strategic decision.   28:07 Yeah, yeah. makes sense to me. Okay, let's move on to number five.   28:13 Number five, using your accountant to do your p&l for you. is a mistake because most accountants on average your account but assuming even give you a p&l, like most accountants, their job is to keep you out of out of jail and to make sure you pay enough tax and that's pretty weird. But what we want to know is, is a down and dirty profit loss for your practice. We want to know take out all the dodgy expenses take out the trip you took to the conference in New York take out all that. Even the year there was a conference there, but it's a bit dodgy like what take everything out of the car, all the other things that are legally claimable, but aren't really required for the business, get a down and dirty profit loss on a calendar month basis. Revenue we build, this is what we spent a know your numbers every month, and you shouldn't be able to wait for the end of the month to come to track your numbers. And one thing you must allocate Karen, you must have an owner consulting wage in there. Which is not the amount of money your accountant told you to take. It's not the dividend. It's a reflection of your consulting effort. So how you do that freedom school, so how many hours per week you're at the practice, multiply that by what it would cost to replace you, as a therapist, assistant your replacement costs, that money is not changing hands, by the way, the accountants looking after that. But this is we've got that in our p&l as a reflection of your consulting time. Because I can tell you now from having done this a long time, the only way sometimes you can get over practice to drop their consulting is to show them a down and dirty profit loss and show them that it hasn't changed or has improved if they dropped their consulting hours. Then you got it and you don't do that with your accountants p&l because it's a different spreadsheet, you got to deal with a down and dirty p&l. But because our natural recourse, Karen is to just consult more, whereas as a result of that we're not mentoring our team. We're not recruiting, we're not marketing. We're not with the kids, all these other things we're not doing.   30:17 Right? Yeah, no, that makes perfect sense. Yeah, I yeah, yeah, it's different. I mean, my accountant does do my p&l. But I also do monthly p&l is for myself. So on a month to month basis,   30:32 it can work if you're if you're doing a percentage of grossmith. But I just the problem with most therapists, we don't know their personal contribution to consulting and the overall scheme of things and we've show owners if you if you cut your hours, 20 hours a week, we can maintain your profit. Would you be happy to do that and see it because they're their natural recourse is to see more patients that just happens all the time. Sure. Anyway, can do it? He's know the numbers, the numbers will set them free.   30:58 Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. No, I like that. And so when you're saying putting your consulting numbers in, you're talking about not just the time that you're with patients, but time that you're working on the business as well. Or just time when you're   31:14 just you're just you're face to face consulting time, because everything else is part of your profit margin. Right? Right. But the other thing is product and it's the other stuff is discretionary. You You can do your marketing when you want you can cancel a staff track you can you can you've got freedom to that, but your patient list. That's that's the one that use you're stuck in. So that's when you would change your business. Got it? Yeah. And, and most of ours, we try and get that down to zero. We try and get your owner consulting wage to zero maintaining your profit, then they have discretion. They can go to work if they want to say they're doing they're seeing patients because they want to not because they have to. Yeah, that's a differentiation. Not enough of us, Mike.   31:55 Got it. Okay, that makes sense. All right. So let's go on to number two to go six.   32:02 ineffective recruitment systems is a is a classic problem. And I know what it is we just we take it personally if they don't, if they leave we we don't get the right people always stuff this recruitment stuffs a nightmare. And I think it comes back a lot of it. As an owner, you have to make make a big decision regarding your team. Do you want to be liked? Or do you want to be respected, to be liked, or to be respected. I believe too many health business owners worry so much about being liked by their team, they can't have those difficult conversations, they don't have the respect of the team. And you're not always going to be like just accepted as an item of business. You know, there was going to be popular, you control the way ours you control the wages, you control everything in the business. It's important to be liked all the time. And if you're trying to be liked, it's going to be very difficult for you. Everyone is replaceable, except that and if they're not you want to make them replaceable. You need to think about the systems in a bit like my lymphedema God big mistake. I, I had an epiphany one night, I often have these epiphanies there. So there I am. And my admin, I had an admin superstar one of the practices and she knew everything. And she was so good everything she just did everything. And I had an I'm in there in bed one night, when I bought up right? What happens if something happens to Gina and I remember I couldn't sleep the rest of night. So I rang Gina, June at nine o'clock in the morning, I want you to come in, I've got someone to replace you at front desk, I've got my camera, you're going to show me everything. And we sat in the back room with the camera, show me how to do this show me how to do that show me and we just that we did that for a whole day. And I had all this stuff so if something happened you can watch the Gina file that someone can do. If you aren't doing that you are you are in all sorts of trouble. So recruitment systems, people are replaceable, except they're going to move on Don't take it personally. One of my mentors, we did a recruitment training program recently and one guy said, Just accept the fact that people are gonna, your business is like a train journey. People are gonna get onto certain station, get a bit down the track and then they get off the train. That's just that's what this journey is like they're not going to stay with you till the end of the line. Don't expect them to that's just just accept they will move on. And the final one and are running in the time, final one, not packaging your services, not packaging it into into an outcome driven solution. The bite write program for TMJ, the run marathon pain free program, whatever you do, we had a corrective orthopedic rehab program with exercise so name it something because once you are the only person that has that program, you can't be compared on price. If I'm bringing around the practices and you're charging 80 bucks and someone's charging 75 you're commoditizing yourself but If you're the only person with the x y Zed migraine program, because no one else has got that you can't put a price on that. So So you got to make sure you don't you have to package your services as a solution driven outcome, not just as a session by session deal. If you do that you're reducing the church have been caught up as a commodity. Now we've got time for one bonus mistake, I think. Yeah, all right. This is one bonus mistake. And too many owners do this. They, they think, well, they put a monetary value on their family time. They put a monetary value on their family time. Meaning I could finish at four o'clock in the afternoon. Or I could I could if I stay I'll make an extra $1,000 whenever I stopped but but I'll miss my daughter's concert. There's there's a so we put a monetary value if I do that, it'll cost me this. You just there's some things in life, you can't put a monetary value on. You just you can't put a monetary value on your family time. And people who told me that it's that it family time, I don't have much but I have quality time. And again, I don't want to guilt you into this stuff. But there's no such thing as quality time with your family. Family time is quantity time. things just happen. When you're around them. things just happen. I'm on. I'm on the back porch of my house. My second youngest daughter was about 17 on home a lot as I was on the on the back porch in she comes in she stands at the door. Not a crier young Jade. She's a very, very stout young lady. And she I said okay, down, and she dissolves like just the tears coming up. Right? a Cadillac for five minutes. Yeah, Caden are just a few things happening at school done. Um, right now, as you took off, yeah. I couldn't plan that.   36:59 I can't, you can't. You can't plan that. That just happens because you're around. And again, I'm not I'm not guilting you guys. Yes, you have bills to pay, they have other things to do. But the business is there to serve you. You do what you need to do to make sure your family is happy and fed and everything else but don't put a monetary value on it. Because it's it's a it's just not a fair comparison. You can't price it. It's just ridiculous to even think about it. Anyway. All right. Sorry to guilt everyone into something but that's the deal. Now I've lost you can you muted yourself.   37:40 There's a loud siren going by sighs just   37:44 could not go to Yes.   37:53 That was allowed one. Well, obviously edit this out. But I was like, I couldn't even I couldn't even It was so loud. Because it must have been like right in front of my apartment. So we'll edit that out. So annoying. That's that has not happened in a while that was allowed one. And didn't I don't even know what it was. Anyway. So we'll just sort of I'll do a little clap, and then we'll start. So this helps me for editing. But uh, you're killing me. I know, he's, I don't like it's fine by me. You know, I don't even realize he's there. But okay. So all right, so we went through seven mistakes, plus a bonus, which is great. And, you know, if you weren't taking notes, don't worry, we'll have all of these written out in the show notes to make it really easy for you and to follow along. But now, where can people find out more about you get some more resources so that they don't make all these mistakes.   38:59 best place to start, we do a monthly demonstration of practice ology. It's a webinar we do every month. And we'd basically show how our clients across 54 countries earning more, working less and enjoying their lives, even during a pandemic. So we talked about some of the principles to talk about today. And it's really a very interactive demonstration of how we do it. So if you go to my practice, ology.com forge forward slash Litzy li Ts Ed, why obviously. So my practice ology.com forward slash, let's see, you'll get the you can log in and register for the next next session. And if you want to get a copy of the book, I wrote a book how to run a woman a practice, as Karen explained at the start. It's not a it's not a big book, I didn't want to write it. It doesn't make sense to have a massive journal for how to run a woman in practice. It's got to be a woman's book, you should read that in less than an hour. Just covers a lot of the action plans and the bookings and there's great resources sample action plans you can get from the book If you just get to one minute practice.com forward slash book sales. So one minute practice.com forward slash book sales. And if you just put in the code, Karen Oh s for overseas. So if you're not Australian, which I don't imagine you will be if you're not Australian, do Karen r West. And it'll take 15 bucks off and you get it for $4.95 Australian which I think's about $1 us. That's a bit more than that. But it's not it's a pretty good deal. If you happen to be Australian, listen to it put in Karen, au, s t. So I'm going to practice.com forward slash Bob sales. Karen Oh s get it for if you're if you're outside Australia, or Karen a USD if you're Australian, and you get that for $4.95. And we'll post it out for you. And my social media platform is LinkedIn believer not I'm an old school, LinkedIn. So follow me on LinkedIn. Paul, right, Newcastle, I'd love to have a chat. And I hope you can join it for join us for a webinar and get some of those great resources from the book. And posted sorry, posters is a bit slow, I think we've covered but once you, once you buy the book, you do get the PDF of the book straightaway. And there is a second page, a link to all the resources and the action plans and all the scripts and stuff. So that's perfect.   41:16 And we will have links to all of that at podcast at healthy, wealthy, smart, calm. So one link will take you to the webinar to the books and to your LinkedIn page. And before we wrap things up, I'll ask you one last question. And it's one that I asked everyone knowing where you are now in your life and in your business and in your practice. What would What advice would you give to your younger self?   41:40 Oh, you love this one? Okay. I would probably be a podiatrist or an optometrist. You're sitting thinking, Okay, what are those things got in common? Well think about it. They've got a product arm. They've got a range of products, because I, I did what we talked about earlier, I became a physiotherapist because I wanted to be a physiotherapist. I didn't know I could be limited in what I can sell our products. So if I could go my time again. podiatry, I would, but I don't like feet. So maybe it's a problem. optometry, I'd be okay. Maybe orthodontics? I'd want a product range. That would be that would be why don't go and say all my diamonds done. Put a product range in your current business, if you can. That helps. But the idea of relying on your hands and trading time for dollars, I'd probably do differently.   42:38 Right? Well, great advice to your younger self, for sure. Thank you so much for Paul, for coming on and sharing seven mistakes that you've made and probably a lot of us who have been in business for more than a couple of years or more than a year have made and hopefully all the listeners out there you will not make those mistakes because we have covered them here. You've got them in your head. You'll sign up for the webinar and you won't make up and it'll be clear sailing. Fingers crossed. So thanks, Paul, for coming on and sharing all of that with us. I appreciate it.   43:14 Absolute pleasure, your superstar. Thanks for having me.   43:17 Thank you and everyone. Thanks for listening, have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

Power + Presence + Position
EP473: How To Grow Your Wealth In Quantum Leaps with Michelle Bosch

Power + Presence + Position

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 58:07


I've been talking a lot on the podcast about feminine energy and the role it plays in wealth creation and business building. For so long, women entrepreneurs have played by the same rules as our male counterparts, unknowingly denying this tremendous power in each of us to lead, manage, and generate wealth.  My guest today is the epitome of embracing feminine energy and using it to grow a massive 8-figure business. Michelle Bosch is a badass entrepreneur, investor, mom, and proud first generation immigrant. Together with her husband, Michelle created The Land Profit Generator Program to help others grow their generational wealth through land investing. Keep reading Michelle's entrepreneurial journey started with focusing solely on  KPIs, metrics, and numbers. While she still has a strong ability to analyze numbers in a business, she also shows up with immense compassion. Today, her journey includes making time and space for her intuition, for flow, and for her feminine energy.  In this episode, Michelle and I talk about the power of shifting from a transactional mindset in business to a more transformational one. Michelle shares her story of immigrating from Honduras and how her late father's investment paved the way for her career in investing. KPIs are always important, but as you'll hear today, taking quantum leaps internally is just as important for building wealth. Today on the Power + Presence + Position Podcast: An example of how harmonious growth can yield the same results as forced growth. 3 quantum leaps Michelle took to build tremendous wealth. How Michelle created and grew her passive income. Why exploring your whys for building wealth is so important. How Michelle describes her relationship with money. Why money has a neutral charge. Resources Mentioned: To receive weekly written gold in your inbox, make sure you sign up for my email newsletter. Learn how to nail your niche, clarify your message, and scale your business in the Power + Presence + Position Business Accelerator! EP470: Feminist Business Credo 1: Heal Your Mother Wound with Bethany Webster EP471: Feminist Business Credo 2: Billion Dollar Rolodex with Ungenita Prevost Michelle Bosch Website | Land Profit Generator | Podcast | Facebook | Instagram Love the show? Let us know! Are you a fan of the Power + Presence + Position? If the tips and interviews we share in each episode have helped you gain the confidence and inspiration to become a better, more powerful leader, head on over to Apple Podcasts, subscribe to the show and leave your honest review to let us know! What are you waiting for? Head on over to Apple Podcasts, subscribe, and leave a review to enter your name into this month's drawing!

Transform My Dance Studio – The Podcast For Dance Studio Owners

Guest hosts and Studio CEO besties, Heather Buelow and Patti Johnston have joined the Transform My Dance Studio podcast team, and over the next 6 weeks they are here to change the way you look at leadership and life in your studio. Introducing: CEO Coffee Chat with Heather and Patti! In this week's unmissable premiere, this innovative pair of Dance Studio CEOs are sharing their proven, actionable tips on how you too can build an amazing and stand-out team and how it will benefit your studio, including: Defining your core values, and why this is such an important step that many studio owners overlook. "Core values give me direction in every business decision that I make, and they also give my staff direction in every decision I want them to make...setting those core values makes your staff feel more connected with the studio and have more of a purpose." Perfecting your pre-season faculty training & preparation. "The kickoff staff meeting is so important to get everyone on the same page before the season begins. It's how I make sure that my standard is met in every class that's offered." How to measure, review and improve your staff's performance. "I know that by giving my staff ownership, they'll just surprise me again and again." PLUS Heather and Patti share their top tips for setting key performance indicators (KPIs), and teacher assessment processes that keep their faculty accountable and thriving in their roles. Listen to episode #1 of CEO Coffee Chat, powered by the Transform My Dance Studio Podcast right here!

Get Paid For Your Pad | Airbnb Hosting | Vacation Rentals | Apartment Sharing
Into the Weeds of the Operations of an Airbnb Business, Part I with—David Golshan

Get Paid For Your Pad | Airbnb Hosting | Vacation Rentals | Apartment Sharing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 44:38


If you manage listings remotely, operations can be a challenge.With no supervision, how do you maintain quality control? How do you make sure that your cleaners and maintenance workers are meeting expectations?David Golshan is the entrepreneur and real estate investor behind StayWithDave, a short-term rental business with properties in Los Angeles, Orange County and the Smoky Mountains. On this episode of Get Paid for Your Pad, Dave asks me questions about the operations of his Airbnb business, describing how hard it is to find contractors he can count on when unexpected issues arise.Listen in for insight on putting systems in place to prevent operations issues and learn how to hustle to find good team members for your short-term rental business—despite the current labor shortage!Topics Covered The ins and outs of Dave's Airbnb businessListings in LA, Orange County & Smoky MountainsTransition from arbitrage to management model Manage operations remotelyHire cleaner or cohost who's invested in your visionDevelop systems to prevent issuesHow to hold STR team members accountableJob score card for everyone who works with youFinancial reward for achieving KPIsSample key performance indicators for STR cleanersAirbnb ratings ConsistencySample KPIs for STR maintenance staffNo guest complaints about things not workingShow up within certain amount of timeWhy it's crucial to develop KPIs for contractorsAlign incentives with team membersIncentivize to do good jobHow to find maintenance workers and cleanersOnline platforms may not work in labor shortageStay in area and build relationships in person Connect with DaveStayWithDave StayWithDave on Instagram Resources Dave on Get Paid for Your Pad EP043 How to Maximize Profit from Your Airbnb Listing by Jasper Ribbers and Huzefa KapadiaThe Risks of Arbitrage on GPFYP EP419 Julie George Breezeway ThumbtackSTR Legends MastermindLegends X 90-Day STR AcceleratorEmail jasper@getpaidforyourpad.com Sponsor Hostfully [Discount Code PAD] See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
How to Build Better Client-Agency Relationships to Scale Faster

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 23:52


Do you know how you can improve client-agency relationships to scale faster? Joe Koufman has worked in the agency world for over 20 years. He was actually a guest on the podcast during its first year. In 2014, he decided to use his experience in marketing, business development, and management to create Setup, a company that works to connect brands and marketing agencies by helping companies find the right agency to meet their needs at a given time. Today he returned to the podcast to discuss what clients look for in an agency, how does a successful client-agency relationship looks like, why you shouldn't be afraid to challenge your clients, and more. 3 Golden Nuggets What do clients look for in an agency? Setup has set out to really understand client-agency relationships and asked several companies what are some of the things that matter to them in their agency partner. They found that most clients really don't care about things like proximity, size of the agency, or awards. Clients were mostly looking for chemistry, transparency, good communication, and creativity. As to the things they wished agencies knew, they wanted agencies to be more strategic partners. They also wished agencies had a better understanding of their business and that they understood that not all ideas could be executed. Building better agency-client relationships. It was curious that, when asked about what they wished to improve in the client-agency relationship, both parties seemed to ask for the same things. The reality is that, in order to have a good client-agency relationship, they need to have shared goals, sharing common KPIs. And, of course, there must also be a high level of transparency between client and agency, even some vulnerability in terms of what they are sharing. A big frustration for clients was when agencies claimed to be good at something that they are not. Agencies have to set clear expectations and be completely transparent and candid about what they do well and what they don't do well. Don't be afraid of tension. “You're not looking for harmony,” Joe says, “you're looking for tension in the relationship.” Don't strive to be your client's buddy. You can be buddies with your sales rep, but never buy anything from them. The idea is that you push the client and bring them an insight that's not obvious to them. Get them to agree that there's an issue in their organization and then present your solution and the best option. Remember that usually, clients don't hire an agency because they want order takers. They hire an agency because there's an unmet need. “The byproduct of being a real challenger,” Joe assures, “is relationship.” Sponsors and Resources Gusto: Today's episode is sponsored by Gusto, an all-in-one people platform for payroll, benefits, HR where you can unify your data. Gusto automatically applies your payroll taxes and directly deposits your team's paychecks, freeing you up to work on your business. Head over to gusto.com/agency to enjoy an exclusive offer for podcast listeners. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM The Byproduct of Being a Real Challenger is Better Client-Agency Relationships Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Got another exciting show for you. One of my good friends from Atlanta that was actually back on the podcast the first year we've done this. And we're going to talk about building client relations so you can scale your agency faster. So let's go ahead and get into the show. Hey, Joe. Welcome back to the show. Joe: [00:00:27] Hey! Thank you. It's been a long time since I've been on this show. Jason: [00:00:31] Yeah, I mean… seven years? And that back with the intro in the, in the video with the cup. I was like, oh, I'm here. Joe: [00:00:42] We, uh, we haven't aged a bit in seven years. Jason: [00:00:45] No, I've, I've just gotten a lot more gray in my beard. Um, a lot more gray. Yeah. No, you've always been kind of peppered. I think… Joe: [00:00:56] Yeah. Just more so. Jason: [00:00:57] Exactly. Well, um, tell everybody who you are and tell them a little bit about your, uh, your background of working with the agencies. Joe: [00:01:05] Sure. So I'm Joe Kaufman, I'm the founder and CEO of Setup and we are marketing matchmakers, meaning that we connect brands and marketing agencies together. So from an agency perspective, um, what that usually means is that we connect agencies with potential clients. From a client perspective, they look at us as a search consultant or a, an augment of their team to help them find agencies that can fill gaps in either capacity. Like they don't have enough arms and legs to do the work they need to do. Or capability, they're missing some capability that an agency could fill. Jason: [00:01:43] Very cool. Awesome. Well, let's, let's kinda talk about what people are listening in for is like building better relationships and, you know, and re-engaging. You know their client year after year, you know, because you, you've worked for, you know, many agencies in the past before doing the matchmaking service. We've had a lot of those guests on from Hill Meyer. It's, uh, you know, uh, Sims and those guys. So I guess let's, let's get into that. How can agencies build better relationships to scale better? Joe: [00:02:15] We, we think a lot about that agency-client relationship. And to that point, we actually do an annual marketing relationship survey. Um, Ad Age actually picked it up, uh, earlier this year, which was pretty cool. But basically what we wanted to do is understand what the reasons are that clients look for agencies. Why do they hire agencies? What do they expect out of their agency relationships? And, um, and we also actually did an event earlier this year, where we were calling it group therapy for the agency-client relationship. And we add a bunch of agency people and a bunch of clients on a Zoom call and we talked through that relationship. Um, you know, as I mentioned before, the clients often look for agency support because of an issue with capacity or an issue with a key capability that they're missing. And, um… That survey that we do annually to understand that relationship, we ask clients, what are some of the things that matter to you in your agency partner? When you're looking for a new agency partner. And the things we didn't hear, the things that came up really low on the list were things like proximity. You know, I don't care if my agency is down the street. Particularly in the days of a pandemic I really don't care where my agency's located physically. I don't care so much about the size of my agency. Smaller agencies can do amazing work for larger clients. Um, I don't care so much about what awards they've won. Just agencies often… Yeah. Agencies often think awards are important. And for some clients, they really do care, but most don't care about… Jason: [00:04:00] Well, those clients are idiots. Did I ever tell you that…? Did I ever tell you the story of, um, we were pitching Mellow Mushroom and, uh, they… If you've ever been to their office, it's like in the middle of nowhere and they were joking around about oh, here's a map to find her office. And like, I want you to show you how, how, how I want you to show me how creative you are. So I showed up at their office in full camping gear. Like they thought I was a homeless person. And like I had like the portfolio in this bag… like, and they were like, we loved it, but we're going with… You mentioned in the pre-show. I won't, I won't bash them now. Um, so I won't bash them on the show. But they were like, we're going with so-and-so because they won a ton of Addy awards and we want to win an Addy award. And I tell them, I go, I'm never eating your pizza ever again. Joe: [00:04:56] You don't want to sell pizza. You just want to win awards. Jason: [00:04:59] Yeah, I've never eaten your pizza. Joe: [00:05:01] That's right. You, you reminded me of a time that I wore an entire cowstume to the Chick-fil-A headquarters. Um, and my goal was to not smile the entire time. I was just going to be deadpan serious. Everybody would cut off pointing at me when I was walking through the lobby and walking through the… The women that check you in at the front desk did not think I was funny. Uh, and in fact, the client told me two or three times during the meeting to please keep my utters underneath the table. He said he found them a little bit disturbing. Jason: [00:05:33] What you should have done is started messing with your utter… utters. Joe: [00:05:38] I, I may or may not have done that. Maybe that was the reason he said that. But, um, I did think it would have been really fun to get some camelbacks or something and have like chocolate milk come out of one and strawberry milk and vanilla and whatever. But… Jason: [00:05:53] And then could be like just tap me. Joe: [00:05:57] Right. But it was an innovative idea for a client. I mean, dispensing cow milk dispensing cow on site. Uh, but anyway, so, uh, we, we found through the survey that, you know, those, those things are less important to clients. The awards, location, size, et cetera. What they really care more about is some of the soft and intangible things that the client can do well. Like… I'm sorry that the agency can do well. Like, um, they're looking for chemistry and relationship and transparency and, and good communication. And they're looking for, um, you know, creativity, uh, th, there are not… Many of those things are things that are within an agency's control. Um, and you know, we did, I mentioned, we did an event where we asked the questions, what things… What do you wish agencies knew? You know, we ask clients, what do you wish agencies knew? And they said things like we wish they were more strategic partners for us. We wish that our agency would help us navigate some of the bureaucratic red tape within our organization. Um, we want them to act as an extension of our team. We want them to I understand that not all ideas can be executed. Sometimes agencies come with these big glossy, creative ideas, but there's just not realistic for, for this client. And they wished that the agency would just understand their business better. Um, we built a series of resources for clients, um, in our resources section of our site. And, you know, there's a complete guide to finding a marketing agency in there. There's a scorecard in there that... There's two versions of the scorecard. One version is if the client is trying to decide between three or four different agencies, how do you choose in a pitch kind of situation? But the other scorecard is made for agency or for clients to evaluate their agency on an ongoing basis to see if they still are feeling the love. Jason: [00:08:05] Yeah. And what are some of those…? What are some of those questions that the clients are actually looking at? Joe: [00:08:12] Yeah. I mean, how, how creative is agency? How, how innovative are they in terms of, you know, finding new ways of doing things? How good is their, their, their communication? How good is their project management, their service? Um, you know, uh, uh, how are, how tech savvy are they? Even if they're not a technology agency, or, you know, a CRM agency or something like that. You still want to know that they're leveraging the best tools and that kind of thing. Um, and you know, we do it like a scorecard. I mean, they can rate each category and section and then decide is this agency is still the right one for me in the future? Um, the flip side of that conversation that we had about what, uh, you know, clients wish agencies knew. We asked the agency people what they wish clients knew. And I'm sure some of your listeners will, you know, feel some of these things. They, they wish that the clients would be patient and answer also, but also answer all the questions that you ask. When, when an agency asks a lot of questions, it's usually to uncover some insights so that they can deliver value for the client. They wish that the client would lean on the agencies for their expertise in a bigger way. They wished that the client would provide all of the crucial information upfront. I think sometimes there's a hesitancy for a client to open the kimono and give you everything as an agency. But if you truly want your agency to be a partner and not a vendor, then you gotta be really. You know, up front about all of the, the, um, information that might be useful. Jason: [00:10:00] Taking care of your employees has never been more important than right now. And while paydays are great, running payroll is a major pain, calculating taxes, deductions, compliance. None of it's easy, unless of course you have Gusto. Gusto is a simple online payroll and benefits built for your small business. Gusto automatically applies your payroll taxes and directly deposits your team's paychecks, freeing you up to work on your business. Plus, with Gustos help, you can offer benefits like 401k's health insurance, workers' comp, and a lot more. And because you're a smart agency masterclass listener, you're going to get three months free once you run your first payroll. Go to gusto.com/agency. That's gusto.com/agency for three free months. Well, you, you, you know what, like… I'm glad you're going over this part. Because if I had one of my agency clients go to me going, and I wished they could do this, I'm like, well, hey, dumb ass, they could. You're taking on the wrong prospect. Um, you know, I, I did a video, I think back around when you were back on the show, and I remember it was the worst background. I looked like Oompa Loompa in it. And the title of it was like, there's no such thing as a bad agency client, there's only a bad prospect or a bad process. And if you don't have the right, if you don't have the right qualification to check, if that prospect is legit or going to be a nightmare client, or it was going to be good. Because like, you've been on so many pitches, like I have, right? Including the cow utter or, or the campaign… Joe: [00:11:54] That, that was planning for cow appreciation day. So it was very appropriate to wear a cowstume. Jason: [00:12:00] Of course, of course. I mean, right? So we've been on all these pitches and like, if you can look back at when the guy was offended by your utters, right? It'd be like, you're probably not going to be a really good client for us. I don't care if your Chick-Fil-A. Uh, like, I need to pick. And then the other point, I think that you mentioned, you know, like kind of like to sum it up is that the end of the day, the agency needs to be the advisor. You can be a really good advisor if you really get laser focused at what you're going after. And having a niche or a specialization rather than a generalist and going after all the big brands. Like when we did that, it was just challenging. But when we started going after automotive, I could talk to Porsche, I could talk to Lotus, talk to Maserati. Like I was like, hey, I speak your language, guys. I race cars too. Like, I'm one of you. So… Joe: [00:12:53] Yeah. Super cool. Yeah, we, it is interesting that, um, they both sides of the equation were talking similar language though in terms of what they were looking for when it came to strategy. And I thought that was interesting that clients were saying, I wish my agency were more strategic. And then the agency people were saying things like, I wish my client would let me be more strategic. So, you know, we, we started that conversation like the old book from the, I guess it was the 80s or something. Men are from Venus & Women are from Mars or whatever it was. And that was sort of like the agencies and clients. But the reality is the best agency-client relationships have shared goals. You know, do you have shared and common KPIs, your key performance indicators that you're trying to achieve. And, you know, sometimes clients will give their agencies skin in the game and, and tie their compensation to, you know, some metric that is important to the larger business. But at the end of the day, those best agency, client relationships, you know, there's no surprises. There's a high level of transparency between client and agency. There's some vulnerability there in terms of sharing, more than you maybe should on purpose. Um, and then just being super clear with expectations about, you know, and that goes on both sides. I mean, the agencies setting clear expectations and being completely transparent and candid about what they do well and what they don't do well. Uh, a big frustration for a lot of clients that we talk to is, you know, my agency says they're good at everything. And I know that they're not. Jason: [00:14:35] Yeah. Yeah. They're full of shit. Yeah. I mean, at the end of the day, it's even if you have the client that like when… Going back to I wish I could be more strategic and I wish you were more strategic… Well, it sounds like, you know, if you find the right client, like it's about the communication or the process in order to show them that, rather than going, you should go do this, but then you can't back it up. I'm like… Joe: [00:14:57] Yeah. There's a, there's a book that I've always loved since I first read it. And I recommend it to a lot of people in The Challenger Sale. And I think you've probably read it. But the concept of The Challenger Sale, the biggest concept to me is you're looking for tension in the relationship. You're not looking for harmony in the relationship. Or relationship… people think they want to hire a relationship builder as a sales guy or saleswoman. The reality is a relationship builder. You can be buddies with your sales rep, but never buy anything from them. But those that really challenged… So the idea of the challenger sale in the book is you push the client, you bring them an insight that's not obvious to them. You get them to nod their head that, yes, that same issue happens within my organization. And then it only, then that they've nodded their head and said, yes, this happens within my organization, you can present your solution as the best. Or maybe the only way to solve that specific challenge or problem. And, um, and I had always been that way with clients where I was constantly, you know, pushing them and looking for tension. And there's a fun byproduct of being a real challenger and the by-product is relationship. Um, because I think that the clients will appreciate... I don't think clients hire an agency because they want order takers, usually. They hire a client, they hire an agency because there's some unmet need. You know, we talked about capacity or capability need, and they feel that the agency could not only solve that problem, but help them think through the future and, and overcome challenges that they haven't even anticipated yet. Jason: [00:16:48] Yeah. We, we were talking about this in our mastermind. We were helping a member out. Um, and they just, their close rate just kept going down and down. And everyone, a lot of people were starting to focus on the end. Like what, how are you asking for the close? We're like, let's start at the very beginning and let's, how are you setting up the meeting? Like, how are you starting the meeting? Are you letting them know…? Like whenever I would do a sales call, I'd be like, hey guys, I'm like, I'm going to build rapport really quick, but I'm not going to be their friend. The friend can come later on, but if they look at me as a friend, they're never going to buy from their friend, they have to, I have to position as an advisor. And then right after I do that, I'm like, hey, I have this quick little framework I'm going to go through to make sure we stay on time and make sure I can really figure out what your biggest issue is so we can fix that out. Can we, can we stay on track? And like, if you audit your process, like start from the very beginning a lot of times people get off track there. And then what do we have happen? The prospect just won't shut up for 40 minutes. They tell you this crap story that you don't need right now. Um, I'm being nice. Uh, but among … Joe: [00:18:00] Yeah. Well, or even go back further. I mean, you know, and to you, you kind of made this point earlier a little bit, which is, are you prospecting the right kind of opportunity? You know, before you even get to the meeting or the conversation, is it the right person? Uh, back when I was at a small digital shop, when I began, you know, my, my mark, my agency career, I had four criteria to determine if I wanted to pursue an opportunity. One was, do we want their logo on our logo slide? You know, is it a brand that we just really need, we really want? Number two was, is it a hundred thousand dollars in revenue and profitable for us as an agency in terms of opportunity? Third was does it teach us a new skill that we need to have? We just don't have today. And then fourth was, are there hungry mouths to feed within the agency? And we just, we'll take it even if it doesn't meet those three criteria because the thing that they need is the exact thing that we have some capacity on right now? Over time, we became part, we were acquired and became part of a kind of medium-size full service agency. We went from 50 people to 250 people. And that number, that second criteria, which was a hundred thousand dollars, became 200 became 500,000, became a million. And by the time we sold to a massive holding company in 2013. Um, I was… if I didn't see a million dollars in revenue in year one, they were too small. And it wasn't just size, but it was just the commitment of does this client…? Are they committed to marketing and working with us on a larger scale than just, we want to give you a little project here? And that doesn't mean we would never take on a project if it was a foot in the door that meant, you know… We would get in and get an opportunity to earn the larger piece of business. But we were really careful about that. We wanted to know that there was a path to a million dollars in revenue in year one. Um, and, and I think, you know, setting those parameters upfront, you know, if you're talking about an agency business development standpoint… You need to have your criteria. I have, an agency we work with that, um, that also has a PITA criteria. Do we think that the client is going to be a pain in the ass? And if the answer is yes, I don't care how many… you know. There are some red flags that sometimes occur upfront. To your point, when you're first having the conversation that the money looks attractive, but maybe you should run away. Jason: [00:20:43] Yeah. Trust your gut, your gut never lies. Joe: [00:20:46] And I'll give you one other piece that you probably experienced in your days running an agency. But nothing is motivational to the team in a positive way, in a very positive way than you firing a pita client. Um, you know, if a client truly is abusive or, you know, doesn't treat the agency like a strategic partner and treats the agency like a vendor or something like that, um, it's not worth the revenue. It's just not. And, and nothing, nothing helps your team be more supportive of the overall mission of the agency than when you say, look, we won't tolerate… You know, a client that's not supportive, not, not, uh, that that's abusive or… Jason: [00:21:36] Yeah, we. Yeah, I can't agree with you more on that. I mean, we literally, there was a… There was a member in the mastermind, not too long ago, that was doing stuff that we didn't agree that we asked to leave. Um, and then it just rallies the other, the other people. They were like, oh wow, they're not just, just taking for the money. They'll defend me. Um, and, uh, yeah, I think it says a lot about your company and character in that. So… Well, this has all been amazing, Joe. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience? Joe: [00:22:13] Um, I would just say that if there's an agency that's interested in growth, um, there are certainly… We can offer some services that help growth. Um, the four primary services can be found at setup.us/four-agencies. And I can send you a link to that. But essentially the services are around how do you help the agency position itself for growth? How do you, um, really uncover insights about the agency, that'll help you do that. And then we actually do help agencies grow through business development services on our sustainable pipeline. So we do have some pretty strict criteria about the kinds of agencies that we'll take on to work with. So we're not working with really small agencies. If they've got fewer than say 50 full-time employees, we probably won't we'll work with them on an ongoing… You know, sustainable pipeline basis. But happy to have the conversation with, with anyone that might be interested. Jason: [00:23:14] Awesome. Well, thanks so much, Joe, for coming on the show and everybody go check out their website. If you have more than 50 employees and you need help, go check them out. And if you want to be around amazing agency owners on a consistent basis where they can see the gaps that you're not able to see. Help you climb that mountain a lot faster, prevent those falls from crashing in the crevasses. Uh, I want you guys to go to a digitalagencyelite.com. This is our exclusive mastermind for experienced agency owners. And until next time have a Swenk day.

State of Demand Gen
206 - Marketing's Job Shouldn't Be To Facilitate Sales Doing Sales | The Ungated Podcast

State of Demand Gen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 42:13


Unpopular opinion—Marketing's job isn't to give sales a bunch of leads for them to call on. Marketing's job is to sell at scale and pull in high intent buyers to request demos for sales to close. But how do you do that if you're KPIs are all based on generating low-intent leads from gated content downloads? In this episode, Chris talks about the current state of B2B marketing and how broken it is. He discusses lead gen status quo, why it always fails, and how to generate real, high intent inbound leads. Register to join us live for the Demand Gen Live: Expert Series with Dave Gerhardt, Nov 4 @ 9:00 AM EST: https://bit.ly/3CtJrU7 Thanks to our friends at Hatch for producing this episode. Get unlimited podcast editing at usehatch.fm.

The Contractor Fight with Tom Reber
TCF426: Your 2022 Attack Plan

The Contractor Fight with Tom Reber

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 21:02


2022 is just around the corner. Tom's here to remind you to step on the gas and create momentum to start the year strong!    In this episode, we talk about… The One Page Business Plan—keep it simple!  Get clear on the foundation of your business  Who do you serve?   What are the most profitable projects?  How will you meet the needs of your ideal clients? What problem are you trying to solve and why are you trying to solve it?  Solidify your values Review company and personal values  Know where your revenue is coming from Do you need to reassess pricing strategies? What income streams do you have?   How many leads do you need for each sales goal? Break down your marketing strategies to reach your targets  Get clear on your goals to be able to create a clear strategy   Examples of marketing strategies  Know the difference between business strategies vs. tactics  Review your competition  What is your advantage? What are your KPIs? SWOT (Strength/Weaknesses/Opportunities/Threats) Analysis Break the plan up and assign who's responsible for each metric, strategy and tactic!   Links to resources: Join us for October Fight Night "Getting a Jump on 2022: Creating your implementation plan"  Register here: https://thecontractorfight.com/fight-night/   Tom's book, Winning the Contractor Fight: http://thecontractorfight.com/book Grab your Fight Planner here: https://gear.thecontractorfight.com/collections/accessories/products/tcf-planner Amp up your presence online. Check out Contractor Growth Network. CGN helps residential contractors increase profits, generate pre-qualified leads, and deal with fewer sales objections through their EPP Sales System. Their system is designed to attract, nurture and convert your ideal clients over and over again. https://thecontractorfight.com/CGN   The $100k Contractor is designed to get you to at least $100k a year in personal income. It's time we quit stealing from our families and get that time back! https://thecontractorfight.com/100k   The Contractor Fight Facebook Group:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/thecontractorfight   The Contractor Fight TV: https://www.youtube.com/c/TomReber

The Flip Empire Show
EP564: How To Improve Your Conversion Rate Without More Marketing

The Flip Empire Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 13:26


Do you want to know how to close 5 to 10 more deals a year without spending more money on marketing? Check out this episode and learn the minor changes you can make on the operational side of your business so you can have a huge impact on your conversion rate.     KEY TAKEAWAYS What you need to focus on to reach your goals Why you should keep track of your finances and KPIs Minor tweaks in your business that can improve your conversion rate     TWEETABLE ‘'In order to achieve the macro-goals, you have to focus on the micro-results. '' -Alex Pardo   ASCEND Don't Wait To Enjoy Your Life, Tomorrow, Live It Today! How To Grow Your Business, Expand Your Impact, and Experience Your Perfect Life:

Real Estate Investing Mastery Podcast
Designing A Business To Support Your Lifestyle w/ Virtual Wholesaler, Haim Mamane Palman » Episode 1066

Real Estate Investing Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 54:55


Haim Mamane Palman lived in the United States for over 20 years and is now back in his home of Israel. He joined forces with a friend who was running a real estate Facebook group and together, they've brought awareness of virtual wholesaling to Israelis. Not many people realize that they can do deals in the United States virtually from Israel. Haim realized that this way of doing business could allow him and his family to travel and live wherever they want. Haim started his career at the Israeli consulate in San Francisco and then got into real estate. He started out buying rentals but realized he wasn't generating enough money to replace his day job. Wholesaling made way more sense because he was generating a lot more money in a month doing less work. Eventually, Haim was able to quit his full-time job.Today, Haim has scaled back on doing deals and spends most of his time coaching. It's become more worth it for him to see success in others than generate deals on his own. In Israel, he teaches people how to build lucrative real estate businesses, including how to work with and manage virtual assistants and utilize KPIs. He also shows them how to generate good leads in a cost-effective way.What's Inside:—How virtual wholesaling works.—Advice for people thinking about quitting their job to pursue real estate.—Tips for building a virtual real estate business.—Challenges of opening an LLC in the US from a foreign country.