Podcasts about Haymarket

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Best podcasts about Haymarket

Latest podcast episodes about Haymarket

From Alpha To Omega
Episode 172: #171 Reform or Revolution w/ Helen Scott

From Alpha To Omega

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 73:11


After a post covid lull, we welcome to the show Prof Helen Scott, editor of the Haymarket books version of the Rosa Luxemburg classics ‘Reform or Revolution' and ‘The Mass Strike'. In this episode we discuss ‘Reform of Revolution', Rosa's text which critiqued ‘Evolutionary Socialism', the seminal revisionist work of the dark lord of reform within the SPD, Eduard Bernstein.Helen is currently working on Volume 5 of the complete works of Rosa Luxemburg, which is due to be released in the coming months. If you'd like to help contribute to this mammoth undertaking, you can donate here:https://www.toledotranslationfund.org/complete_works_rosa_luxemburg

Black Man With A Gun Show
Will You Save Mark Bressner? | Episode 4

Black Man With A Gun Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 32:01


This week I want to share a story of a cop now in jail for tasing a guy in Detroit.  It's tough to be a police (Anything) these days.  No respect, no love, no chance to excel at your job in the current culture.  Damned by most.  I am hoping you're different.  I am hoping you understand how the system works and will listen to the story of a guy named Mark Bressner.   He isn't alone.  Sometimes it's worse than jail. A Baltimore Police officer who was shot while sitting in her patrol car Christmas Eve has died , according to the Baltimore Police Department. An off-duty New York City Police Department officer was shot in the head while sleeping in his car on New Year's Day. This episode has foul language from a movie in it.  NOT SAFE FOR KIDS or WORK. (Movie clip)    In alliance with the National Center for Police Defense (NCPD) I'm asking for your financial assistance in support of Trooper Mark Bressner this week.  The NCPD's sole mission is to raise funds for the legal defense of the brave men and women who have fallen into the crosshairs of anti-police prosecutors (and judges) seeking to further their careers by going after law enforcement. https://nationalcenterforpolicedefense.com/donate Or send your 100% tax deductible check to: National Center for Police Defense, Inc., 5501 Merchants View Sq. #763 Haymarket, VA 20169     The National Center for Police Defense, Inc. (NCPD) is a 501©3 non-profit organization. All contributions are tax-deductible as allowed by law, and are made with the understanding that NCPD has complete discretion and control over the use of all donated funds. If we receive more than we need for any one law enforcement officer's case, the remaining funds will be used to assist other officers and/or to help further other programs. Upon your written request to our national office (NCPD, c/o Day Johns, 10560 Main Street, Ste 218 Fairfax VA 22030), we will be pleased to send you a copy of our most recent audited financial statement.     Thank you,   Rev. Kenn Blanchard patreon.com/blackmanwithagun 

Haymarket Books Live
Haymarket Poetry Presents: The Patron Saint of Making Curfew

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 80:45


Join Tim Staffford to celebrate the release of his new chapbook The Patron Saint of Making Curfew! Tim will be joined on the mic by special guests Natasha Carrizosa, Omar Holmon and Dan “Sully” Sullivan, for an evening hosted by Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz. Get the book: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1890-the-patron-saint-of-making-curfew Poets: Tim Stafford is a poet and public educator from Lyons, IL. He is the editor of the Learn Then Burn all-ages anthology series on Write Bloody Publishing. He is a former Chicago Poetry Slam champion and he performs regularly across the U.S. and Europe including the 2015 Woerdz Festival in Luzern, Switzerland and the ABC Brecht Festival in Augsburg, Germany. Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz is a New York Times bestselling nonfiction writer and poet. Author of seven books of poetry, her latest How to Love the Empty Air was published in 2018. Her nonfiction book Dr. Mutter's Marvels: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine, debuted at #7 on the New York Times Bestseller List for Books about Health and would stay on it for three months. Cristin is married to fellow bestselling author and screenwriter Ernest Cline. She lives in Austin, Texas with her family and their two eccentric rescue dachshunds. Natasha Carrizosa won the National Poetry Award for multicultural poet of the year in 2013. She is a poet, writer, and spoken word artist. She is a published author of several projects – including heavy light, mejiafricana, and Of Fire and Rain (co-authored with Joaquin Zihuatanejo.) She has performed her work and conducted workshops for audiences in Madrid, Paris, St. Lucia, New York, Chicago, Houston and countless other cities. Omar Holmon is an Alumni poet of Rutgers University and has competed in slam poetry for numerous years with two final stage appearances at the National Poetry Slam. He has been featured on Button Poetry, Tedx, and a commercial for Laphroaig whiskey (we outchea). In 2014 Omar Holmon Co-founded the Black Nerd Problems website with William Evans, where he spends his days writing essays on pop culture, blackness, and making top quality gifs. Dan “Sully” Sullivan poems and performances have been featured on HBO Def Poetry Jam, WGN Morning News, and National Public Radio. Sully is a three-time Chicago Poetry Slam Champion, a recipient of the Gwendolyn Brooks Open Mic Poetry Award, the Earl S Ho Award for Excellence in Teaching Creative Writing, and an Indiana University Writer in South Asia Recipient. His first full-length book of poems, The Blue Line Home, is available from EM-Press. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/istJRk0L3UE Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Coup: Violence and Resistance in Bolivia (Book Launch)

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 87:10


Join the authors for a book launch and discussion of "Coup: A Story of Violence and Resistance in Bolivia." In three dramatic weeks in October and November 2019, the fourteen years of progressive change that Evo Morales' pink tide government had worked to implement in Bolivia and beyond came to a screeching halt. President Morales was forced to resign after protests against his re-election to a fourth term in allegedly fraudulent elections erupted among the urban middle classes, anti-indigenous racists, and prominent conservative politicians. Join Linda Farthing and Thomas Becker in conversation as they discuss the story of this year of upheaval in Bolivia, providing a critical analysis of the 14 years of the MAS government that preceded it as well as the MAS return to power in 2020. The will relate personal accounts and commentary from women and men on the streets, leaders in social movements, members of the MAS party and government, survivors of Áñez's abuses, and intellectuals. Buy the book from Haymarket: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1745-coup Speakers: Linda Farthing is a journalist and independent scholar who reported and commented from Bolivia during the 2019-2020 coup for The Guardian, The Economist, Al Jazeera, Americas Quarterly, NPR and the BBC. She is the co-author of three books on Bolivia. Thomas Becker is an activist, attorney, and academic who has worked on human rights issues in Bolivia for over 15 years. He spent much of 2019-2020 in Bolivia investigating abuses carried out after the 2019 coup for Harvard Law School. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/2yv34EDD_pQ Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Studs Terkel Archive Podcast
Discussing the book "The Haymarket Tragedy," with the author, historian Paul Avrich

Studs Terkel Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 50:23


First broadcast on December 27, 1984.

Haymarket Books Live
Just Resistance: Building Toward a Demilitarized and Decolonized Future

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 83:00


Join organizers and advocates to imagine and discuss building a future safe for all and free of militarization and colonization. The Immigrant Defense Project, the Center for Constitutional Rights and Haymarket Books are proud to present “The Next 20 Years: Building towards a demilitarized and decolonized future of safety for all”, the final event of a 4-part series marking the 20th anniversary of 9/11. The event commemorating International Human Rights Day brings together organizers and advocates who are building towards a world we have not yet seen, and helping to pave our collective path forward. From the abolition of borders, to the complete defunding of the military industrial complex within a future of economic, racial, gender and climate justice, we will discuss both the necessity of imagination, as well as the strategies, tactics and principles we need to win the world we deserve. To mark the 20th anniversary of 9/11, the Center for Constitutional Rights, Haymarket Books and our partners are pleased to present a 4-part series, "Just Resistance: 20 years of global struggle against the post-9/11 human rights crisis." Moderator: Mizue Aizeki is the Deputy Director of the Immigrant Defense Project (IDP). Mizue's work focuses on ending the injustices—including criminalization, imprisonment, and exile—at the intersections of the criminal and immigration systems. Mizue guides IDP's local and state policy work, including the ICE Out of Courts Campaign and IDP's campaigns to end the growing entanglement between local law enforcement and ICE. . Panelists: Lara Kiswani is the executive director of the Arab Resource & Organizing Center (AROC), and a faculty member in the College of Ethnic Studies at SF State University. Lara has been active in movements against racism and war, for Palestinian self-determination, and international solidarity for the last 20 years. Arun Kundnani is the author of The Muslims are Coming! Islamophobia, extremism, and the domestic War on Terror (Verso, 2014) and The End of Tolerance: racism in 21st century Britain (Pluto, 2007). He has previously been an editor of the journal Race & Class and a scholar-in-residence at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library. Timmy Châu (he/him) is a Viet organizer, lawyer, and facilitator based in Zhigaagoong, also known as Chicago. He started organizing with an effort called We Charge Genocide doing cop-watch and know-your-rights trainings across the City. He is the Managing Director at the Prison + Neighborhood Arts / Education Project (PNAP) where he works on building inside/outside networks of mutual support and advocacy between incarcerated and freeworld activists, scholars, thinkers, and artists. He's also a co-starter of Dissenters, a new youth-led anti-war organization, where he currently sits on the Advisory Committee. Fernando Martí is a poet, printmaker, community architect, and housing activist. His work reflects his formal training in urbanism, his roots in rural Ecuador, and his current residence in the heart of Empire in an age of climate catastrophe. His poetry, prints, altar ofrendas and utopian constructions inhabit the space between ancestral traditions of place and a futurist imagination rooted in Latinx culture. For over a decade, Fernando co-directed the Council of Community Housing Organizations. His artwork can be found regularly on justseeds.org. His writing has appeared in publications as varied as El Tecolote, Street Sheet, Geez magazine, Left Turn and Shelterforce. He shares his art and writing in a zine called Amor y Lucha. This event is sponsored by the Immigrant Defense Network, the Center for Constitutional Rights and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/SfXYOx3cGq4 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
What's Happening in Ethiopia?

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 87:38


Join us for this discussion about how to make sense of the current crisis in Ethiopia. How should progressives make sense of the government of Ethiopia, alongside the Amhara regional militia, launching a genocidal attack on the country's northern Tigray region — even going as far as inviting neighboring Eritrea to join in on the atrocities? NGOs have documented some of the torture, sexual assault, starvation and state violence uniquely directed at Tigray — including Eritrean refugees who lived there prior to the war — but without providing broader analysis of the historical and contemporary political forces driving the conflict. The panelists in this forum will juxtapose the Tigray genocide with the #OromoProtests movement — which ousted the previous regime — seeking to rectify legacies of conquest and enslavement in an Ethiopian empire best described as a “prison house of nations”. The mainstream media and humanitarian organizations count casualties from the standpoint of nowhere, and some claiming to represent the international left, like the ANSWER Coalition and the Black Alliance for Peace, which co-organized the November 21 coordinated rallies, approach the war through a US-centric prism and defend the Abiy government. In contrast, a grounded political analysis that rejects US imperialism and genocide is possible if we ask a different set of questions. How should we understand the #TigrayGenocide in relation to conscription in Oromia by the federal government and reports of the Tigrayan Defense Force committing atrocities in Amhara, Afar and against Eritrean refugees? What do the Qimant, Somali or those of the 83+ nationalities forcibly incorporated into Ethiopia tell us about how state formation got us here and what's politically possible to get us out? Speakers: J. Khadijah Abdurahman is founder and Director of We Be Imagining at Columbia University's INCITE Center and the American Assembly's Democracy and Trust Program. They are also a Tech Impact Network Research Fellow at NYU's AI Now Institute in partnership with UCLA's C2I2 and UWA Law School. Their research focus is on predictive analytics in the New York City child welfare system and the role of tech in mass atrocities in the Horn of Africa. Maebel Gebremedhin is the founder and president of Tigray Action Committee, a nonprofit committed to helping end the suffering of millions of Tigrayans due to the #TigrayGenocide. Ayantu Tibeso is a scholar focusing on transnational Indigenous Oromo knowledge production and archival erasure in the construction of Ethiopian national narratives. She is a Cota-Robles Fellow and doctoral student in Information Studies at UCLA. Recent article by Ayantu Tibeso & J. Khadijah Abdurahman: “Tigray, Oromia, and The Ethiopian Empire”: https://thefunambulist.net/magazine/against-genocide/tigray-oromia-and-the-ethiopian-empire Recent from Maebel Gebremedhin: "Will My Tigrayan Family Ever Really Be Free?": https://www.thecut.com/2021/10/my-tigrayan-family.html Moderator: Promise Li is an activist and writer from Hong Kong and Los Angeles. He organizes international solidarity work with Internationalism from Below and Lausan Collective. This event is sponsored by Haymarket Books, Internationalism From Below, Africa Is A Country, and Review of African Political Economy (ROAPE). Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/sMTdgtzoiro Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Game Worker Solidarity: Organizing from the Screen to the Table

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 87:24


Join worker organizers from the Games industry to celebrate the launch of the Game Worker Solidarity website. The Game Worker Solidarity Project is mapping and documenting collective movements by game workers striving to improve their working conditions. They are collecting materials created by workers for these movements and aim to document the longer history of resistance in the industry which goes back to its formation. This event launches the project website, backed by a database of events that can be freely searched by location, type of action, and numbers involved for events like the creation of trade union branches, new contracts, strikes, protests, social media campaigns. The goal is to create a living resource that can help support and inspire more organizing in the games industry. To start that off, this event will feature organizers from the campaign at Activision Blizzard and the recent unionization of the games company Paizo. View the site here: https://gameworkersolidarity.com/ --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Jessica Gonzalez is an organizer of the campaign against sexual harassment at Activision Blizzard, where workers have launched an open letter and held walkouts in recent weeks. Jenny Jarzabski is a founding member of United Paizo Workers. She is also an organized play developer for Paizo Inc., as well as a freelance writer and game designer. Her credits include work for Paizo Inc., Kobold Press, Rogue Genius Games, and Playground Adventures. Austin Kelmore is a 14 year veteran of the games industry, founding member and former chair of the IWGB (Independent Workers Union of Great Britain) Game Workers Branch, and co-creator of Game Worker Solidarity. Nataliya Nedzhvetskaya is a doctoral student in sociology at University of California, Berkeley, fellow in Digital Ethics & Governance at the Jain Family Institute, and archivist at Collective Action in Tech. Aubrey Ryan is an LQGBTIA+/Differing Abilities Activist, artist, and game industry veteran. Alex Speidel (he/him) is the Organized Play Coordinator for Paizo, an organizer for the United Paizo Workers, and a former volunteer for the Organized Play Foundation. Nora Valletta is a software engineer at Blizzard Entertainment, and has been part of the campaign against sexual harassment at Activision Blizzard. Jamie Woodcock is a senior lecturer at the Open University and a researcher based in London. He is the author of The Fight Against Platform Capitalism, The Gig Economy, Marx at the Arcade, and Working the Phones. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is sponsored by Notes From Below and Haymarket Books. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of our important publishing and programming work. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/VFU2HjAiGUM Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
The US Empire After Afghanistan w/ Anand Gopal & Rozina Ali

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 77:51


Join renowned journalists Rozina Ali and Anand Gopal for a discussion of the aftermath of the Afghanistan withdrawal and the US empire. Following the official U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan in August, questions remain about the fate of the country following the twenty-year US occupation. What will happen to the 3.6 million Afghans that have fled their homes since the withdrawal? Or the twenty-three million in the country now threatened with starvation and famine because of US Sanctions? Is the war still being fought in more insidious ways that are harder to see and harder to resist? Join renowned journalists Rozina Ali and Anand Gopal as they discussion all this and more on Friday Dec 3rd at 5PM on the Haymarket Youtube channel. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Rozina Ali is a contributing writer at New York Times Magazine and a fellow at Type Media Center. Her writing covers the War on Terror, Islamophobia, and the Middle East and South Asia. She was previously on the staff of The New Yorker and The Cairo Review of Global Affairs. She is currently working on a book about the history of Islamophobia in the United States. Anand Gopal is a freelance journalist covering Afghanistan, Egypt, Syria, and other international hotspots. He is the author of the Pulitzer Prize nominated No Good Men Among the Living, and is currently working on a book about the Arab revolutions. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/u1Hd4jTAauc Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Abolition Must Be International: Study & Struggle #4 w/ Harsha Walia & more

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 68:54


A conversation about centering internationalism in the fight for abolition with Jalil Muntaqim, Harsha Walia, and more. Study and Struggle organizes against criminalization and incarceration in Mississippi through mutual aid, political education, and community building. We provide a bilingual Spanish and English curriculum with discussion questions and reading materials, as well as financial support, to over 100 participants in radical study groups inside and outside prisons in Mississippi. These groups correspond with groups from across the country through our pen pal program. We regularly come together for online conversations hosted by Haymarket Books. The curriculum, built by a combination of currently- and formerly-incarcerated people, scholars, and community organizers, centers around the interrelationship between prison abolition and immigrant justice, with a particular attention to freedom struggles in Mississippi and the U.S. South. For our Fall 2021 four month curriculum, we have borrowed and augmented Ruth Wilson Gilmore's argument that “abolition is about presence, not absence. It has to be green, and in order to be green, it has to be red (anti-capitalist), and in order to be red, it has to be international," having added “intersectional” as a fourth analytical category that we hope moves us beyond “single-issue” organizing. Study and Struggle provides a bilingual curriculum to all our imprisoned comrades in Mississippi with the support of our friends at 1977 Books and makes it fully available online for other study groups to use as they see fit. For more on Study and Struggle: https://www.studyandstruggle.com/ Our fourth webinar theme is "International" and will be a conversation about what it means for abolition to be internationalist, centering questions about the role of nations, states, and borders in maintaining hierarchy and subjugation, as well the necessity of organizing across and beyond them for collective liberation. --------------------------------- Speakers: Jaan Laaman was a long held political prisoner, who got out of captivity earlier in 2021. Jaan is one of the Ohio-7 — United Freedom Front anti-imperialist and anti- racist underground activists who were captured in 1984. Jaan is a life long working class revolutionary, always active in anti-imperialist, anti-racist, anti-repression work, both as a public activist and underground fighter Jalil Muntaqim is currently on parole after being wrongfully incarcerated for half a century at Attica Correctional Facility and Southport Correctional Facility. While incarcerated Jalil faced numerous attempts of retaliation by the state—including routine denial of parole. Before he was incarcerated, he was a member of the Black Panther Party and the Black Liberation Army. He is the author of We Are Our Own Liberators: Selected Prison Writings, a collection of essays that he wrote while in prison. Felix Sitthivong is an organizer and advisor for the Asian Pacific Islander Cultural Awareness Group (APICAG). Through APICAG, Sitthivong has organized immigration, social justice and youth outreach forums and has designed Asian American studies courses, an intersectional feminism 101 class and anti-domestic violence program. He was previously a GED tutor through Edmonds Community College. He has published in The Marshall Project, Inquest, the Washington State Wire, and the International Examiner. He is currently serving a 65-year sentence at the Stafford Creek Corrections Center. Harsha Walia is the award-winning author of Undoing Border Imperialism and Border and Rule. Trained in the law, she is a community organizer and campaigner in migrant justice, anti-capitalist, feminist, and anti-imperialist movements, including No One Is Illegal and Women's Memorial March Committee. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/A-Xi9UUNcoE Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Stories of Survival Recording: Stories of Survival: Surviving the Post-9/11 Human Rights Crisis

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 73:13


Join us for the third event in a 4-part series by the Center for Constitutional Rights and Haymarket Books marking the 20th anniversary of 9/11. In “Stories of Survival: Surviving the post-9/11 human rights crisis and reclaiming rights for all,” we are honored to hear from survivors of the U.S. government's so-called “War on Terror,” who have resisted the U.S.' campaign of human rights abuses, from endless wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, to the global export of the nebulous and discriminatory “terrorism framework”, and the proliferation of domestic policies of surveillance and detention that reinforced existing systems of oppression. From Kabul and Mombasa to Omaha--panelists will share the impact of the harms and together demand accountability and imagine a world repaired. Panelists: Marie Ramtu holds a master's degree in Peace Studies and International Relations from Hekima University College. She's a lobbyist with grassroots, regional, and international niches. Her experience in humanitarian, the human rights and social justice sectors spans at least 14 years. Marie has operated to safeguard the rights of the marginalized refugees and asylum seekers. She has also had a specific focus in influencing a shift in attitude, policies, and practices in the specific protection on the rights of sexual and gender minorities. Before joining Muslims for Human Rights (MUHURI) as the Executive Director, Marie worked with regional and international non-governmental organizations that include the Coalition for the Independence of the African Commission (CIAC), the Network of African National Human Rights Institutions (NANHRI), and Church World Service. Born in Kabul, Afghanistan and raised in rural Washington state, Gazelle Samizay's work often reflects the complexities and contradictions of culture, nationality and gender through the lens of her bicultural identity. Her work in photography, video and mixed media has been exhibited across the US and internationally, including at Whitechapel Gallery, London; Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery; the California Museum of Photography, Riverside; the de Young Museum, San Francisco; and the Slamdance Film Festival, Park City, UT. In addition to her studio practice, her writing has been published in One Story, Thirty Stories: An Anthology of Contemporary Afghan American Literature and she is a founding member of the Afghan American Artists and Writers Association. Samizay has received numerous awards and residencies, including from the Princess Grace Foundation, NY; Craft Contemporary, Los Angeles; the Arizona Community Foundation, Phoenix; Level Ground, Los Angeles, the Torrance Art Museum, and Side Street Projects, Los Angeles. She received her MFA in photography at the University of Arizona and currently lives in San Francisco. www.gazellesamizay.com. @gsamizay. Naveed Shinwari is a plaintiff in Tanvir v. Tanzin, a case brought in 2013 on behalf of American Muslims who were placed or kept on the No-Fly List by the FBI for refusing to spy on their Muslim communities. He was repeatedly questioned and harassed by the FBI as they attempted to recruit him to spy on others. As retaliation for his refusal to do so, Naveed was placed on the No-Fly List and unable to travel to Afghanistan to visit his wife and daughters for two years. His fight to hold government officials accountable for their abuse of power continues. Moderator: Samah Mcgona Sisay is a Bertha Justice Fellow at the Center for Constitutional Rights, where she specializes in international human rights and challenging inhumane immigration policies and abusive police practices. Prior to coming to the Center for Constitutional Rights, Samah worked as an Equal Justice Works Fellow at African Services Committee. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/1bClT5GmLJk Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

My Time Capsule
Ep. 152 - Matthew Kelly

My Time Capsule

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 47:48


Matthew Kelly is an actor and presenter best known for presenting the shows Stars in Their Eyes, You Bet! and Game for a Laugh. After leaving Stars in Their Eyes he returned to acting. On the stage he won an Olivier Award for his portrayal of Lennie in John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men at the Savoy Theatre, He was in Waiting for Godot at the Theatre Royal, Haymarket, alongside Ian McKellen and he's played Pandarus in Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida at the Globe in London amongst so much more. Matthew Kelly is guest 152 on My Time Capsule and he chats to Michael Fenton Stevens about the five things he'd like to put in a time capsule; four he'd like to preserve and one he'd like to bury and never have to think about again .Follow My Time Capsule on Twitter, Instagram & Facebook: @MyTCpod .Follow Michael Fenton Stevens on Twitter: @fentonstevens and Instagram @mikefentonstevens .Produced and edited by John Fenton-Stevens for Cast Off Productions .Music by Pass The Peas Music .Artwork by Matthew Boxall .Social media support by Harriet Stevens .This podcast is proud to be associated with the charity Viva! Providing theatrical opportunities for hundreds of young people. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Haymarket Books Live
Is Neoliberalism Finished? w/ David McNally, Michael Roberts, & Prabhat Patnaik

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 89:17


Join Haymarket Books and Spectre Journal for a discussion of Neoliberalism and the future of the global economy. After the failures of Keynesianism in the 1970s, the capitalist classes of the world turned to neoliberalism to discipline workers and restore profitability. In the wake of the Great Recession of 2008-10, capitalism has been mired in a long-term global slump and neoliberal policies have been unable to trigger a new boom. Is neoliberalism finished? Are states returning to Keynesianism? Will that work? Why is the world economy locked in a slump? Join this webinar to hear answers to these and other questions from Prabhat Patnaik, Michael Roberts, and David McNally. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: David McNally teaches history at the University of Houston. He is an editor of Spectre journal, and the author of seven books, including Blood and Money: War, Slavery, Finance and Empire (Haymarket Books 2020). Michael Roberts is a British-based Marxist economist and author who worked as a professional economist in financial institutions for 40 years. He is author of several books: The Great Recession - a Marxist View (2009); The Long Depression (Haymarket 2016); World in Crisis joint ed (Haymarket 2018) and Marx 200 (2018). He blogs regularly at: thenextrecession.wordpress.com. Prabhat Patnaik is a well-known radical economist. He has written extensively on macroeconomics, development economics, and political economy. His books include Accumulation and Stability Under Capitalism and The Retreat to Unfreedom. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is sponsored by Spectre Journal and Haymarket Books. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of our important publishing and programming work. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/bzCjTUNrQRk Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
The Haitian Migration Crisis: Made in the USA

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 87:56


Join us for a critical discussion of the Haitian Migration Crisis⁠—made in the USA and enforced by the imperial border regime. The Biden administration in collusion with states throughout Latin America and the Caribbean are repressing Haitian refugees, blocking their migration, denying them the right to asylum, and subjecting them to deportation to horrific conditions in Haiti. This webinar will explore how this so-called migrant crisis was caused by US imperialism and enforced by the expansion of its border regime throughout the region. Speakers: Todd Miller has researched and written about border issues for more than 20 years. He resides in Tucson, Arizona, but also has spent many years living and working in Oaxaca, Mexico. His work has appeared in the New York Times, The Guardian, TomDispatch, The Nation, San Francisco Chronicle, In These Times, Guernica, and Al Jazeera English, among other places. Miller is the author of three previous books: Empire of Borders: The Expansion of the U.S. Border Around the World (Verso, 2019), Storming the Wall: Climate Change, Migration, and Homeland Security (City Lights, 2017), which was awarded the 2018 Izzy Award for Excellence in Independent Journalism, and Border Patrol Nation: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Homeland Security (City Lights, 2014). His newest book, published by City Lights in 2021, is Build Bridges, Not Walls: A Journey to a World Without Borders. He's a contributing editor on border and immigration issues for NACLA Report on the Americas and its column “Border Wars.” Follow him at @memomiller. Daniel Tse, Asylum/Detention Task-Force Coordinator at the Haitian Bridge Alliance. Guerline Jozef is Co-Founder and Executive Director of the Haitian Bridge Alliance. Camilo Perez-Bustillo, member, leadership team Witness at the Border; co-founder of International Tribunal of Conscience of Peoples in Movement; co-author, Human Rights, Hegemony and Utopia in Latin America: Poverty and Forced Migration in Mexico and Colombia (Haymarket Books 2017). This event is sponsored by Haymarket Books, Spectre Journal, DSA Immigrant Rights Working Group, Witness at the Border, and the Tempest Collective. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of our important publishing and programming work. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/M_zbfFCwRiQ Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Salvage Live: The Tragedy of the Worker: Communism in the Age of Climate Catastrophe

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 90:59


Join Salvage and Haymarket Books for a discussion of how to avert ecological ruin through Salvage Communism Facing irreversible climate change, the planet is en route to apocalypse. To understand the scale of what faces us and how it ramifies through every corner of our lives is to marvel at our inaction. Why aren't we holding emergency meetings in every city, town and village every week? What is to be done to create a planet where a communist horizon offers a new dawn to replace our planetary twilight? What does it mean to be a communist after we have hit a climate tipping point? Annie Olaloku-Teriba and Barnaby Raine will be joined by Richard Seymour and Rosie Warren, two members of the Salvage Collective, for a discussion of capitalism's death drive, the left's complicated entanglements with fossil fuels, the rising tide of fascism, and other themes related to the newly published Tragedy of the Worker. Amidst the ruins and future wreckage of climate catastrophe they argue that Salvage Communism is our only path toward a liberated future on a habitable planet. This discussion will be part of the ongoing Salvage Live events series, hosted by Haymarket Books. --------------------------------------------------------------------- The Tragedy of the Worker is available from Verso Books. Order a copy here: https://www.versobooks.com/books/3727-the-tragedy-of-the-worker --------------------------------------------------------------------- Richard Seymour is the author of numerous works of non-fiction, most recently The Twittering Machine. His writing appears in the New York Times, London Review of Books, Guardian, Prospect, Jacobin, and innumerable other places, including his own Patreon. Rosie Warren is an Editor at Verso and the Editor-in-Chief of Salvage. Annie Olaloku-Teriba is a writer and podcaster whose research focuses on how neoliberalism has transformed the theory and practice of ‘race.' Barnaby Raine is writing his PhD at Columbia University on visions of ending capitalism. He teaches at the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/AtVPnstgR_A Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
What's Happening in South Africa?

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 85:10


Join us for a conversation about the current crisis of political violence and inequality in South Africa. The arrest in July of former president Jacob Zuma in connection with an investigation into widespread corruption sparked an eruption of unrest and violence, mainly in the province of his base, KwaZulu-Natal. Yet the upheaval reflects a broader crisis underpinned by the failures of the African National Congress (ANC) to deliver on the hopes of national liberation, and the neoliberalization and contradictions of the ANC in power. Soaring levels of unemployment and inequality – among the highest on the planet – have been exacerbated by the pandemic and government austerity policies. With the approach of municipal elections in November and an emerging new round of violence, our panelists from the online magazine Africa Is A Country will explore the roots of the crisis and the potential for building left organization and social forces capable of challenging the conditions facing the working class and the poor in South Africa today. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Sean Jacobs is Associate Professor of International Affairs at The New School. Founder and Editor of Africa is a Country. Author of Media in Postapartheid South Africa: Postcolonial Politics in the Age of Globalization (2019). Originally from Cape Town William Shoki is Staff Writer for Africa Is A Country, and is based in Johannesburg. Facilitator: Lee Wengraf is author of Extracting Profit: Imperialism, Neoliberalism, and the New Scramble for Africa (Haymarket Books, 2018, re-issued by Daraja Press in 2021). Contributing Editor at the Review of African Political Economy. This event is sponsored by Africa Is A Country, Haymarket Books, Internationalism From Below, Review of African Political Economy (ROAPE). Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/elxz0EeOVww Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
The Consequences of Capitalism with Noam Chomsky

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 80:48


Join Noam Chomsky and Marv Waterstone as they discuss their latest book, Consequences of Capitalism. Consequences of Capitalism, a new book by Noam Chomsky and Marv Waterstone, exposes the deep, often unseen connections between neoliberal 'common sense' and structural power. In making these linkages, the will show how the current hegemony keeps social justice movements divided and marginalized. And, most importantly, we see how we can fight to overcome these divisions. Is there an alternative to capitalism? Chomsky and Waterstone will chart a critical map for a more just and sustainable society. Get the book, Consequences of Capitalism: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1548-consequences-of-capitalism --------------------------------------------------------------------- Noam Chomsky is Institute Professor (emeritus) in the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Laureate Professor of Linguistics and Agnese Nelms Haury Chair in the Program in Environment and Social Justice at the University of Arizona. His work is widely credited with having revolutionized the field of modern linguistics. Chomsky is the author of numerous best-selling political works, which have been translated into scores of languages. Recent books include What Kind of Creatures Are We?, as well as Optimism Over Despair, and Internationalism of Extinction. Marv Waterstone is Professor Emeritus in the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona, where he has been a faculty member for over 30 years. He is also the former director of the University of Arizona Graduate Interdisciplinary Program in Comparative Cultural and Literary Studies. His research and teaching focus on the Gramscian notions of hegemony and common sense, and their connections to social justice and progressive social change. His most recent books are Wageless Life: A Manifesto for a Future beyond Capitalism (University of Minnesota Press; co-authored with Ian Shaw) and Geographic Thought: A Praxis Perspective (Routledge; co-edited with George Henderson). Janine Jackson (host) is the program director at Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting (FAIR) and producer/host of FAIR's syndicated weekly radio show CounterSpin. Her work has appeared in various publications, including Civil Rights Since 1787 (New York University Press) and Stop the Next War Now: Effective Responses to Violence and Terrorism (New World Library). Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/7-D5jbtnzpI Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Taking Children, Taking the Land: Nick Estes with Rebecca Nagle

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 88:29


Join Nick Estes and Rebecca Nagle for an urgent discussion of the ongoing attack on Indigenous children and Indigenous land. Nick Estes puts into historical context recent headlines surrounding the discovery of mass graves of Native children at Canadian residential schools. The removal of Indigenous children from their communities and families has a long genocidal legacy that persists today, well beyond the boarding school era in Canada and the United States. The attack on Indigenous children is an attack on Indigenous sovereignty and land, and there is urgency to uphold protections that are under assault by the right wing, such as the Indian Child Welfare Act. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Nick Estes is a citizen of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe. He is the author of Our History Is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance (Verso, 2019), coeditor with Jaskiran Dhillon of Standing with Standing Rock: Voices from the #NoDAPL Movement (University of Minnesota Press, 2019), and coauthor with Melanie K. Yazzie, Jennifer Nez Denetdale, and David Correia of Red Nation Rising: From Bordertown Violence to Native Liberation (PM Press, 2021). In 2014 he cofounded The Red Nation, an Indigenous resistance organization, and he is cohost of The Red Nation podcast. His writing has appeared in the Guardian, Intercept, Jacobin, Indian Country Today, High Country News, and other publications. Estes was an American Democracy Fellow at the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University (2017–2018) and until 2021 was an assistant professor in the American Studies Department at the University of New Mexico. He joins the faculty of the University of Minnesota Department of American Indian Studies in 2022. Rebecca Nagle is an award-winning journalist and citizen of the Cherokee Nation. Nagle hosted Crooked Media's podcast This Land, telling the story of a Supreme Court case about tribal land in Oklahoma, the small town murder that started the case, and the surprising connection to her own family history. You can find her writing on issues of Native representation and tribal sovereignty in the Atlantic, the Washington Post, the Guardian, USA Today, Teen Vogue, Indian Country Today, and other publications. Nagle was awarded the 2020 American Mosaic Journalism Prize for her reporting. She has also been named to the YBCA 100 and the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development's Native American 40 under 40. Nagle lives in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is a partnership between Lannan Foundation and Haymarket Books. Lannan Foundation's Readings & Conversations series features inspired writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as cultural freedom advocates with a social, political, and environmental justice focus. We are excited to offer these programs online to a global audience. Video and audio recordings of all events are available at lannan.org. Haymarket Books is a radical, independent, nonprofit book publisher based in Chicago. Our mission is to publish books that contribute to struggles for social and economic justice. We strive to make our books a vibrant and organic part of social movements and the education and development of a critical, engaged, international left. Lannan Foundation is a family foundation dedicated to cultural freedom, diversity, and creativity through projects that support exceptional contemporary artists and writers, inspired Native activists in rural communities, and social justice advocates. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/rE52UHthmLM Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Abolition Must Be Red: Ruth Wilson Gilmore & Stevie Wilson, Study and Struggle Critical Conversation

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 74:30


A conversation about centering anti-capitalism in the fight for abolition with Stevie Wilson and Ruth Wilson Gilmore. Study and Struggle organizes against criminalization and incarceration in Mississippi through mutual aid, political education, and community building. We provide a bilingual Spanish and English curriculum with discussion questions and reading materials, as well as financial support, to over 100 participants in radical study groups inside and outside prisons in Mississippi. These groups correspond with groups from across the country through our pen pal program. We regularly come together for online conversations hosted by Haymarket Books. The curriculum, built by a combination of currently- and formerly-incarcerated people, scholars, and community organizers, centers around the interrelationship between prison abolition and immigrant justice, with a particular attention to freedom struggles in Mississippi and the U.S. South. For our Fall 2021 four month curriculum, we have borrowed and augmented Ruth Wilson Gilmore's argument that “abolition is about presence, not absence. It has to be green, and in order to be green, it has to be red (anti-capitalist), and in order to be red, it has to be international," having added “intersectional” as a fourth analytical category that we hope moves us beyond “single-issue” organizing. Study and Struggle provides a bilingual curriculum to all our imprisoned comrades in Mississippi with the support of our friends at 1977 Books and makes it fully available online for other study groups to use as they see fit. Our Critical Conversations webinar series, hosted by Haymarket Books, will cover the themes for the upcoming month. Haymarket Books is an independent, radical, non-profit publisher. For more on Study and Struggle: https://www.studyandstruggle.com/ --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our third webinar theme is "Red" and will be a conversation about what it means for abolition to be anti-capitalist, centering questions of labor, time, and unfreedom. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of commissary and mutual aid for our incarcerated participants. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Ruth Wilson Gilmore is Professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences and Director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the City University of New York Graduate Center. Co-founder of many grassroots organizations including the California Prison Moratorium Project, Critical Resistance, and the Central California Environmental Justice Network, Gilmore is author of the prize-winning Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California (UC Press) and the forthcoming book Change Everything (Haymarket) . Recent honors include the SUNY-Purchase College Eugene V. Grant Distinguished Scholar Prize for Social and Environmental Justice (2015-16); the American Studies Association Richard A Yarborough Mentorship Award (2017); The Association of American Geographers Lifetime Achievement Award (2020); and election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2021). Stephen Wilson is a currently incarcerated, Black, queer writer, activist and student. He is a founding member of Dreaming Freedom Practicing Abolition, a network of self-organized prisoner study groups building abolitionist community behind and across prison walls. Follow him on Twitter @agitateorganize. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/E2OWObx5J9A Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Sudan: Revolution & Counter-Revolution

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 92:39


Join us for this forum on the military coup in Sudan and the mass resistance against it. In 2019, Sudan's mass democratic uprising toppled the country's despised dictator, Omar al-Bashir, and secured a power sharing agreement between civilian leaders and the military with the promise of elections for a new government. In October 2021 the military reneged on that pledge and carried out a coup, arresting activists across the country. The people have now returned to the streets in mass numbers to defend their revolution. Speakers: Raga Makawi is a Sudanese democracy activist living in London. She is principal editor on the Debating Ideas platform at African Arguments, as well as leading publications and website administrator at the Rift Valley Institute (RVI). She is co-author of Sudan's Unfinished Democracy: The Promise and Betrayal of a People's Revolution (forthcoming in March from Hurst Publishers) and Honorary Research Associate at the Institute for Humanities in Africa (HUMA). Previously, she was a commissioning editor with Zed Books. Muzan Alneel is an activist and writer in Sudan. She is co-founder and Managing Director of the Innovation, Science and Technology Think Tank for People-Centered Development (ISTiNAD) in Khartoum and is a non-resident Fellow of the Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy (TIMEP), focusing on a people-centric approach to economy, industry and the environment in Sudan. She also consults on industrial policy at the Industrial Research and Consultancy Center (IRCC) in Sudan. Jean-Baptiste Gallopin is a researcher working on the Horn of Africa. The former Sudan researcher at Amnesty International, he has written on the role of the UAE and Saudi Arabia in Sudan's counter-revolution and the political economy of the Sudanese transition. His writing has appeared in Le Monde Diplomatique, the London Review of Books, Democracy & Security, and the Project on Middle East Political Science. He holds a PhD in sociology from Yale. This event is co-sponsored by Internationalism from Below, the Tempest Collective, Africa is a Country, DSA AfroSocialists & Socialists of Color Caucus, Dissenters, New Politics, Review of African Political Economy (ROAPE), Spring Magazine, and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/OihwYEacdpA Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

SBS Cantonese - SBS广东话节目
【命懸一線】雪梨唐人街疫情後還有未來嗎?

SBS Cantonese - SBS广东话节目

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 10:51


在這輯【社區專訪】中,鄺美玲訪問了雪梨唐人街Haymarket工商業總會主席陳建青, 請他談談他對現時雪梨唐人街的情況是否感到擔憂。同時,他認為商戶、州及市政府又可以做些甚麼事情來改善有關的情況呢?

Haymarket Books Live
A Pause in the Storm: Episode 2 with Hadas Thier

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 88:29


A Pause in the Storm is a new series from Haymarket Books and Gargi Bhattacharyya. Join Gargi Bhattacharyya and one Haymarket author every month to explore ways of collectively rebuilding our crumbling world. Short and accessible, these conversations encourage us to pause and reflect on how to change everything. Our chat this month features Hadas Thier, author of A People's Guide to Capitalism: An Introduction to Marxist Economics (Haymarket Books, 2020). Economists regularly promote Capitalism as the greatest system ever to grace the planet. With the same breath, they implore us to leave the job of understanding the magical powers of the market to the “experts.” Despite the efforts of these mainstream commentators to convince us otherwise, many of us have begun to question why this system has produced such vast inequality and wanton disregard for its own environmental destruction. This book offers answers to exactly these questions on their own terms: in the form of a radical economic theory. Gargi Bhattacharyya is one of the UK's leading scholars on race and capitalism. She is the author of Rethinking Racial Capitalism (2018), Dangerous Brown Men (2008), Traffick (2005) and co-author of Empire's Endgame (2020).

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

Haymarket Books Live
The Austrian Revolution: Book Launch and Discussion w/ Mike Davis & more

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 82:14


Join us for a discussion of Otto Bauer's magisterial work, The Austrian Revolution. Austro-Marxism is best known for its municipal-policy reforms symbolized by ‘Red Vienna'―a vital part of the left's intellectual and historical heritage. Otto Bauer's book, available in English for the first time, tells the story of the Austrian Revolution with all the immediacy of a central participant, and all the insight of a brilliant and original theorist. This book charts the disintegration of Austria-Hungary's multinational empire and the revolutionary wave that led to short-lived council republics in Hungary and Bavaria. Along with a chronology of these revolutionary events, Bauer sets out his original views on the socialist transformation of capitalist society. His ideas are relevant to a multitude of contemporary strategies and movements, including Right to the City initiatives and the experiences of progressive municipal governments, making his work a crucial resource for the left today. Order a copy of the book: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1480-the-austrian-revolution --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Hilary Wainwright is a British sociologist, political activist and socialist feminist. She is a founding editor of Red Pepper magazine. Mike Davis is the author of City of Quartz, Late Victorian Holocausts, Buda's Wagon, and Planet of Slums. He is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship and the Lannan Literary Award. Walter Baier is a Vienna based economist and co-ordinator of the network transform! europe. He was National Chairman of the Communist Party of Austria (KPÖ) from 1994 to 2006. Dunja Larise (moderator) lectures on political theory and empirical studies of international politics. She holds a PhD in political theory from the University of Vienna. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/BAB4i2Fwt5U Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
The Hard Crowd: Rachel Kushner & Wallace Shawn in Conversation

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 69:09


Join authors Rachel Kushner and Wallace Shawn for a conversation on Kushner's latest, The Hard Crowd. Rachel Kushner's latest collection, The Hard Crowd, addresses the most pressing political, artistic, and cultural issues of our times—and illuminates the themes and real-life experiences that inform the author's fiction. Kushner takes us on a journey through a Palestinian refugee camp, an illegal motorcycle race down the Baja Peninsula, 1970s wildcat strikes in Fiat factories, her love of classic cars, and her young life in the music scene of her hometown, San Francisco. The closing, eponymous essay is her manifesto on nostalgia, doom, and writing. Wallace Shawn will join Kushner for a conversation on The Hard Crowd, our current political situation, and what it means for art to engage with our world. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Rachel Kushner's latest book, The Hard Crowd, gathers a selection of her writing from over the course of the last twenty years. Kushner is also the author of The Mars Room, and The Flamethrowers, which was a finalist for the National Book Award and a New York Times Top Five Novel of 2013. Her debut novel, Telex from Cuba, was a finalist for the 2008 National Book Award and a New York Times bestseller and Notable Book. A collection of her early work, The Strange Case of Rachel K, was published by New Directions in 2015. Her fiction has appeared in the New Yorker, Harper's, and the Paris Review. She is the recipient of a 2013 Guggenheim Fellowship and the 2016 Harold D. Vursell Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. More at http://www.rachelkushner.com. Wallace Shawn is an Obie Award–winning playwright and a noted stage and screen actor. His plays The Designated Mourner and Marie and Bruce have been produced as films, as has his adaptation of Henrik Ibsen's A Master Builder. He is co-author of the movie "My Dinner with André" and the author of the plays The Fever, The Designated Mourner, Aunt Dan and Lemon, and Grasses of a Thousand Colors, as well as the nonfiction books Essays (featuring the essay “Why I Call Myself a Socialist”) and Night Thoughts (Haymarket Books). His latest play, Evening at the Talk House, premiered at the Socialism conference in Chicago and was performed at The National Theatre in London and The New Group in New York. His plays The Designated Mourner and Grasses of a Thousand Colors will soon be available as multipart podcasts. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/GjkhBO97Bzw Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Punishing Immigrants: U.S. Immigration Enforcement and the Prison Industrial Complex

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 115:31


Join us for an educational lecture on immigration enforcement, the criminal punishment system, and data literacy. Calls for abolition and defund the police have at times been coupled with calls to abolish ICE and organizing against criminalization and punishment often includes targeting immigration enforcement. Immigrant rights work is increasingly connecting to the decades-long movement to abolish the prison industrial complex. This educational lecture seeks to support these efforts by encouraging political and data literacy regarding the intersection of the U.S. criminal punishment system (often called the criminal justice system) and U.S. immigration enforcement. Topics that will be covered are some of the differences between immigration law and criminal law, a brief overview of the Department of Homeland Security's immigration enforcement agencies, contemporary policies and programs that involve cooperation between immigration enforcement and police and the criminal punishment system, various categories of immigrants/immigration programs, patterns of detention and deportation, and differences between criminal and non-criminal deportations. We will also learn about some of the relevant data sources. While this event and all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able please make a solidarity donation in support of this important work. Part of the proceeds from this event will go to the UndocuBlack Network (UBN) and the Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI). Speaker: Tamara K. Nopper is a sociologist, writer, educator, and editor with experience in Asian American community organizing, immigrant rights, and anti-war activism. She is the editor of We Do This ‘Til We Free Us: Abolitionist Organizing and Transforming Justice, a book of Mariame Kaba's writings and interviews (Haymarket Books), and researcher and writer of several data stories for Colin Kaepernick's Abolition for the People series. She is a Fellow at Data for Progress, an Affiliate of The Center for Critical Race and Digital Studies, a member of the inaugural cohort of the NYU Institute for Public Interest Technology, and a 2021-2022 Faculty Fellow at Data & Society as part of a cohort focused on race and technology. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/ArmHR6QrPhw Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Grasping at the Root: White Supremacy and the So-Called “War on Terror”

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 76:43


Join us for a discussion of white supremacy, the human rights crisis, and public policy in the twenty years since 9/11. The Institute for Policy Studies, Haymarket Books, and the Center for Constitutional Rights present “Grasping at the Root: White Supremacy and the so-called “War on Terror”, the second event of a 4-part series marking the 20th anniversary of 9/11. The conversation with scholars, lawyers and journalists is an invitation to reflect and interrogate the pillars of white supremacy upon which the U.S. constructed the last twenty years of policy. The post-9/11 human rights crisis is but the latest chapter in over half a millennium of colonialism, capitalism and war. Only in situating today's injustices within a history of U.S. domination, exceptionalism and impunity, can we begin to chart a new future rooted in accountability, solidarity and interdependence. To mark the 20th anniversary of 9/11, the Center for Constitutional Rights, Haymarket Books and our partners are pleased to present a 4-part series, "Just Resistance: 20 years of global struggle against the post-9/11 human rights crisis." The series is an opportunity to bring together our colleagues and comrades from impacted communities across the world, to center stories of survival, and to contextualize the last two decades of U.S. policy within a history of imperialism, domination and impunity. Speakers: Nana Gyamfi is the Executive Director of Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI), the largest Black-led social justice organization representing the nearly 10 million Black immigrants, refugees, and families living in the U.S. A Movement attorney for the past 25 years, Nana is co-founder of Justice Warriors 4 Black Lives and Human Rights Advocacy, both dedicated to fighting for human rights and Black liberation. She is the current President of the National Conference of Black Lawyers, and a member of the Movement for Black Lives Policy Table. Nana is a former professor in the Pan African Studies Department at California State University Los Angeles, and has long been a sought after voice for legal and political insight into issues affecting Black communities. Tiara R. Na'puti is a Chamoru scholar (Guåhan/Guam) who focuses on issues of Indigenous movements, colonialism, and militarism in the Mariana Islands archipelago. She is currently a 2021 Mellon/ACLS Scholars and Society Fellow working with Independent Guåhan a community organization educating the island's public about sovereignty and addressing climate change as an urgent challenge brought about by the island's colonial political status. She is also a new faculty member in the Department of Global & International Studies at University of California Irvine. Dr. Maha Hilal is a researcher and writer on institutionalized Islamophobia and author of the forthcoming book Innocent Until Proven Muslim: Islamophobia, the War on Terror, and the Muslim Experience Since 9/11. Her writings have appeared in Vox, Al Jazeera, Middle East Eye, Newsweek, Business Insider, and Truthout, She is also Co-Director of Justice for Muslims Collective where she focuses on political consciousness and narrative shifting programming. Dr. Hilal earned her doctorate in May 2014 from the Department of Justice, Law and Society at American University in Washington, D.C. The title of her dissertation is “Too damn Muslim to be trusted: The War on Terror and the Muslim American response." Moderator: Khury Petersen-Smith is the Michael Ratner Middle East Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, where he researches and discusses the War on Terror, the militarization of borders, and the Palestinian freedom struggle. Khury is a student of Black internationalism, researches US militarization and resistance in the Pacific, and builds solidarity against US empire. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/WRhcwcJiuEk Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Study and Struggle Critical Conversation #2: Abolition Must Be Green

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 78:39


A conversation about centering climate justice, land, food sovereignty, and fighting environmental racism in the struggle for abolition. Study and Struggle organizes against criminalization and incarceration in Mississippi through mutual aid, political education, and community building. We provide a bilingual Spanish and English curriculum with discussion questions and reading materials, as well as financial support, to over 100 participants in radical study groups inside and outside prisons in Mississippi. These groups correspond with groups from across the country through our pen pal program. We regularly come together for online conversations hosted by Haymarket Books. The curriculum, built by a combination of currently- and formerly-incarcerated people, scholars, and community organizers, centers around the interrelationship between prison abolition and immigrant justice, with a particular attention to freedom struggles in Mississippi and the U.S. South. For our Fall 2021 four month curriculum, we have borrowed and augmented Ruth Wilson Gilmore's argument that “abolition is about presence, not absence. It has to be green, and in order to be green, it has to be red (anti-capitalist), and in order to be red, it has to be international," having added “intersectional” as a fourth analytical category that we hope moves us beyond “single-issue” organizing. Our Critical Conversations webinar series, hosted by Haymarket Books, will cover the themes for the upcoming month. Haymarket Books is an independent, radical, non-profit publisher. For more on Study and Struggle: https://www.studyandstruggle.com/ --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our second webinar theme is "Green" and will be a conversation about what it means for abolition to be life-sustaining, and how abolition demands we center questions of climate justice, land, food sovereignty, and environmental racism. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of commissary and mutual aid for our incarcerated participants. Speakers: J.T. Roane is assistant professor of African and African American Studies in the School of Social Transformation at Arizona State University. He received his PhD in history from Columbia University and he is a 2008 graduate of the Carter G. Woodson Institute at the University of Virginia. He currently serves as the lead of the Black Ecologies Initiative at ASU's Institute for Humanities Research. He is the former co-senior editor of Black Perspectives, the digital platform of the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS). Roane's scholarly essays have appeared in Souls Journal, The Review of Black Political Economy, Current Research in Digital History and Signs. His work has also appeared in venues such as Washington Post, The Brooklyn Rail, Pacific Standard, and The Immanent Frame, Roane was 2020-2021 National Endowment for the Humanities/Mellon Foundation Research Fellow at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library. Bigg Villainus is an artist, musician, founder of Overthrow Media and a radical revolutionary who has been dedicated to radical struggle and revolutionary growth for over a decade. Currently an organizer with Fight Toxic Prisons they bring a lot of abolitionist and direct action history and experience to the table. As well as a lumpen proletariat perspective and Analysis. They are firm advocates of bottom-up organizing. As well as having a firm decolonial Praxis. They have a long history of organizing with groups such as black Frontline movement, outside agitators, black lives matter, occupied, and many more. They are currently on a national tour, networking, spreading abolition and music. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/PH6CWhLKODY Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Union City Radio
Union City Radio Operation Union Veterans Day

Union City Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 2:21


New campaign amplifies the role veterans and military families play in the American labor movement. Today's labor quote: Will Attig. Today's labor history: Haymarket martyrs hanged. @wpfwdc #1u #unions #LaborRadioPod @AFLCIO @unionveterans @HelmetsHardhats Proud founding member of the Labor Radio Podcast Network

Haymarket Books Live
Abortion is Won in the Streets: The Past, Present, and Future of the Fight for Reproductive Freedom

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 86:49


Jenny Brown and Mexico-based abortion activist Lluvia “Rayito” del Rayo Rocha Perez discuss the struggle for reproductive justice. Join author Jenny Brown in conversation with Mexico-based abortion activist Lluvia “Rayito” del Rayo Rocha Perez as they discuss the history and future of the struggle for abortion rights and reproductive freedom. In 1973, the landmark Supreme Court ruling in Roe v. Wade legalized abortion in the United States. This is usually where the story begins and ends. But legal abortion was not handed down by the courts, it was won in the streets through years of grassroots mobilizations and political organizing led by activists during the Women's Liberation movement. With all eyes on Texas, where the state legislature has passed a devastating 6-week abortion ban, today's abortion rights movement must again take to the streets to turn back a wave of rightwing attacks on abortion access. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Jenny Brown was a leader in the fight to get the morning-after pill over the counter in the US and a plaintiff in the winning lawsuit. She writes, teaches, and organizes with the feminist group National Women's Liberation and is the author of Without Apology:The Abortion Struggle Now and Birth Strike: The Hidden Fight over Women's Work. Lluvia (“Rayito”) del Rayo Rocha Perez is an activist for abortion rights in Juarez, Mexico where the federal court recently decriminalized abortion under pressure from mobilizations of activists. This event is co-sponsored by Chicago for Abortion Rights, NYC for Abortion Rights, the DSA Socialist Feminist working group and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/76a_vewAWss Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Noam Chomsky on the Consequences of Capitalism

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 94:19


Noam Chomsky discusses the brutal realities laid bare by the COVID-19 pandemic—and the urgent need for an alternative to capitalism. Covid-19 has revealed glaring failures and monstrous brutalities in the current capitalist system. It represents both a crisis and an opportunity. Everything depends on the actions that people take into their own hands. Join Noam Chomsky for a conversation with E. Tammy Kim. Noam Chomsky is Institute Professor (emeritus) in the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Laureate Professor of Linguistics and Agnese Nelms Haury Chair in the Program in Environment and Social Justice at the University of Arizona. He is the author of numerous best-selling political works, which have been translated into scores of countries worldwide. Among his most recent books are Who Rules the World?, Requiem for the American Dream, and What Kind of Creatures Are We? Haymarket has published twelve of his classic works with new introductions, as well as his books Masters of Mankind, Hopes and Prospects, Intervenciones, On Palestine and Gaza in Crisis (with Ilan Pappé and Frank Barat), Optimism Over Despair and The Precipice (with C. J. Polychroniou), and Consequences of Capitalism (with Marv Waterstone). In spring 2022, Haymarket is publishing a new compilation of Chomsky's 1984–1996 interviews with David Barsamian, Chronicles of Dissent. E. Tammy Kim is a freelance magazine reporter, a contributing opinion writer at The New York Times, and a co-host of the Time to Say Goodbye podcast, based in Brooklyn, New York. Her work has appeared in outlets including The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The New York Review of Books, Columbia Journalism Review, and The Nation. She previously worked on the editorial staff of The New Yorker and as a national features writer at Al Jazeera America. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is a partnership between Lannan Foundation and Haymarket Books. Lannan Foundation's Readings & Conversations series features inspired writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as cultural freedom advocates with a social, political, and environmental justice focus. We are excited to offer these programs online to a global audience. Video and audio recordings of all events are available at lannan.org. Haymarket Books is a radical, independent, nonprofit book publisher based in Chicago. Our mission is to publish books that contribute to struggles for social and economic justice. We strive to make our books a vibrant and organic part of social movements and the education and development of a critical, engaged, international left. Lannan Foundation is a family foundation dedicated to cultural freedom, diversity, and creativity through projects that support exceptional contemporary artists and writers, inspired Native activists in rural communities, and social justice advocates. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/y8UciV-Frr8 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
What the Jewish Left Learned From Occupy

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 70:16


Join Haymarket and Jewish Currents for a discussion about what the Jewish left learned from Occupy Wall Street. This fall, the tenth anniversary of Occupy Wall Street also marks a decade since what came to be known as “Occupy Judaism,” a loose series of ritual protests that emerged at Zuccotti Park and at other Occupy encampments around the country. The most visible of these took the form of a Kol Nidre, the evening service that marks the beginning of Yom Kippur, which fell on October 7th in 2011, a few weeks into Occupy Wall Street's short history. As the holiday approached, a group of Jewish participants in the nascent movement, led by organizer Daniel Sieradski, began planning a service to be held in a plaza across the street from Zuccotti Park. The event that is remembered as Occupy Yom Kippur drew hundreds of people and attracted considerable press attention, registering a new current in American Jewish life. Occupy Yom Kippur, and the broader activities of Occupy Judaism, turned out to presage a much larger wave of left Jewish movement-building. Though most Jewish organizers at Occupy were not involved in Occupy Judaism, or in Jewish organizing more generally, many of the founders of organizations like IfNotNow first came together in Zuccotti Park; the movement's energy also revitalized already-existing groups like Jews for Racial and Economic Justice (JFREJ). Ten years ago, identity-based organizing occurred only on Occupy's fringes, and anti-racist and anti-imperialist organizing, including around the occupation of Palestine, was pushed outside the movement's frame altogether. But in the years since, Occupy's limitations have impelled a generation of organizers to try to rectify its omissions, galvanizing anti-racist organizing in the US and a new wave of Palestine solidarity activism. Following a Jewish Currents oral history on the same topic, this event will explore how the contemporary Jewish left was changed—perhaps, formed—by Occupy Wall Street ten years ago. Speakers: Daniel Sieradksi is a web developer and digital strategist as well as an advocacy journalist, digital organizer, and movement-builder. He has worked with a variety of organizations, including Repair the World, JTA News, JDub Records, the JCC in Manhattan, the Educational Alliance, Jewish Funds for Justice, and the New Israel Fund. Sieradski is the former publisher of the pioneering weblog Jewschool.com and the founder of Occupy Judaism. Tamara Shapiro (Tammy) is the Program Director for the NYC Network of Worker Cooperatives. Previously she was one of the lead coordinators of Occupy Sandy, a citizen-led relief effort, as well as Rockaway Wildfire and Worker Owned Rockaway Cooperatives, a worker-owned coop incubation project with residents hit by the hurricane. She also served as a lead strategist and facilitator of the InterOccupy network, created and implemented a networked hub structure for The People's Climate March, and worked at The Murphy Institute for Labor Studies. Prior to these roles, she was the first Director of J Street U, and one of the founders of IfNotNow. Audrey Sasson is the Executive Director of Jews for Racial & Economic Justice, and the organization's first Mizrahi leader to serve in the position. She has 25 years of broad movement experience as a social worker, organizer, coalition-builder, and campaign director, on issues ranging from immigrant worker struggles and tenant rights to sustainable economies and racial justice. Arielle Angel is the editor-in-chief of Jewish Currents. This event is sponsored by Haymarket Books and Jewish Currents. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/le12N2Q06t0 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
The Border Crossed Us: The Case for Opening the US-Mexico Border

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 92:31


Join us for a discussion about how re-building the international labor movement requires solidarity with migrant workers and opening borders Join Justin Akers Chacón, Yanny Guzmán, and Magally “Maga” Miranda Alcázar for a discussion about the history and function of the US-Mexico border, why we should fight to open it, and the way forward for the migrant justice movement. This event marks the release of Justin Akers Chacón's latest book, The Border Crossed Us: The Case for Opening the US-Mexico Border. Contemporary North American capitalism relies heavily on an inter-connected working class which extends across the border. Cross-border production and supply chains, logistics networks, and retail and service firms have aligned and fused a growing number of workers into one common class, whether they live in the US or Mexico. While money moves without restriction, the movement of displaced migrant workers across borders is restricted and punished. But despite the growth and violence of the police state dedicated to the repression of transborder populations—the migra-state—migrant workers have been at the forefront of class struggle in the United States. This timely book persuasively argues that labor and migrant solidarity movements are already showing how and why, in order to fight for justice and re-build the international union movement, we must open the border --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Justin Akers Chacón is an activist, labor unionist, and educator living in the San Diego-Tijuana border region. He is a Professor of Chicana/o History at San Diego City College. His most recent book is The Border Crossed Us: The Case for Opening the US-Mexico Border. He is also the author of No One is Illegal (with Mike Davis) and Radicals in the Barrio. Magally “Maga” Miranda Alcázar (she/they) is a graduate student in Chicana/o and Central American Studies at UCLA. Using methods that emphasize the co-production of knowledge with rank-and-file workers, their research explores the contested meanings of care, work and Latinidad in the context of the global economy of care. Maga is also the co-founder of the multimedia platform SAL(T): Xicana Marxist Thoughts. Yanny Guzmán is a Xicana living on Lenape land, now known as the Bronx. She is a daughter of immigrant parents indigenous to Mexico and Ecuador. She is a socialist, activist, organizer and rank & file union member. Currently she is a tenant organizer and member of the South Bronx Tenants Movement, a legal advocate for low income tenants in the Bronx, and a member of Southern Solidarity, a grassroots, community-based group of volunteers in solidarity with the unhoused in their quest toward liberation. She previously was a writer, reporter, website administrator, and a graphic designer for the Working Class Heroes Radio. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Order a copy of The Border Crossed Us: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1655-the-border-crossed-us --------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is sponsored by Haymarket Books. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of our important publishing and programming work. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/IBZi8dVGrZU Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Angela Davis, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, & Mike Davis on Abolition, Cultural Freedom, Liberation

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 84:56


Join 2020 Lannan Prize recipients Angela Y. Davis, Mike Davis, and Ruth Wilson Gilmore for a conversation hosted by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor. The Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize for 2020 was awarded to Angela Y. Davis for her lifetime achievements as a public intellectual advocating for racial, gender, and economic justice; to Mike Davis for his life's work as a public intellectual who encourages critical analysis of society in the service of constructing an alternative, post-capitalist future in both theory and practice; and Ruth Wilson Gilmore for a lifetime of achievement as a public intellectual working toward the decarceration of California, the United States, and the world. Join all three, along with Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor for a conversation on abolition, cultural freedom, and liberation. Speakers: Mike Davis, professor emeritus of creative writing at UC Riverside, joined the San Diego chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality in 1962 at age 16 and the struggle for racial and social equality has remained the lodestar of his life. His City of Quartz challenged reigning celebrations of Los Angeles from the perspectives of its lost radical past and insurrectionary future. His wide-ranging work has married science, archival research, personal experience, and creative writing with razor-sharp critiques of empires and ruling classes. He embodies the Lannan vision of working at the intersection of art and social justice. Angela Y. Davis is Distinguished Professor Emerita in the History of Consciousness and Feminist Studies Departments at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Dr. Davis grew up in Birmingham, Alabama, and has been an activist and Marxist-Feminist in the Black Power and abolitionist movements since the late 1960s. In the 1980s, her book Women, Race and Class helped to establish the concept of intersectionality. She also helped to develop the concept of prison abolition, especially in her books Are Prisons Obsolete? . Ruth Wilson Gilmore is Professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences and Director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the City University of New York Graduate Center. Co-founder of many grassroots organizations including the California Prison Moratorium Project, Critical Resistance, and the Central California Environmental Justice Network, Gilmore is author of the prize-winning Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California. Recent publications include, co-edited with Paul Gilroy, Stuart Hall: Selected Writings on Race and Difference. Forthcoming projects include Change Everything: Racial Capitalism and the Case for Abolition; Abolition Geography: Essays Toward Liberation. Gilmore has lectured in Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor writes and speaks on Black politics, social movements, and racial inequality in the United States. She is author of From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation (a Lannan Cultural Freedom Especially Notable Book Award recipient) and editor of How We Get Free. Her third book, Race for Profit was a finalist for a National Book Award for nonfiction, and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for History. She is a contributing writer at The New Yorker and professor at Princeton University. This event is a partnership between Lannan Foundation and Haymarket Books. Lannan Foundation's Readings & Conversations series features inspired writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as cultural freedom advocates with a social, political, and environmental justice focus. Lannan Foundation is a family foundation dedicated to cultural freedom, diversity, and creativity through projects that support exceptional contemporary artists and writers, inspired Native activists in rural communities, and social justice advocates. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/WLO0UuSnPzU Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Revolutionary Rehearsals in the Neoliberal Age w/ Frances Fox Piven & more

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 89:43


Join Haymarket Books and Spectre Journal for a conversation on revolution in the contemporary era. The last three decades have seen an increase in the number of political upheavals that challenge existing power structures, many of them taking the form of urban revolts. Revolutionary Rehearsals in the Neoliberal Age explores a series of these upheavals--in Eastern Europe, South Africa, Indonesia, Argentina, Bolivia, Venezuela, sub-Saharan Africa (including Congo, Zimbabwe, Burkina Faso) and Egypt. In this book launch scholars of and participants in some of these revolutionary upheavals will consider what lessons we can draw from these moments and movements that brought the system to its knees, before it rallied and turned back the tides of sweeping change. Order a copy of the book from Haymarket: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1653-revolutionary-rehearsals-in-the-neoliberal-age --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Cinzia Arruzza is associate professor of philosophy at the New School for Social Research and Eugene Lang College. She is the Vice-President of the New School AAUP chapter and the co-author of Feminism for the 99%. A Manifesto. She is a member of the editorial board of Spectre Journal. Gareth Dale teaches politics at Brunel University. He is the author of The East German Revolution of 1989. Frances Fox Piven is a distinguished professor of political science and sociology at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. She is a co-author, with Richard A. Cloward, of The Breaking of the American Social Compact; a co-author, with Lorraine C. Minnite and Margaret Groarke, of Keeping Down the Black Vote: Race and the Demobilization of American Voters; and the author of The War at Home: The Domestic Costs of Bush's Militarism and Who's Afraid of Frances Fox Piven?: The Essential Writings of the Professor Glenn Beck Loves to Hate. She lives in New York City. Sameh Naguib teaches sociology at the American University in Cairo and has written extensively on politics in Egypt and the Middle East. He is also a founding member of the Revolutionary Socialist Movement in Egypt. --------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is sponsored by Spectre Journal and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/OyRXyOXZyv0 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Not a Nation of Immigrants: Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, History w/ Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 86:02


Join Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Bill Fletcher Jr. for an urgent discussion of settler colonialism, white supremacy, and a history of exclusion Not “A Nation of Immigrants”: Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, and a History of Erasure and Exclusion, a new book from Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, debunks the pervasive and self-congratulatory myth that our country is proudly founded by and for immigrants, and urges readers to embrace a more complex and honest history of the United States. Whether in political debates or discussions about immigration around the kitchen table, many Americans, regardless of party affiliation, will say proudly that we are a nation of immigrants. In this bold new book, historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz asserts this ideology is harmful and dishonest because it serves to mask and diminish the US's history of settler colonialism, genocide, white supremacy, slavery, and structural inequality, all of which we still grapple with today. While some of us are immigrants or descendants of immigrants, others are descendants of white settlers who arrived as colonizers to displace those who were here since time immemorial, and still others are descendants of those who were kidnapped and forced here against their will. This paradigm shifting new book from the highly acclaimed author of An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States charges that we need to stop believing and perpetuating this simplistic and ahistorical idea and embrace the real (and often horrific) history of the United States. ——————————————————————————————————— Get the book, Not “A Nation of Immigrants” from Beacon Press: http://www.beacon.org/Not-A-Nation-of-Immigrants-P1641.aspx ——————————————————————————————————— Speakers: Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz is a historian, writer, speaker, and professor emerita at California State University East Bay. She is author of numerous scholarly Indigenous related books and articles, including Roots of Resistance: A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico and The Great Sioux Nation, as well as a memoir trilogy and is author of the award-winning book, An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States. Her book Loaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment was published in 2018, and her new book, Not “A Nation of Immigrants”: Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, and a History of Erasure and Exclusion is out now from Beacon Press. Bill Fletcher Jr is the former president of TransAfrica Forum; a Senior Scholar with the Institute for Policy Studies; and in the leadership of several other projects. Fletcher is the co-author (with Peter Agard) of The Indispensable Ally: Black Workers and the Formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1934-1941; the co-author (with Dr. Fernando Gapasin) of Solidarity Divided: The crisis in organized labor and a new path toward social justice, and the author of “They're Bankrupting Us!” And 20 Other Myths about Unions. Fletcher is a syndicated columnist and a regular media commentator on television, radio and the Web. This event is sponsored by Beacon Press and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/bNvn0jVWcfw Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Fortress Europe, Fortress USA: How Borders Work

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 93:48


Join Haymarket Books and Salvage for a discussion of Fortress Europe, Fortress USA: How Borders Work Contemporary capitalism relies heavily on an inter-connected working class which extends across borders. Cross-border production and supply chains, logistics networks, and retail and service firms have aligned and fused a growing number of workers into one common class, regardless of where they happen to live. While money moves without restriction, the movement of displaced migrant workers across borders is restricted, punished—often violently so. And all of this is before imperial adventures and decades of neoliberal structural adjustment policies conspire to create the dire circumstances that lead to “refugee crises.” In both the US and across Europe this context has been seized on and converted to political fodder by mainstream parties of the liberal and the reactionary varieties. While often flavored differently—from outright scapegoating of migrants to handwringing calls for ‘kinder-gentler' deportation regimes—the growth and violence of the police state dedicated to the repression of transborder populations has proceeded unabated for decades. Drawing on Justin Akers Chacón's new book "The Border Crossed Us", and Chloe Haralambous's work with Sea-Watch, this Salvage Live event will look at the differences and similarities between Fortress USA and Fortress Europe, examine how to effectively dismantle their respective border regimes, and aim to explain how borders work (and for whom). The conversation will be hosted by Annie Olaloku-Teriba and Barnaby Raine. This discussion will be part of the ongoing Salvage Live events series, hosted by Haymarket Books. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Justin Akers Chacón is an activist, labor unionist, and educator living in the San Diego-Tijuana border region. He is a Professor of Chicana/o History at San Diego City College. His most recent book is The Border Crossed Us: The Case for Opening the US-Mexico Border. He is also the author of No One is Illegal (with Mike Davis) and Radicals in the Barrio. Chloe Haralambous is a member of Sea-Watch, participating in and coordinating maritime rescue missions in the Central Mediterranean migration corridor to Europe, and the co-founder of the Mosaik Support Center for Refugees and Locals on the Greek island of Lesvos. She is also a PhD candidate in comparative literature at Columbia University. Annie Olaloku-Teriba is a writer and podcaster whose research focuses on how neoliberalism has transformed the theory and practice of ‘race.' Barnaby Raine is writing his PhD at Columbia University on visions of ending capitalism. He teaches at the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/bPCaw1e-3dA Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

New Books Network
Ted Stolze, "Becoming Marxist: Studies in Philosophy, Struggle, and Endurance" (Haymarket, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 89:33


Marxism is having a moment; higher workloads, stagnating wages, rising costs of living, a new economic crisis every few years, a warming climate and now almost two years of a worldwide pandemic have all led to a number of people across the world, especially younger people, to self-identify with ideas once thought to be in the dustbin of history. But while people may find Marx's theories helpful for understanding what's happening, turning these interpretations into sustained commitments is another thing. What's more, Marx's works often turn out to be less definitive than is often imagined, giving us rigorous methods of inquiry that we then need to develop and adapt to other fields. Being a Marxist then is not simply about adopting a particular series of propositions, but a way of interpreting and engaging with the world. This is one of the animating ideas for my guest today, Ted Stolze, here to discuss his essay collection Becoming Marxist: Studies in Philosophy, Struggle, and Endurance (Haymarket Books, 2020). While Marx occupies a central place throughout the essays, readers will find engagements with a variety of figures, going back as far as Aristotle or the Apostle Paul, all the way up to the present with essays on Zizek and Deleuze. In between these poles are studies of Hobbes, Spinoza, Hegel and many other early modern thinkers. Throughout the essays, Stolze puts Marxist practice in dialogue with philosophy and vice-versa, showing us how political struggle demands philosophical inquiry, not simply for the purpose of political and tactical clarity, but for the same reasons people have turned to philosophy for several millennia now. Socrates famously said the unexamined life is not worth living, kicking off an entire tradition of self-examination. It's this tradition Stolze believes activists and organizers ought to draw on today to better understand what it might mean to become Marxist. Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series. Ted Stolze holds an M.A. in religion and a PhD in philosophy. He is an associate professor of philosophy at Cerritos College. He is the coeditor of The New Spinoza and has published numerous articles on philosophy, politics and religion. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Haymarket Books Live
The Second International and Revolutionary Marxism

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 90:03


Join Mike Taber, Eric Blanc, Lars Lih, and Anne McShane for a book launch celebrating the release of Under the Socialist Banner: Resolutions of the Second International, 1889–1912, edited by Taber. Recent years have seen a massive growth of interest in socialism, particularly among young people. But few are fully aware of socialism's revolutionary history. For this reason, an appreciation of the Second International—often called the “Socialist International”—during its Marxist years is particularly relevant. What is the record of the Second International in its Marxist years? What is its legacy, and what lessons does it offer for today? These and other questions will be discussed. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Order a Copy of Under the Socialist Banner: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1649-under-the-socialist-banner --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Eric Blanc is the author of Red State Revolt: The Teachers' Strike Wave and Working-Class Politics and Revolutionary Social Democracy: Working-Class Politics Across the Russian Empire, 1882-1917. Lars T. Lih is an independent scholar who lives in Montreal. He is the author of Bread and Authority in Russia, 1914-1921, co-author of Stalin's Letters to Molotov , author of Lenin Rediscovered: What Is to Be Done? In Context , and co-editor, with Ben Lewis, of Zinoviev and Martov: Head to Head in Halle . He has also authored a short biography entitled Lenin . At present, he is working on a study of the 1917 revolution that brings out the overlooked role of consensus and continuity in the Bolshevik outlook. Mike Taber is the editor of Under the Socialist Banner: Resolutions of the Second International, 1889–1912. He has edited and prepared a number of other books related to the history of revolutionary and working-class movements—from collections of documents of the Communist International under Lenin to works by figures such as Leon Trotsky, Malcolm X, and Che Guevara. Anne McShane has been involved in Marxist politics for over 30 years. She has a particular interest in the struggle for women's emancipation within socialist projects and has completed a PhD on the role of the Zhenotdel (Women's Department of the CPSU) in Soviet Central Asia. She works as a human rights lawyer in Ireland. This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and Verso Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/wcdUfdo2C_w Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
What's Happening in Myanmar?

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 90:27


Join us to discuss the popular uprising in Myanmar and its global repercussions in labor, feminist dynamics, and for ethnic minorities. A panel of women will discuss three specific aspects of this momentous upheaval: labor struggles, the feminist dynamic, and the role of ethnic minorities. Since February, an uprising has been in progress against a military coup in Myanmar. The military, which has been in power since 1948 when the country became independent from Britain, declared the coup to overturn the results of a legitimate election in which the National League for Democracy gained a majority of seats in the parliament. Over 1000 protesters have been killed, over 4000 arrested and 20 sentenced to death since the coup. The majority of the population have been denied any type of COVID care or vaccination. A general strike involving most sectors of the population has been ongoing. Women, who have been explicitly challenging misogyny and the second-class status of women in Burmese society, have come out in support of the uprising. Various oppressed national minority populations, including the Rohingya, have also joined the uprising. The opposition National Unity Government is now calling for a federalist alternative to the military-civilian government that ruled from 2015 on. The combined might of the capitalist state-army, which promotes ethno-religious chauvinism and misogyny, and the important strategic role which Myanmar plays for various global powers, makes its military government hugely powerful. Authoritarian powers around the world are also learning from the coup for their own fascistic purposes. The struggle in Myanmar and similar struggles around the world cannot move forward without global grassroots solidarity to oppose the military government and to give voice to Myanmar women, striking labor activists and ethnic minorities. Speakers: Debbie Stothard is an active promoter of human rights in Burma and the ASEAN region. During her 32-year career, she has worked as a journalist, community education consultant, governmental advisor, and trainer in Malaysia, Australia, and Thailand. In 1996, she founded the Alternative ASEAN Network on Burma (ALTSEAN-Burma) and was elected Secretary-General of the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH) in 2013. She developed the first women-specific human rights training program for Myanmar in 1997, an initiative which is ongoing, and has supported many local and national young women leaders in Myanmar. Yasmin Ullah is an independent Rohingya social justice activist. She was born in the Northern Rakhine state of Myanmar. Her family fled to Thailand in 1995 when she was a child and she remained a stateless refugee until moving to Canada in 2011. Yasmin has served as the President of the Rohingya Human Rights Network, a non-profit group led by activists across Canada advocating and raising public awareness of the Rohingya genocide. Myra Dahgaypaw is the Managing Director of the U.S. Campaign for Burma. She is a Karen human rights activist from Karen State, Eastern Burma. She was an internally displaced person and a refugee prior to resettling in the U.S. at age of 13. Myra has played a strong role in her community as an organizer and a human rights advocate. Previously, Myra worked as a human rights advocate at the United Nations with the Burma Fund United Nations Office. Moderator Frieda Afary is an Iranian American librarian, translator, and activist. She produces the blog Iranian Progressives in Translation and writes about the Middle East and the politics of solidarity for a variety of publications, including New Politics magazine. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/hyXXPJxnq6Y Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
A Pause in the Storm: Episode 1 with Rory Fanning

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 33:16


A Pause in the Storm is a new series from Haymarket Books and Gargi Bhattacharyya. Join Gargi Bhattacharyya and one Haymarket author every month to explore ways of collectively rebuilding our crumbling world. Short and accessible, these conversations encourage us to pause and reflect on how to change everything. Our chat this month features Rory Fanning, author of Worth Fighting For (Haymarket, 2014). In 2008, Rory walked across the United States for his friend Pat Tillman. Pat's death by friendly fire in Afghanistan was covered up just days before Rory left the Army Rangers as a conscientious objector. Worth Fighting For traces Rory's journey across the US, but also his political journey towards becoming a socialist and anti-imperialist. Gargi Bhattacharyya is one of the UK's leading scholars on race and capitalism. She is the author of Rethinking Racial Capitalism (2018), Dangerous Brown Men (2008), Traffick (2005) and co-author of Empire's Endgame (2020).

Haymarket Books Live
Mi María: Surviving the Storm—Voices from Puerto Rico

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 71:46


Join us for a conversation about recovering from climate disaster and building community within the context of colonialism in Puerto Rico. Celebrate the launch of Mi María: Surviving the Storm, a new book from Voice of Witness and Haymarket Books, with a roundtable conversation about the aftermath of Hurricane María in Puerto Rico. Mi María: Surviving the Storm brings together 17 first-person stories that explore how government neglect and colonialism impact recovery, how communities come together in the wake of disaster, and how precarity and inequity are exacerbated on the frontlines of the climate crisis. Weaving together long-form oral histories and shorter testimonios, the book offers a multivocal history of the storm and its long aftermath as people waited for relief and aid that rarely arrived and communities collectively organized to support one another in recovery. This event is cosponsored by Haymarket Books and Voice of Witness. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able please make a solidarity donation in support of our important educational and publishing work. Donations from this event will support our work with Voice of Witness. You can also support by purchasing the book, Mi María: Surviving the Storm, online here: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1746-mi-maria-surviving-the-storm Speakers: Dr. Ricia Chansky is a professor in the English department at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez and the co-editor of Mi María: Surviving the Storm. She is the co-editor of the scholarly journal, a/b: Auto/Biography Studies and the editor of the Routledge Auto/Biography Studies book series. Ricia is also a Research Affiliate at the York University Centre for Research in Latin America and the Caribbean and a Global Fellow at the Brown University Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Studies. For her work directing the large-scale public humanities project, “Mi María: Puerto Rico after the Hurricane,” Ricia won the MLA Innovation in the Humanities Award and the Oral History Association's Post-Secondary Teaching Award, and was selected as a partner in the Humanities Action Lab. She has been recognized by the Simon Wiesenthal Center/Museum of Tolerance as a Global Human Rights Leader in the Climate Crisis. Zaira Arvelo Alicea is a narrator in Mi María: Surviving the Storm and the Curriculum Specialist for the project. Zaira is a writer, editor, and educator with a focus on English language learners (ELLs) and equity in the continental US and Puerto Rico. She was born in Lares, Puerto Rico, a mountainous town in the archipelago with a tradition of anticolonial insurgency. Zaira and her husband survived Hurricane María by floating on an air mattress for sixteen hours, trapped in their home. Her story highlights several failures in the federal disaster-response system, which led them to remain homeless for well over a year after the hurricane. She currently lives on Puerto Rico's largest island where she spearheads a small business. Lorel Cubano Santiago is a narrator in Mi María: Surviving the Storm and a community organizer with a background in tourism. She is the founder of the Old San Juan Heritage Foundation and the community arts center Colectivo PerlArte. After Hurricane María, Lorel mobilized mutual aid efforts with her community to feed hundreds of people despite not receiving any aid from the supply ships that docked just minutes away from their neighborhood of La Perla in San Juan. Brenda Flores Santiago is a researcher, translator, and oral historian. Brenda was a student interviewer for the Mi María project at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez. She is currently a graduate student in the Master of Arts in Translation and Interpreting program at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/4J-e1ITH3ZQ Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Study and Struggle #1: Intersectionality w/ Mariame Kaba & Moni Cosby

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 84:52


A Study and Struggle critical conversation about what it means for abolition to be intersectional. Study and Struggle organizes against criminalization and incarceration in Mississippi through mutual aid, political education, and community building. We provide a bilingual Spanish and English curriculum with discussion questions and reading materials, as well as financial support, to over 100 participants in radical study groups inside and outside prisons in Mississippi. These groups correspond with groups from across the country through our pen pal program. We regularly come together for online conversations hosted by Haymarket Books. The curriculum, built by a combination of currently- and formerly-incarcerated people, scholars, and community organizers, centers around the interrelationship between prison abolition and immigrant justice, with a particular attention to freedom struggles in Mississippi and the U.S. South. For our Fall 2021 four month curriculum, we have borrowed and augmented Ruth Wilson Gilmore's argument that “abolition is about presence, not absence. It has to be green, and in order to be green, it has to be red (anti-capitalist), and in order to be red, it has to be international," having added “intersectional” as a fourth analytical category that we hope moves us beyond “single-issue” organizing. Study and Struggle provides a bilingual curriculum to all our imprisoned comrades in Mississippi with the support of our friends at 1977 Books and makes it fully available online for other study groups to use as they see fit. Our Critical Conversations webinar series, hosted by Haymarket Books, will cover the themes for the upcoming month. Haymarket Books is an independent, radical, non-profit publisher. For more on Study and Struggle: https://www.studyandstruggle.com/ ---------------------------------------------------- Our first webinar theme covers "intersectionality" and will be a conversation about what it means for abolition to be intersectional and how abolition demands a reimagination of relationships, accountability, and what it means to be in community and to care for one another. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of commissary and mutual aid for our incarcerated participants. ---------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Mariame Kaba is an organizer, educator and curator who is active in movements for racial, gender, and transformative justice. She is the author of We Do This 'Til We Free Us: Abolitionist Organizing and Transforming Justice. She is the founder and director of Project NIA, a grassroots organization with a vision to end youth incarceration. Mariame is currently a researcher at Interrupting Criminalization: Research in Action at the Barnard Center for Research on Women, a project she co-founded with Andrea Ritchie in 2018. She co-authored the guidebook Lifting As They Climbed and published a children's book titled Missing Daddy about the impacts of incarceration on children and families. Kaba is the recipient of the Cultural Freedom Prize from Lannan Foundation. Moni Cosby is a Chicago activist, mother, grandmother, writer and abolitionist who was incarcerated by the state of Illinois for 20 years. She has dedicated her life to ending all forms of violence that Black, Indigenous and People of Color, particularly women, encounter daily. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/eIVOxim1qS8 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
The Kaepernick Effect: How A Knee Inspired a Generational Revolt w/ Dave Zirin & Eddie S. Glaude Jr.

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 57:08


Join Dave Zirin and Eddie S. Glaude Jr. for a discussion and launch of Dave's book "The Kaepernick Effect." In 2016, amid an epidemic of police shootings of African Americans, the celebrated NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick began a series of quiet protests on the field, refusing to stand during the U.S. national anthem. By “taking a knee,” Kaepernick bravely joined a long tradition of American athletes making powerful political statements. This time, however, Kaepernick's simple act spread like wildfire throughout American society, becoming the preeminent symbol of resistance to America's persistent racial inequality. Critically acclaimed sports journalist and author of A People's History of Sports in the United States, Dave Zirin chronicles “the Kaepernick effect” for the first time, through interviews with a broad cross-section of professional athletes across many different sports, college stars and high-powered athletic directors, and high school athletes and coaches. In each case, he uncovers the fascinating explanations and motivations behind a mass political movement in sports, through deeply personal and inspiring accounts of risk-taking, activism, and courage both on and off the field. Dave will be joined for this book launch by Eddie S. Glaude Jr. Speakers: Dave Zirin is the sports editor of The Nation, a columnist for The Progressive, and the host of the Edge of Sports podcast. His many books include A People's History of Sports in the United States, Game Over, Bad Sports, and The Kaepernick Effect. Zirin has also been a regular guest on MSNBC, CNN, and ESPN. He lives near Washington, DC. Eddie S. Glaude Jr. is a scholar who speaks to the black and blue in America. His most well-known books, Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul, and In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America, take a wide look at black communities and reveal complexities, vulnerabilities, and opportunities for hope. He is the William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies and chair of the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University. His most recent book is Begin Again: James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons For Our Own. Order a copy of The Kaepernick Effect: https://bookshop.org/a/1039/9781620976753 --------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and The New Press. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/3sstEC6LJq8 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire, Twenty Years After 9-11 w/ Deepa Kumar, Naomi Klein, & more

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 85:55


Join Deepa Kumar, Noura Erakat, Naomi Klein, Jasbir Puar, and Keenaga-Yamahtta Taylor to discuss Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire. In Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire, leading scholar Deepa Kumar traces the history of Islamophobia from the 16th century to the “War on Terror.” In the twenty years since 9/11, she writes, Islamophobia has functioned in the United States both as a set of coercive policies and as a body of ideas that take various forms: liberal, conservative, and rightwing. This particular form of bigotry continues to have horrific consequences not only for people in Muslim-majority countries who become the targets of an endless War on Terror, but for Muslims and those who “look Muslim” in the West as well. Importantly, Kumar contends that Islamophobia is not simply religious intolerance or the reaction of an empire in crisis; it must be recognized instead as racism—the kind that manifests in mass surveillance, arbitrary arrests, and deportation, much like other forms of centuries-old systemic racism. And this anti-Muslim racism in turn sustains empire. Order a Copy of Islamophobia: https://www.versobooks.com/books/3839-islamophobia-and-the-politics-of-empire Speakers: Noura Erakat is a human rights attorney, Associate Professor of Africana Studies at Rutgers University, and non-resident fellow of the Religious Literacy Project at Harvard Divinity School. Noura is the author of Justice for Some: Law and the Question of Palestine. She is co-founding editor of Jadaliyya and editorial board member of the Journal of Palestine Studies. Noura has also produced video documentaries, including "Gaza In Context" and "Black Palestinian Solidarity." She has appeared on CBS News, CNN, Fox News, and NPR, among others. Naomi Klein is the bestselling author of The Shock Doctrine, This Changes Everything, No Is Not Enough, and the young adult book How to Change Everything: The Young Human's Guide to Protecting the Planet and Each Other. She is Senior Correspondent for The Intercept, a Puffin Writing Fellow at Type Media Center and Professor of Climate Justice at the University of British Columbia. Deepa Kumar is an award-winning scholar and social justice activist. She is Professor of Media Studies at Rutgers University. Her critically acclaimed book Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire (2012) has been translated into five languages. The second and fully revised edition, published in 2021, marks twenty years of the War on Terror. Dr. Kumar has authored more than 80 books, journal articles, book chapters, and articles in independent and mainstream media. She has shared her expertise in numerous media outlets such as the BBC, The New York Times, NPR, USA Today, the Danish Broadcast Corporation, TeleSur and other national and international news media outlets. Jasbir K. Puar is Professor of Women's and Gender Studies at Rutgers University. She is the author of the award-winning books The Right to Maim: Debility, Capacity, Disability, and Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times. Her scholarly and mainstream writings have been translated into more than 15 languages. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor writes and speaks on Black politics, social movements, and racial inequality in the United States. ​She is author of Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership, which was a semifinalist for the 2019 National Book Award and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History in 2020. She is a contributing writer at The New Yorker, and a Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and Verso Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/XoyuCSmd-JA Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Whose Security? Communities Resisting Post-9/11 Global Security Framework

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 87:53


In this inaugural event of a 4-part series marking the 20th anniversary of 9/11, artists, lawyers and scholars will be reflecting on the impact of the post-9/11 “global security” framework on communities fighting for their rights to be, to move, to believe and to resist. From the indefinite detention of Muslim men in Guantanamo, to the unending repression of the Black freedom movement, to suppression of advocacy for Palestine, and to the racist immigration and border regimes, panelists will trace the harms of post-9/11 policies with an emphasis on the ever-expanding terrorism framework. The conversation will highlight stories of creative resistance to U.S. policies of criminalization and dehumanization, and point towards new horizons of community safety and collective flourishing. Speakers: Sadie Barnette's multimedia art practice illuminates her own family history as it mirrors a collective history of repression and resistance in the United States. Barnette holds a BFA from CalArts and an MFA from the University of California, San Diego. She has been awarded grants and residencies by the Studio Museum in Harlem, Art Matters, Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, and the Headlands Center for the Arts. Omar Farah is a Senior Staff Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights and is the lead lawyer in Color of Change v. Department of Homeland Security and Federal Bureau of Investigation, which seeks records that reveal the government's expansive surveillance of the Movement for Black Lives. Silky Shah is the Executive Director of Detention Watch Network (DWN), a national coalition building power to abolish immigration detention in the US. She has worked as an organizer on issues related to immigration detention, mass incarceration, and racial and migrant justice for over 15 years. In her time at DWN she has helped transform the organization into a national leader in the immigrant rights movement, leading campaigns to expose the system and building the capacity of grassroots members to take action. Tarek Z. Ismail is an Associate Professor of Law at the CUNY School of Law. Prior to joining CUNY Law's faculty, he served as Senior Staff Attorney at the Creating Law Enforcement Accountability & Responsibility (CLEAR) project, which primarily aims to address the legal needs of Muslim, Arab, South Asian, and other communities in the New York City area that are particularly affected by national security and counterterrorism policies and practices deployed by various law enforcement agencies. Nadia Ben-Youssef (moderator) is the Advocacy Director at the Center for Constitutional Rights. Together with the legal, advocacy, and communication teams, Nadia identifies opportunities for the Center for Constitutional Rights to make strategic cultural and political interventions that shift public narrative and policy on human and civil rights. She has expertise in international human rights fora and mechanisms, and extensive experience developing advocacy strategies to influence U.S. decision-makers. This event is sponsored by Center for Constitutional Rights and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/9aZAajigt84 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Violent Order: Racial Capitalism, Settler Colonialism, and the Nature of the Police

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 85:15


Join us for a book launch discussion of the nature of the police project and its rootedness in racial capitalism and settler colonialism. Join David Correia, Melanie K Yazzi, Tyler Wall and Julie Sze in a discussion that will explore that idea that police and police violence are modes of environment-making. The police project, in order to fabricate and defend capitalist order, must patrol an imaginary line between society and nature, it must transform nature into inert matter made available for accumulation. Police don't just patrol the ghetto or the Indian reservation, the thin blue line doesn 't just refer to a social order, rather police announce a general claim to domination—of labor and of nature. Order the book,Violent Order: Essays on the Nature of Police from Haymarket!: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1663-violent-order Speakers: David Correia is a Professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of Properties of Violence (University of Georgia Press, 2013), co-author with Tyler Wall of Police: A Field Guide (Verso, 2018), and co-author with Nick Estes, Melanie Yazzie, and Jennifer Denetdale of Red Nation Rising Nation: From Bordertown Violence to Native Liberation (PM Press, 2021). He is a co-founder of AbolishAPD, a research and mutual aid collective in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Julie Sze is Professor of American Studies at UC Davis. She has written 3 books, most recently Environmental Justice in a Moment of Danger and over 60 articles and book chapters, on environmental justice, the environmental humanities, geography, and public policy. She collaborates with environmental scientists, engineers, social scientists and community-based organizers in California and New York. Tyler Wall is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He is the coauthor with David Correia of Police: A Field Guide. Melanie K. Yazzie, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Native American Studies and American Studies at the University of New Mexico. She specializes in Navajo/American Indian history, political ecology, Indigenous feminisms, queer Indigenous studies, and theories of policing and the state. She also organizes with The Red Nation, a grassroots Native-run organization committed to the liberation of Indigenous people from colonialism and capitalism. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/aja0_wFeUsI Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Abolition Means No War: The New Generation of Anti-Imperialists w/ Dissenters & Rampant Magazine

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 82:34


Join Dissenters and Rampant Magazine to discuss abolition, imperialism, and building a movement for our global liberation. While the United States sends drones and drops bombs in the Middle East and Africa, militarized police at home are killing Black people and filling detention centers on the Mexico border. These are two sides of the same imperialist coin. Sprawling military bases around the world support the everyday brutal violence of empire and US-backed military coups tear apart homes and force migration. Their wars haunt our families and bring violence into our homes and neighborhoods. It is time we abolish their wars. Dissenters is leading a new generation of young people to reclaim our resources from the war industry, reinvest in life-giving services, and repair collaborative relationships with the earth and people around the world. Join Dissenters and Rampant Magazine for a discussion about rebuilding a movement against imperialism and creating a new global future built from mutual care, real safety, and liberation. Speakers: Hoda Katebi is an Iranian-American writer, abolitionist organizer, and creative educator based between Chicago and the Bay. Her work has been hailed from the BBC to the New York Times to the pages of VOGUE and featured and cited in books, journals, and museums around the world. Hoda is the host of #BecauseWeveRead, a radical digital book club and discussion series mobilizing local communities with 25+ chapters globally; founding member of Blue Tin Production, an apparel manufacturing workers co-operative run by working class women of color setting new international standards in labor and sustainability within fashion supply chains; a national lead with Believers Bail Out, a bail fund using Zakat to bail Muslims from pretrial & immigration incarceration; and organizing strategist for anti-war movements with the No War Campaign. She is the author of the book Tehran Streetstyle (2016), contributor to the book I Refuse to Condemn: Resisting Racism in Times of National Security (Manchester Press 2020), and her writing has appeared in publications including Newsweek, Washington Post, and the Columbia Journalism Review. Destiny Harris is a Black, queer abolitionist and organizer from the west side of Chicago. She is a student at Howard University. Her work is at the intersection of abolition, anti-war, anti-militarism and environmental liberation. Destiny believes in the power of storytelling, poetry and culture as means of mobilization that should always be driving our movements. She has organized throughout Chicago on campaigns like #DefundCPD, #CopsOutCPS and the #NoCopAcademy campaign which aimed to combat the narrative that our communities need police. Nadya Tannous is the General Coordinator of the Palestinian Youth Movement. PYM is a transnational, independent, grassroots movement of young Palestinians in Palestine and in exile worldwide as a result of the ongoing Zionist colonization and occupation of our homeland. brian bean is a Chicago-based socialist activist, writer, and speaker originally from North Carolina. He is one of the founding editors of Rampant Magazine. His work has been published in Jacobin, Red Flag, International Viewpoint, Bel Ahmar بالأحمر) ) and other publications. He is co-editor of Palestine: A Socialist Introduction (Haymarket Books) and recently co-authored the article, "Rebuilding the Anti-Imperialist Movement in a New Era." This event is co-sponsored by Dissenters, Rampant Magazine, and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/CgPhsFpbLoQ Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Strong Communities Make Cops Obsolete w/ Geo Maher, Robin DG Kelley, & Alex Vitale

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 85:23


If police are the problem, what's the solution? Tens of millions of people poured onto the streets for Black Lives Matter, bringing with them a wholly new idea of public safety, common security, and the delivery of justice, communicating that vision in the fiery vernacular of riot, rebellion, and protest. Geo Maher's new book, A World Without Police transcribes these new ideas—written in slogans and chants, over occupied bridges and hastily assembled barricades—into a compelling, must-read manifesto for police abolition. Compellingly argued and lyrically charged, A World Without Police offers concrete strategies for confronting and breaking police power, as a first step toward building community alternatives that make the police obsolete. Geo will be joined by Robin D.G. Kelley and Alex Vitale to pick up on these urgent themes and to examine the alternatives to Police and policing. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Order a Copy of A World Without Police: https://www.versobooks.com/books/3783-a-world-without-police --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Geo Maher has previously taught at Vassar College, San Quentin State Prison, and the Venezuelan School of Planning in Caracas. He is the author of five books, including We Created Chavez, Decolonizing Dialectics, Building the Commune, Spirals of Revolt, and A World Without Police. Robin D.G. Kelley is Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History at UCLA and the author of many books, including Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination, Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class, and Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression. Alex S. Vitale is Professor of Sociology and Coordinator of the Policing and Social Justice Project at Brooklyn College and a Visiting Professor at London Southbank University. He has spent the last 30 years writing about policing and consults both police departments and human rights organizations internationally. Prof. Vitale is the author of City of Disorder: How the Quality of Life Campaign Transformed New York Politics and The End of Policing. His academic writings on policing have appeared in Policing and Society, Police Practice and Research, Mobilization, and Contemporary Sociology. He is also a frequent essayist, whose writings have been published in New York Times, Washington Post, Guardian, The Nation, Vice News, Fortune, and USA Today. He has also appeared on CNN, MSNBC, CNBC, NPR, PBS, Democracy Now, and The Daily Show with Trevor Noah. This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and Verso Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/Shj1A0_r5MQ Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Haymarket Books Live
Hillbilly Nationalists The Young Patriots & the Rainbow Coalition

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 87:26


Join Young Patriots co-founder Hy Thurman and Amy Sonnie and James Tracy for a book launch discussion of 'Hillbilly Nationalists'. In 1969, the Young Patriots Organization (YPO) emerged out of Chicago's Uptown neighborhood to organize poor white people against capitalism and white supremacy. They worked alongside the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense and the Puerto Rican Young Lords in the Original Rainbow Coalitions. The YPO embodied the politics that sought to build multiracial working-class unity while respecting the self-determination and autonomy of their comrades of color. Join YPO co-founder Hy Thurman, Amy Sonnie and James Tracy, co-authors of Hillbilly Nationalists, Urban Race Rebels and Black Power: Interracial; Solidarity in 1960s-70s New Left Organizing, Expanded Anniversary Edition, (Melville House Publishing) in conversation with Rampant Magazine. Get the new, expanded Anniversary Edition of Hillbilly Nationalists, Urban Race Rebels and Black Power: Interracial; Solidarity in 1960s-70s New Left Organizing from Melville House Publishing here: https://www.mhpbooks.com/books/hillbilly-nationalists-urban-race-rebels-and-black-power ---------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Amy Sonnie is the co-author of Hillbilly Nationalists, Urban Race Rebels and Black Power: Interracial; Solidarity in 1960s-70s New Left Organizing (Melville House Publishing). Hy Thurman is a co-founder of the Young Patriots Organization and author of Revolutionary Hillbilly: Notes From the Struggle at the Edge of the Rainbow (Regent Press). James Tracy is co-author of Hillbilly Nationalists, Urban Race Rebels and Black Power: Interracial; Solidarity in 1960s-70s New Left Organizing (Melville House Publishing). Moderator: Eric Kerl is a Kentuckian living, working, organizing, and writing in Chicago. He is the author of White Bred: Hillbillies, White Trash, and Rednecks against White Supremacy (forthcoming from Haymarket Books) and is on the editorial collective of Rampant Magazine. ---------------------------------------------------- This event is co-sponsored by Rampant Magazine, Melville House Publishing, Howard Zinn Book Fair, and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/JBL-hyLqjhk Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks