Podcasts about departments

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Best podcasts about departments

Show all podcasts related to departments

Latest podcast episodes about departments

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast
Alex McFarland: The Assault on God, Family, Morality, America

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 53:08


California just made it illegal for boy's and girl's toys to be separated. Departments must be gender neutral. Our culture is saying you can't change behavior but you can change your biology. That's the complete opposite of the truth! You can change behavior, not biology. This is what happens when a culture rejects God. "Although they knew God, they did not honor him as God or give thanks to him, but they became futile in their thinking, and their foolish hearts were darkened" (Romans 1:21). Alex McFarland Daily podcast, relevant articles on issues pertaining to Christians and more can be found on Stand Up For The Truth.

Connections with Evan Dawson
Connections: How Emotional Awareness and Expression Therapy can be used to treat chronic pain

Connections with Evan Dawson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 52:26


Have you heard of Emotional Awareness and Expression Therapy (EAET)? It's a form of mind-body medicine used to treat chronic pain. A documentary called "This Might Hurt" explores the role of the brain in chronic pain and how EAET can be used to manage it. Dr. Howard Schubiner is the director of the Mind Body Medicine Center at Providence Hospital in Michigan. His use of EAET to help patients is explored the film. We talk with Schubiner and additional experts about the therapy, what the research shows, and how they think the medical system needs to change to help more people suffering from chronic pain. Our guests: Howard Schubiner, M.D. , director of Mind-Body Medicine program at Providence Hospital in Southfield, Michigan Aaron Olden, M.D., physician and owner of Mindful Medicine Rochester William Watson, Ph.D. , associate professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology at the University of Rochester Medical Center

The Breakdown with Shaun King
Ep. 521 - Here's what happens when Black police speak out against injustice in their own departments

The Breakdown with Shaun King

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 16:55


Louisiana State Trooper Carl Cavalier, a young Black man, did the right thing and spoke out on the horrible police murder of Ronald Greene by his department. He called out their lies covering it up and called out their murder of an innocent, unarmed Black man. And now the Louisiana State Police have filed papers to fire this man - not for murder or a coverup, but for speaking up. It's a damn shame and he needs our support.

The Breakdown with Shaun King
Ep. 520 - Here's what happens when Black police speak out against injustice in their own departments

The Breakdown with Shaun King

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 17:10


Louisiana State Trooper Carl Cavalier, a young Black man, did the right thing and spoke out on the horrible police murder of Ronald Greene by his department. He called out their lies covering it up and called out their murder of an innocent, unarmed Black man. And now the Louisiana State Police have filed papers to fire this man - not for murder or a coverup, but for speaking up. It's a damn shame and he needs our support.

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, thousands of psychotherapists were forced to migrate their practice to teletherapy or secure video.  While many have embraced this new mode of practice and have even found enhancements to their delivery of therapy, others are eager to return to the office or adopt a hybrid model.  Dr. Hannah Zeavin, author of the The Distance Cure: A History Teletherapy, joins us for a conversation around the history of teletherapy as well as systems-level implications for the wide adoption of teletherapy. In this conversation we cover:     the biggest misconceptions that psychotherapists are likely to labouring under with respect to the history and deployment of teletherapya discussion of the reality of every therapeutic exchange - whether virtual, in the office or otherwise - being mediated in some respect and existing within a "frame"the evidence-base around teletherapy3rd party payers stance towards teletherapy and whether a distinction between in-office therapy and teletherapy remains relevantthe dysfunctional focus on "activities" vs "outcomes" in an insurance-driven mental health system and how teletherapy could unwittingly accentuate this dynamicconsideration of therapy-process related factors in the context of teletherapy (e.g., client seeing the clinician within their home environment & vice versa)implications of the the appification/commodification of mental health services via digital platformsthe dangers of "batch processing" and "gamification" in the provision of therapy within a commodified mental health systemthe potential for the digital distribution of services to create “winner takes all” outcomes and the danger of a cost leader further commodifying mental health via call-center models or similarPotential unintended consequences of national licensure around the commodification of mental health services Dr. Zeavin's thoughts on the questions clinicians and practices should be grappling with right now in the context of tele therapyHannah Zeavin is a Lecturer in the Departments of English and History at the University of California, Berkeley and is on the Executive Committee of the University of California at Berkeley Center for Science, Technology, Medicine, and Society and on the Executive Committee of the Berkeley Center for New Media. Additionally, she is a visiting fellow at the Columbia University Center for the Study of Social Difference. Dr. Zeavin's first book, The Distance Cure: A History of Teletherapy is now out from MIT Press, with a Foreword by John Durham Peters. She is at work on her second book, Mother's Little Helpers: Technology in the American Family (MIT Press, 2023).  Dr. Zeavin serves as an Editorial Associate for The Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association and is a co-founder of The STS Futures Initiative. Other work has appeared in or is forthcoming from American Imago, differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies, The Guardian, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Real Life Magazine, Slate, The Washington Post, Logic Magazine, and beyond. Dr. Zeavin received her B.A. from Yale University in 2012 and her Ph.D. from the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication at NYU in 2018.https://www.zeavin.org/

Life, Love and Entrepreneurship
How to 10x the results of your heads of departments

Life, Love and Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 5:23


How to 10x the results of your heads of departments by Deepak Shukla

Faith and Law
U.S. Immigration Policy: Can we achieve safety, security, and compassion?

Faith and Law

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 40:36


The United States is facing a moral crisis prompted by rapid increases in cross-border migration and global displacement. For too long, the debate around immigration policy has been framed with false choices that have resulted in political stalemates at a great human cost. Crisis after crisis, Americans are asked to choose between security and unbridled compassion. Is there a better way to safeguard our immigration system while welcoming the stranger? Daniel Garza is the president of the LIBRE Initiative. Born in the Central Valley of California, he would migrate with his family annually from their ancestral hometown of Garza Gonzalez in Nuevo Leon, Mexico- throughout California, Nebraska and Washington State following the crop season as farm workers until he was 19 years of age.Mr. Garza began his in public service career as congressional staff assistant for U.S. congressman Richard "Doc" Hastings and was later elected as councilman for the city of Toppenish, Washington in 1996. In 2001, he was tapped by the George W. Bush Administration to serve as Deputy Director of External and Intergovernmental Affairs in the Office of the Secretary at The Department of Interior, and was appointed in 2004 to Associate Director of the Office of Public Liaison in the White House. In 2007, Daniel joined Univision to host and co-produce "Agenda Washington", a weekly Spanish-language news talk show covering the issues impacting the U.S. Hispanic community. Mr. Garza was appointed to serve on the Board of The Harvard Journal of Hispanic Policy in 2016, was designated as one of Washington, D.C.'s “Influentials” by Congressional Quarterly Magazine in 2018, and in 2019, Daniel was named 1 of the 50 most influential voices in Washington DC by The National Journal.Elizabeth Neumann served during the George W. Bush administration managing President Bush's Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, which involved working with the Departments of Education and Housing Development. From 2003 to 2005, Neumann worked at the White House as part of the inaugural staff of the Homeland Security Council post 9/11. The job included working with the different government security agencies to counter terrorism. Neumann served as an executive assistant to Homeland Security Advisor, John A Gordon, shifting eventually to serve as a Homeland Security policy advisor for a year and as Associate Director of the Domestic Counterterrorism Directorate. As a director, she advised the presidential appointee on Homeland Security policy initiatives. Neumann left the Bush Administration and worked with the Senior Advisor to the Program Manager for the Information Sharing Environment, Office of the Director of National Intelligence.Neumann joined DHS Secretary John Kelly as his Deputy Chief of Staff in 2017; and she served in the same capacity under Acting DHS Secretary Elaine Duke. In 2018, Neumann transitioned into her role as DHS Assistant Secretary for Threat Prevention and Security Policy, where she served until her resignation in April 2020.John Cusey is the Vice President of Communications at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). He has a long record of government service including working for multiple presidential administrations and members of Congress. In 2019, John served in the Office of Refugee Resettlement at the Department of Health and Human Services. In his time on Capitol Hill, he served as the Executive Director of the Bipartisan Congressional Pro-life Caucus for five years with Congressman Chris Smith and as the Legislative Director and Press Secretary for Congressman Gary Miller for two years. Prior to working in DC, John worked for three different Members of the California State Legislature where he focused on budget issues.Support the show (http://www.faithandlaw.org/donate)

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands
Why unifying your departments and data could be the biggest growth level you pull (with Julie Bernard, Chief Marketing Officer at Tradeswell)

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 30:03


“You need one single unified environment to manage your businesses” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“There's such a connectivity between how a digital commerce grows, and you really need to have all of that data in one environment.” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“The digital commerce landscape has changed in terms of consumer expectations for speed and shipping costs.” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“There's a great opportunity, I think, for innovation still with meeting that need for discoverability and experience for consumers.” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“Everything can be measured. That's the beauty of digital.” @jbernard23 #DTCPODWe Speak About:[00:59] Julie introduces herself and Tradeswell [02:47] Marketing and how it relates to other departments of the business[05:40] Recording data and what to do with it [08:33] Key differences in how consumers buy[12:43] importance of embracing technology[16:24] The present and future role of AI [20:07] Businesses sizes and technology [22:07] internal business strategies to implement before technology[24:51] Key learnings working with brands post-pandemic [28:12] What's next for Tradeswell and where to find the brand, and Julie BernardHow Tradeswell helps brands create profit through data Julie Bernard, Chief Marketing Officer of Tradeswell, joins the POD to give some insight on the business's actionable insights, customer experience, and marketing data & technology  Tradeswell is a company that helps brands unify data, leverage AI-generated insights and accelerate essential decisions to empower growth across the digital commerce landscape.Julie realizes that to empower growth across the digital commerce landscape, the data and business operations function better when unified.A unique approach is taken by creating a quantitative trading platform that implements real-time algorithms and insights, to uncover and execute the optimal actions companies need to growJulie recognizes that technology can help small businesses operate at the same level of sophistication as their larger business counterparts.Understanding you data, and drawing insights from it, is key to growthTradeswell stands out as a platform that simplifies the process for a brand to visualize the whole picture of their ecommerce business, while leveraging machine learning to receive insights and cross-channel operations.The company understands that the technologies that are out there are more cost effective, accessible, and sophisticated than ever, and the brand works to help others make informed decisions Julie takes the approach of integrating authentical actionable insights and team empowerment to achieve success within the business The brand further acknowledges that just because it can be measured through data, does not mean that it shouldJulie recommends to to draw some conclusions and have insights on the data that you do have rather than being on a perpetual pursuit of perfectionStay tuned as Julie discusses AI and post-pandemic business learnings. If you'd like to learn more about Trend and our influencer marketing platform for influencers and brands visit trend.io. You can also follow us for tips on growing your following and running successful campaigns on Instagram and LinkedIn.Mentioned Links:Tradeswell Website: https://www.tradeswell.com/Julie Bernard's Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/jbernard23

Instructional Designers In Offices Drinking Coffee
How Training Departments Support Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion with Liza Wisner

Instructional Designers In Offices Drinking Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 42:34


Many training teams are already deploying DE&I courses.  Is yours? Are you building your own courses or buying off-the-shelf curricula, or maybe even both?  What if there was more to it than that?It's not an easy decision to make, and in some cases, it's a difficult conversation to have within your team, organization, and/or company.On this episode, Liza Wisner joined us to talk about DE&I and so much more.  She has an amazing background and unique experiences to share with the IDIODC community.  She was a top 3 finalist on the television show, "The Apprentice" and serves her community as the Senior Curator of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion initiatives at OpenSesame.  You might also be interested to know that she is part of our community being professionally trained in computer science and educational technology.  Become virtual friends with the IDIODC gang on Twitter. Remember you can always stay in the loop by searching through the #IDIODC tag:Brent: @BSchlenkerChris: @Chris_V_WIDIODC: @TeamIDIODC Brent Schlenker is dominKnow's Community Manager. Chris Van Wingerden is dominKnow's Sr. VP Learning Solutions. Want to join us live? Follow us on Crowdcast: https://www.crowdcast.io/dominknow

SportsTalk on TribLIVE.com Podcast
Food Bank: Why more Food Banks are creating Government Affairs Departments

SportsTalk on TribLIVE.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:53


Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk
Ep. 115: Antibiotic Resistant Diseases and Nature's Next Medicines with Cassandra Quave

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 49:26


"No matter where you go in the world, there has been a system of medicine that has been primarily based on plants. Billions rely on such a system still today." Ethnobotanist (we discover what that is!) Dr. Cassandra Quave joins the podcast. She is out with a book called The Plant Hunter: A Scientist's Quest for Nature's Next Medicines. The book explores many issues people often think about-- what is happening in the vast, dizzying world of plants, and can plants help us more-- maybe a lot more-- than they already are? Plants are the basis for an array of lifesaving and health-improving medicines we all now take for granted. Ever taken an aspirin? Thank a willow tree for that. What about life-saving medicines for malaria? Some of those are derived from cinchona and wormwood. In today's world of synthetic pharmaceuticals, scientists and laypeople alike have lost this connection to the natural world. But by ignoring the potential of medicinal plants, we are losing out on the opportunity to discover new life-saving medicines needed in the fight against the greatest medical challenge of this century: the rise of the post-antibiotic era. Antibiotic-resistant microbes plague us all. Each year, 700,000 people die due to these untreatable infections; by 2050, 10 million annual deaths are expected unless we act now. Support Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk. Dr. Cassandra L. Quave is a medical ethnobotanist whose work is focused on the documentation and analysis of botanical remedies used in the treatment of infectious disease. Her expertise and interests include the traditional medical practices of the Mediterranean, and the botanical sources of anti-infectives and natural products for skin care. Dr. Quave holds a joint appointment as Associate Professor of Dermatology in the Emory University School of Medicine and Emory Center for the Study of Human Health, where she leads drug discovery research initiatives and teaches courses on medicinal plants, food and health. Dr. Quave also serves as Director/Curator of the Emory University Herbarium, and is associated faculty with the Departments of Biology, Environmental Sciences and Anthropology at Emory. She is a member of the Emory University Antibiotic Resistance Center and the Winship Cancer Center Discovery and Development Therapeutics Program. She also serves on the training faculty for the Antibiotic Resistance and Therapeutic Discovery Training Program, the Molecular and Systems Pharmacology Graduate Program and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics Graduate Program at Emory. Her work has been featured in a number of international outlets including the New York Times Magazine.

Fostering Change
Fostering Change | Dr Bruce Perry Recap

Fostering Change

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 51:17


On this season 2 recap we chat with Dr. Bruce Perry!Dr. Perry is the Principal of the Neurosequential Network, Senior Fellow of The ChildTrauma Academy and a Professor (Adjunct) in the Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago and the School of Allied Health, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria Australia. Over the last thirty years, Dr. Perry has been an active teacher, clinician and researcher in children's mental health and the neurosciences holding a variety of academic positions. His work on the impact of abuse, neglect and trauma on the developing brain has impacted clinical practice, programs and policy across the world. Dr. Perry is the author, with Maia Szalavitz, of The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog, a bestselling book based on his work with maltreated children and Born For Love: Why Empathy is Essential and Endangered. Dr. Perry's most recent book, What Happened to You? Conversations on Trauma, Resilience, and Healing (2021), co-authored with Oprah Winfrey, is a #1 New York Times Bestseller. Dr. Perry was on the faculty of the Departments of Pharmacology and Psychiatry at the University of Chicago School of Medicine from 1988 to 1991. From 1992 to 2001, Dr. Perry served as the Trammell Research Professor of Child Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. During this time, Dr. Perry also was Chief of Psychiatry for Texas Children's Hospital and Vice-Chairman for Research within the Department of Psychiatry. From 2001 to 2003, Dr. Perry served as the Medical Director for Provincial Programs in Children's Mental Health for the Alberta Mental Health Board. He continues to consult with the government of Alberta on children's issues and serves as a founding member of the Premier's Council of Alberta's Promise. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

To The Point - Cybersecurity
Cyber in the 21st Century, With Combiz Abdolrahimi

To The Point - Cybersecurity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 46:57


This week we welcome guest Combiz Abdolrahimi, a national security lawyer and Emerging Technology and Innovation Leader at Deloitte. We deep dive into today's critical infrastructure vulnerabilities and navigating the path forward to address the threat with systems that weren't originally designed with cybersecurity in mind. (Hint: don't approach 21st century cyber challenges with 20th century thinking) And he shares perspective from his time in government at the U.S. Departments of State, Treasury, and Commerce, among others, as well as insights across today's hot topic themes including ransomware, cryptocurrency regulations, international enforcement, and the criticality of information sharing and reporting requirements. For links and resources discussed in this episode, please visit our show notes at https://www.forcepoint.com/govpodcast/e154

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
Dr. Brett Litz: Adaptive Disclosure - An Effective Treatment to Address Traumatic Loss & Moral Injury

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 49:53


While trauma perpetuated by traumatic loss or imminent threat to one's life is familiar and salient to most psychotherapists, the pervasiveness & severity of trauma precipitated by "moral injury" experienced during and/or after a trauma is frequently underestimated and overlooked as a factor that can exacerbate and/or maintain PTSD.  Internationally recognized expert in PTSD, psychologist, researcher & author, Dr. Brett Litz, joins us for an interview around the Adaptive Disclosure (AD) psychotherapy protocol.  In this episode we cover:  the nuances involved with conceptualizing and treating operational stress injuries among military personnel, including a review of the biggest misconceptions that clinicians unfamiliar with this population might harbour and how this could impact treatmentthe definition of a moral injury and an overview of the two major types of moral injury (i.e., moral injury "self" & moral injury "other")consideration of the "moral" emotions of shame & anger in the context of moral injurychallenges of treating moral injury as well as subtle or overt signs that a client might be affected by a moral injurythe origin of Adaptive Disclosure (AD) and where it departs from other CBT-based trauma therapies such as Prolonged Exposure Therapy or Cognitive Processing Therapythe basic theoretical framework/some of the core assumptions of Adaptive Disclosuredescriptions of some of the core therapeutic interventions in Adaptive Disclosurethe unique challenges of delivering any psychotherapy - including Adaptive Disclosure - within the context of a military population (e.g., over control, overregulation)  a brief outline of the next iteration of Adaptive Disclosure - Adaptive Disclosure Enhanced (ADE), which emphasizes to an even great extent increased flexibility in provision of therapy, an emphasis on functioning (as opposed to symptoms) and integration of compassion trainingDr. Litz is a clinical psychologist and Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Psychological and Brain Sciences and is also the Director of the Mental Health Core of the Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiological Research and Information Center at the VA Boston Healthcare System. Dr. Litz is internationally recognized as an expert on PTSD, military trauma, and the early intervention and treatment of trauma, traumatic loss, and moral injury.  Dr. Litz recent work entails the development and validation of a new measure of moral injury as a multidimensional outcome (the Moral Injury Outcome Scale; a public domain scale available by emailing Dr. Litz) and conducting a VA funded multi site clinical trial testing an expanded version of Adaptive Disclosure on Veterans with PTSD. Adaptive Disclosure is a flexible multidimensional psychotherapy that employs different strategies to target threat-based, loss-related, and moral injury-related trauma. Dr. Litz has over 370 peer reviewed publications and is a fellow of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, the American Psychopathological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science.https://www.bu.edu/psych/people/litzb/http://www.guilford.com/books/Adaptive-Disclosure/Litz-Lebowitz-Gray-Nash/9781462523290

The Podcast by KevinMD
Is COVID a turning point for sustainability in hospital supply chains?

The Podcast by KevinMD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 18:47


"Scarcity has, in many ways, defined the COVID-19 experience in the U.S., from shortages in personal protective equipment to ICU ventilators and hospital capacity, to COVID test kits, to drugs like Remdesivir in hard-hit states. These shortages have added impetus and new dimensions to existing conversations around health care supply chains, some of which had originally stemmed from a climate-conscious, sustainability lens. As suggestions are put forth to re-evaluate hospital supply chain design, from procurement to waste disposal, this momentum can be harnessed to achieve the dual aims of bolstering pandemic preparedness and improving sustainability in the health care sector. COVID-19 illustrates the need for greater resiliency within health care's supply chain. Dependence on expansive global networks for raw materials, manufacture, and distribution of critical health care supplies created a pathway prone to breakdown during a worldwide pandemic. Of note, this pathway is similarly vulnerable to the climate crisis, as worsening natural disasters can disrupt critical junctures of the U.S. supply chain." Genevieve Silva is a medical student. Cassandra Thiel is an assistant professor, NYU Langone Health's Departments of Population Health and Ophthalmology. They share their stories and discuss their KevinMD article, "Is COVID a turning point for sustainability in hospital supply chains?" (https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2020/10/is-covid-a-turning-point-for-sustainability-in-hospital-supply-chains.html) This episode is sponsored by Tradeoffs, available on your favorite podcast platform.

Contra Radio Network
Prepper Guy Update | Defund Bureaucracy

Contra Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 35:58


My Local Issue is a national issue and we all must become Non-Compliant so Join Defund Bureaucracy on Facebook, here  Of all the Departments in a city Planning and Zoning is one of the worst, We all like Parks and Recreation, Sewer and Water, our Trash is picked up regularly and even the Police are good to have around, these things are what makes City life happy. Planning and Zoning not so much, they take our family and friends money and harass our Grandparents and our girl or boyfriends,  are truly are an abomination to Freedom and are just tools of Agenda 21. Did I mention that this, and all my podcasts, are rated (R) well now you know! When the shit hits the fan, harsh language will be the least of your concerns. Agenda 21, Non-compliant, just say no, bureaucracy, defund, politics, local, 

The Castle Report
Criminalizing Dissent

The Castle Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 12:26


Darrell Castle raises the question of who has the right to decide what goes into the heads and arms of your children. Phrased differently, who owns your children? Transcription / Notes CRIMINALIZING DISSENT Hello this is Darrell Castle with today's Castle Report. Today is Friday the 8th day of October in the year 2021 and in this Report, I will be raising the question of who has the right to decide what goes into the heads and arms of your children, phrased differently, who owns your children? There has been conflict between parents and the government for perhaps a century but now that conflict seems to be reaching the breaking point. Parents are finally telling the government that they have been patient, but their patience is wearing thin, and the government responds with the only thing it has, force. The Castle Family finds itself in good health this weekend and for that I am grateful. Monday the 11th is my 73rd birthday so this is the last weekend of my 72nd year. Joan and I will celebrate the life that is a gift from God because he gave me Joan and she gave me the family daughter who finds herself in the wonderful and glorious golden city of Los Angeles California, this weekend, but I'm sure I will get a phone call on Monday. Yes, parents out there in the hinterlands of America have been getting a little uppity lately as they start to realize what is being done to their children and what has been done for decades. Angry parents have been appearing at Schoolboard meetings across America to protest, not just what is being taught, but arrogance of the way the boards have conducted themselves, and we are above the law, attitude of the school boards. The schoolboards, by way of the National Schoolboards Association (NSBA) wrote a letter on September 29th to the President of the United States urging the federal government to “deal with the growing number of threats of violence and acts of intimidation occurring across the nation. “The letter alleges that parents who sought to express their opposition to mask mandates, COVID-19 vaccination, and the teaching of critical race theory, have been “inciting chaos” during board meetings. The fact that the letter went to the president is an indication that the NSBA believes that the federal government controls education. The assumption is correct of course because even though the Constitution does not confer that authority the federal government through the Department of Education and the Department of Justice has control of it. Therefore, using simple logic parents have probably concluded that if the federal government is sick and perverted those same values will be imparted to their children. The letter denied that critical race theory is being taught in schools and called for a joint collaboration among federal law enforcement agencies, state and local law enforcement and with public school officials be undertaken to focus on these threats. The schoolboards are asking, without any evidence or examples of an actual threat, federal and state law enforcement to go after parents who show up at board meetings and object to critical race theory, mask mandates, forced vaccination policies, etc. It gets worse though as the letter apparently asked that federal law enforcement agencies such as the FBI, the Secret Service, and the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security “investigate, intercept, and prevent the current threats and acts of violence by whatever extraordinary measures necessary. ”The question of who owns your kids has been answered loud and clear by this letter. The schoolboards own your kids, and they want their kids. Furthermore, if you try to intervene between them and your kids, they demand the FBI and the Secret Service go after you. The Secret Service? What authority does the Secret Service have in such matters? Ah, wait a minute, I get it now. The Secret Service mission includes protection of high-profile government officials and I suppose that is what the schoolboard...

Freedom Pact
#224: Dr Emeran Mayer - The Mind-Gut Connection

Freedom Pact

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 56:11


Emeran Mayer is a gastroenterologist, lecturer, author, neuroscientist, filmmaker and a professor in the Departments of Medicine, Physiology and Psychiatry at the School of medicine at UCLA. Dr Mayer is a pioneer of medical research into brain gut interactions. In this podcast today, we discuss: - The role of the microbiome - Why your gut is your second brain - How many microbes do we have in our gut? - The role of food in mental health - Can thoughts make you sick? - The best foods for your gut - Much more Links: https://www.youtube.com/c/FreedomPact... (video interviews) https://freedompact.co.uk/newsletter​​​​ (Healthy, Wealthy & Wise Newsletter) https://instagram.com/freedompact​​​​ https://emeranmayer.com

The Takeaway
Whistleblower Exposes Facebook's Prioritization of Profit Over People 2021-10-06

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 49:05


Whistleblower Exposes Facebook's Prioritization of Profit Over People The Takeaway discussed Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen's testimony and about regulating big tech with Cecilia Kang, a national technology reporter for The New York Times. She is the co-author of “An Ugly Truth: Inside Facebook's Battle for Domination.”  The Hidden Biases of Search Engine Algorithms  Dr. Safiya Noble is an Associate Professor at UCLA in the Departments of Gender Studies and African American Studies and she's also the author of a best-selling book Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism. In her research, she has extensively detailed the negative impacts that come from rarely having women of color, particularly Black women, programming algorithms for popular search engines. Dr. Noble joined The Takeaway to discuss her research. Afro-Latino Representation in Children's Books Many Afro-Latinos are taking up the call to make sure the next generation sees representations of themselves in one of the first places they experience images and stories, in children's books. The Takeaway talks with Sulma Arzu Brown, author of "Pelo Malo, No Existe" (Bad Hair Does Not Exist), Charles Esperanza, author of "Boogie Boogie, Y'all," and Yesenia Moises, author of "Stella's Stellar Hair." For transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

The Takeaway
Whistleblower Exposes Facebook's Prioritization of Profit Over People 2021-10-06

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 49:05


Whistleblower Exposes Facebook's Prioritization of Profit Over People The Takeaway discussed Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen's testimony and about regulating big tech with Cecilia Kang, a national technology reporter for The New York Times. She is the co-author of “An Ugly Truth: Inside Facebook's Battle for Domination.”  The Hidden Biases of Search Engine Algorithms  Dr. Safiya Noble is an Associate Professor at UCLA in the Departments of Gender Studies and African American Studies and she's also the author of a best-selling book Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism. In her research, she has extensively detailed the negative impacts that come from rarely having women of color, particularly Black women, programming algorithms for popular search engines. Dr. Noble joined The Takeaway to discuss her research. Afro-Latino Representation in Children's Books Many Afro-Latinos are taking up the call to make sure the next generation sees representations of themselves in one of the first places they experience images and stories, in children's books. The Takeaway talks with Sulma Arzu Brown, author of "Pelo Malo, No Existe" (Bad Hair Does Not Exist), Charles Esperanza, author of "Boogie Boogie, Y'all," and Yesenia Moises, author of "Stella's Stellar Hair." For transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

Hard Shop Life
Parts Departments 7 Deadly Sins

Hard Shop Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021


This week we sat down with a few of our favorite people who are also the best parts managers in the country. The conversation was around all the mistakes made in parts departments every day. We ended up narrowing it down to the 7 Deadly Sins! Let's see if you agree.    

Faculty Factory
Habits and Hacks with Jose Suarez, MD, FNCS, FANA | Faculty Factory Podcast | Episode 141

Faculty Factory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 22:14


Information overload. We all know about it, but what can we do about it? In today's Faculty Factory Podcast with Jose Suarez, MD, FNCS, FANA, we discuss some of the habits and hacks for combatting information overload to the benefit of our patients. We also chat about how concepts of precision medicine can be applied to education, faculty development, and more. Dr. Suarez serves as Professor and Director of Neurosciences Critical Care in the Departments of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Neurology, and Neurosurgery with Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore. He is also a Past President of the Neurocritical Care Society (NCS).

Corporate Crime Reporter Morning Minute
Monday September 27, 2021 Criminology Departments Not Offering Corporate Crime Courses

Corporate Crime Reporter Morning Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 1:00


Monday September 27, 2021 Criminology Departments Not Offering Corporate Crime Courses

Sinica Podcast
The benefits of engagement with China, defined: An audit of the S&ED

Sinica Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 92:36


This week on the Sinica Podcast, Kaiser welcomes former Acting Assistant Secretary of State for East Asia and Pacific Affairs Susan Thornton to discuss a recently published audit of the Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED), the annual set of high-level meetings with Chinese officials that were convened during the Obama administration by the U.S. Departments of State and the Treasury. The audit's two lead authors, representing the two organizations behind the audit, the National Committee on U.S. Foreign Policy and the American Friends Service Committee, also join the conversation. Rorry Daniels is the Deputy Project Director at the National Committee on American Foreign Policy's Forum on Asia-Pacific Security, where she organizes research and Track II discussions on security issues and conflict mediation in the Asia-Pacific. Daniel Jasper is the Public Education and Advocacy Coordinator, Asia, for the American Friends Service Committee, where his work focuses on China and North Korea. Susan, Rorry, and Dan make a strong case that, contrary to an emerging bipartisan consensus in Washington that engagement with China was a failure, the policy of engagement actually bore substantial fruit.6:12 – The SED and the S&ED — why the ampersand matters10:37 – The rationale behind the S&ED16:15 – In the room at the S&ED meetings30:12 – Critiques of the S&ED process36:47 – The mechanics of the S&ED audit44:13 – Five major accomplishments of the S&ED1:01:38 – Other surprising U.S. gains from the S&ED1:10:51 – How could the process be improved?A transcript of this interview is available on SupChina.com. Recommendations:Rorry: The Good Place (a TV show by Michael Schur) and the eponymous podcast hosted by Tara Brach.Dan: Silence: The Power of Quiet in a World Full of Noise, by Thich Nhat Hanh, and The China Hustle, a documentary on China-focused short sellers, by Jed Rothstein.Susan: The Incredible Dr. Pol, a reality show about a veterinarian on National Geographic; Hidden Forces, a podcast hosted by Demetri Kofinas; and China and Japan: Facing History, the last book by the great scholar Ezra Vogel.Kaiser: Wildland: The Making of America's Fury, by Evan Osnos, especially in audiobook form, read by the author, and Grand Tamasha, a podcast about current affairs in India, hosted by Milan Vaishnav.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Arts & Ideas
Green Thinking: Soil

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 26:47


Soil nurtures plant, animal and human life. Industrial farming practices have depleted soil and agrochemicals have been used to revive it. In recent years some farmers have adopted regenerative methods, to create and nurture soil, before turning their attention to growing crops and livestock. So what does the latest research suggests we need to change if we are to encourage greater sustainability in our soil culture and practices? Des Fitzgerald talks to Maria Puig de la Bellacasa and Daryl Stump about how we might change the way we think about and treat soil. Maria Puig de la Bellacasa is an AHRC Leadership Fellow and a Reader at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies, University of Warwick. Her research covers science and technology studies, feminist theory and environmental humanities. Her current work explores the formation of novel ecological cultures, looking at how connections between scientific knowing, social and community movements, and art interventions are contributing to transformative ethics, politics and justice. Her current work explores the changes in human-soil relations. Inspired by a range of interventions and practices from science, community activism, art, and soil policy and advocacy, Maria explores contemporary human-soil encounters that happen beyond the usual uses of soil for production. Through her research, Maria hopes to change the way we relate to soils and to contribute to nurturing everyday ecological awareness. You can find details about Maria's research here: https://gtr.ukri.org/projects?ref=AH%2FT00665X%2F1. And, you can watch a talk Maria gave for the Serpentine Galleries here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bfNSPx24f2l Daryl Stump is an archaeologist in the Departments of Archaeology and Environment and Geography at the University of York. His research makes use of archaeological techniques to assess the sustainability of human-environment interactions, with a particular focus on historic agricultural systems in eastern Africa. He is currently leading on the AHRC-funded project, SOIL-SAFE, which explores the benefits of soil erosion and river-side sediment traps for agricultural production and, in turn, food security. Building on relationships with agricultural NGOs in the UK, Europe and eastern Africa, this project combines archaeological, ethnobotanical and development studies research to design a method of assessing the costs and benefits of sediment traps that can be applied by NGOs and researchers to a range of social and ecological environments worldwide. It aims to benefit rural communities where soil erosion presents a serious threat to their future livelihoods. You can find details about Daryl's research here: https://gtr.ukri.org/projects?ref=AH%2FT004185%2F1 And here: https://gtr.ukri.org/projects?ref=AH%2FV000551%2F1#/tabOverview Professor Des Fitzgerald is a New Generation Thinker based at the University of Exeter. You can find a new podcast series Green Thinking: 26 episodes 26 minutes long in the run up to COP26 made in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI, exploring the latest research and ideas around understanding and tackling the climate and nature emergency. New Generation Thinkers Des Fitzgerald and Eleanor Barraclough will be in conversation with researchers on a wide-range of subjects from cryptocurrencies and finance to eco poetry and fast fashion. The podcasts are all available from the Arts & Ideas podcast feed - and collected on the Free Thinking website under Green Thinking where you can also find programmes on festivals, rivers, eco-criticism and the weather. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07zg0r2 For more information about the research the AHRC's supports around climate change and the natural world you can visit: https://www.ukri.org/our-work/responding-to-climate-change/ or follow @ahrcpress on twitter. To join the discussion about the research covered in this podcast and the series please use the hashtag #GreenThinkingPodcast. Producer: Ruth Watts

Futurum Tech Podcast
Digitizing HR Document Processes: A Gamechanger for HR Departments Everywhere

Futurum Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 41:38


In this Futurum Tech Webcast, Futurum Lead Analyst Shelly Kramer sits down with Gunter Appel and Jan Klockgeter of aconso for a conversation on digitizing HR documents and the difference this can make for enterprise organizations.  

The Thomas Jefferson Hour
#1461 Circular to the Heads of Departments

The Thomas Jefferson Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 55:01


We speak with President Jefferson about his "Circular to the Heads of Departments," a memo he wrote dated November 6, 1801 which provides insight into Jefferson's governing style. He refers to his cabinet as one of the most harmonious in history, and he closes his letter by writing, "If I had the Universe to choose from, I could not change one of my associates to my better satisfaction." You can order Clay's new book at Amazon, Target, Barnes and Noble, or by contacting your independent bookstore. The Language of Cottonwoods is out now through Koehler Books. Mentioned on this episode: “Circular to the Heads of Departments”, Jeffersonians in Power: The Rhetoric of Opposition Meets the Realities of Governing Find this episode, along with recommended reading, on the blog. Support the show by joining the 1776 Club or by donating to the Thomas Jefferson Hour, Inc. You can learn more about Clay's cultural tours and retreats at jeffersonhour.com/tours. Check out our new merch. You can find Clay's publications on our website, along with a list of his favorite books on Jefferson, Lewis and Clark, and other topics. Thomas Jefferson is interpreted by Clay S. Jenkinson.

Inside the Lab
S2Ep4: The Carbon Footprint of Clinical Laboratories

Inside the Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 45:32


The principal tenet of medicine is to “first, do no harm.” And yet, the U.S. healthcare sector is responsible for 8.5% to 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions. What can we do in the clinical laboratory to deliver care with a smaller carbon footprint? On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Dan Milner and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Dr. Ilyssa Gordon, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology and Medical Director for Sustainability at the Cleveland Clinic, Dr. Cassandra Thiel, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Departments of Population Health and Ophthalmology at NYU Langone Health, and Mr. James Connelly, CEO of My Green Lab, to discuss the carbon footprint of laboratories. Our panelists describe the healthcare sector's impact on climate, and share what goes into conducting a life-cycle assessment and what it tells us about the environmental impact of a product or service. They explain how we can leverage the ACT label to promote sustainability in lab product manufacturing and explore how a shift in the supply chain compares to reducing consumption in an individual lab. Listen in for insight on applying the principles of reduce, reuse, and recycle to the clinical lab and find out how you can help minimize the carbon footprint of your lab. Topics Covered  · How the healthcare sector is responsible for as much as 10% of carbon emissions· What inspired a study around the carbon footprint of GI biopsies and the response they've gotten to their work· What goes into performing a life-cycle assessment and what it tells us about the environmental impact of a product or service· Leveraging the ACT label to choose sustainable products and ultimately influence lab product markets· Applying the principles of reduce, reuse, and recycle to the clinical lab· Why focusing on a shift in the supply chain makes a bigger impact than reducing consumption in an individual labConnect with ASCPASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Dr. GordonDr. Gordon on LinkedInDr. Gordon at the Cleveland Clinic Connect with Dr. Thiel Dr. Thiel on TwitterDr. Thiel at NYUConnect with Mr. ConnellyMr. Connelly on LinkedInMy Green Lab Connect with Dr. Milner & Ms. SwailsDr. Milner on TwitterMs. Swails on Twitter Resources‘Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Gastrointestinal Biopsies in a Surgical Pathology Laboratory' in the American Journal of Clinical Pathology‘A Different Kind of Laboratory Stewardship' in the American Journal of Clinical PathologyInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 

Stroke Alert
Stroke Alert September 2021

Stroke Alert

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 31:18


On Episode 8 of the Stroke Alert Podcast, host Dr. Negar Asdaghi highlights two articles from the September 2021 issue of Stroke: “Risk of Fractures in Stroke Patients Treated With a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor” and “Carotid Plaques From Symptomatic Patients Are Characterized by Local Increase in Xanthine Oxidase Expression.” She also interviews Drs. Jukka Putaala and Markku Kaste about their article “Should Tenecteplase be Given in Clinical Practice for Acute Ischemic Stroke Thrombolysis?”. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         1) Are we ready to say goodbye to our old friend alteplase and replace it with a new one, tenecteplase, for acute stroke thrombolysis? 2) Does treatment of depression with SSRIs increase the risk of fractures in stroke patients? 3) When it comes to carotid intervention, should we continue offering treatment based on the degree of luminal stenosis, or are there better biomarkers in the horizon? These are some of the questions that we'll tackle in today's podcast. We're covering the best in Stroke. Stay with us. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Welcome back to Stroke Alert Podcast. My name is Negar Asdaghi. I'm an Associate Professor of Neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and your host for the monthly Stroke Alert Podcast. For the September 2021 podcast, we have an exciting program where we discuss some of the controversies in stroke therapies. The September issue also contains a Focused Update with a set of articles and comprehensive reviews on the topic of genetics and stroke, organized by Professor Martin Dichgans, which I encourage you to review in addition to our podcast today. Later in today's podcast, I have the pleasure of interviewing Drs. Putaala and Kaste, from Helsinki Institute, to help us with a burning question of whether there's enough evidence now to use tenecteplase instead of alteplase for ischemic stroke thrombolysis. But first with these two articles. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Over a third of stroke survivors either have depressive symptoms or a formal diagnosis of depression. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, are the mainstay of depression treatment and the most common antidepressants prescribed in the U.S. In addition, in 2011, we had the results of the FLAME trial suggesting that early poststroke treatment with fluoxetine, a commonly prescribed SSRI, improves motor recovery and functional independence in stroke patients with motor deficit. Though these results were not replicated in the subsequent larger FOCUS trial, the use of SSRIs poststroke dramatically increased over the past decade. So what are the side effects of using SSRIs poststroke? It's a known fact that adult stroke survivors are more likely to experience bone fracture, and that there's some evidence that SSRIs may increase this risk. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, in the current issue of the journal, Dr. Graeme Hankey and Joshua Jones, from Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, in Perth, and colleagues aimed to answer this question with a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that included an SSRI treatment for an adult patient with a previous hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke and included incident fractures, either as a primary or secondary study outcome, amongst other criteria. So they found four randomized controlled trials that fulfilled their research criteria. Three of them looked at the effects of fluoxetine, used at a dose of 20 mg per day for six months duration, on functional recovery and outcomes after stroke. And one trial, which has studied neuroregeneration in vascular protection by citalopram, either at a 10 mg or 20 mg daily dose also for six months duration, in patients with acute ischemic stroke. So three studies included with fluoxetine and one study included citalopram. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, what they found was that although the risk of falls, seizures and recurrent stroke were not statistically increased with SSRI treatment, it was actually a significant increased risk of fractures with a risk ratio of 2.36 in patients treated with SSRI as compared to the placebo. Now, how the SSRIs will increase the risk of fractures is still unknown. There are multiple postulated mechanisms that are discussed in the paper, such as SSRIs potentially increasing spastic motor activity, causing orthostatic hypotension, dizziness, delayed reaction time or temporary imbalance or sleep disorders. But the most important mechanism to keep in mind is the possibility of SSRIs lowering bone mineral density. It's also important to note that the duration of exposure to SSRIs is an important predictor of factors. It's worth noting that the usual SSRI exposure in patients with the primary diagnosis of depression is a lot longer than the exposure time in these trials. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, what are the top two takeaway points for stroke physicians? Number one: Fluoxetine and citalopram SSRIs, used for six months poststroke, double the risk of fracture as compared to placebo in this meta-analysis. Number two: While the mechanism of this association is still debated, fracture prevention should be an important discussion point when considering prescribing an SSRI to stroke patients. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         We all know that carotid disease is a major cause of ischemic stroke. Now we have to keep in mind that the bulk of the literature in carotid disease are practically concentrated on the association between the degree of luminal stenosis and the risk of recurrent stroke. So, in practice, we constantly counsel and discuss risk of future ischemia in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease based on the degree of stenosis that's less than 50%, or between 50% to 70%, or over 70%. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         But what if we learn that some plaques can be active despite causing small or little stenosis? And conversely, some may be active despite being very large. There seems to be a growing literature that much of the recurrent strokes are occurring in destabilized plaques. And it turns out that there are actually biomarkers that could cause this destabilization, and we can actually measure them. Xanthine oxidase, or XO, is one of these biomarkers. XO is a key enzyme involved in degradation of purine into uric acid. Now I'm trying to simplify a complex subject here. Xanthine oxidase oxidizes the conversion of hypoxanthine into xanthine and xanthine into uric acid. Along the way, it also does create a whole bunch of reactive oxygen species such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which can create tissue damage. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Now, how is XO and serum uric acid levels related to carotid disease? Well, it turns out that XO is enhanced in carotid arteries with evidence of atherosclerosis. Better yet, in animal models, inhibition of XO is associated with reduction in progression of atherosclerosis. So, in the current issue of the journal, Drs. Morsaleh Ganji and Valentina Nardi, from Departments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Anatomic Pathology of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and colleagues set out to investigate whether carotid plaques from symptomatic patients had increased expression of xanthine oxidase than their asymptomatic counterparts. So, what they did was they looked at 88 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid disease, part of the routine clinical practice, and then measured the XO expression by immunohistochemical staining in CA obtained specimens. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         In addition, they collected a number of serum samples and other demographics and vascular risk factors from the participating patients. They found four major findings in their paper. Number one: XO expression was indeed higher in symptomatic carotid arteries. Number two: Symptomatic patients had a higher serum uric acid levels. Number three: Higher XO expression was inversely associated with the serum levels of HDL. Number four: The symptomatic plaques had higher amount of macrophages expressing XO. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Very interesting, but these findings were irrespective of the actual degree of luminal stenosis. In fact, the asymptomatic carotid plaques patients, as routine practice dictates, had a higher degree of luminal stenosis, but they had lower expression of XO and other associated findings. So what did we learn from this study? Well, there seems to be a strong association between certain biomarkers, in this case xanthine oxidase, and symptomatic state of carotid plaques, suggesting that perhaps in future we'll have other ways of measurements that may help us decide on carotid intervention rather than just the symptomatic state of the artery and the degree of stenosis. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         It's been over 25 years since alteplase was approved as the thrombolytic agent of choice for treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. But in the past decade, tenecteplase, a genetically modified variant of alteplase with regulatory approval for treatment of ST-segment–elevation, myocardial infarction, has gained interest as an alternative reperfusion therapy for treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Whether tenecteplase is ready to completely replace alteplase in clinical practice is certainly a burning question faced by the stroke community today. This was the subject of a lively debate at the most recent and entirely virtual 2021 International Stroke Conference, where a panel of experts reviewed the current evidence regarding the use of tenecteplase in acute ischemic stroke, examining data from animal models, preclinical studies to dose escalation studies and randomized trials, directly comparing tenecteplase with alteplase, as well as the collective clinical experience to date with this thrombolytic agent. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         The proponents of change point out the many advantages of tenecteplase over alteplase, including its ease of use, increased fibrin specificity, longer half-time and its non-inferiority to alteplase in the head-to-head trials. On the other hand, the opponents caution stroke physicians, drawing attention to the inherent issues with the already completed clinical trials of tenecteplase, and argue that more data is needed before tenecteplase is considered as a thrombolytic agent of choice in routine clinical practice. Continuing on this debate in the September issue of the journal as part of the Controversies in Stroke series, Drs. Jeffrey Saver and May Nour provide opposing views to Drs. Dawn Kleindorfer and Mollie McDermott on the present evidence and current guidelines around tenecteplase use in acute ischemic stroke. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Acting as moderators, the senior authors of paper, Dr. Jukka Putaala, Head of Stroke Unit at Neurocenter, Helsinki University Hospital, and Dr. Markku Kaste, Emeritus Professor of Neurology at the University of Helsinki and past chairman of Neurocenter, Helsinki University Hospital, in Finland, provide us with the balancing remarks on the issue. I'm joined today by Professors Putaala and Kaste to give us an overview on the debate of tenecteplase versus alteplase. Is it time to make the switch? Good morning from sunny Florida and good afternoon to you both in Finland. Thank you for joining us on the podcast. I hope the weather is as beautiful in Helsinki today as it is here in Miami. Dr. Jukka Putaala:           Here it is not as warm as you have, but we have had a really beautiful summer, and at the moment, although it is also autumn, temperature is around 20 Celsius, so it's just great. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         It's great to have you both. The paper outlines a generally recognized criteria to support the use of any new pharmacotherapy. Can you please start us off by reviewing the components of this criteria and tell us, please, how many checkmarks does TNK get on this checklist when considered as a reperfusion therapy in acute ischemic stroke? Dr. Jukka Putaala:           These eight criteria include a well-characterized mechanism of action; strong preclinical data; evidence of benefits and safety in a closely related clinical condition, which here is myocardial infarction; important practical advantages over existing agents; the clinical efficacy in how the patient has demonstrated in randomized trials; and endorsement by national practice guidelines. Also, support from regulatory authorities. And finally, clinical effectiveness, which has demonstrated in routine care. We think that tenecteplase for acute ischemic stroke meets actually all of these eight criteria. But we could also think that a smaller number of criteria will be enough to satisfy or meet, would be sufficient. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Perfect. So definitely many important steps, starting with the basics all the way to post-marketing clinical experience. Markku, now over to you. Can you remind us about the mechanism of action of tenecteplase? And what are some of the similarities and differences in terms of pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetics with alteplase? Dr. Markku Kaste:           So alteplase catalyze plasminogen cleavage to plasmin and, in turn, degrades fibrin in thrombi, yielding clot lysis. TNK, compared to alteplase, is 14-fold greater fibrin activity and 80 times higher resistance to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, which means it has a longer half-life, which is a major advantage. Patients need only one injection. In case you're compared to alteplase, when you had to have third dose injection and then one-hour infusion, which delay the care of patient, if the patient need thrombectomy. So it takes an hour for the infusion before patient can be transferred to thrombectomy, and time matters in brain infarction. So the faster you are, the better it is for patients. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Perfect. So more fibrin specificity, as you mentioned, and longer half-time for TNK. And in addition, TNK is not a new drug. In fact, there is over two decades' worth of experience with this in cardiology. Can you also tell us about this? And also some of the preclinical and animal studies that make TNK a potential candidate as a thrombolytic therapy in stroke? Dr. Markku Kaste:           In animal studies, both in vitro model of mural platelet deposits under arterial flow and a rabbit model using extracorporeal arterial-venous shunts, TNK was more potent, showing benefits up to three hours versus one hour when alteplase was used. So, it's a major benefit already in animal experiments and in the code team, of course, it will be transferred in clinical practice. So, in myocardial infarctions, in three randomized trials, including our 17,000 patients, TNK showed significant reduction for bleeding rates and similar intracerebral hemorrhage rates and 30-day mortality. Dr. Markku Kaste:           So, these facts support the use of TNK, also in ischemic stroke, the results from myocardial infarction, some steady encouraging. Although we have to keep in mind that myocardial infarction is very homogeneous disease, it's arterial occlusion, while ischemic stroke can be caused by the local occlusion just like myocardial infarction, but also from artery-to-artery thrombi or from a cardiac emboli. And these three [inaudible 00:17:43] mechanisms generate different kind of thrombi, so we need a better drug than alteplase, which really is effective, whatever is the etiology of the occlusion of brain artery. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Right. Thank you. Jukka, now over to you. Before we review the data from randomized trials of tenecteplase, can you please tell us about some of the practical advantages of tenecteplase over alteplase? We're comfortable with alteplase. Why should we make the switch? Dr. Jukka Putaala:           The key practical advantages arise from the fact that tenecteplase can be given as one single dose; it takes only one minute. And if you compare that to alteplase, you'll have to give the bolus first, and then following the bolus is 60 minutes infusion. And that also has many advantages in clinical practice, for example, if you have a patient with large vessel occlusion in a remote hospital, which is not thrombectomy-capable, you can give tenecteplase and then put the patient in the ambulance and transfer swiftly the patient to the thrombectomy center. While, when using alteplase, you have to start infusion, which you have to have the nursing staff that is capable of monitoring the infusion and taking care of any complications arising during the infusion and so forth. Dr. Jukka Putaala:           With tenecteplase, you can immediately transport the patient to a thrombectomy site after the bolus without any infusion-capable paramedics staff. Another practical advantage is that by using tenecteplase, you avoid the potential gap between the bolus and the infusion, which means that there is at least several minutes or longer gap in four out of five patients treated with alteplase. You can also think the other scenarios during this coronavirus era, and you have 15 patients with suspected or very fast coronavirus infection. By using bolus, you don't need to put nurses in the same room with the patients many times with the infusion if you use alteplase. Instead, you can use tenecteplase, it's only one single bolus, and you can go away and you don't have to be exposed to potential coronavirus infection. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, many important advantages, as you mentioned. It seems very reasonable, then, to use tenecteplase in routine practice if it is indeed non-inferior to alteplase. Jukka, what dose of tenecteplase should be used for treatment of acute ischemic stroke patients? And we're definitely excited to hear about the head-to-head trials with tenecteplase versus alteplase. Dr. Jukka Putaala:           Well, the trial, the dose is 0.25 mg/kg or 0.4 mg/kg. It depends if you have LVO, if you review the evidence what we have now available, you have to use the lower dose in LVO patients. But you can use the higher dose in non-LVO patients. All of this arises from the evidence we have available right now. So, basically, five randomized trials have been completed, to date, comparing tenecteplase with alteplase in acute ischemic stroke. And shortly, if they pull out these five trials and compare primary outcome, which is modified Rankin Scale 0 to 1 versus prior, which means excellent outcome. Dr. Jukka Putaala:           So, when pulling out these five trials, 58% percent of patients rates excellent outcome versus 55% of alteplase, and this satisfied the criteria for non-inferiority. Regarding safety and secondary outcomes, major intracranial bleeding, mortality, this meta-analysis according to five trials shows similar results for tenecteplase and alteplase. You have to consider some details of this trial. I think Markku was going to quickly review some of the details of the science and doses used in these trials later on. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, yes, this sounds great for tenecteplase, but so now over to you, Markku. As Jukka mentioned, do we hear a "not so fast for tenecteplase"? Is the current data enough to say goodbye to alteplase entirely and completely turn over to tenecteplase? What are some of the issues with the already completed trials? Dr. Markku Kaste:           It's not today, we cannot say goodbye to alteplase. As Jukka referred to those trials, there's no reason to go into these really deep details because the trials are quite small compared to ordinary clinical randomized trials studying stroke care. Like I don't want to give neuroprotection agents, for example. One larger trial was, let's say, reasonably well designed. But as to say that most of these trials are not really double-blind randomized clinical trials. And so the results which can be generated is not as reliable as double-blind trials because, of course, there are reasons, I mean, colleagues randomizing cases may think that, OK, a randomizing case and I'm not totally convinced about TNK. And I think this gentleman or this lady really needs effective thrombolytic agents, so I give alteplase, while if another patient with a mild symptom, same physician may think, OK, this stroke patient will recover no matter what, so let us randomize the patient. Dr. Markku Kaste:           So, it means these kind of unbalanced randomization provides data which is not really reliable. We had to have lots double-blinded randomized trials before it's time to say goodbye, if this double-blinded randomized trial verified that TNK beats alteplase. And, of course, we need also meta-analysis of those advanced trials, and these things can take time, although many guidelines, like AHA guidelines, European Stroke Organization guidelines, Chinese guidelines, Indian guidelines, they, in a way, how do you say, might recommend use of TNK, but I think we need more reliable scientific evidence before it's time to say goodbye to alteplase. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, Jukka, Markku already alluded to this. I wanted you to review this for our listeners, the national practice guidelines and drug regulatory authority guidelines around the globe with regards to the issue of tenecteplase versus alteplase. Dr. Jukka Putaala:           Yeah, actually, already American, European, Chinese, Australian and Indian guidelines are recommending tenecteplase into the guidelines, which were recently published in 2019, between 2019 and 2021. What we can read from the guidelines is that tenecteplase can be considered over alteplase. But we have to remember that the strength of the recommendation will remain weak at present and quality of evidence is by the facts that we discussed of these five completely randomized trials and meta-analysis pulling out the data. Qualitative evidence remains slow, and, therefore, the wording in the guidelines is that it may be reasonable to choose or consider alteplase. Tenecteplase might be considered as an alternative to alteplase in certain conditions. Dr. Jukka Putaala:           The recommendations are a little bit mixed in the guidelines, but generally, in large vessel occlusions, the guidelines say that you could consider TNK over alteplase or even that you should consider TNK over alteplase in large vessel occlusion before proceeding to thrombectomy. However, in cases without large vessel occlusion, the statements are more mixed and they say tenecteplase might be considered or even that alteplase is preferred over tenecteplase until we have more evidence. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Thank you, Jukka. Markku, what should be our final takeaway message for the practicing stroke physicians at this point considering the use of tenecteplase in routine practice?   Dr. Markku Kaste:           Before your paper has been accepted and published in high-quality journal, it takes weeks, mostly it takes months, even a half a year. While in Stroke Conference, you get the most recent data, which is, let's say, generated last week or even the same day. So, when you want to really provide high-quality care of your patient, keep you updated. And then it's best for you and her, and it's better, of course, for your patient. International Stroke Conference and also European Stroke Conference, they are excellent places to get the most recent, yet unpublished, reliable information. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Professors Jukka Putaala and Markku Kaste, thank you for summarizing a large body of evidence for our listeners. We're definitely excited to learn how tenecteplase will ultimately stand against the old competitor and perhaps learn that both may be reasonable thrombolytic options, depending on the specifics of the clinical setting. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         And this concludes our podcast for the September 2021 issue of Stroke. Please be sure to check the September table of contents for the full list of publications, including two special reports on consensus recommendations from the 11th STAIR Consortium, that is, Stroke Treatment Academic Industry Roundtable. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         The first report is intended to enhance patient, clinician and policymaker comprehension at modified Rankin Scale findings in clinical trials and quality improvement initiatives. The second report from the STAIR Consortium is on top priorities for cerebroprotective studies, an important manuscript where the roundtable considered and presented a new paradigm for evaluation of putative therapies that may work together with recanalization treatments to improve outcome after ischemic stroke, with special attention to using the correct nomenclature, such as replacing the term "neuroprotection" with "cerebroprotection" when the intention of an investigation is to demonstrate that a new treatment benefits the entire brain, rather than neurons alone. Or replacing the term "time window" with "tissue window" or "target window" when selecting patients for recanalization therapies to enhance the notion that various elements of the neurovascular unit show vulnerability to ischemia evolving over different time scales in different brain regions. An important paradigm shift in ways we think of the brain under ischemic attack. With that, we invite you to continue to stay alert with Stroke Alert. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit AHAjournals.org.

The Steve Gruber Show
Michael Van Beek, Health Departments Threaten Families If School-Related COVID Orders Violated

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 11:00


Michael Van Beek is director of research for the Mackinac Center for Public Policy. Health Departments Threaten Families If School-Related COVID Orders Violated

Today with Claire Byrne
ICU Departments

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 13:32


Alan Gaffney, Beaumont Consultant and Vice President of Intensive Care Society of Ireland

Contra Radio Network
Defund Bureaucracy | Prepper Guy Update 08/31/2021

Contra Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 35:58


Defund Bureaucracy My Local Issue is a national issue and we all must become Non-Compliant so Join Defund Bureaucracy on Facebook, here  Of all the Departments in a city Planning and Zoning is one of the worst, We all like Parks and Recreation, Sewer and Water, our Trash is picked up regularly and even the Police are good to have around, these things are what makes City life happy. Planning and Zoning, not so much! they take our family and friend's money and harass our Grandparents and our girl or boyfriend. Did I mention that this, and all my podcasts, are rated (R) well now you know! When the shit hits the fan, harsh language will be the least of your concerns. Agenda 21, Non-compliant, just say no, bureaucracy, defund, politics, local, 

SCP: Find Us Alive
22: Departments

SCP: Find Us Alive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 22:02


Harley navigates the strange worlds of the other Departments on his ongoing quest to teach the Body Code. Everything is fine! Everything is going great. This episode was written by Anna Maguire and features the voices of Logan Laidlaw (Harley), Jackson McMurray (Lancaster), Tabi Bardall (Agent Love), Taschia Ritter (Klein) and Anna Maguire (Raddagher). Original music by Jackson McMurray. CONTENT WARNINGS: alcohol, injury mention, death mention, hospitals. Follow us on Twitter @Site107 or visit findusalivepodcast.com for updates, info, art, and more. Join us on Patreon for exclusive behind-the-scenes content! Word of mouth is the best advertising, so be sure to share with your friends if you like the show! This podcast and all content relating to the SCP Foundation are released under a Creative Commons Sharealike 3.0 license.

Reinventing Professionals
Why a Centralized Project Management Platform Matters for Law Departments

Reinventing Professionals

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 15:08


I spoke with Don Keller and Jim Brock, the CEO and chief product officer, respectively, at Joinder, a project management software platform for corporate legal departments. We discussed why a centralized project management platform is so important for law departments, how the increased use of technology by professionals in legal has impacted the overall comfort level, and whether law firms should focus on developing new technology.

WEMcast
The story of Amanita Phalloides: The Death Cap Mushroom with Anne Pringle

WEMcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 36:50


Host, Stephen Wood and Dr Anne Pringle, a mycologist and botanist, tell the story of the Amanita Phalloides mushroom. This is not a mushroom native to the United States, but it has found its way there in an unsuspecting way, cork trees. These cork trees were imported for use by California wineries but they had a stowaway, the Amanita Phalloides or death cap mushroom. Death caps are toxic mushrooms that kill both humans as well as domestic pets when consumed. These toxic mushrooms resemble several edible species (most notably Caesar's mushroom and the straw mushroom) commonly consumed by humans, increasing the risk of accidental poisoning. Amatoxins, the class of toxins found in these mushrooms, are thermostable: and thus they resist changes due to heat, which means their toxic effects are not reduced by cooking. Signs and symptoms start with an initially self-limiting gastrointestinal illness, that later can result in liver and renal failure and death. The conversation led to a discussion on how to safely collect mushrooms as well as resources to help medical providers and gatherers alike to identify mushrooms. Just as important was a discussion on how we as healthcare providers and environmentalists can prevent invasive species infestations through local action. Mushroom Observer:  https://mushroomobserver.org/ iNat:  https://www.inaturalist.org/ Mushroom Expert:  https://www.mushroomexpert.com/ Guest Bio: Anne Pringle was born in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and spent her childhood travelling through Southeast Asia and West Africa. After being dragged along on one too many birding expeditions, she abandoned the birds for fungi. She was an undergraduate at the University of Chicago, and then completed a PhD in Botany and Genetics at Duke University. After completing a Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science Fellowship at the University of California, Berkeley, she joined the faculty at Harvard University. She next moved to the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where she is now Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor in the Departments of Botany and Bacteriology. Anne has given over 100 invited talks to academic and popular audiences in countries including China, Colombia, France, Singapore, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. She has been awarded the Alexopoulos Prize for a Distinguished Early Career Mycologist (2010), the Mendelsohn Excellence in Mentoring Award from the Harvard University Graduate Student Council (2011), the Fannie Cox Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching from Harvard University (2013), and a Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellowship (2011-2012). Her research has been featured by the New York Times, National Public Radio, Slate, and the Wisconsin State Journal, among others. In 2019, Anne was elected President of the Mycological Society of America.

The Adversity Advantage
How to Improve Your Gut Microbiome, Brain Health & Immune System w/ Dr. Emeran Mayer

The Adversity Advantage

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 83:12


Today's guest is world-renowned gastroenterologist and neuroscientist Dr. Emeran Mayer. Dr. Mayer is a distinguished research professor in the Departments of Medicine, Physiology, and Psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He has over 35 years of experience studying how the mind and gut interact and how it all pertains to health and disease. His work has been supported by the National Institute of Health (NIH) and has published over 370 peer-reviewed scientific articles. He has also written two books of his own including The Mind-Gut Connection and his newly released book the Gut Immune connection.   I felt like I could have spent all day talking with him as this subject is something that is extremely fascinating to me and it's also very timely given the times we are in. Our conversation today is super informative and tactical and I can promise you that you will feel empowered to take action on your health after listening. We get into the nuts and bolts of it all. We discuss the mind-gut-immune system connection and why it is so important to take care of them all.   Dr. Mayer shares why chronic stress is one of the most destructive things for your brain, gut health, and immune system and how to fix it. We chat about what else is at the root cause of poor brain and gut health and immune function and you will find out why what you eat plays such a pivotal role in all of this.   He talks about what you can do to improve your gut health, brain health, and immune system and how to know if each of these is not functioning properly. Our convo also gets into probiotics and if in fact, they are actually useful as well as what you can do when your body begins to feel off balance. Of course, we get into how to know if all the systems are running smoothly if it's ever too late to address your brain and gut health and so much more!   Connect with Dr. Emeran Mayer:   Website: https://emeranmayer.com/   Instagram: https://emeranmayer.com/   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/emeranamayer   Connect with Doug:   Instagram: www.instagram.com   Twitter: www.twitter.com/dougbopst   Facebook: www.facebook.com/dougbopst   More on Earth Echo Foods/Cacao Bliss:   www.earthechofoods.com/dougbopst   Use Promo code "Doug" at checkout to receive 15% off your order        

Gwinnett Daily Post Podcast
Former Norcross Basketball Couch Accuses GCPS of Racism; Towne Center Project in Snellville Continues to Build; Gwinnett Departments Will Present Budgets.

Gwinnett Daily Post Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 13:25


A former Norcross women's basketball coach is suing GCPS and alleging racism; The Towne Center project looks to be the heart of Snellville; And Gwinnett's government departments will present their budget for 2022 #GwinnettCounty #Georgia #LocalNews           -          -          -          -          -          -          The Gwinnett Daily Post Podcast is local news for Lawrenceville, Norcross, Duluth, and all of Gwinnett County. Register Here for your essential digital news.             This podcast was produced and published for the Gwinnett Daily Post and GwinnettDailyPost.com by BG Ad Group on 8-30-2021            For advertising inquiries, please email j.southerland@bgadgroup.com      See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST
RU157: DR HANNAH ZEAVIN ON THE DISTANCE CURE – A HISTORY OF TELETHERAPY

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 53:55


Rendering Unconscious welcomes Dr. Hannah Zeavin to the podcast! Hannah Zeavin is a Lecturer in the Departments of English and History at the University of California, Berkeley and is on the Executive Committee of the University of California at Berkeley Center for Science, Technology, Medicine, and Society and on the Executive Committee of the Berkeley Center for New Media. Additionally, she is a visiting fellow at the Columbia University Center for the Study of Social Difference. Zeavin's first book, The Distance Cure: A History of Teletherapy is now out from MIT Press, with a Foreword by John Durham Peters. She is at work on her second book, Mother's Little Helpers: Technology in the American Family (MIT Press, 2023). https://www.zeavin.org Upcoming event at McNally Jackson (online) with Dr. Orna Guarlnik this Thursday September 2: https://www.zeavin.org/events/mcnally-jackson-bookstore-in-conversation-with-dr-orna-guarlnik Follow her at Twitter: https://twitter.com/HZeavin Mentioned in this episode: Elizabeth Danto's Freud's Free Clinics: https://cup.columbia.edu/book/freuds-free-clinics/9780231506564 Daniel Gaztambide's A People's History of Psychoanalysis: https://drgpsychotherapy.com/book-announcement-a-peoples-history-of-psychoanalysis-freud-liberation-psychology-social-justice This episode also available at YouTube: https://youtu.be/lp7rSQq8y74 You can support the podcast at our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vanessa23carl Thank you so much for your support! Rendering Unconscious Podcast is hosted by psychoanalyst Dr. Vanessa Sinclair: http://www.drvanessasinclair.net Visit the main website for more information and links to everything: http://www.renderingunconscious.org Rendering Unconscious: Psychoanalytic Perspectives, Politics & Poetry (Trapart 2019): https://store.trapart.net/details/00000 The song at the end of the episode is “These Boots (Just got a brand new pair)” from the album "Conceive ourselves" by Vanessa Sinclair and Pete Murphy. https://vanessasinclairpetemurphy.bandcamp.com/album/this-is-voyeurism Many thanks to Carl Abrahamsson, who created the intro and outro music for Rendering Unconscious podcast. https://www.carlabrahamsson.com Image: The Distance Cure: A History of Teletherapy (MIT Press, 2021): https://www.zeavin.org

Junction City Podcast
No Mask for You!: The Battle Between County Commissions and Health Departments in Utah

Junction City Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 62:17


We still pod sometimes, JCPeeps. This time, we're talking about recent news out of Salt Lake County, where the county council struck down the advice of medical professionals at the county health department to move toward another mask mandate. The same fight is coming to Weber county and we've got the details.We also talk about the right wing media chorus, including Utah Congressional District One's own Blake Moore, decrying the pull-out from Afghanistan, ignoring the details that led us to this point.Plus, we've always got Pinkies Up, Thumbs Down and a few events for you check out. Cause that's how we do.Special thanks to our sponsors, Foley's MMA and Ashley Wolthius and the Elements of Real Estate     Patreon | FB Group | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

The Servant Leader Coaches Bible Study
The Fruit of the Spirit: "Peace" with Darrick McGhee, Sr. ; Pastor of Bible Based Church-Tallahassee, Entrepreneur, Blogger and Leadership Developer

The Servant Leader Coaches Bible Study

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 70:12


This episode is sponsored by Church Trac: https://www.churchtrac.com/index.php?rc=PCSLP Mr. Darrick D. McGhee, Sr. currently serves as Chief Operating Officer for Johnson & Blanton, LLC. with over two decades of experience in state and local government. Most recently, Darrick was the Director of Legislative Affairs for the Executive Office of Governor Rick Scott. In this capacity, he was responsible for advocating and securing passage of the Governor's legislative priorities. He ensured the proper and legal administration of the Governor's legislative role throughout the legislative process and provided counsel and support to the Governor and other staff members with regard to legislative and executive issues. In this role, Darrick also oversaw the Legislative Affairs Directors for each of the executive agencies. Before joining the Executive Office of Governor Rick Scott, Darrick served in multiple senior leadership roles with the Department of Economic Opportunity. While at this agency, Darrick was the interim Executive Director, Chief of Staff, and the Director of Legislative and Cabinet Affairs. He also served as Legislative Affairs Director for three additional state agencies: The Departments of Elder Affairs, Business and Professional Regulation, and Education respectively. Darrick is an active registered lobbyist in the state of Florida. He received his formal education at Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University (FAMU). Here he earned his BA in Political Science and Religion (2000). Darrick is also the Founding Pastor of Bible Based Church Tallahassee, where he resides with his wife, Tikia, and their two children, Darrick II and Tania. He also has over two decades of preaching ministry experience. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chefranjohn/support

The Big Story
772: COVID-19: Is India Entering the Endemic Stage?

The Big Story

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 12:09


For much of 2021, we have only heard about prediction of the next wave of COVID-19, about new variants like Delta and Delta Plus, and rising number of cases. But for the first time, we have received news that India may be in the final stages of this pandemic. In an interview with The Wire on 25 August, the World Health Organization's top scientist Dr Soumya Swaminathan said that India could have reached some stage endemicity. Essentially, an endemic is defined as a stage in the pandemic when the virus is only present in small areas of the population and the rate of infection within that population is predictable. Some examples of endemic diseases are chicken pox, malaria, and even the common cold. In the interview, Dr Swaminathan stated that it is likely that the current stage of COVID cases may continue with a few local surges and COVID may transform as an endemic by the end of 2022. However, she pointed out that vaccinations and COVID-appropriate behaviour will be essential components to facilitate this transformation. So how close is India to enter the COVID endemic stage and what would that future look like? Will masks no longer be a part of society, will there be no future waves or variants? To answer these questions, for today's episode, we spoke to Gautam Menon, a Professor at the Departments of Physics and Biology at Ashoka University. Host and Producer: Himmat Shaligram Guest: Gautam Menon, a Professor at the Departments of Physics and Biology at Ashoka University. Editor: Shelly Walia Music: Big Bang Fuzz Listen to The Big Story podcast on: Apple: https://apple.co/2AYdLIl Saavn: http://bit.ly/2oix78C Google Podcasts: http://bit.ly/2ntMV7S Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2IyLAUQ Deezer: http://bit.ly/2Vrf5Ng Castbox: http://bit.ly/2VqZ9ur

Customer Service Secrets by Kustomer
Bringing Departments Together in Harmony | Gabe Larson

Customer Service Secrets by Kustomer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 13:24


Today it's just Gabe sharing an interesting experience he had this past week through which he learned some useful lessons. Sometimes leaders can go over a line with how they treat other leaders, which is exactly what Gabe witnessed recently and discusses. We cannot be successful without the various moving parts that make up a business, such as the technology and operations team, or the customer service team. Being able to communicate effectively is essential to overall company harmony and growth. Working through a customer transformation project with a company 0:51A bit of advice for all operations professionals 1:25Structure and process 4:06Solving a problem together 8:31“This is not a problem that can be solved just by an ops person. This cannot just be solved by a CX person. You really need the combination to come together and see if they can map this out in a way that doesn't feel so disjointed.” 8:41

SportSquire
SQ Wellness Corner: How Does Exercise Impact Your Immune System? A Look At Exercise Immunology

SportSquire

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 11:47


In this week's SportSquire Wellness Corner, Brad speaks to the large body of research that has been done in the exercise immunology field and the great promise the field has to uncover with future research focal points. He highlights Dr. Richard Simpson PHD's article Titled: Exercise, Immunity, and the COVID-19 Pandemic. Dr. Simpson's research interests are concerned with the effects of aging, stress and exercise on the immune system. He is an associate professor in the Departments of Nutritional Sciences, Pediatrics and Immunobiology at the University of Arizona. You can read it in it's entirety here. https://www.acsm.org/blog-detail/acsm-blog/2020/03/30/exercise-immunity-covid-19-pandemic. It is a good read that lays out in layman's terms the impact that exercise has on our immune function. Simpson writes in his blog, "Having higher age and sex-adjusted scores for cardiorespiratory fitness and performing regular exercise of moderate- to vigorous-intensity exercise that fall within ACSM (American College of Sports Medicine) guidelines has been shown to improve immune responses to vaccination, lower chronic low-grade inflammation, and improve various immune markers in several disease states including cancer, HIV, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cognitive impairment and obesity. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has raised a lot of questions regarding how exercise can protect us from infection by boosting immunity.”

fireengineering
Fire in America: Data, Departments, and Decision Making

fireengineering

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 87:00


Hosts Rick Lasky, Terry McGrath, John Salka, and Bobby Halton speak with guest Butch Cobb, retired chief of the Jersey City (NJ) Fire Department and ISO, about our nation's civilian fire deaths and property losses over the past 20 years and our current mission of protecting lives and property.

The You Project
#538 Prof. Emeran Mayer

The You Project

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 47:27


Emeran Mayer is a Gastroenterologist, Lecturer, Author, Editor, Neuroscientist, Documentary Filmmaker and Professor in the Departments of Medicine, Physiology and Psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He is a pioneer of medical research into brain gut interactions and this was a fun chat. Enjoy.

Stroke Alert
Stroke Alert August 2021

Stroke Alert

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 26:31


On Episode 7 of the Stroke Alert Podcast, host Dr. Negar Asdaghi highlights two articles from the August 2021 issue of Stroke: “Stroke Risks in Adult Survivors of Preterm Birth: National Cohort and Cosibling Study” and “Roles of Phytoestrogen in the Pathophysiology of Intracranial Aneurysm.” She also interviews Drs. Nirav Bhatt and Diogo Haussen about their article “Reliability of Field Assessment Stroke Triage for Emergency Destination Scale Use by Paramedics: Mobile Stroke Unit First-Year Experience.” Dr. Negar Asdaghi: 1) Can preterm birth be associated with increased risk of stroke in adulthood? 2) Can a plant-based diet high in phytoestrogens reduce the risk of aneurysm formation and aneurysmal rupture in postmenopausal women? 3) What is the predictive ability of FAST-ED score in detection of large vessel occlusion? We will review these questions in today's podcast. You're listening to the Stroke Alert Podcast. Stay with us. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         From the Editorial Board of Stroke, welcome to the Stroke Alert Podcast. My name is Negar Asdaghi. I'm an Associate Professor of Neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and your host for the monthly Stroke Alert Podcast. The August 2021 issue of Stroke covers a wide range of topics from examining if the presence of spot sign modifies the treatment effect of tranexamic acid in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage to the results of the PRESERVE randomized clinical trial examining whether intensive blood pressure lowering in patients with severe cerebral small vessel disease can be associated with progression of white matter damage as detected by diffusion tensor imaging or MRI studies, which I encourage you to review in addition to our podcast today. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Later in today's podcast, I have the pleasure of interviewing Drs. Diogo Haussen and Nirav Bhatt from Emory University on their work on reliability of FAST-ED scale when used by the paramedics in mobile stroke units and learn about the implementation of mobile stroke units in Atlanta. But first with these two articles. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Preterm birth, defined as birth prior to 37 weeks of gestation, affects approximately 11% of births worldwide. Today, with the advent of modern neonatal and pediatric care, the majority of preterm babies survive into adulthood. Multiple studies have shown that adult survivors of preterm birth are at increased risk of developing vascular risk factors, such as diabetes and hypertension, and have a higher incidence of ischemic heart disease as compared to their age-matched individuals born at term, though the association between preterm birth and risk of stroke is not well studied. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         In the current issue of the journal, Dr. Casey Crump from Departments of Family Medicine and Community Health and Population Health Science and Policy at Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai, New York, examined whether preterm birth is associated with an increased risk of stroke and its major subtypes in adulthood. The authors use the prenatal and birth information obtained from the Swedish Birth Register, which contains information for nearly all births in Sweden since 1973. The study cohort included over 2,200,000 singleton live births in Sweden from 1973 to 1994. These years were chosen to allow for sufficient follow-up into adulthood. The study cohort was examined for the earliest diagnosis of stroke from the time the participants turned 18 through September 31, 2015, and the maximum age of included population is 43 years. Stroke was identified using ICD codes from all primary and secondary diagnosis in the Swedish Hospital and Outpatient Registries and all deaths attributed to stroke in the Swedish Death Register. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Cosibling analyses assess for potential shared, familial confounding factors, such as genetic and environmental factors, that could contribute to development of stroke. In 28 million person-years of follow-up, 4861, or 0.2% persons, were diagnosed with stroke between 18 to 43 years of age. The authors found that low gestational age at birth was associated with a significantly higher risk of first-time stroke in adulthood. In their adjusted model, as compared to those born at full-term, the hazard ratio for any stroke associated with early preterm, that is birth between 22 to 33 weeks of gestation, was 1.4, and the hazard ratio for late preterm, that is birth between 34 to 36 weeks of gestation, was 1.22, both of which were statistically significant. Interestingly, each additional week of gestation was, on average, associated with a 3% lower risk of first stroke in adulthood. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Similar associations were found in men and women and for both hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes. These findings were only partially explained by shared genetic or environmental risks of preterm birth and stroke within families, suggesting important direct effects of preterm birth on risk of stroke. Multiple putative mechanisms that could potentially link preterm birth with increased stroke risk were discussed in the paper as well, including interaction of fetal angiogenesis during the critical developmental period leading to reduced capillary density and increased arterial stiffness, to persistently elevated levels of anti-angiogenic factors, which are correlated with increased blood pressure development and development of hypertension in adulthood. In summary, the study findings suggest that preterm birth should be recognized as a risk factor for stroke later in life, and survivors need early preventive evaluation and long-term clinical follow-up into adulthood to reduce their lifetime risk of stroke. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         The incidences of intracranial aneurysm and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage are high in postmenopausal women, suggesting estrogen may be protective against aneurysm formation or aneurysmal rupture. However, estrogen-containing hormone replacement therapy is also associated with an increased risk of other significant adverse outcomes, such as increased risk of breast cancer and ischemic stroke, and is not routinely recommended for primary prevention of chronic conditions in postmenopausal women. Isoflavones, a type of phytoestrogen, are plant-based, diet-derived compounds with properties similar to estrogen. Two types of isoflavones, genistein and daidzein, are found in soybeans, chickpeas, and lentils and are thought to be the most potent phytoestrogens that exert estrogenic activities with tissue and receptor specificity. Regular consumption of isoflavones has been shown to alleviate the vasomotor symptoms of estrogen deficiency and associated with reduced incidence of estrogen-dependent diseases in postmenopausal women. Daidzein, once ingested, is converted to its bioactive metabolite, equol, which preferentially binds to estrogen receptor beta, a receptor subtype responsible for the protective effect of estrogen against the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         In the paper titled "Roles of Phytoestrogen in the Pathophysiology of Intracranial Aneurysm," Dr. Tomoki Hashimoto from the Barrow Aneurysm and AVM Research Center, Departments of Neurosurgery and Neurobiology, the Barrow Neurological Institute, and colleagues investigated whether the phytoestrogens daidzein and its bioactive form, equol, are protective against the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms in ovariectomized female mice. Intracranial aneurysms were induced by combining systemic hypertension and a single injection of elastase into the CSF at the right basal system. Ovariectomized mice were fed with an isoflavone-free diet. The systemic treatment with equol delivered via an implanted mini-osmotic pump in the treatment group (0.5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (in the control group) began one week before aneurysm induction and was continued for four weeks thereafter. So, what they found was that equol treatment significantly reduced the incidence of aneurysm formation compared to vehicle, and there was a trend for equol-treated mice to have a lower incidence of aneurysmal rupture than control mice, while there was no difference in the blood pressure noted between the two groups. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Furthermore, systemic treatment through equol decreased mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and interleukin-1β. Importantly, equol seems to require estrogen receptor beta, as the observed protected effects of equol against aneurysm formation was not duplicated in ovariectomized estrogen receptor beta knockout mice. The authors further demonstrated that dietary daidzein reduced the incidence of aneurysm formation, an effect that was dependent on the conversion of daidzein to equol as the beneficial effect of this dietary supplement was abolished in mice that were fed vancomycin, which prevented the intestinal microbial conversion of daidzein to equol. In summary, this study showed that both dietary oral daidzein or the systemic use of its bioactive metabolite, equol, protect against aneurysm formation in ovariectomized female mice through the activation of estrogen receptor beta and subsequent suppression of inflammation. These results indicate a potential therapeutic value of phytoestrogen in prevention of intracranial aneurysm formation and related subarachnoid hemorrhage. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Early recognition of stroke-like symptoms, combined with increased utilization of revascularization therapies, have greatly improved the clinical outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke, but have similarly resulted in an ever-growing demand on the stroke systems of care. In the era of endovascular thrombectomy, a prehospital scoring tool with predictive abilities for detection of a target vessel occlusion can greatly assist in the appropriate triage, transfer, and activation of the endovascular team for eligible patients, all the while preventing the inevitable fatigue that accompanies the overuse of the system by properly triaging out those who have a lower likelihood of needing endovascular therapy. For any scoring system used in the prehospital setting, the need for precision needs to be balanced with notions such as ease of administration, time consumption, and reproducibility, as decisions made in the field are invariably fast and frequently made in unstable situations. The Field Assessment Stroke Triage for Emergency Destination, or the FAST-ED scale, is one such stroke scale that meets many of the above-stated criteria in patients with stroke-like presentations to predict a possible large vessel occlusion. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         In the paper titled "Reliability of FAST-ED Scale Use by Paramedics: Mobile Stroke Unit First-Year Experience," Drs. Nirav Bhatt and Diogo Haussen and colleagues, from the Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center, Grady Memorial Hospital, and the Department of Neurology at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, report on the reliability of the FAST-ED score in the prehospital setting when used by the paramedics in a mobile stroke unit. I'm joined now by Drs. Bhatt and Haussen to discuss this paper. Good afternoon, Nirav and Diogo. Thank you very much for joining us. Dr. Nirav Bhatt:               Thank you so much for the invitation. I'm very happy to be here. Dr. Diogo Haussen:         Thank you very much. It is a great pleasure to join you. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Right. In this paper, the FAST-ED score was administered by the paramedics in a mobile stroke unit. So Nirav, to get us started, please tell us about the concept of a mobile stroke unit, how long it's been implemented in Atlanta, and what it means for patients with stroke-like symptoms who would possibly have a large vessel occlusion. Dr. Nirav Bhatt:               The mobile stroke unit, or the MSU, is an ambulance equipped with a CT scanner and state-of-the-art telemedicine capabilities and is operated by the Grady Emergency Medical Services that covers majority of Metro Atlanta and many of its suburbs, caring for a population of a little over 500,000. It was specifically incorporated to expedite care amongst patients with suspected strokes and went into operations on 30th May, 2018, Monday through Saturday, 12 hours a day, 8 a.m. through 8 p.m. It is operated by a group consisting of an EMT driver, a paramedic, an emergency medicine registered nurse, and a CT technician. So, when a patient has symptoms suspicious for a stroke, the MSU is activated either through 911 dispatch or by an ALS ambulance crew evaluating a possible stroke alert patient in the field. After the initial stroke triage performed by the MSU crew, if there is a persistent suspicion for stroke, the patient is transferred to the MSU and a noncontrast CT scan of the brain is immediately performed. Dr. Nirav Bhatt:               These CT images are transmitted via the telemedicine platform and are available for review by the vascular neurologist and neuroradiologist in real time. With the help of telemedicine technology, a remotely located vascular neurologist then examines the patient. So, with the help of telemedicine and CT scanner, it allows the remotely located vascular neurologist to identify patients who may qualify for IV alteplase, which is then administered in the MSU to qualifying patients, and these patients get subsequently transported to a stroke treatment center. Now, if the neurological exam is concerning for a large vessel occlusion and the non-contrast CT scan does not show corresponding early ischemic changes, these patients get transferred specifically to a comprehensive stroke center for consideration of thrombectomy. At our centers, some of these patients get directly transported to the neuro-angio suite for further imaging and possible thrombectomy. Thus, the MSU serve a very important goal of expediting critical neurological care for a stroke patient, not only by administering IV alteplase in the field to qualifying patients, but also early triage and transport of qualifying patients to the neuro-angio-suite and with earlier activation of neuroangiosuite. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Perfect, Nirav. An important and a growing concept, bringing treatment to patients and helping with triaging them appropriately, as you mentioned, which I'm sure we'll see more of in the United States and across the world. Now, Diogo, over to you. Can you tell us about the FAST-ED score, its components, then about the reliability of FAST-ED score in the prehospital setting prior to your current study? Dr. Diogo Haussen:         So, the landmark trials published in 2015 defined mechanical thrombectomy as this very effective and powerful treatment of large vessel occlusion stroke patients, and the clinical and the public health impact of this treatment are certainly highly dependent on the rapid triage of these folks into the appropriate destination. So, this involves the prompt identification of patients with severe symptoms by the emergency medical system personnel, and obviously the transportation of them for a thrombectomy capable center. So, some scales had been proposed earlier on, and the FAST-ED was then developed, and it aimed to help with the identification of patients with a higher probability of having a large vessel occlusion stroke. So, in 2017, we validated the scale on stroke patients that had undergone contrast-enhanced vascular images, which had not been done before, in this publication led by Fabricio Lima and Raul Nogueira in Stroke, in the Stroke journal. Dr. Diogo Haussen:         So, this paper demonstrated that FAST-ED had higher accuracy than RACE and CPSS. The main limitation at the time was the fact that the FAST-ED score derived from the NIH Stroke Scale and, therefore, had to be validated in the field. The FAST-ED scale stands for the important features that are involved with stroke care and recognition and triage, such as facial palsy, arm weakness, speech changes, and time. Then we complimented this with findings of critical dysfunction illustrated by eye deviation and also denial/neglect. So, the FAST-ED has the following scoring system: So, facial palsy scored from zero to one; arm weakness from zero to two; speech changes, which is aphasia, from zero to two; time is just for documentation, but not for really any decision-making in terms of the scale itself. So, eye deviation goes from zero to two, and denial/neglect from zero to two, and again, was designed based on the items of the NIH Stroke Scale with higher predictive value for large vessel occlusion strokes. I think Nirav is going to discuss a little bit more about why we chose those cutoffs, but they're all designed in a specific way. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Perfect. So a quick score that can be administered easily by different healthcare personnel. So, please tell us, before we go back to Nirav, about your paper's methodology. What were you hoping to expand on the existing knowledge with this paper? Dr. Diogo Haussen:         I'm just going to repeat a few things, but our mobile stroke unit is equipped obviously with a CT machine and is staffed by an EMT driver and emergency medicine registered nurse, a paramedic, and a CT technician. So, a remote evaluation of patients by a vascular neurologist is then performed through this video-based telemedicine platform. The MSU, as he mentioned, is routinely accompanied by an Advanced Life Support–staffed ambulance, which responds to the suspected stroke calls, and sometimes then calls in or calls off the potential of our stroke code. And as part of this MSU evaluation, the FAST-ED is then administered by the MSU paramedic via the FAST-ED smartphone application that was designed. And then an independent NIH is performed by the registered nurse within the MSU. So, subsequently, the patient is transferred into the MSU itself and a non-conscious CT is performed. Once the scan is completed, the patient is evaluated by the vascular neurologist in a two-way video conference where the FAST-ED is then estimated by the physician. Dr. Diogo Haussen:         So, all patients are then transferred to the comprehensive stroke center, where further evaluation, including vascular imaging, is performed. The vascular imaging data was formerly read by neuroradiology and then followed by an independent read by the vascular neurologist for the identification of large vessel occlusion strokes, which we define in this paper as an intracranial occlusion off the internal carotid, the M1 or the M2 branches of the middle cerebral artery or the basilar artery. The study encompassed our initial experience, which was from May of 2018 till August of 2019. And we have some other goals, but the initial experience was planned to allow us to investigate, once again, this most important feature, which is the potential reliability of the estimation of the FAST-ED score by paramedics in the field. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Perfect. Thank you for this background, Diogo. Now Nirav, we're ready to hear about the study results. Dr. Nirav Bhatt:               So, in the first 15 months of operation of the mobile stroke unit, we analyzed data on 173 eligible patients. We had an almost equal distribution of our patients in terms of gender. We had 52.6% females, and the majority of our patients were Black. We found that FAST-ED scores matched perfectly between paramedics and vascular neurologists 56% of the time, and there was only a zero to one point difference in 91% of the cases. Cases in which the discrepancy of the FAST-ED score between the paramedic and vascular neurologist was two points or higher were less than 9%. Overall, the intraclass correlation of FAST-ED score between the paramedic and the vascular neurologist was 0.94, indicating excellent interrater reliability. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Thank you. You found a higher interrater reliability between the paramedics and vascular neurologists for scores of three or above on the FAST-ED scale. Higher FAST-ED scales also were more specific in terms of detection of a target vessel occlusion. How should your results be interpreted in our day-to-day practice, Nirav? Dr. Nirav Bhatt:               That is correct. When vascular neurologists recorded a FAST-ED score greater than or equal to three, paramedics also recorded a FAST-ED score greater than or equal to three in 87.5% of the instances, and when a vascular neurologist recorded a FAST-ED score of greater than or equal to four, the paramedics also recorded a FAST-ED score of greater than or equal to four in 92% of the instances. This is suggestive that when the patients presented with a moderate to a severe stroke, that EMS paramedics were highly reliable in identifying the neurological severity of these patients. This provides a sound basis for more widespread utilization of FAST-ED as a simple and reliable tool that can be utilized by paramedics to identify stroke severity in the field. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Thank you, Nirav. Simple indeed. I know Diogo briefly alluded to this, but can you also tell us a little more about how FAST-ED compares to the other prehospital scoring systems in terms of their interrater reliability and LVO prediction? And what should be our takeaway message from your paper? Dr. Nirav Bhatt:               Yes, absolutely. So, just to give you an example, the Los Angeles Motor Scale, LAMS, tests for facial droop, arm drift, and grip strength, but does not really test for cortical signs. We know that a lot of patients with subcortical strokes will have those features, meaning facial droop, arm drift, and decreased grip strength. Similarly, while RACE is very similar to FAST-ED, it tests for leg weakness in addition to what FAST-ED does. It also puts a lot more emphasis on the facial droop as compared to FAST-ED. And with that, I want to draw your attention to a study that we cited in our paper where these scales were compared head to head, and while the accuracies of all the prehospital scales were found to be acceptable, the accuracy of RACE and LAMS were slightly higher than that of FAST-ED. However, it should be noted that in almost 35% of the cases, a complete FAST-ED score could not be reconstructed largely due to data and availability regarding patients' neglect. Dr. Nirav Bhatt:               This percentage for data and availability for RACE was even higher, meaning we have to consider the feasibility of these scales when we recommend the widespread adoption of these scales into our communities. Overall, the takeaway from this entire study is we strongly believe that there needs to be a system in place for prehospital stroke triage in order to identify and transport the patients to the right destination rapidly. However, the choice of individual scales should be made after consideration of the geographical characteristics of a particular community, and also that experience and that comfort with the level of training required for reliable performance of each of these scales by the EMS personnel. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Thank you so much, Nirav. More to come on this, I'm sure, in the future. Thank you for joining us on the podcast today. Dr. Nirav Bhatt:               Thank you so much. It was our pleasure. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Thank you, Drs. Nirav Bhatt and Diogo Haussen. Thank you for joining us on the podcast today, and we look forward to covering more of your work in the future. This concludes our podcast for the August 2021 issue of Stroke. Please be sure to check out the August table of contents for the full list of publications, including a special report on the safety of the mobile stroke units and a descriptive review of the amount of radiation exposure to the public, patients, and staff from these mobile units. With that, as our work to save every brain cell from ischemic and hemorrhagic damage continues, we invite you to stay alert with Stroke Alert. Dr. Negar Asdaghi: This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit AHAjournals.org.

Montana Public Radio News
Montana Health Departments Prepare To Distribute COVID Booster Shots

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 2:15


Montana county health departments are gearing up for the possible rollout of booster COVID-19 vaccines after federal health officials announced the efficacy of the shots may be waning with time.

AirGo
Black Freedom Convos Vol. 3 - Black Marxism, Internationalism, & Anti-Fascism w/ Barbara Ransby

AirGo

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 59:46


AirGo is partnering with friend of the show and self-appointed honorary cohost Eve Ewing to present Black Freedom Conversations, a suite featuring Eve in conversation with Black scholars toward collective Black liberation and learning. Each episode corresponds to lectures given by the featured scholar, which are available for free at https://www.blackfreedomlectures.org/. Episode three features Eve in conversation with Barbara Ransby. Ransby is the John D. MacArthur Chair, and Distinguished Professor, in the Departments of African American Studies, Gender and Women's Studies, and History at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She also directs the campus-wide Social Justice Initiative, a project that promotes connections between academics and community organizers doing work on social justice. She was deeply involved in the anti-Apartheid/ Free South Africa movement in the 1980s and later co-founded a number of organizations including: The Ella-Baker Nelson Mandela Center, Ella's Daughters, and African American Women in Defense of Ourselves. She is a founding member of the national organization Scholars for Social Justice and works closely with The Movement for Black Lives and the multi-racial coalition, The Rising Majority. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Woods Fund of Chicago, and the grassroots Chicago-based, Equity and Transformation, (E.A.T.) a group that supports formerly incarcerated persons and those working in the informal economy. SHOW NOTES Watch the lecture - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vm_guOnUi90 Follow the guest - twitter.com/barbararansby Become an AirGo Amplifier - airgoradio.com/donate Rate and review AirGo - podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/airgo/id1016530091

NFL: Move the Sticks with Daniel Jeremiah & Bucky Brooks
697. Preview of Teams Starting Training Camp + Evolution of College Football Personnel Departments

NFL: Move the Sticks with Daniel Jeremiah & Bucky Brooks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 50:26


Daniel Jeremiah and Bucky Brooks are back with a new episode of Move the Sticks. To start off, the duo react to Los Angeles Rams running back Cam Akers' injury and discuss San Francisco 49ers safety Jimmie Ward calling out Rams quarterback Matthew Stafford. Next, the guys preview the Dallas Cowboys, Pittsburgh Steelers and Tampa Bay Buccaneers as these teams are starting training camp this week. To wrap up the show, DJ and Bucky look at the evolution of college football player personnel departments and how they're being shaped like pro teams. Move the Sticks is a part of the NFL Podcasts Network. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Blonde Files Podcast
The Gut-Brain Connection with Dr. Emeran Mayer

The Blonde Files Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 52:12


In this episode I'm talking to Dr. Emeran Mayer—world renowned gastroenterologist, neuroscientist and Distinguished Research Professor in the Departments of Medicine, Physiology and Psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA—about the gut, the gut-brain connection and how they influence each other. We discuss why the gut-brain connection is so important; how emotions and stress affect the gut; anxiety and the gut; the truth about SIBO; how food fear contributes to digestive issues; multidisciplinary treatments for IBS; why digestive issues are so prevalent right now; what to eat for a healthy gut and so much more.   www.headspace.com/BLONDE  for a free one-month trial www.blublox.com/BLONDE  for 15% off and free shipping worldwide www.ritual.com/BLONDE  for 10% off during your first 3 months www.Fxchocolate.com  with code BLONDEFILES for 20% off your first order   Produced by Dear Media