Podcasts about cancer survivors

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Best podcasts about cancer survivors

Show all podcasts related to cancer survivors

Latest podcast episodes about cancer survivors

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Natural Methods To Keeping A Young Prostate Dr. Geo Espinosa • http://www.DrGeo.com• Book – Thrive, Don't Only Survive, #GeoEpinosa  #ProstateCancer #CancerSurvivor Dr. Geo Espinosa is a Naturopathic Functional Medicine doctor recognized as an authority in Urology and Men's health.  He is faculty and holistic clinician in Urology at New York University Langone Health and faculty for the Institute for Functional Medicine.  Dr. Geo is the first naturopathic physician to complete an internship, residency, and fellowship in urology at a conventional medical institution at Columbia University in New York.   As an avid researcher and writer, Dr. Geo has authored numerous scientific papers and books, including co-editing the Integrative Sexual Health book, and author of the bestselling prostate cancer book: Thrive, Don't Only Survive In his book, Thrive, Don't Only Survive, Prostate cancer is not the end—it's the beginning point where you start taking control. Information on what to do isn't hard to find. There are dozens of books on prostate cancer, as well as a massive number of online resources. What's lacking, however, is a trusted, reliable source on implementing the abundance of scientific evidence in a way that's realistic and sustainable.Based on his extensive research and clinical experience on natural medicine for prostate problems, Dr. Geo has created a lifestyle blueprint that men can apply immediately to thrive before or after prostate cancer. Dr. Geo walks readers of every stage and age (as well as their partners) through the steps to become a thriver, not just a survivor. This book delivers invaluable information and essential lifestyle practices to help you renew and rebuild your body despite prostate cancer. This one-of-a-kind book will answer the most common and important questions on prostate cancer:Dr. Geo is co-founder, Chief Medical Officer (CMO), and formulator of advanced nutraceutical formulas at XY Wellness, LLC. He lectures internationally on the application of science-based holistic treatments for urological conditions. In his free time, Dr. Geo enjoys delivering content on his popular website, DrGeo.com, spending time with his wife and three kids, reading, strength training, and practicing martial arts. To Contact Dr Geo go to DrGeo.com Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

BH Sales Kennel Kelp CTFO Changing The Future Outcome
WHAT? WHOM? HOW? IS DIVISION THE NEW MATH?

BH Sales Kennel Kelp CTFO Changing The Future Outcome

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 25:56


Grandpa Bill today continues to follow up on a recent interview I did with#Talaya Dendy, Cancer Survivor and Cancer Doula. Today Grandpa Bill also Asks: Is Division The New Math? Widespread abortions, stillbirths, infertility and deaths.Excess mortality across the population at large is running around 32 percent, meaning an extra 2,400+ are dying each day. Dead, aborted or still birthed to be replaced by WHAT? WHOM? HOW? IS DIVISION THE NEW MATH? US Army FortsDozens have contaminated groundwater, from Fort Dix in New Jersey to Adak Naval Air Station in Alaska. Fort Ord is 25 years into its cleanup as a federal Superfund site, and it's expected to continue for decades. To date, the military has only acknowledged troops' health could have been damaged by drinking contaminated water at a single U.S. base: Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, and only during a 35-year window, between 1953 to 1987. Servicemembers there were found by federal epidemiologists to have higher mortality rates from many cancers, including multiple myeloma and leukemia. Men developed breast cancer, and pregnant women tended to have children with higher rates of birth defects and low birth weight. Like Fort Ord, Camp Lejeune began closing contaminated wells in the mid-'80s.Cited Article-https://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/national-international/veterans-worry-polluted-fort-ord-base-in-california-made-them-sick/2878238/ Todays second half of this podcast GB discusses :Widespread abortions, stillbirths, infertility and deaths. excess mortality across the population at large is running around 32 percent, meaning an extra 2,400+ are dying each day dead, aborted or still birthed to be replaced by WHAT? WHOM? HOW? IS DIVISION THE NEW MATH? Which Delivery System Works Best for You? CBDa Drops or CBDa Gummies? Leave GB Messages at my Anchor Radio Message Bord What's Your Thoughts? --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bhsales/message

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Pancreatic Cancer Caregiver : Anuja Raina : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 31:10


Anuja Raina is a Pancreatic Cancer Caregiver. Her mother was diagnosed at the age of 54 in the year 2010 with Stage 2 Pancreatic Cancer, as the diagnosis was not done at the early stage. Initially, it was hard to identify cancer even after undergoing numerous tests for 2-3 months due to a lack of awareness about the testing criteria. As a proud daughter, Anuja still remembers her mother dealing with cancer very strongly till the end. She passed away in the year 2011 when the quality of treatment was not as advanced as present in India.

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Caregiver : Arushii : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 56:02


Arushii was a caregiver to her mother who lost the battle to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. She suggests caregivers to accept what has happened without wasting more time and plan the treatment logically, by taking as many opinions as needed. She says, “ Make sure you take more than one opinion and have regular checkups to ensure you are on the right path. These decisions can be expensive, but it is something that you can't avoid once you're diagnosed with cancer, so make the necessary preparations for them. Always listen to what the patient is saying, both verbal and non-verbal.”

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Sarcoma Cancer Survivor : Brandi Bensoni : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 20:07


Brandi Benson is an Ewing Sarcoma survivor. She was diagnosed with cancer after noticing a lump on her leg, which she first dismissed. Her advice for other cancer patients is to believe in themselves and never give up because there are miracles every day. She says that cancer has motivated her to do better in life.

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Hodgkin's Lymphoma Cancer Survivor : Flávia Maoli : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 25:55


Flávia Maoli was diagnosed with Hodgkin's Lymphoma at the age of 23. However, she did not give up hope. Instead, she learned from her cancer experience and fought back with far more courage and optimism the second time Hodgkin's Lymphoma struck her. In fact, using her outstanding interpersonal abilities, she founded Instituto Camaleao to serve society and inspire them through her cancer journey.

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Gestational Trophoblastic Disease Survivor : Lynette Vanderhorst : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 43:23


Lynette Vanderhorst is a Gestational Trophoblastic Disease survivor Her cancer journey began when my pregnancy test was positive just six months after giving birth to her son when the doctors performed a D&C. But she believes that her cancer journey taught her a lot of things. She asks her fellow warriors to believe in themselves, stay grounded, stay focused, and stay in the moment.

The Breast Cancer Recovery Coach
#219 How to Make Life Easier on Yourself

The Breast Cancer Recovery Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 26:05


I remember when I was a kid, I couldn't hang out with my friends until I cleaned my room.  I hated cleaning my room, so I'd fight with my mom, I'd get grounded, and I always thought it was her fault because she was so mean.  Then I became a parent, and I had a mind-blowing moment when I realized the facts were if my kids stopped crying and fighting, the room would be clean in 25 minutes, and they could have what they wanted.  But, because they thought the fact was I was being mean, they made life so much harder on themselves.  Another mind-blowing moment…we still do that as adults!  We get caught up in our own emotions, stories, and interpretations of life and other people, creating stress for ourselves.  In today's show, I'll help you change that.  I'll offer you a simple way to see the difference between the facts you're dealing with and the story about them that's making your life so much harder.  Listen in now and start making life easier on yourself today.  Referred to in this episode:  Gift Certificates  Pre-Enroll in The Four Pillars of Breast Cancer Recovery Coaching Experience

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Breast Cancer Survivor : Jos Mc Laren : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 22:30


Jos' cancer journey began in 2020, unfortunately during the lockdown. While cancer came as a complete surprise to her, her positive attitude toward it was what kept her spirits up. In fact, after her successful journey, she has some words of advice for other cancer patients: help and accept help; Try not to be homebound and interact and socialize with others. Finally, feel and express all of your emotions.

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Mouth Cancer Survivor : David Lofthouse : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 14:35


David Lofthouse is a mouth cancer survivor. His one advice to people going through a similar journey is to never give up and give life the fight it deserves. He was declared cancer free in April, 2022 and is now a successful writer, who has written multiple books, one of which consists of detailed accounts of his cancer journey and his life after it.

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Pancreatic Cancer Caregiver : Malvika Manjunath : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 30:34


Malvika Manjunath is a caregiver of her father who was diagnosed with Pancreatic Cancer. She shares her moments with her father and how closely she was part of her father's cancer journey. She says that the journey begins with shock, denial, and then trying to figure out what best can be done for your loved one. She believes that it is very important to share thoughts, moments, and memories that you hold with the cancer patient before it's too late and all you are left with is regret.

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Breast Cancer Survivor : Sabrina Ramadan : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 32:33


Sabrina is a Stage-2 Breast Cancer Survivor, who was diagnosed at a very young age and had a husband and children. She believes that cancer can be defeated more effectively when the person stays positive and stubborn to fight against cancer throughout the treatment. She says that cancer made her realize how strong she is mentally and physically. Seek help, reach out to people who have gone through the same, and do not give up and have faith in yourself and in the people around you.

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Colon Cancer Survivor : Carla Harrington : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 27:50


Carla Harrington says "God had a plan for my life and he gave me divine healing". This brave survivor suggests that one should advocate for his/her body and listen to what their body says. She wanted to support and become an advocate for others and after her treatment, she ended up becoming one. She was a part of the Cancer Leadership Program Training and then she started a cancer care Ministry for the community. She created a safe space for the people who came for resources, to pray together and share their cancer stories to encourage each other.

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Breast Cancer Survivor : Anil Khanna : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 33:20


Anil Khanna is a Breast Cancer Caregiver for his wife. She was diagnosed with cancer in the month of December, 2017. She first encountered a lump in her left breast, but the first mammogram was conducted in Feb'18 which did highlight BI-RADS category 5, which means advanced cancer. His wife lost her battle last year to Cancer, but he proudly says that his wife stayed strong till the end. “She taught me the real meaning of words like resilience and happiness, a smiling face which faded away but not in my memories”.

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Breast Cancer Survivor : Lauren Tarpley : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 35:13


Lauren Tarpley is a Stage 2 Breast Cancer Survivor. She was diagnosed in the year 2021 when she was a mother to an eighteen months old child and was in the breastfeeding phase. Though the times were tough for her, she still managed to overcome the dark phase successfully. She believed that cancer is a fight which cannot be winned alone. She connected with other fellow-cancer patients who were suffering from similar conditions and tried new challenges along with them. She says “Maintain consistency, find what works for you. It's all going to be trial-and-error”

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Rectal cancer Survivor : Monika : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 36:01


Monika is a Rectal Cancer Survivor who was diagnosed 2 years ago. She believes that cancer has made her realize that every moment in life is precious. Running after success, fame, or money will gain you nothing but spending valuable moments and memories with yourself and your loved ones matters the most. During her cancer journey, she became closer to nature and started to feel connected with it. The support from her family helped her the most to defeat cancer and currently, she is leading a happy life.

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Acute Myeloid Leukemia Survivor : Dr. Nikhil : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 64:30


Dr. Nikhil Aggarwal is an Acute Myeloid Leukemia Survivor who was diagnosed in July 2012 even though he had no symptoms at all. He says that throughout his cancer journey, traveling, and sharing his story on social media helped him throughout his first journey with cancer. Unexpectedly, the recurrence happened in the2014 where he had to go through another set of obstacles. Though it was not an easy journey, he still managed to overcome everything with the support of his family members and friends. As a healthcare expert, he suggests that one should not bottle up their emotions and feelings from their loved ones and seek mental support when required.

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer
Ovarian Cancer Survivor : Susan Rienzo : Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Healing Journeys by ZenOnco.io & Love Heals Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 27:19


Susan Rienzo is a stage 3 Ovarian Cancer Survivor. Her cancer journey began in the year 2016. The support from her loved ones and medical experts gave her hope and faith in what she was undergoing. She stayed positive throughout the cancer journey and letting people take care of her helped her the most. The thought to witness more in life, especially with her loved ones gave her the strength to fight against cancer. Cancer has made her realize that it is important to appreciate each moment of your life, listen to your body, and take care of yourself.

It Takes Balls
Josh Robson - Testicular Cancer Survivor

It Takes Balls

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 26:32


Josh Robson is a testicular cancer survivor from Melbourne, Australia. Josh talks about feeling something wrong for about 18 months, the empty feeling after being diagnosed, being a triathlete and trying to stay active to a degree during treatment, competing an Ironman and Ultra Ironman after treatment, Turning Up every day, and more! Want to be a guest? Apply here: https://www.testicularcancerawarenessfoundation.org/it-takes-balls-submissions Follow Testicular Cancer Awareness Foundation: https://www.testescancer.org https://www.twitter.com/testescancer https://www.instagram.com/testescancer https://www.facebook.com/tca.org/ Follow Manny de la Cruz: https://instagram.com/jrobie92 Follow Steven Crocker: https://www.twitter.com/stevencrocker https://www.instagram.com/stevencrocker https://www.facebook.com/steven.crocker2

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Most Doctors And Researchers Are Trapped In A System That Promotes The Status Quo

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 9:24


Most Doctors And Researchers Are Trapped In A System That Promotes The Status Quo Dr Jonathan Stegall MD • http://www.cancersecrets.com• Book – Cancer Secrets  #JonathanStegall#Cancer #IntegrativeOncology Dr Jonathan Stegall MD is a medical Integrative Oncology doctor and a bestselling author of Cancer Secrets and host of an award-winning podcast, The Cancer Secrets Podcast. His book Cancer Secrets is a much-needed resource for cancer patients and their families, with vital information on evidenced-based treatments from both modern medicine and alternative medicine This book is about Cancer being the second leading cause of death in the United States, and will soon overtake heart disease as the #1 killer. This year alone in the United States, there will be 1.7 million new cancer cases, and over 600,000 cancer deaths. The lifetime risk of developing cancer is now 1 in 3 people, and is quickly approaching 1 in 2. Despite billions of dollars devoted to cancer research, we are no closer to a cure. Sadly, we are losing the war on cancer. Patients diagnosed with cancer, as well as their family and friends, are left with a difficult decision: do I follow the standard of care, consisting of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, or do I seek alternative treatments on my own? Do I listen to my doctor, or do I follow advice from the internet? Who do I listen to? Who can I trust? Until now, cancer patients and their families did not have a reliable resource for optimally treating cancer. In this breakthrough book, Cancer Secrets, you will learn critical information about what cancer is (and is not) and how to best treat it using the best that both modern medicine and alternative medicine have to offer.  Integrative oncologist, Jonathan Stegall, MD, provides a long-awaited and much-needed remedy for our cancer problem. Dr. Stegall has a successful integrative oncology practice in Atlanta, GA, and has seen first hand what works and what doesn't when it comes to cancer treatment. This book is a "must have" if you or a loved one is fighting cancer! Dr. Stegall believes that there are many potentially valuable therapies which are not (yet) part of the conventional standard of care. All of these therapies have a scientific study suggesting their mechanism of action and potential therapeutic benefit. These therapies include, but are not limited to, local hyperthermia, sono-photodynamic therapy, lymphatic drainage therapy, nutrition, supplementation, and stress reduction therapy. These therapies, which are all considered natural approaches, make sense to incorporate as well.He earned his bachelor's degree at Clemson University and master's degree in physiology from Georgetown University. He earned his medical degree at the University of South Carolina. After medical school he did his internal medicine residency through the Yale University School of Medicine, with clinical training at Greenwich Hospital in Greenwich, Conn., as well a Yale New Haven Hospital in New Haven, Conn. Then completed his fellowship in Integrative Oncology through the Metabolic Medical Institute, affiliated with the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine. He holds membership in several organizations, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO), and the International Organization of Integrative Cancer Physicians (IOICP).The Center for Advanced Medicine is transforming how cancer is treated. I am very proud of the transformative work we do, and the powerful difference we make in the lives of our patients. I run my practice in a way that is consistent with my Christian faith, based on love. My team and I love what we do, and we love the patients we treat.He is married and has two sons and a daughter. To Contact Dr Jonathan Stegall, M.D. go to  cancersecrets.com Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

Beyond The Ribbon
Cancer Survivors Stories - Part 2

Beyond The Ribbon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 53:47


Cancer Survivors Stories - Part 2

Cancer Shop Talk: Behind the Diagnosis with Dr. Vaughn
Humans of HOAF: Lung Cancer Survivor Stories

Cancer Shop Talk: Behind the Diagnosis with Dr. Vaughn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 18:37


In honor of Lung Cancer Awareness Month, Dr. Vaughn welcomes three HOAF lung cancer survivors, Jim Herrick, Jennifer Bartley, and Bradley James, to share their journey and experience. Listen now to go behind the diagnosis and hear the empowering stories recounting the importance of resilience, faith, and being proactive about your healthcare.

Newstalk Breakfast Highlights
Number of cancer survivors in Ireland has increased by over 50% in ten years

Newstalk Breakfast Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 5:19


New stats say that cancer survivors in Ireland have increased by 50% in just ten years. That's according to new stats from the National Cancer Registry. Professor Deirdre Murray is the Director of the National Cancer Registry and joined us on Newstalk Breakfast.

The
How to win the battle for your life with Cancer Survivor Eddie Richardson

The "What's Your Revolution?" Show with Dr. Charles Corprew"

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 59:51


This episode will have you on the edge of your seat. As we close out Prostates Awareness Month, my dear friend and Frat Brother Eddie Richardson joins me to discuss his journey to win his battle with Prostate Cancer. A man of faith and perseverance, Eddie walks me through his journey from his diagnosis to being a survivor. It is a story filled with brick walls, but Eddie took his sledgehammer with him to ensure that any challenge he faced was demolished. Riveting doesn't even begin to describe this story and the man that Eddie has become. Just so you understand, although Prostate cancer is curable, it is more aggressive and lethal to Black men, thus Eddie's story is a reminder to all men, don't take your health lightly. Please, go get checked often, if could be a matter of life and death. Enjoy this revolution!

Highlights from Newstalk Breakfast
Number of cancer survivors in Ireland has increased by over 50% in ten years

Highlights from Newstalk Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 5:19


New stats say that cancer survivors in Ireland have increased by 50% in just ten years. That's according to new stats from the National Cancer Registry. Professor Deirdre Murray is the Director of the National Cancer Registry and joined us on Newstalk Breakfast.

It Takes Balls
Manny de la Cruz - Testicular Cancer Survivor

It Takes Balls

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 43:03


Manny de la Cruz is fresh out of treatment of testicular cancer and reflects upon his journey. Manny talks about feeling an unbearable scrotal pain at work that led to his diagnosis, going through chemo after seeing how it affected his mother, plans to run a race soon after treatment, and more! Want to be a guest? Apply here: https://www.testicularcancerawarenessfoundation.org/it-takes-balls-submissions Follow Testicular Cancer Awareness Foundation: https://www.testescancer.org https://www.twitter.com/testescancer https://www.instagram.com/testescancer https://www.facebook.com/tca.org/ Follow Manny de la Cruz: https://instagram.com/md10_15 Follow Steven Crocker https://www.twitter.com/stevencrocker https://www.instagram.com/stevencrocker https://www.facebook.com/steven.crocker2

Sushant Pradhan Podcast
Episode 104: Pramita Khanal | Brest Cancer Survivor | Fighting Cancer | Sushant Pradhan Podcast

Sushant Pradhan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 33:10


Mrs. Pramita Khanal is a Brest cancer survivor and the President of the Nepal Cancer Survivor Society. In this podcast, she shares her experience fighting cancer and the reality of cancer patients. Follow Nepal Cancer Survivors' Society on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100046925123882

Plant-Strong
REPLAY Dr. Dawn Mussallem - This Plant-Based Physician Survived Two Death Sentences To Become a Real Life Wonder Woman

Plant-Strong

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 89:17


Dr. Dawn Mussallem is a board-certified Lifestyle Medicine Physician at the Mayo Clinic Jacoby Center for Breast Health where she works with breast cancer patients during and after their diagnosis to heal and thrive using the pillars of lifestyle medicine alongside their conventional cancer treatments.  Dawn has many remarkable stories of patient recovery, but the biggest recovery story of all is her own. You see, in addition to being a physician, teacher, wife, and mother, Mussallem is also a cancer survivor, 2021 heart transplant recipient, and as of February 2022, she's also a marathon finisher! It's a story you simply have to hear to believe and her passion and positivity will leave a lasting impact. Not only does she acknowledge her family and faith in this decades-long journey, but she also credits her whole foods plant-based diet with her ability to thrive and train with a renewed sense of purpose and boundless energy. It's a life force she brings both to her life and the lives of the patients she works with on a daily basis.  About Dawn Mussallem, DO Dr. Mussallem is a consultant in the Department of General Internal Medicine at Mayo Clinic and is an Assistant Professor of Medicine. She is a diagnostic breast specialist at The Robert and Monica Jacoby Center for Breast Health and serves as Medical Director for Mayo Clinic Florida Lyndra P. Daniel Center for Humanities in Medicine. Dr. Mussallem is double-board certified, including a board certification in Lifestyle Medicine. She has over 25 years of patient-centered clinical wellness experience with international recognition in the field of breast medicine, lifestyle medicine, integrative oncology, cancer prevention, and cancer survivorship, and a unique personal experience as a stage IV cancer patient diagnosed 3 months into medical school, as well as a heart transplant recipient. She shares that her journey as a patient cultivated her boundless energy and deep purpose to help guide patients toward renewed vitality. In 2015, she founded the Integrative Medicine and Breast Health Program at Mayo Clinic Florida, a patient-centered program that works with breast cancer patients during and after a breast cancer diagnosis, introducing them early on to the importance of lifestyle optimization and evidence-based mind-body practices alongside conventional cancer treatments with a goal to reframe the cancer diagnosis as a “teacher of life,” leading patients to discover renewed vitality through healthier living.    Episode Resources Join TEAM PLANTSTRONG - plantstrongfoods.com/team Watch the Episode on YouTube Become an Organ Donor Mayo Clinic News Network Story on Dawn Dawn's Journey from Cancer Survivor to Heart Transplant Recipient Running to a New Beat - Heart transplant recipient to mark 1-year anniversary with marathon To stock up on the best-tasting, most convenient, 100% PLANTSTRONG foods, check out all of our PLANTSTRONG products HERE. Give us a like on the PLANTSTRONG Facebook Page and check out what being PLANSTRONG is all about. We always keep it stocked full of new content and updates, tips for healthy living, delicious recipes, and you can even catch me LIVE on there! We've also got an Instagram! Check us out and share your favorite PLANTSTRONG products and why you love it! Don't forget to tag us using #goplantstrong

Marketing with Russ... aka #RussSelfie
Marketing with Russ... aka #RussSelfie with Tim Sohn - Ep. 260

Marketing with Russ... aka #RussSelfie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 20:26


Join me and my Great Friend Tim Sohn as we talk "Support & Recovery." Tim is a Livestream Show & Virtual Event Producer, Host, Showing Up: Perspectives On Cancer, Mission Award Winner, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Man & Woman of the Year & Cancer Survivor, and Host of the Tim & Jim Show. Marketing with Russ…aka #RussSelfie, Episode 260 14 November, Monday, 8am PST Watch Here: LinkedIn: https://lnkd.in/gQPTTNZW Facebook: https://lnkd.in/g4KBY_Yh YouTube: https://lnkd.in/gpbF2Q6h Connect with Tim: LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/timsohn Email: tim@sohnsocialmediasolutions.com Connect with Russ Hedge: LinkedIn: https://lnkd.in/eDN9fGWC Website: russhedge.com YouTube: @russhedge #showingup #recovery #connection #community #support #friends #marketing #inspiration #InspirationSpecialist

The Courageous Podcast
Robert Duran - Navigating Life with Pancreatic Cancer

The Courageous Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 57:21


Our guest today defines what it means to be courageous.  Robert Duran is a father, husband and passionate cyclist. For the last decade, Robert has been riding through life navigating the rocky terrain that comes with being diagnosed with what many call a death sentence in Pancreatic Cancer.  In this very open and raw conversation with host Ryan Berman, Robert opens up about how he has been able to survive and thrive despite the odds against him. Robert shares how cycling has been a lifesaver during his battle with cancer, but was almost the thing that killed him. The two also discuss how “cutting the cord” from most electronics has allowed Robert to take his life back and live every moment in the present. It's a moving and inspiring episode with a tremendous human being in honor of World Pancreatic Cancer Day on 11/17/2022.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
A Plant Based Diet And Lifestyle Is The Healthiest Diet On The Planet

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 13:37


A Plant Based Diet And Lifestyle Is The Healthiest Diet On The Planet Kristi Funk, MD  • http://www.pinklotus.com/powerup/drkristifunk  • Book - Breasts: The Owner's Manual: Dr. Thomas Campbell  • https://nutritionstudies.org/  • Book – The China Study Solution Dr Robert L. Bard, MD  • http://www.bardcancercenter.com  • Book – The Prostate Cancer Revolution #PlantBasedDoctors  #Diet, #Lifestyle #Cancer   Kristi Funk, MD is a board-certified breast cancer surgeon & physician, international keynote speaker, women's health advocate and author of; Breasts: The Owner's Manual: Every Woman's Guide to Reducing Cancer Risk, Making Treatment Choices, and Optimizing Outcomes In this national bestseller! Breast cancer surgeon Dr. Kristi Funk offers a comprehensive and encouraging approach to breast care and breast cancer. Empowered with facts and strategies to understand your breasts, reduce your cancer risk, and open your eyes to interventions and treatments. In 2009, Dr. Funk opened the Pink Lotus Breast Center in Beverly Hills, which at the time became the first breast cancer center of its kind, fusing state-of-the art screening, genetic testing, diagnosis and surgical treatment with preventive strategies and holistic, compassionate care – all under one roof. You can follow or connect with Dr. Funk on pinklotus.com/powerup/drkristifunk Dr. Thomas Campbell II   has been learning, writing, presenting, or practicing in the area of nutrition and lifestyle for 20 years. He is co-author, with his father T. Colin Campbell, PhD, of The China Study, The Most Comprehensive Study Ever Undertaken of Nutrition Ever Conducted and the Starting Implications for Diet, Weight Loss, and Long-Term Health. The book has been a worldwide bestseller, having been translating in dozens of languages and sold throughout the world. It has inspired politicians, professional athletes and millions of others to consider plant-based nutrition. In 2015, he published The Campbell Plan, which is called The China Study Solution in paperback. This is a practical "how-to" guide to implement a whole-food, plant-based diet, including over 50 recipes. To Contact Dr Thomas Campbell II, M.D. go to nutritionstudies.org  Dr Robert L. Bard, MD,  is an author of; The Prostate Cancer Revolution: Beating Prostate Cancer Without Surgery and an internationally known and recognized leader in the field of  21st Century 3-D ULTRASONOGRAPHIC VOLUMETRIC DOPPLER IMAGING. In the Book The Prostate Cancer Revolution there is a new world of medical options for the 200,000+ men diagnosed annually with prostate cancer. The Prostate Cancer Revolution explains how imaging breakthroughs provide peace of mind, tumors and their blood supply are precisely identified, if a biopsy is necessary, needle samples are taken only from the known tumor(s) for highly accurate findings, advanced imaging is used to plan and deliver minimally invasive, painless outpatient targeted treatments that destroy tumors without urinary or sexual side effects. To Contact Dr Robert L. Bard, go to bardcancercenter.com Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

Beyond The Ribbon
Cancer Survivor Stories - Part 1

Beyond The Ribbon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 66:10


Cancer Survivor Stories

Radical Audacity in Love & Life with Tiphany Kane
Resilience in Painful Times with Guest Savio P. Clemente

Radical Audacity in Love & Life with Tiphany Kane

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 54:42


This weeks guest is no stranger to pain, heartache, and challenges. He survived stage-3  cancer as a young LGBTQ+ man and came to realise that it is his ability to tap into his inner resilience that helped him get through.He is now a #1 Best Selling author, syndicated columnist, board certified wellness coach, and founder of The Human Resolve, LLC. Savio has dedicated his life to coaching cancer survivors to overcome the confusion and gain the clarity needed to get busy living in mind, body, and spirit.  He inspires health and wellness seekers to find meaning in the "why" and to cultivate resilience in their mindset.Read Savio's Interview of me in Authority Magazine: Overcoming the Fear Of Failure You can find Savio:Instagram  @ thehumanresolveTwitter & Linkedin: Savio P. ClementeOther Episodes you will enjoy:Radical Audacity of Scary Decision Making3 Important Lessons Fear Teaches Us5 Ways to Overcome the Fear of FailureContact Tiphany:DM me on IG @tiphanykaneCheck out my website: www.tiphanykane.comLeave Tiphany a Voice Message to have a spotlight on the podcastProduced & Edited by: KaSa Media Productions

The Breast Cancer Recovery Coach
#217 How to Stop Letting People Annoy You

The Breast Cancer Recovery Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 28:12


As the holidays get closer, we often start to dread holiday gatherings. We think about the people who annoy us and tell ourselves stories of how awful the gatherings will be.  We also follow this same line of thought for many special occasions or even our day-to-day lives.  We think other people are the problem, but our thoughts about other people create our suffering.  In this episode, I'll share a story of how this happened in my life, how I realized what I was putting myself through and how you and I can become more aware of our thoughts and judgments of other people, so we can reign ourselves in and create a more peaceful life.  Referred to in this episode:  Free lesson -Abundance, Peace, and Sleep  90 Days of Wellness 

Closer Look with Rose Scott
Pancreatic cancer survivors discuss diagnosis and treatment; Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation continues work to invest in Atlanta's westside; WABE politics reporter reflects on Speaker Ralston's legacy

Closer Look with Rose Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 48:26


In honor of World Pancreatic Cancer Day, Rose talks with Barbara Washburn, a National Pancreatic Foundation Elise Tedeschi, a co-affiliate chair of PanCAN's Atlanta Affiliate of volunteers. Both women share details about their battle with the disease and discuss efforts to spread awareness.Plus, Danny Shoy, the managing director for Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation's Westside portfolio, discussed new efforts and grants that will be used to invest in the Westside of Atlanta.Lastly, Georgia House Speaker David Ralston died Wednesday, just days after announcing that he would not seek nomination as House Speaker for the upcoming legislative session, citing a "health challenge." WABE politics reporter Rahul Bali discusses Ralston's legacy.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Jennasis Speaks: The Transformative Power of Women's Stories
Moving from Fear to Freedom: Three Time Cancer Survivor Speaks

Jennasis Speaks: The Transformative Power of Women's Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 28:40


Vickie Hogan was a single mom focusing on raising her son, Elec, when the worst news imaginable comes: She has breast cancer. Facing this diagnosis not only once, but three times has helped Vickie grow into the warrior woman she is today. On this week's episode, Vickie shares how she embraced the fear, accepted support, and advocated for herself in the midst of battling cancer.

It Takes Balls
Daniel Ramirez - Testicular Cancer Survivor

It Takes Balls

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 34:39


Daniel Ramirez is a Colorado businessman and a testicular cancer survivor. Daniel talks about being diagnosed at a point in his life where things were moving quickly with his restaurants, being his own advocate, staying active while being treated with BEP, testicular cancer in the hispanic community, and much more!   Want to be a guest? Apply here:   https://www.testicularcancerawarenessfoundation.org/it-takes-balls-submissions  Follow Testicular Cancer Awareness Foundation:  https://www.testescancer.org  https://www.twitter.com/testescancer  https://www.instagram.com/testescancer  https://www.facebook.com/tca.org/  Follow Daniel Ramirez:  https://www.instagram.com/@dramirez__10  Follow Steven Crocker:  https://www.twitter.com/stevencrocker  https://www.instagram.com/stevencrocker  https://www.facebook.com/steven.crocker2

HELLO GORGEOUS!
STAGE 2 CANCER SURVIVOR - LAUREN TARPLEY

HELLO GORGEOUS!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 30:42


Surviving Cancer is hard enough but when you find stage 2 it's alarming.

The Cure with Aimee Cabo
Triple Cancer Survivor

The Cure with Aimee Cabo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 49:22


Triple Cancer Survivor Talking about hope beating cancer, with triple cancer survivor Chad Otar on the latest The Cure Show with Aimee Cabo. Chad Otar is a successful small business owner, president of Lending Valley, a cancer survivor and a contributor to The Green Sheets and Forbes Financial Council. https://www.lendingvalley.com/ Aimee Cabo is a syndicated radio show host of THE CURE on Sirius XM and Truth Network, an award winning Christian author, a coach and a speaker. Godisthecure.com #Godisthecure

Sailing Through Life
Sailing Through Life

Sailing Through Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 1:13


Hello and welcome to Sailing Through Life. I'm Lorie, your host and friend on this journey. Join me, a 2-time cancer survivor and sailor, as I share conversations that give you hope, passion and vision to live a more fulfilled life - even when going through some of life's most challenging times. Discover ways to focus on your health and wellbeing through modifying your habits, improving your self-care routines and practicing mindfulness and meditation. By finding the positive in life and continuing to realize your strength and resilience, you can create the life you desire - living beyond cancer. This supportive community will inspire you through the life experiences of my guests as well as hearing my own crazy, wonderful adventure. Set sail with me on this journey to health, happiness and living your dreams. It's time to feel empowered! It's time to make every choice count! Let us show you how as you Sail Through Life! Welcome Aboard! Find us just about everywhere @sailingthroughlifepodcastHow do you sail through life? Join me on this endeavor! I would love to grow this amazing support community.If you have any thoughts on today's episode, or topics you'd like me to further touch on, reach me through my WEBSITE. Check it out here- SailingThroughLifePodcast.comRemember~ Stay Anchored ⚓Music Credit: Alex_MakeMusic ** Sailing Through Life Podcast is intended to educate, inspire and support you on your personal journey and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. All content is for general informational purposes only. If you are suffering from any psychological or medical conditions, please seek help from a qualified health professional.

The Drew Pearlman Show
A Field Guide for Cancer Survivors with Dr. Amy Rothenberg

The Drew Pearlman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 43:25


Dr. Amy Rothenberg has practiced naturopathic medicine since 1986 and is the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians, 2017 Physician of the Year.  When diagnosed with cancer in 2014, Dr. Rothenberg sought care at a renowned teaching hospital and also added naturopathic doctors who specialize in integrative oncology to create her medical dream team. Her book, You Finished Treatment, Now What? A Field Guide for Cancer Survivors is a roadmap for lifestyle and natural medicine to address health challenges that persist after care, and to reduce risk of recurrence. She enjoys the good life in Western Massachusetts with longtime husband and collaborator, Dr. Paul Herscu. Amy grew up as a kid who wanted to be a doctor, however during her early years, she became disillusioned with conventional medicine and how it failed to help her parents.  She talks about what ultimately drew her into the world of Naturopathic medicine.  It integrated all of her natural interests in one modality. Besides being a doctor, Amy is a three time cancer survivor.  She completed all of her treatments and is feeling healthy and strong; in fact, she just completed a triathlon. As both a patient and a doctor, Amy recognizes that conventional cancer care is lacking in certain important areas.  This lead her to write her new book: You Finished Treatment, Now What? A Field Guide for Cancer Survivors.  She describes it as a “love song” to naturopathic medicine. For years, the American Cancer Society said that one in four people would get cancer.  Now, they say it's one in three and moving toward one in two! A recent study came out that 80% of cancer, diabetes and heart disease is lifestyle preventable.   Amy wants people to feel empowered that they do have power, control and influence over their medical outcomes.  She also wants to help people navigate what to do after they finish their treatment. Amy tells us some of the most powerful lifestyle interventions: exercise; anti-inflammatory diet; stop or minimize alcohol; stop smoking and vaping; manage stress; sleep; community and connection with other people; plus botanical medicines and nutritional supplements. Amy talks about why nature is such good medicine in her life.  She loves spending time in the garden picking flowers and giving away flower bouquets.  She finds it incredibly peaceful and healing. In the end, Amy shares advice from her current self to her younger self and gives the prescription for living a beautiful life! You can learn more about Dr. Amy and her work right here: https://dramyrothenberg.com/ You can order Amy's new book here Today's episode's sponsor is Microbiome Labs.  For the last 9 years, Microbiome Labs has been committed to advancing understanding of the human microbiome. They are at the helm of innovation, putting new formulations and technology in the hands of healthcare practitioners and patients. Among many other novel innovations, MBL can now help improve the gut-brain connection with their ZenBiome Cope and ZenBiome Sleep products.  Maybe it has been a while since you've re-examined your probiotic choices, the science around the microbiome, or novel solutions that are coming out every day. Microbiome Labs will be here, at the forefront of science, continuing to pioneer health in this space. For more about this strain and other gut microbiome products, visit microbiomelabs.com. And, as a special bonus for The Drew Pearlman Show listeners, receive 15% off your total order from Microbiome Labs by using this discount code: https://microbiomelabs.com/shop/?guest=yes&ref=drew APPLE PODCASTS SPOTIFY STITCHER

The Breast Cancer Recovery Coach
#216 People Pleasing and Your Health

The Breast Cancer Recovery Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 29:42


Is there a difference between being a nice person and being a people pleaser?  That is a resounding YES!  What is the difference?  When you do something nice for someone else out of love, compassion, or the desire to serve, it fills you up.  When you do something from a place of people pleasing, it drains you. You do things for others at a cost to yourself.   Typical costs include:  Stress  Insomnia  Anxiety Fear Feelings of inadequacy  Those are high prices to pay, which take a toll on your mental and physical wellness.  In this episode, you'll learn more about what people pleasing is, why you do it, and how to start stopping.  It's a process that's worth the energy.  Referred to in this episode:  Better Than Before Breast Cancer Life Coaching Membership  Becoming You  Can Being a People Pleaser Impact My Mental Health? 

OneMicNite Podcast with Marcos Luis
S3Ep.23 Melissa del Valle Ortiz Cancer Survivor and Outreach Activist Mobilizer with a mission

OneMicNite Podcast with Marcos Luis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 39:36


Make sure you don't miss this episode.. Make sure you don't miss this episode.. Guest: --Contact/Follow Melissa De Valle Ortiz Fb: https://www.facebook.com/public/Melissa-Del-Valle-Ortiz Email: ReadySetOctober@gmail.com *** I grew up in Bayview Houses, Canarsie, and have decade long family roots in Bushwick and Clinton Hills. After graduating Norman Thomas HS in 1988, I married and joined the US Army. Stationed in Seoul, Korea I started my family and took an early leave. Upon my return to Brooklyn and juggling some family issues, I moved to Sunset Park; Where I have raised my children Jeffrey and Victoria, since 1993. In 1994, I was introduced to the non profit sector during my employment with Hispanic Young Peoples Alternatives, Inc. In 1997, I began working as a community organizer with Neighbors Helping Neighbors, Inc. It was there, I began to develop my leadership qualities. As my children grew into young adults, I became more involved with community and cultural issues including: **Affordable/subsidized Housing **Discrimination **Women's Equality **Children's literacy **Civics **Missing persons and more! Thanks for taking the time to get to know more about me! ------** Host: Contact/ Follow Marcos on IG/Fb/IMdb/Twitter/TikTok: @MarcosLuis and www.MarcosLuis.com —Show: OneMicNite Podcast with Marcos Luis Contact/Follow: IG/Fb/Twitter/Tumbler/LinkedIn/Youtube/TikTok @OneMicNite www.OneMicnite.com ------** Music on Audio Podcast: "OMN Theme Song 'Halftime' by Daniel Howse youtube @ProfesorSoraMusic ** Listen to Audio Podcast: Available wherever you download , all digital platforms.. ** -- ***OneMicNite and Marcos Luis have been here since 2006 as with a Home and platform for Indie Artists around the world with our #LiveSeries and now two Virtual podcasts. OnemicNite Podcast wit Marcos Luis and OneMicNiteTalk with Co-Hosts. In 2022 OneMicNite received a NYC Arts Cultural Grant. --- Support Us Now: http://www.Anchor.fm/onemicnite ** Over Veterans Day Weekend, The American Italian Cancer Foundation will be providing FREE Mammograms at the locations on the fliers for Women ages 40-79. No insurance is required and ALL insurances are accepted. Area residents are encouraged to apply but ANY NYC resident can call for this FREE service. If anyone has any questions they may phone me direct at 347 423 5818. Please direct persons to call for an appointment to the number on the flier or pre-screen themselves to be called for an appointment. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/onemicnite/support

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 73 – Unstoppable Visionary and Two-Time Cancer Survivor with Howard Brown

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 76:06


Yes, Howard Brown is a two-time cancer survivor. As you will discover in our episode, he grew up with an attitude to thrive and move forward. Throughout his life, he has learned about sales and the concepts of being a successful entrepreneur while twice battling severe cancer.   Howard's life story is one of those events worth telling and I hope you find it worth listening to. He even has written a book about all he has done. The book entitles Shining Brightly has just been released, but you get to hear the story directly from Howards' lips.   About the Guest: Howard Brown is an author, speaker, podcaster, Silicon Valley entrepreneur, interfaith peacemaker, two-time stage IV cancer survivor, and healthcare advocate. For more than three decades, Howard's business innovations, leadership principles, mentoring and his resilience in beating cancer against long odds have made him a sought-after speaker and consultant for businesses, nonprofits, congregations, and community groups. In his business career, Howard was a pioneer in helping to launch a series of technology startups before he co-founded two social networks that were the first to connect religious communities around the world. He served his alma mater—Babson College, ranked by US News as the nation's top college for entrepreneurship—as a trustee and president of Babson's worldwide alumni network. His hard-earned wisdom about resilience after beating cancer twice has led him to become a nationally known patient advocate and “cancer whisperer” to many families. Visit Howard at ShiningBrightly.com to learn more about his ongoing work and contact him. Through that website, you also will find resources to help you shine brightly in your own corner of the world. Howard, his wife Lisa, and his daughter Emily currently reside in Michigan. About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Hi, and welcome to another episode of unstoppable mindset. Today, we get to interview Howard Brown, I'm not going to tell you a lot because I want him to tell his story. He's got a wonderful story to tell an inspiring story. And he's got lots of experiences that I think will be relevant for all of us and that we all get to listen to. So with that, Howard, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Howard Brown  01:44 Thank you, Michael. I'm really pleased to be here. And thanks for having me on your show. And excited to talk to your audience and and share a little bit.   Michael Hingson  01:54 Well, I will say that Howard and I met through Podapolooza, which I've told you about in the past and event that brings podcasters would be podcasters. And people who want to be interviewed by podcasters together, and Howard will tell us which were several of those he is because he really is involved in a lot of ways. But why don't you start maybe by telling us a little bit about your, your kind of earlier life and introduce people to you and who you are. Sure, sure.   Howard Brown  02:23 So I'm from Boston. I can disguise the accent very well. But when I talked to my mother, we're back in Boston, we're packing a car. We're going for hot dogs and beans over to Fenway Park. So gotta get a soda. We're getting a soda, not a pop. So we add the Rs. They call my wife Lisa, not Lisa. But I grew up I grew up in the suburbs of Boston, a town called Framingham. And I'm a twin. And I'm very unusual. But a girl boy twin, my twin sister Cheryl. She goes by CJ is five minutes older. And I hold that I hold that now against her now that we're older and she didn't want to be older, but now she's my older sister, my big sister by five whole minutes.   Michael Hingson  03:09 Well, she's big sister, so she needs to take care of her baby brother   Howard Brown  03:12 says exactly. And she did. And we're gonna get to that because it's a really important point being a twin, which we'll get to in a second. But so Britta she Where does she live now? So she lives 40 minutes away from me here in Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:25 Oh my gosh, you both have moved out of the area.   Howard Brown  03:27 So she she moved to Albany, New York. I moved to Southern then California, LA area and the beaches, and then Silicon Valley. And then the last 17 years we've all lived close. And we raised our families together here in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:40 What got you to all go to Michigan?   Howard Brown  03:43 Well, for me, it was a choice. My wife is from Michigan, and I was in Silicon Valley. And we were Pat had a little girl Emily, who's four. There's a story there too. But we'll we decided we wanted her to grow up with a family and cousins and aunts and uncles and my in laws live here. My wife grew up here. And this made it closer for my parents and Boston suburbs to get here as well. So great place to raise a family very different from Silicon Valley in Palo Alto, California.   Michael Hingson  04:12 Yeah, but don't you miss Steve's ice cream in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:15 I do. I miss the ice cream. I missed the cannolis in the Back Bay. I missed some of the Chinese food. So in the north end, but it just it I do, but I have not lived there. I went to college there at Babson College number one school for entrepreneurship. And then when I got my first job, I moved out to Ohio but then I moved back and well there's a whole story of why I had to move back as well but we'll get   Michael Hingson  04:41 there. So are your parents still living in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:46 They are and so my dad I call myself son of a boot man. My dad for 49 years has sold cowboy boots in New England in the in the in the western you know the states New York Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts. And that's, you know, anyone who stayed somewhere for 49 years got to be applauded. And he's a straight commission boot salesman and he sold women's shoes prior to that. So he he's, he's a renaissance man.   Michael Hingson  05:15 Wow. So does he sell cowboy boots with snow treads as it were for the winter?   Howard Brown  05:21 No snow trends but, you know, like out west when you're working on, you know, on with cattle and working out west and sometimes it's a fashion statement. Not not too many places in New England like that. But he, he made a living, he enjoyed it. And he's, he's just about to retire at the age of 79. This year.   Michael Hingson  05:39 I remember living in Boston and and when I wear shoes with just leather soles, I slid around a lot on the sidewalks and all that so did get rubber rubbers to go over my boots and then later got real boots.   Howard Brown  05:54 Right. So I have the big hiking boots, the Timberlands, but I too have a pair of a you know, in Boston, we call them rabbits, rabbits, robins. And they basically are slip ons that gave you grip. They slipped right over your leather shoes. And you wore them when anyway in the snow and in those sloshing in the mess. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  06:12 And they worked really well. They did. So you went off to college. And I gather kind of almost right from the beginning you got involved in the whole idea of entrepreneurship.   Howard Brown  06:23 Well, I did I transferred to Babson from a liberal arts school called Connecticut College. I just I found out it wasn't for me and Babson College changed the trajectory of my entire life. i i I knew that I wanted to do sales and then later technology. But Babson was the catalyst for that. They just they support entrepreneurship of all kinds, no matter how you define it, and I just drank it in and I loved, I loved my time there. I love my learning there. And I continue to stay involved with Babson very closely as a past president of the Alumni Association, a former trustee, and very actively recruit students to go there and support student businesses. So it was a big impact on me and I continue to give back to it.   Michael Hingson  07:11 That's pretty cool. So how, how did you proceed as far as a career and entrepreneurial involvement as it were in in sales and all that?   Howard Brown  07:22 So I had an internship, I had wanted cellular one when cellular phones came out and I was basically learning the business. This is really early 1984 And five, and then I got another internship at NCR Corporation if you remember national cash register 120 year old company based out of Dayton, Ohio, and now it's in Atlanta, and it's, it's just not the same company. But I took an internship there a lot of Babson folks work there. And I worked as a trainer, sales installation rep. I trained waitresses, waiters, bartenders, hotel clerks, night audits, how to use cash register computer systems. So I was the teacher and a trainer. And I would, you know, talk to waitresses and waiters and bartenders and say you can make more tips by providing better service. But the way that you do that is you type you the order into a computer, it zaps it to the order station or the back to the back of the house to cook to prepare the foods or for the drinks. And you can spend more time servicing your table which should translate into higher tips. Well, about a third of them said nope, not for me, a third of them were need to be convinced and a third of them are like I'm in. I had a lot of fun doing that. And then after the shift, the either the manager or the owner would come over and they'd give you a savior at a Chinese food restaurant. They give you a poopoo platter to go to take home to your dorm room.   Michael Hingson  08:46 So I had a lot of fun, a lot of fun and a lot of good food.   Howard Brown  08:50 Sure sure. So that's what really started me off and hired me   Michael Hingson  08:55 so did that did that concept of tips and all that and advising people ever get you to translate that to Durgin Park?   Howard Brown  09:03 I actually did install the cashiers to computers area ago Daniel hall so the checkerboard you know draped you know cloth on the table and so you know it's there's a lot of good restaurants in Boston, you know the union Oyster House with a toothpick but I did countless restaurants hotels bars, you know it was I was basically at the whim of the Salesforce and there was a couple of us that went to go train and teach people and take the night shift and make sure everything was going smoothly as they installed the new system of course the no name restaurant and other one but well you know for for your listeners that no name was a place to get, you know, really great discounted seafood but you sat on a park bench. Remember that?   Michael Hingson  09:50 Right? Oh yeah, definitely. It wasn't. Well, neither was Durgin park, but I haven't kept up Is it still there?   Howard Brown  10:00 Yes, I believe it's still there.   Michael Hingson  10:01 Oh, good. I heard somewhere that, that it might not be because of COVID. But we enjoy   Howard Brown  10:07 down it shut down for a while during COVID I hope it's back open. I'm gonna have to go now. Yeah, you're gonna make me go check to see if it's open. But you know, many of them are still there. And obviously restaurants turn over. But that's a mainstay that's got a lot of history.   Michael Hingson  10:19 Oh, it does. And we had a lot of fun with the waitresses and so on at their Compac. I know, once we went there, and you know, the whole story, that Durgan is a place where you sit at family tables, unless we actually have four people then they'll let you sit at one of the tables for for around the outside. Well, there were three of us and my guide dog when we went in one time. And the hostess said, we're gonna put you at one of the tables for for just to give more room for the puppy dog. And she sat us down there. Then the waitress came over and as they are supposed to do at Durgan Park, she said, you're not supposed to sit here. There are only three of you. And I said there's a dog under the table. No, there's not. You can't fool me with that. And the waitress isn't supposed to be snotty, right. And she just kept going on and on about it. And I kept saying there is a dog under the table. She went away. And then she came back a little bit later. And she said, You've got to move and I said no. Why don't you just look, there's a dog under the table. You're not gonna make me fall for that. She finally looked. And there are these Golden Retriever puppy eyes staring back at her. She just melted. It was so much fun.   Howard Brown  11:26 Wouldn't be Boston if you didn't get a little attitude. Well, yeah, that's part of what it's all about your right next seating. And they just they sit you in a and they say, meet each other and be married.   Michael Hingson  11:38 Yeah, yeah. And it was a lot of fun. So how long did it take you to get to Silicon Valley?   Howard Brown  11:44 Well, so the story is that I did. I worked for NCR and I got hired by NCR, but I wanted out of the hospitality business. You know, even though he's young work until two, three in the morning, once they shut the restaurant or bar down or the hotel down, and then you do the night audit and you do the records. It was a hard life. So I looked and I did my research. And I said, you know who's who's making all the money here at NCR in the banking division. And it was really the early days of the outsourcing movement, punch cards, and you're outsourcing bank accounts, over 1200 baud modems. And I said, Well, that's interesting. And so I went to NCRs training at Sugar camp to learn how to be a salesperson were they actually in the early days, they filmed you, they taught you negotiation skills, competitive analysis, Industry Skills, it was fantastic. It's like getting an MBA today. But they did it all in six months, with mixing fieldwork in with, you know, training at this education facility in Dayton, Ohio. And I came out as a junior salesperson working for for very expansive experience, guys. And they just, I knew one thing, if I made them more productive, they'd make me money. And I did. And I, they sent me to banks and savings and loans and credit unions all over New England. And I basically learned the business of banking and outsourcing to these banks. And they made a lot of money. So that was how my career started. You can't do better than that. But to answer the question, because it's a little more complex than that. But it took me NCR in 1988. And then I moved out to Los Angeles in 1991, after a big health scare, which we'll talk about, and then I moved up in 2005. So there's the timeline to get me to Silicon Valley.   Michael Hingson  13:29 So you, you definitely moved around. I know that feeling well, having had a number of jobs and been required to live in various parts of the country when going back and forth from one coast to another from time to time. So you know, it's it's there. So you, you did all of that. And you You ended up obviously making some money and continuing to to be in the entrepreneurial world. But how does that translate into kind of more of an entrepreneurial spirit today?   Howard Brown  14:00 So great question, Michael. So what happened was is that I built a foundation. So at that time when you graduated school, and as far as for technology, the big computer shops like IBM Unisys, NCR, Hewlett Packard, what they did is they took you raw out of college, and they put you through their training program. And that training program was their version of the gospel of their of their products and your competitors and all that. And that built a great foundation. Well, I moved to Los Angeles after this big health scare, which I'm sure we're gonna go back and talk about, and I moved into the network products division. So I didn't stay in the banking division. I looked at the future and said voice data and video. I think there's the future there and I was right and AT and T bought NCR and, unfortunately, this is probably 1992. They also bought McCaw cellular they had just bought all of Eddie computer. They were a big company of five 600,000 employees and I have To tell you, the merger wasn't great. You felt like a number. And I knew that was my time. That was my time where I said, I got my foundation built. It's now time to go to a startup. So your time had come. My time had come. So at&t, offered early retirement for anyone 50 and older, and then they didn't get enough takers. So they offered early retirement for anyone that wanted to change. And so the talk around the watercooler was, let's wait they'll make a better offer. And I was like, I'm 26 and a half years old. I what am I waiting for? So they made a tremendously generous offer. I took early retirement, and I moved to my first true startup called avid technology that was in the production space. And we basically were changing film and television production from analog to digital. And I never looked back, I basically have been with startups ever since. And that, but that foundation I felt was really important that I got from NCR, but I prefer smaller companies and build the building them up from scratch and moving them forward.   Michael Hingson  16:07 Yeah, when you can do more to help shape the way they go. Because the the problem with a larger a lot of larger companies is they get very set in their ways. And they tend not to listen as much as maybe they should to people who might come along with ideas that might be beneficial to them, as opposed to startups as you say,   Howard Brown  16:27 Well, it depends. I mean, you know, you want to build a company that is still somewhat innovative. So what these large companies like Google and Facebook do, and Apple is they go acquire, they acquire the startups before they get too big or sometimes like, it's like what Facebook did with Instagram, they acquired six people, Google acquired YouTube, and they acquire the technology of best of breed technology. And then they shape it, and they accelerate it up. So listen, companies like IBM are still innovative, Apple, you know, is so innovative. But you need to maintain that because it can get to be a bureaucracy, and with hundreds of 1000s of employees. And you can't please everybody, but I knew my calling was was technology startups. And I just, I needed to get that, get that foundation built. And then away away I went. And that's what I've done. Since   Michael Hingson  17:16 you're right. It's all about with with companies, if they want to continue to be successful, they have to be innovative, and they have to be able to grow. I remember being in college, when Hewlett Packard came out with the HP 25, which was a very sophisticated calculator. Back in the the late 19th, early 1970s. And then Texas Instruments was working on a calculator, they came out with one that kind of did a lot of the stuff that HP did. But about that same time because HP was doing what they were doing, they came out with the HP 35. And basically it added, among other things, a function key that basically doubled the number of incredible things that you could do on the HP 25.   Howard Brown  17:58 Right, I had a TI calculator and in high school.   Michael Hingson  18:02 Well, and of course yeah, go ahead HPUS pull reverse Polish notation, which was also kind   Howard Brown  18:09 of fun. Right and then with the kids don't understand today is that, you know, we took typing, I get I think we took typing.   Michael Hingson  18:19 Did you type did you learn to type on a typewriter without letters on the keys?   Howard Brown  18:23 No, I think we have letters I think you just couldn't look down or else you get smacked. You know, the big brown fox jumped over the you know, something that's I don't know, but I did learn but I I'm sort of a hybrid. I looked down once in a while when I'd say   Michael Hingson  18:39 I remember taking a typing course in actually it was in summer school. I think it was between seventh and eighth grade. And of course the typewriters were typewriters, typewriters for teaching so they didn't have letters on the keys, which didn't matter to me a whole lot. But by the same token, that's the way they were but I learned to type and yeah, we learned to type and we learned how to be pretty accurate with it's sort of like learning to play the piano and eventually learning to do it without looking at the keys so that you could play and either read music or learn to play by ear.   Howard Brown  19:15 That's true. And And again, in my dorm room, I had Smith Corona, and I ended up having a bottle of or many bottles of white out.   Michael Hingson  19:25 White out and then there was also the what was it the other paper that you could put on the samosa did the same thing but white out really worked?   Howard Brown  19:33 Yeah, you put that little strip of tape and then it would wait it out for you then you can type over it. Right? We've come a long way. It's some of its good and some of its bad.   Michael Hingson  19:43 Yeah, now we have spellchecker Yeah, we do for what it's worth,   Howard Brown  19:49 which we got more and more and more than that on these I mean listen to this has allowed us to, to to do a zoom call here and record and goods and Bad's to all of that.   Michael Hingson  19:58 Yeah, I still I have to tell people learning to edit. Now using a sound editor called Reaper, I can do a lot more clean editing than I was able to do when I worked at a campus radio station, and had to edit by cutting tape and splicing with splicing tape.   Howard Brown  20:14 Exactly. And that's Yeah, yeah, Michael, we change the you know, avid changed the game, because we went from splicing tape or film and Betamax cassettes in the broadcast studios to a hard drive in a mouse, right? changed, we changed the game there because you were now editing on a hard drive. And so I was part of that in 1994. And again, timing has to work out and we had to retrain the unions at the television networks. And it was, for me, it was just timing worked really well. Because my next startup, liquid audio, the timing didn't work out well, because we're, we were going to try to do the same thing in the audio world, which is download music. But when you do that, when you it's a Sony cassette and Sony Walkman days, the world wasn't ready yet. We we still went public, we still did a secondary offering. But we never really brought product to market because it took Steve Jobs 10 years later to actually sell a song for 99 cents and convince the record industry that that was, you know, you could sell slices of pizza instead of the whole pizza, the whole record out   Michael Hingson  21:17 and still make money. I remember avid devices and hearing about them and being in television stations. And of course, for me, none of that was accessible. So it was fun to to be able to pick on the fact that no matter what, as Fred Allen, although he didn't say it quite this way, once said they call television the new medium, because that's as good as it's ever gonna get. But anyway, you know, it has come a long way. But it was so sophisticated to go into some of the studios with some of the even early equipment, like Avid, and see all the things that they were doing with it. It just made life so much better.   Howard Brown  21:52 Yeah, well, I mean, you're not I was selling, you know, $100,000 worth of software on a Macintosh, which first of all the chief engineers didn't even like, but at the post production facilities, they they they drank that stuff up, because you could make a television commercial, you could do retakes, you could add all the special effects, and it could save time. And then you could get more revenue from that. And so it was pretty easy sale, because we tell them how fast they could pay off to the hardware, the software and then train everybody up. And they were making more and more and better commercials for the car dealerships and the local Burger Joint. And they were thrilled that these local television stations, I can tell you that   Michael Hingson  22:29 I sold some of the first PC based CAD systems and the same sort of thing, architects were totally skeptical about it until they actually sat down and we got them in front of a machine and showed them how to use it. Let them design something that they could do with three or four hours, as opposed to spending days with paper and paper and paper and more paper in a drafting table. And they could go on to the next project and still charge as much.   Howard Brown  22:53 It was funny. I take a chief engineer on to lunch, and I tried to gauge their interest and a third, we're just enthusiastic because they wanted to make sure that they were the the way that technology came into the station. They were they were the brainchild they were the they were the domain experts. So a third again, just like training waitresses and waiters and bartenders, a third of them. Oh, they wanted they just wanted to consume it all. A third of them were skeptical and needed convincing. And a third of whom was like, that's never going out on my hair anywhere. Yeah, they were the later and later adopters, of course.   Michael Hingson  23:24 And some of them were successful. And some of them were not.   Howard Brown  23:28 Absolutely. We continue. We no longer. Go ahead. No, no, of course I am the my first sales are the ones that were early adopters. And and then I basically walked over to guys that are later adopters. I said, Well, I said, you know, the ABC, the NBC and the fox station and the PBS station habit, you know, you don't have it, and they're gonna take all your post production business away from you. And that got them highly motivated.   Michael Hingson  23:54 Yeah. And along the way, from a personal standpoint, somebody got really clever. And it started, of course at WGBH in Boston, where they recognize the fact that people who happen to be blind would want to know what's going on on TV when the dialog wasn't saying much to to offer clues. And so they started putting an audio description and editing and all that and somebody created the secondary audio programming in the other things that go into it. And now that's becoming a lot more commonplace, although it's still got a long way to go.   Howard Brown  24:24 Well, I agree. So but you're right. So having that audio or having it for visually impaired or hearing impaired are all that they are now we're making some progress. So it's still a ways to go. I agree with you.   Michael Hingson  24:36 still a ways to go. Well, you along the way in terms of continuing to work with Abbott and other companies in doing the entrepreneurial stuff. You've had a couple of curveballs from life.   Howard Brown  24:47 I have. So going back to my promotion, I was going driving out to Dayton, Ohio, I noticed a little spot on my cheekbone. didn't think anything of it. I was so excited to get promoted and start my new job. up, I just kept powering through. So a few weeks after I'd moved out to Dayton, Ohio, my mom comes out. And she's at the airport and typical Boston and mom, she's like, What's that on your cheek? What's that on your cheek? And I was like, Mom, it's nothing. I kind of started making excuses. I got hit playing basketball, I got it at the gym or something. And she's like, well, we got to get that checked out. I said, No, Mom, it's okay. It's not no big deal. It's a little little market. Maybe it's a cyst or pebble or something I don't know. So she basically said she was worried, but she never told me. So she helped set up my condo, or an apartment. And then she left. And then as long Behold, I actually had to go speak in Boston at the American Bankers Association about disaster recovery, and having a disaster recovery plan. And so this is the maybe August of 1989. And I came back and that spot was still there. And so my mom told my dad, remember, there was payphones? There was no cell phones, no computers, no internet. So she told my dad, she didn't take a picture of it. But now he saw it. And he goes, Let's go play tennis. There's I got there on a Friday. So on a Saturday morning, we'd go do something. And instead of going to play tennis, he took me to a local community hospital. And they took a look at it. And they said off its assist, take some my antibiotic erythromycin or something, you'll be fine. Well, I came back to see them on Monday after my speech. And I said, I'm not feeling that great. Maybe it's the rethrow myosin. And so having to be four o'clock in the afternoon, he took me to the same emergency room. And he's and I haven't had the same doctor on call. He actually said, You know what, let's take a biopsy of it. So he took a biopsy of it. And then he went back to the weight room, he said, I didn't get a big enough slice. Let me take another. So he took another and then my dad drove me to the airport, and I basically left. And my parents called me maybe three weeks later, and they said, You got to come back to Boston. We gotta go see, you know, they got the results. But you know, they didn't tell us they'll only tell you. Because, you know, it's my private data. So I flew back to Boston, with my parents. And this time, I had, like, you know, another doctor there with this emergency room doctor, and he basically checks me out, checks me out, but he doesn't say too much. But he does say that we have an appointment for you at Dana Farber Cancer Institute at 2pm. I think you should go. And I was like, whoa, what are you talking about? Why am I going to Dana Farber Cancer Institute. So it gets, you know, kind of scary there because I show up there. I'm in a suit and tie. My dad's in a suit down. My mom's seems to be dressed up. And we go, and they put me through tests. And I walk in there. And I don't know if you remember this, Michael. But the Boston Red Sox charity is called the Jimmy fund. Right? And the Jimmy fund are for kids with blood cancers, lymphoma leukemias, so I go there. And they checked me in and they told me as a whole host of tests they're going to do, and I'm looking in the waiting room, and I see mostly older people, and I'm 23 years old. So I go down the hallways, and I see little kids. So I go I go hang out with the little kids while I'm waiting. I didn't know what was going on. So they call me and I do my test. And this Dr. George Canalis, who's you know, when I came to learn that the inventor of some chemo therapies for lymphomas very experienced, and this young Harvard fellow named Eric Rubin I get pulled into this office with this big mahogany desk. And they say you have stage four E T cell non Hodgkins lymphoma. It's a very aggressive, aggressive, very aggressive form of cancer. We're going to try to knock this out. I have to tell you, Michael, I don't really remember hardly anything else that was said, I glossed over. I looked up at this young guy, Eric Rubin, and I said, What's he saying? I looked back out of the corner of my eye, my mom's bawling her eyes out. My dad's looks like a statue. And I have to tell you, I was really just a deer in the headlights. I had no idea that how a healthy 23 year old guy gets, you know, stage four T cell lymphoma with a very horrible prognosis. I mean, I mean, they don't they said, We don't know if we can help you at the world, one of the world's foremost cancer research hospitals in the world. So it was that was that was a tough pill to swallow. And I did some more testing. And then they told me to come back in about a week to start chemotherapy. And so, again, I didn't have the internet to search anything. I had encyclopedias. I had some friends, you know, and I was like, I'm a young guy. And, you know, I was talking to older people that potentially, you know, had leukemia or different cancer, but I didn't know much. And so I I basically showed up for chemotherapy, scared out of my mind, in denial, and Dr. RUBIN comes out and he says, we're not doing chemo today. I said, I didn't sleep awake. What are you talking about? He says, we'll try again tomorrow, your liver Our function test is too high. And my liver function test is too high. So I'm starting to learn but I still don't know what's going on. He says I got it was going to field trip. Field Trip. He said, Yeah, you're going down the street to Newton Wellesley hospital, we're going to the cryogenic center, cryo, what? What are you talking about? He goes, it's a sperm bank, and you're gonna go, you know, leave a sample specimen. And it's like, you just told me that, you know, if you can help me out what why I'm not even thinking about kids, right now. He said, Go do it. He says what else you're going to do today, and then you come back tomorrow, and we'll try chemo. So thank God, he said that, because I deposited before I actually started any chemotherapy, which, you know, as basically, you know, rendered me you know, impotent now because of all the chemotherapy and radiation I had. So that was a blessing that I didn't know about until later, which we'll get to. But a roll the story forward a little more quickly as that I was getting all bad news. I was relapsing, I went through about three or four different cycles of different chemotherapy recipes, nothing was working. I was getting sicker, and they tight. My sister, I am the twin CJ, for bone marrow transplant and she was a 25% chance of being a match. She happened to be 100% match. And I had to then gear up for back in 1990 was a bone marrow transplant where they would remove her bone marrow from her hip bones, they would scrub it and cleanse it, and they would put it in me. And they would hope that my body wouldn't immediately rejected and die and shut down or over time, which is called graft versus host these that it wouldn't kill me or potentially that it would work and it would actually reset my immune system. And it would take over the malignant cells and set my set me back straight, which it ended up doing. And so having a twin was another blessing miracle. You know that, you know, that happened to me. And I did some immunotherapy called interleukin two that was like, like the grandfather of immunotherapy that strengthened my system. And then I moved to Florida to get out of the cold weather and then I moved out to California to rebuild my life. I call that Humpty Dumpty building Humpty Dumpty version one. And that's that's how I got to California in Southern California.   Michael Hingson  32:15 So once again, your big sister savedthe day,   Howard Brown  32:19 as usual.   Michael Hingson  32:21 That's a big so we go,   Howard Brown  32:23 as we call ourselves the Wonder Twins. He's more. She's terrific. And thank God she gave part of herself and saved my life. And I am eternally grateful to her for that,   Michael Hingson  32:34 but but she never had any of the same issues or, or diseases. I gather. She's been   Howard Brown  32:41 very healthy, except for like a knee. A partial knee replacement. She's been very healthy her whole life.   Michael Hingson  32:48 Well, did she have to have a knee replacement because she kept kicking you around or what?   Howard Brown  32:52 No, she's little. She's five feet. 510 So she never kicked me. We are best friends. My wife's best friend. I know. She is just just a saint. She's She's such a giving person and you know, we take that from our parents, but she she gave of herself of what she could do. She said she do it again in a heartbeat. I don't think I'm allowed to give anybody my bone marrow but if I could, would give it to her do anything for her. She's She's amazing. So she gave me the gift, the gift of life.   Michael Hingson  33:21 So you went to Florida, then you moved to California and what did you do when you got out here?   Howard Brown  33:24 So I ended up moving up to northern California. So I met this girl from Michigan in Southern California, Lisa, my wife have now 28 years in July. We married Lisa Yeah, we got married under the Jewish wedding company's wedding canopies called the hotpot and we're looking at the Pacific Ocean, we made people come out that we had that Northridge earthquake in 94. But this is in July, so things are more settled. So we had all friends and family come out. And it was beautiful. We got it on a pool deck overlooking the Pacific. It was gorgeous. It was a beautiful Hollywood type wedding. And it was amazing. So we got married in July of 94. And then moved up to Silicon Valley in 97. And then I was working at the startups. My life was really out of balance because I'm working 20 hours, you know, a day and I'm traveling like crazy. And my wife says, You know what, you got to be home for dinner if we're going to think about having a family. And we're a little bit older now. 35 and 40. And so we've got to think about these things. And so I called back to Newton Wellesley hospital, and I got the specimen of sperm shipped out to San Jose, and we went through an in vitro fertilization process. And she grew eight eight eggs and they defrosted the swimmers and they took the best ones and put them back in the four best eggs and our miracle baby our frozen kids sickle. Emily was born in August of 2001. Another blessing another miracle. I was able to have a child and healthy baby girl.   Michael Hingson  34:58 So what's Emily doing today?   Howard Brown  35:00 Well, thank you for asking that. So, she is now in Missoula, Montana at a television station called K Pax eight Mountain News. And she's an intern for the summer. And she's living her great life out there hiking, Glacier National Park. And she ran I think she ran down to the Grand Tetons and, and she's learning about the broadcast business and reporting. She's a writer by trade, by trade and in journalism. And she likes philosophy. So she'll be coming back home to finish her senior year, this at the end of the summer at the University of Michigan. And so she's about to graduate in December. And she's, she's doing just great.   Michael Hingson  35:35 So she writes and doesn't do video editing us yet using Abbott or any of the evolutions from it.   Howard Brown  35:41 No, she does. She actually, when you're in a small market station, that's you. You write the script, she does the recording, she has a tripod, sometimes she's she films with the other reporters, but when she they sent her out as an intern, and she just covered the, this, you know, the pro pro life and pro choice rallies, she she records herself, she edits on Pro Tools, which is super powerful now, and a lot less expensive. And then, when she submits, she submits it refer review to the news director and to her superiors. And she's already got, I think, three video stories and about six different by lines on written stories. So she's learning by doing, it's experiential, it's amazing.   Michael Hingson  36:23 So she must have had some experience in dealing with all the fires and stuff out at Yellowstone and all that.   Howard Brown  36:31 So the flooding at Yellowstone, so I drove her out there in May. And I didn't see any fires. But the flooding we got there before that, she took me on a hike on the North Gate of Yellowstone. And she's she's, you know, environmentally wilderness trained first aid trained. And I'm the dad, and I'm in decent shape. But she took me out an hour out and an hour back in and, you know, saw a moose saw a deer didn't see any mountain lion didn't see any Grizzlies, thank God, but we did see moose carcass where the grizzly had got a hold on one of those and, and everybody else to get it. So I got to go out to nature weather and we took a road trip out there this summer, it was a blast. It's the those are the memories, when you've been through a cancer diagnosis that you just you hold on to very dearly and very tight. It was a blast. So that's what he's doing this summer. She'll be back. She'll be back in August, end of August.   Michael Hingson  37:22 That's really exciting to hear that she's working at it and being successful. And hopefully she'll continue to do that. And do good reporting. And I know that this last week, with all the Supreme Court cases, it's it's, I guess, in one sense, a field day for reporters. But it's also a real challenge, because there's so many polarized views on all of that.   Howard Brown  37:44 Well, everybody's a broadcaster now whether it's Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and all the other ones out there, tick tock. So everybody's sort of a reporter now. And you know, what do you believe, and unfortunately, I just can't believe in something in 140 characters or something in two sentences. Yeah, there's no depth there. So sometimes you miss the point, and all this stuff. And then everything's on 24 hours on CNN, on Fox on MSNBC, so it never stops. So I call that a very noisy world. And it's hard to process. You know, all this. It's coming at you so fast in the blink of an eye. So we're in a different time than when we grew up, Michael, it was a slower pace. Today in this digital world. It's, it's, it's a lot and especially COVID. Now, are we just consuming and consuming and binging and all this stuff, I don't think it's that healthy.   Michael Hingson  38:36 It's not only a noisy world, but it's also a world, it's very disconnected, you can say all you want about how people can send tweets back and forth, text messages back and forth and so on. But you're not connecting, you're not really getting deep into anything, you're not really establishing relationships in the way that as you point out, we used to, and we don't connect anymore, even emails don't give you that much connection, realism, as opposed to having meaningful dialogue and meaningful conversations. So we just don't Converse anymore. And now, with all that's going on, in the very divided opinions, there's there's no room for discussion, because everybody has their own opinion. And that's it, there's no room to dialogue on any of it at all, which is really too bad.   Howard Brown  39:21 Yeah, I agree. It's been divisive. And, you know, it's, it's hard because, you know, an email doesn't have the body language, the intent, the emotion, like we're talking right now. And, you know, we're expressing, you know, you know, I'm telling stories of my story personally, but you can tell when I get excited, I smile, I can get animated. Sometimes with an email, you know, you don't know the intent and it can be misread. And a lot of that communication is that way. So, you know, I totally get where you're coming from.   Michael Hingson  39:55 And that's why I like doing the podcasts that we're doing. We get to really have conversation isn't just asking some questions and getting an answer and then going on to the next thing. That's, frankly, no fun. And I think it's important to be able to have the opportunity to really delve into things and have really good conversations about them. I learned a lot, and I keep seeing as I do these podcasts, and for the past 20 plus years, I've traveled around the world speaking, of course, about September 11, and talking about teamwork, and trust, and so on. And as I always say, if I don't learn more than I'm able to teach or impart, then I'm not doing my job very well.   Howard Brown  40:35 So that's exactly and that's, that's where I'm going after the second health concern. You know, I'm now going to teach, I'm gonna inspire, I'm going to educate. And that's, that's, that's what I do, I want to do with the rest of my time is to be able to, you know, listen, I'm not putting my head in the sand, about school shootings, about an insurrection about floods about all that. You gotta live in the real world. But I choose, as I say, I like to live on positive Street as much as possible, but positive street with action. That's, that's what makes the world a better place at the end of the day. So you sharing that story means that one we'll never forget. And you can educate the generations to come that need to understand, you know, that point in time and how it affected you and how you've dealt with it, and how you've been able to get back out of bed every day. And I want to do the same.   Michael Hingson  41:26 Well, there's nothing wrong with being positive. I think that there is a need to be aware. But we can we can continue to be positive, and try to promote positivity, try to promote connectionism and conversations and so on, and promote the fact that it's okay to have different opinions. But the key is to respect the other opinion, and recognize that it isn't just what you say that's the only thing that ever matters. That's the problem that we face so much today.   Howard Brown  41:58 Right? Respect. I think Aretha Franklin saying that great. She   Michael Hingson  42:01 did. She did. She's from Motown here. There you go. See? When you moved out to California, and you ended up in Silicon Valley, and so on, who are you working for them?   Howard Brown  42:14 So I moved up, and I worked for this company called Liquid audio that doesn't exist anymore. And it was just iTunes 10 years too early on, there was real audio, there was Mark Cuban's company was called Audio net and then broadcast.com used for a lot of money. And so the company went public and made a lot of money. But it didn't work. The world wasn't ready for it yet to be able to live in this cassette world. It was not ready. I Napster hadn't been invented, mp3 and four hadn't been invented. So it just the adoption rate of being too early. But it still went public a lot. The investors made a ton of money, but they call that failing, failing forward. So I stayed there for a year, I made some money. And I went to another startup. And that startup was in the web hosting space, it was called Naevus. site, it's now won by Time Warner. But at that time, building data centers and hosting racks of computers was very good business. And so I got to be, you know, participate in an IPO. You know, I built built up revenue. And you know, the outsourcing craze now called cloud computing, it's dominated by the folks that like Amazon, and the folks at IBM, and a few others, but mostly, you know, dominated there, where you're basically having lots of blinking lights in a data center, and just making sure that those computers stay up to serve up the pages of the web, the videos, even television, programming, and now any form of communication. So I was, I was early on in that and again, got to go through an IPO and get compensated properly unduly, and, but also my life was out of balance. And so before we were called out for the sperm and had a baby, I transitioned out when Silicon Valley just the pendulum swung the other way, I ended up starting to work at my own nonprofit, I founded it with a couple of Silicon Valley guys called Planet Jewish, and it was still very technologically driven. It was the world's first Community Calendar. This is before Google Calendar, this is in 2000. And we built it as a nonprofit to serve the Jewish community to get more people to come to Jewish events. And I architected the code, and we ran that nonprofit for 17 years. And before calendaring really became free, and very proud of that. And after that, I started a very similar startup with different code called circle builder, and it was serving faith and religions. It was more like private facebook or private online communities. And we had the Vatican as a client and about 25,000 Ministries, churches, and nonprofits using the system. And this is all sort of when Facebook was coming out to you know, from being just an edu or just for college students. And so I built that up as a quite a big business. But unfortunately, I was in Michigan when I started circle builder. I ended up having to close both of those businesses down. One that the revenue was telling off of the nonprofit and also circuit builder wasn't monetizing as quickly or as we needed as well. But I ended up going into my 50 year old colonoscopy, Michael. And I woke up thinking everything was going to be fine. My wife Lisa's holding my hand. And the gastroenterologist said, No, I found something. And when I find something, it's bad news. Well, it was bad news. Stage three colon cancer. Within about 10 days or two weeks, I had 13 and a half inches of my colon removed, plus margins plus lymph nodes. One of the lymph nodes was positive, install a chemo port and then I waited because my daughter had soccer tournaments to travel to but on first week of August in 2016, I started 12 rounds of Rockem sockem chemotherapy called folfox and five Fu and it was tough stuff. So I was back on the juice again, doing chemotherapy and but this time, I wasn't a deer in the headlights, I was a dad, I was a husband. I had been through the trenches. So this time, I was much more of a marine on a mission. And I had these digital tools to reach out for research and for advocacy and for support. Very different at that time. And so I unfortunately failed my chemotherapy, I failed my neck surgery, another colon resection, I failed a clinical trial. And things got worse I became metastatic stage four that means that colon cancer had spread to my liver, my stomach linings called the omentum and peritoneum and my bladder. And I had that same conversation with a doctor in downtown Detroit, at a Cancer Institute and he said, We don't know if we can help you. And if you Dr. Google, it said I had 4% of chances of living about 12 to 18 months and things were dark I was I was back at it again looking looking at the Grim Reaper. But what I ended up doing is research and I did respond to the second line chemotherapy with a little regression or shrinkage. And for that you get more chemotherapy. And then I started to dig in deep research on peritoneal carcinoma which is cancer of the of the of the stomach lining, and it's very tricky. And there's a group called colon town.org that I joined and very informative. I there then met at that time was probably over 100 other people that had had the peritoneal carcinoma, toma and are living and they went through a radical surgery called cytoreduction high pack, where they basically debulk you like a de boning a fish, and they take out all this cancer, they can see the dead and live cells, and then they pour hot chemo in you. And then hot chemo is supposed to penetrate the scanning the organs, and it's supposed to, in theory kill micro cell organism and cancer, although it's still not proven just yet. But that surgery was about a 12 and a half hour surgery in March of 2018. And they call that the mother of all surgeries. And I came out looking like a ghost. I had lost about 60 pounds, and I had a long recovery. It's that one would put Humpty Dumpty back together. It's been now six years. But I got a lot of support. And I am now what's called no evidence of disease at this time, I'm still under surveillance. I was quarterly I just in June, I had my scans and my exams. And I'm now going to buy annual surveillance, which means CAT scans and blood tests. That's the step in the right direction. And so again, I mean, if I think about it, my twin sister saved my life, I had a frozen sperm become a daughter. And again, I'm alive from a stage four diagnosis. I am grateful. I am lucky, and I am blessed. So that's that a long story that the book will basically tell you, but that's where I am today.   Michael Hingson  48:50 And we'll definitely get to the book. But another question. So you had two startups that ran collectively for quite a period of time, what got you involved or motivated to do things in the in the faith arena?   Howard Brown  49:06 So I have to give credit to my wife, Lisa. So we met at the Jewish Federation of Los Angeles at this young leadership group. And then they have like a college fair of organizations that are Jewish support organizations. And one of them happened to be Jewish Big Brothers, now Jewish Brothers and Big Sisters of Los Angeles. Suppose you'd be a great big brother. I was like, well, it takes up a lot of time. I don't know. She's like, you should check it out. So I did. And I became I fill out the application. I went through the background checks, and I actually got to be a Jewish big brother to this young man II and at age 10. And so I have to tell you, one of the best experiences in my life was to become a mentor. And I today roll the clock forward. 29 years in is now close to 40 years old or 39 years old. He's married with a son who's one noble and two wife, Sarah, and we are family. We stayed together past age 18 Seen, and we've continued on. And I know not a lot of people do that. But it was probably one of the best experiences I've ever done. I've gotten so much out of it. Everyone's like, Oh, you did so much for in? Well, he did so much for me and my daughter, Emily calls him uncle and my wife and I are we are his family, his dad was in prison and then passed away and his mom passed away where his family now. And so one of the best experiences. So that's how I kind of got into the Jewish community. And also being in sales I was I ended up being a good fundraiser. And so these nonprofits that live their lifeblood is fundraising dollars. I didn't mind calling people asking them for donations or sitting down over coffee, asking them for donations. So I learned how to do that out in Southern California in Northern California. And I've continued to do that. So that gave me a real good taste of faith. I'm not hugely religious, but I do believe in the community values of the Jewish community. And you get to meet people beyond boards and you get to raise money for really good causes. And so that sort of gave me another foundation to build off of and I've enjoyed doing that as a community sermon for a long time.   Michael Hingson  51:10 I'll bite Where does Ian live today?   Howard Brown  51:13 Okay, well, Ian was in LA when we got matched. I had to move to San Francisco, but I I petitioned the board to keep our match alive because it was scholarship dollars in state right. And went to UC Santa Cruz, Florida State for his master's and got his last degree at Hastings and the Jewish community supported him with scholarships. And in was in very recently was in San Francisco, Oakland area, and now he's lives in South Portland, Oregon.   Michael Hingson  51:39 Ah, so you haven't gotten back to Michigan yet? Although he's getting into colder weather. So there's a chance?   Howard Brown  51:45 Well, let me tell you, he did live with us in Michigan. So using my connections through the Jewish community, I asked if he could interview with a judge from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals a friend of mine, we sat on a on a board of directors for the American Jewish Committee, Detroit. And I said, she's like, well, Howard, I really have to take Michigan kids. I said, You know what? No problem. You decide if he's if he's worthy or not go through your process, but would you take the phone call? So she took the phone call, and I never heard anything. And then Ian called me and he said, I got it. I as a second year loss. Going to be a second year law student. I'm going to be clerking for summer interning and clerking for this judge Leanne white. And again, it just it karma, the payback, it was beautiful. So he lived with us for about four and a half months. And when he came back, and it was beautiful, because Emily was only about four or five years old. And, and he lived with us for that time. And it was beautiful.   Michael Hingson  52:43 But that's really great. That, that you have that relationship that you did the big brother program. And I'm assuming you've been big brother to other people as well.   Howard Brown  52:53 No, no. I have not actually. Because what it did is it trained me to be a dad. So when I had Emily, it was more it was more difficult actually to do that. And so no, Ian has been my one and only match. I mentor a lot of Babson students, and I mentor and get mentored by some cancer patients and, and some big entrepreneurs. Mentorship is a core value of mine. I like to be mentored. And I also like to mentor others. And I think that's, that's what makes the world go round. So when Steve Gates when Bill Gates, his wife, Melinda, just donated 123 million to the overall arching Big Brothers, Big Sisters of America. And that money will filter to all those, I think that that's such a core value. If a young person can have someone that takes interest in them, they can really shape their future and also get a lot out of it. So mentorship is one of my key values. And I hope it's hope it's many of your viewers and yours as well. Michael,   Michael Hingson  53:52 absolutely is I think that we can't do anything if we can't pass on what we've learned and try to help other people grow. I've been a firm believer my entire life of you don't give somebody a fish, you teach them how to fish and however, and wherever that is, it's still the same thing. And we need to teach and impart. And I think that in our own way, every one of us is a teacher and the more we take it seriously, the better it is.   Howard Brown  54:18 Well, I'm now a student not learning podcasting. I learned how to be a book author and I'm learning how to reinvent myself virgin Humpty Dumpty, version two coming out.   Michael Hingson  54:29 So you had been a national cancer survivor advocate and so on. Tell me a little bit about that if you would.   Howard Brown  54:35 So I respect people that want to keep their diagnosis private and their survivorship private. That's not me. I want to be able to help people because if I would have been screened at age 40 or 42, I probably wouldn't have had colon cancer and I was not, but this is a preventable disease and really minorities and indigenous people as they need to get screened more, because that's the highest case of diagnosis for colorectal cancer. But what I think that that's what his needs now it's the second leading killer of cancer right now. And it's an important to get this advocacy out and use your voice. And so I want to use my voice to be able to sound the alarm on getting screening, and also to help people survive. There's I think, 16 million growing to 23 or 4 million by 2030. Cancer survivors out there, cancer diagnosis, it sucks sex all the way around, but it affects more than the patient, it affects your caregiver, it affects your family affects relationships, it affects emotions, physical, and also financial, there is many aspects of survivorship here and more people are learning to live with it and going, but also, quite frankly, I live with in the stage for cancer world, you also live with eminence of death, or desperation to live a little bit longer. You hear people I wish I had one more day. Well, I wish I had time to be able to see my daughter graduate high school, and I did and I cherished it. I'm going to see her graduate college this December and then walk at the Big House here in Michigan, in Ann Arbor in May. And then God willing, I will walk her down the aisle at the appropriate time. And it's good to have those big goals that are important that drive you forward. And so those are the few things that drive me forward.   Michael Hingson  56:28 I know that I can't remember when I had my first colonoscopy. It's been a while. It was just part of what I did. My mother didn't die of colon cancer, but she was diagnosed with colon cancer. She, she went to the doctor's office when she felt something was wrong. And they did diagnose it as colon cancer. She came home my brother was with her. She fell and broke her hip and went into the hospital and passed away a few days later, they did do an operation to deal with repairing her hip. And but I think because of all of that, just the amount that her body went through, she just wasn't able to deal with it. She was 6970. And so it was no I take Yeah, so I was just one of those things that that did happen. She was 71, not 70. But, you know, we've, for a while I got a colonoscopy every five years. And then they say no, you don't need to do it every five years do it every 10 years. The couple of times they found little polyps but they were just little things. There was nothing serious about them. They obviously took them out and autopsy or biopsy them and all that. And no problems. And I don't remember any of it. I slept through it. So it's okay.   Howard Brown  57:46 Great. So the prep is the worst part. Isn't it though? The preps no fun. But the 20 minutes they have you under light anesthesia, they snipped the polyps and away you go and you keep living your life. So that's what I hope for everyone, because I will tell you, Michael, showing through the amount of chemotherapy, the amount of surgeries and the amount of side effects that I have is, is I don't wish that on anyone. I don't wish on anyone. It's not a good existence. It's hard. And quite frankly, it's, I want to prevent about it. And I'm just not talking about colon cancer, get your mammogram for breast cancer, get your check for prostate cancer, you know, self care is vital, because you can't have fun, do your job, work Grow family, if your hell if you're not healthy, and the emotional stuff they call the chemo brain or brain fog and or military personnel refer to it as PTSD. It's real. And you've got to be able to understand that, you know, coming from a cancer diagnosis is a transition. And I'll never forget that my two experiences and I I've got to build and move forward though. Because otherwise it gets dark, it gets lonely, it gets depressing, and then other things start to break down the parts don't work well. So I've chosen to find my happy place on the basketball court be very active in sounding the alarm for as an advocate. And as I never planned on being a book author and now I'm going to be a published author this summer. So there's good things that have come in my life. I've had a very interesting, interesting life. And we're here talking about it now so I appreciate it.   Michael Hingson  59:20 Well tell me about you in basketball seems to be your happy place.   Howard Brown  59:24 So everyone needs to find a happy place. I'll tell you why. The basketball court I've been playing since I was six years old and I was pretty good you know, I'm not gonna go professional. But I happen to like the team sport and I'm a point guard so I'm basically telling people what to do and trash talk and and all that. But I love it a

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I'm Dying to Tell You
How Cancer Changed Their Lives for the Better: Michael & Ashlee Cramer

I'm Dying to Tell You

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 42:58


In this episode, hear 21 year old Michael Cramer who was given just eight months to live share his journey on beating a rare and aggressive blood cancer.  At age 19, Michael had been an athletic, healthy teenager.  He was a surfer and sailor, rarely sick and had never been hospitalized.  A routine blood test led to a life-changing cancer diagnosis.  After Michael was diagnosed with Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma (HSTCL)  Michael and his mom Ashlee Cramer were terrified.  They knew Michael might not survive and could only have just eight months to live.  That was in July 2020.  Now Michael is inspiring others who are going through health hardships.  Although Michael has some major challenges as a result of his treatments, he and his Mom are reaching out and helping so many others.  This beautiful momma/son team talk cancer, share how this tragedy changed their lives for the better, and gave them the courage to motivate and inspire others.  From the beginning, Michael and his mom have embraced sharing their experience and the lessons they have learned on social media through Instagram and TikTok.   Recently they tell their story in more depth, from both perspectives on their podcast , called Michael and Mom Talk Cancer.  Michael still has a long recovery road ahead, but is now in full remission and is sharing his miraculous journey to let others know they are loved and not alone.  Thank you for listening and sharing with a friend.  Hugs, Lorri

The Firehouse Logbook Podcast
Episode 52: Kitchen Worker, Fire Chief, State FM, and Cancer Survivor - Julius Halas

The Firehouse Logbook Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 47:02


Julius Halas is a 48 year veteran of the fire service, starting out as a firefighter in Sarasota, FL and working his way up to Fire Chief, then consolidating his way out of a job - one of the most humble, team focused, and mission driven people I have ever had the chance to meet. Ultimately rising the to the position of Director of the State Fire Marshals Office, Julius retired in the same city where it all began when I met with him last week at the Florida Fire Marshals and Inspectors Association as he passed the baton to his successor. Support this podcast at https://patreon.com/firehouselogbookpodcast Comments or suggestions? Contact us at: Email - FirehouseLogbook@gmail.comTwitter - @FDLogbookInstagram - @FDLogbookPodcastFacebook - www.facebook.com/FDLogbookPodcastWebsite - www.firehouselogbook.captivate.fm Music: "Tired traveler on the way to go home", Andrew Codeman via Freemusicarchive.com

Sailing Through Life
Crossing Your Wake: Another New Day Two Years Later

Sailing Through Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 14:11


Today's episode is a bonus episode  - my first ever!Crossing your wake: another new day…two years later.Crossing your wake is a nautical term to describe how you have gone around and looped over your original starting point of your journeyWell this is the two-year anniversary of the podcast and it's not as grand as circumnavigating the world but it is worth mentioning after two years and 86 episodes. It's time to celebrate!So travel back in time with me, back to November 2020Back to the beginning...How do you sail through life? Join me on this endeavor! Support the show here.  I would love to grow this amazing support community.If you have any thoughts on today's episode, or topics you'd like me to further touch on, reach me through my WEBSITE. Check it out here- SailingThroughLifePodcast.comStay Anchored ⚓Music Credit: Alex_MakeMusic  ** Sailing Through Life Podcast is intended to educate, inspire and support you on your personal journey and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. All content is for general informational purposes only. If you are suffering from any psychological or medical conditions, please seek help from a qualified health professional.

The Breast Cancer Recovery Coach
#215 When Thinking Positive Isn't Useful

The Breast Cancer Recovery Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 27:42


“Look at the brightside.”  “Think positive.”  “It's not all bad.”  How many times have you thought or been told to think like this when the words just fell flat in front of you?  There are a lot of great things about having a positive attitude and a positive mindset. But, if the positive thought is something that isn't true for you, it's not going to be very useful in helping you move forward in your life, experience the change you need or process the emotions you're going through.  Worse yet, just thinking positive when you don't feel it can throw you into a shame spiral of judging yourself for not thinking the way you think you should be thinking!  Ugh! So meta! ; )  In this episode, I'll help you understand the difference between positive thinking and useful thinking.  I'll offer you two questions that you can apply to the way you're thinking that will move you closer to thinking in a useful way.  Meaning a way of thinking that will move you forward while allowing you to feel everything you need to feel without guilt or shame.  Referred to in this episode: 90 Days of Wellness Better Than Before Breast  Cancer Life Coaching Membership  

Wings Of...Inspired Business
Chaos of the Unknown: Entrepreneur Brittany Driscoll on Taking the Leap from the C-Suite

Wings Of...Inspired Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 43:32


Brittany Driscoll is the co-founder and CEO of Squeeze, a unique massage experience from the founders of Drybar. As DryBar CMO, she took the hair ‘blowout' phenom from $30M to more than $100M in revenue, and as an entrepreneur, cancer survivor, and wellness advocate, Brittany has a strong passion for supporting other women in business. Today she shares what it's like transitioning from the C-suite to scrappy startup founder, the secrets of great marketing and customer success, her vision of a “feel good revolution” and why we all have the ability to change the world for good.