Podcasts about Roosevelt

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Best podcasts about Roosevelt

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Latest podcast episodes about Roosevelt

Composers Datebook
Korngold writes a symphony

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 2:00


Synopsis On today's date in 1972, almost two decades after its premiere, Erich Wolfgang Korngold's Symphony in F-sharp received its first successful concert performance by the Munich Philharmonic led by Rudolf Kempe. A recording was made with the same performers, supervised and produced by the composer's son, George Korngold. Korngold had died in 1959, so was not able to enjoy the eventual success of this major work. He completed his Symphony in 1950, and its Austrian Radio premiere in 1954 had been a disaster. As the composer himself put it: “The performance, which was an execution in every sense of the term, took place under the most unfavorable conditions imaginable, with inadequate rehearsals and an exhausted and overworked orchestra.” Korngold had become an American citizen during the 1940s, and dedicated his Symphony to the memory of America's wartime President, Franklin D. Roosevelt. The postwar European premiere of his Symphony came at a time when shifting tastes in music made his late-Romantic style seem hopelessly old-fashioned to many of critics of that day. “More corn than gold” was one dismissive appraisal of his style. These days, Korngold's music – including his Symphony –make more frequent, better-played, and eagerly welcomed appearances on concert programs. Music Played in Today's Program Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897 – 1957) — Symphony, Op. 40 (Philadelphia Orchestra; Franz Welser-Most, cond.) EMI 56169

This Day in History Class
FDR establishes the modern Thanksgiving holiday - November 26th, 1941

This Day in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 10:58


On this day in 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a bill officially declaring that the Thanksgiving holiday would occur every year on the fourth Thursday in November. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

New Books Network
Marc Gallicchio, "Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 82:52


Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks or so earlier, in the wake of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. In the end, the surrender itself fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made that it be "unconditional," as had been the case with Nazi Germany in May, 1945.  Though readily accepted as war policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945, popular support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. The ending of the war in Europe spurred calls in Congress, particularly among anti-New Deal Republicans, to shift the American economy to peacetime and bring home troops. Even after the atomic bombs had been dropped, Japan continued to seek a negotiated surrender, further complicating the debate. Though this was the last time Americans would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued at home through the 1950s and 1960s, when liberal and conservative views reversed, and particularly in Vietnam and the definition of "peace with honor." It remained controversial through the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary and the Gulf War, when the subject revived. In Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II (Oxford UP, 2020), which publishes in time for the 75th anniversary of the surrender, Bancroft Prize co-winner Marc Gallicchio offers a narrative of the surrender in its historical moment, revealing how and why the event unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur, who would effectively become the leader of Japan during the American occupation. It also reveals how the policy underlying it remained controversial at the time and in the decades following, shaping our understanding of World War II. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Marc Gallicchio, "Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 82:52


Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks or so earlier, in the wake of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. In the end, the surrender itself fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made that it be "unconditional," as had been the case with Nazi Germany in May, 1945.  Though readily accepted as war policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945, popular support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. The ending of the war in Europe spurred calls in Congress, particularly among anti-New Deal Republicans, to shift the American economy to peacetime and bring home troops. Even after the atomic bombs had been dropped, Japan continued to seek a negotiated surrender, further complicating the debate. Though this was the last time Americans would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued at home through the 1950s and 1960s, when liberal and conservative views reversed, and particularly in Vietnam and the definition of "peace with honor." It remained controversial through the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary and the Gulf War, when the subject revived. In Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II (Oxford UP, 2020), which publishes in time for the 75th anniversary of the surrender, Bancroft Prize co-winner Marc Gallicchio offers a narrative of the surrender in its historical moment, revealing how and why the event unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur, who would effectively become the leader of Japan during the American occupation. It also reveals how the policy underlying it remained controversial at the time and in the decades following, shaping our understanding of World War II. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in History
Marc Gallicchio, "Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 82:52


Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks or so earlier, in the wake of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. In the end, the surrender itself fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made that it be "unconditional," as had been the case with Nazi Germany in May, 1945.  Though readily accepted as war policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945, popular support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. The ending of the war in Europe spurred calls in Congress, particularly among anti-New Deal Republicans, to shift the American economy to peacetime and bring home troops. Even after the atomic bombs had been dropped, Japan continued to seek a negotiated surrender, further complicating the debate. Though this was the last time Americans would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued at home through the 1950s and 1960s, when liberal and conservative views reversed, and particularly in Vietnam and the definition of "peace with honor." It remained controversial through the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary and the Gulf War, when the subject revived. In Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II (Oxford UP, 2020), which publishes in time for the 75th anniversary of the surrender, Bancroft Prize co-winner Marc Gallicchio offers a narrative of the surrender in its historical moment, revealing how and why the event unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur, who would effectively become the leader of Japan during the American occupation. It also reveals how the policy underlying it remained controversial at the time and in the decades following, shaping our understanding of World War II. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in East Asian Studies
Marc Gallicchio, "Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 82:52


Signed on September 2, 1945 aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay by Japanese and Allied leaders, the instrument of surrender formally ended the war in the Pacific and brought to a close one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history, one that had cost the lives of millions. VJ―Victory over Japan―Day had taken place two weeks or so earlier, in the wake of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the entrance of the Soviet Union into the war. In the end, the surrender itself fulfilled the commitment that Franklin Roosevelt had made that it be "unconditional," as had been the case with Nazi Germany in May, 1945.  Though readily accepted as war policy at the time, after Roosevelt's death in April 1945, popular support for unconditional surrender wavered, particularly when the bloody campaigns on Iwo Jima and Okinawa made clear the cost of military victory against Japan. The ending of the war in Europe spurred calls in Congress, particularly among anti-New Deal Republicans, to shift the American economy to peacetime and bring home troops. Even after the atomic bombs had been dropped, Japan continued to seek a negotiated surrender, further complicating the debate. Though this was the last time Americans would impose surrender unconditionally, questions surrounding it continued at home through the 1950s and 1960s, when liberal and conservative views reversed, and particularly in Vietnam and the definition of "peace with honor." It remained controversial through the ceremonies surrounding the 50th anniversary and the Gulf War, when the subject revived. In Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II (Oxford UP, 2020), which publishes in time for the 75th anniversary of the surrender, Bancroft Prize co-winner Marc Gallicchio offers a narrative of the surrender in its historical moment, revealing how and why the event unfolded as it did and the principle figures behind it, including George C. Marshall and Douglas MacArthur, who would effectively become the leader of Japan during the American occupation. It also reveals how the policy underlying it remained controversial at the time and in the decades following, shaping our understanding of World War II. Grant Golub is a PhD candidate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of American grand strategy during World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

An Epidemic of World Lawlessness

"To the Best of My Ability"

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 23:21


In 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt inherits a nation amidst The Great Depression, but around the world, fascist powers gain footholds. FDR begins to shape foreign policy through a series of addresses that connect the American people to the president in an unprecedented way, threading the needle between readying the nation for war and appeasing isolationists. This week's episode, hosted by Museum Historian Dr. Stephanie Hinnershitz and produced by Digital Content Manager Bert Hidalgo, examines the lead-up to World War II through the lens of American policy as FDR attempts to prepare a nation for war. Referencing the dangers the Axis powers contained and threatened humanity as a whole, the title for this week's episode comes from FDR's 1937 speech following reports of brutality by Japanese troops in China.

Playmaker's Corner
Playmaker's Corner Episode 85: Week 13 Recap and 1A/2A Championship Picks

Playmaker's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 148:15


Kodey, Mazen, and Simon work together to get you the recap you deserve as the Colorado football season inches closer and closer to an end with so many tantalizingly close games and great matchups staring us down this weekend including state championships on the 1A and 2A level! Time Stamps: 0:00-0:00:22 Intro 0:00:22-3:30 Cherry Creek vs. Regis Jesuit 3:31-6:27 Valor Christian vs. Columbine 6:28-11:57 A Valor Record Falls and a Legacy is Remembered 11:58-24:39 Grandview vs. Ralston Valley 24:40-39:55 Legend vs. Arapahoe 39:56-42:56 Valor vs. Grandview Picks 42:57-45:15 Cherry Creek vs. Legend 45:25-47:08 Montrose vs. Fountain Fort-Carson 47:09-51:34 Dakota Ridge vs. Chatfield 51:35-1:03:25 Pine Creek vs. Loveland 1:03:26-1:15:02 Palmer Ridge vs. Erie 1:15:03-1:16:33 Montrose vs. Erie Picks 1:16:34-1:18:43 Chatfield vs. Pine Creek Picks 1:18:54-1:22:49 Mead vs. Durango 1:22:50-1:25:47 Fort Morgan vs. Fredrick 1:25:48-1:28:37 Roosevelt vs. Holy Family 1:28:38-1:29:53 Lutheran vs. Palisade 1:29:54-1:31:39 Lutheran vs. Fort Morgan Picks 1:31:40-1:33:47 Roosevelt vs Mead Picks 1:34:00-1:58:10 Eaton vs. University 1:58:11-2:00:48 Brush vs. Severance 2:00:49-2:03:35 2A Championship Predictions 2:03:45-2:13:12 Limon vs. Wray 2:13:13-2:18:33 Centauri vs. Buena Vista 2:18:34-2:23:55 1A Championship Preview and Predictions 2:23:56-2:27:57 Playmakers of the Week and Outro https://linktr.ee/PlaymakersCorner Social Media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/PlaymakerCorner Tik Tok: Playmakers Corner Instagram: https:https://www.instagram.com/playmakerscorner/?hl=en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PlaymakerCorner Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUEcv0BIfXT78kNEtk1pbxQ/featured Listen to us on: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4rkM8hKtf8eqDPy2xqOPqr Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-cycle-365/id1484493484?uo=4 Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/the-cycle-365 Google Podcasts: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9mODg4MWYwL3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz

Sports Curious
How To Survive The Awkward Holiday Moments

Sports Curious

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 5:15


Steer clear from a flare-up at the Thanksgiving table by avoiding these conversation minefields and diverting to a safer (and dare we say sportier?) one. 1. For any conversation involving politics Plenty of political and Hollywood icons once ran the sidelines. Samuel L. Jackson, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Meryl Streep and four former U.S.A. Presidents (Eisenhower, Roosevelt, Reagan and George W. Bush) all had spirit. We'd be remiss if we didn't mention the marching band. In college, you would've found Halle Berry, Steven Spielberg, Alan Greenspan and Lionel Richie entertaining you in formation at halftime. Much safer than venturing into the political minefield at the dinner table.   2. When grandma asks you why you're not married…for the 10th time—that day. Tell grandma that a long-lasting marriage isn't a sure bet, but you know what is? The Detroit Lions and Dallas Cowboys (NFL - National Football League) taking the field on Thanksgiving. The Thanksgiving tradition started for the Lions in 1934 and 1966 for the Cowboys. So regardless of whether you're cheering for the winless Lions or the first-place Cowboys, one thing you can count on is these teams to play while you nap off your meal.   3. Your dog-obsessed aunt joins you for Thanksgiving lunch and brings her dog that she feeds from the table. For the dog who doesn't earn the title of best showing at the table, there's still hope to claim the title of "Best in Show." Thanksgiving also doubles as the date of the National Dog Show. And just like your uncle, who avoids anything with Cheez-Whiz, the judges have high standards too. They're not only looking for a dog with defined features, correct gait and fitness level but a happy dog that enjoys the competition, so each dog's expression and general demeanor receive extra scrutiny. 4. Your little sister keeps taking selfies, and all you can think about is how full you are. Be thankful you don't have to pass a post-meal jiggle test. Some NFL team's cheer coaches conduct "jiggle tests" to assess the firmness of the cheerleaders' bodies during the season, and if they don't pass the test, they're benched. During a regular-season many make, on average less than $10/hour. With practices, appearances and games, they put in 30-40 hour weeks during the season, but most are required to have a full-time job elsewhere. 5. When your sibling throws a dinner roll at you (You know it's going to happen no matter how old you are). Don't get caught up in the heat of the moment, unlike Kelly Stafford. Kelly Stafford and her QB husband, Matt, are new additions to the LA Rams roster this year. Matt and his team took a beating in last week's Monday Night Football game against the San Francisco 49ers. During the game, Kelly threw a pretzel at a taunting opposing fan. A neighboring Rams fan called her out on it, and she later apologized for her bad behavior on Instagram. Links: Five things you never knew about NFL cheerleaders: https://lastnightsgame.com/podcast/2019/11-nfl-cheerleaders

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 11-19-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 5:50


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for November 19th, 2021. It's known for its festive Christmas markets but health officials in Germany say they could be heading for a terrible Christmas. New measures were approved yesterday to rein in record infections and some German states are considering mandatory vaccinations for some professional groups like medical staff. Again, it is good to be Pfizer. The U.S. government will pay the company $5.29 billion for 10 million courses of its potential COVID treatment if regulators authorize it. That's about $529 per course if you're doing the math. The President said in a statement the treatments “will be easily accessible and free,” although the taxpayers just paid $5.29 billion. Still, these treatments have been repeatedly called potential game changers. Unvaccinated Army soldiers are starting to get their marching orders. They will not be allowed to re-enlist or be promoted. This also applies to reservists and National Guardsmen. 28% of the entire U.S. Army is not yet fully vaccinated. New research shows the pandemic has brought on an "emerging public health concern" of people losing their sense of smell. Like, for a long time. The estimate is between 700,000 and 1.6 million people in the US who had COVID have lost or had a change in their sense of smell that has lasted more than 6 months, and that's likely an underestimate. They say some may never regain it. Why is the sense of smell lost? Scientists have no idea. If you don't like needles or humans, have we got a story for you. A Canadian startup has built a vaccine robot that can dose you in the arm without a needle or any human help. You use an app to register with the robot, prove your identity by holding an ID card in front of its camera, the robot arm retrieves the vaccine and uses a sensor to find your arm, then injects the vaccine using a brief, high-pressure jet of fluid with no needle. If it detects you have COVID at the time, it starts yelling Danger Will Robinson. Okay that last part isn't true. In the United States cases were up 23%, deaths are down 13%, and hospitalizations are down 1% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since November 3. The five states that had the most daily deaths per 100,000 are Wyoming, Montana, West Virginia, Idaho, and Kentucky. There are 9,279,227 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: New Hampshire 45%, Michigan 37%, Minnesota 36%. Rhode Island 32%. And New Mexico 31%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Nome Census Area, AK. Big Horn, MT. Dodge, MN. San Juan, NM. Scurry, TX. Grant, NM. Mason, MI. Wadena, MN. Roosevelt, MT. And Shiawassee, MI. There have been at least 768,684 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 72.2%, Rhode Island unchanged at 71.8%, and Maine unchanged at 71.6%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia unchanged at 41.5%, Wyoming unchanged at 45%, and Alabama at 45.6%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is unchanged at 58.9%. Globally, cases were up 15% and deaths were flat over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 19,646,839 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 99,146. Germany 64,164. The U.K. 46,807. Russia 37,374. And Poland 24,882. There have been at least 5,131,160 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Beaver State Podcast
Episode 76B: Coastal elk

Beaver State Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 36:36


ODFW's North Coast District Wildlife Biologist Paul Atwood covers the basics of Oregon's coastal Roosevelt elk. They're quite a bit different than their Cascade relatives, and hunting them in the rugged, wet Oregon Coast Range is a very different kind of adventure. 

Beaver State Podcast
Episode 76A: Cascade Elk

Beaver State Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 46:36


There are two main populations of Roosevelt elk in Oregon, the coastal Roosevelt and the Cascade Roosevelt. Cascade Roosevelt elk tend to act a little more like Rocky Mountain elk due to the landscapes they inhabit. ODFW's Big Game Manger Brian Wolfer talks about the biology, life history strategy and thoughts around hunting these Roosevelt elk in the Cascade Mountains. 

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. - On Leadership and Pearls of Life with Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmann (Part 2)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 20:10


In the second part of this Oncology, Etc. episode Drs. Patrick Loehrer (Indiana University) and David Johnson (University of Texas) continue their conversation with Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmann, exploring the prominent leadership roles she held, from first female Chancellor at UCSF to CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and member of Facebook's Board of Directors. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts | Additional resources: education.asco.org | Contact Us Air Date: 11/18/21   TRANSCRIPT SPEAKER 1: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. PAT LOEHRER: Hi, Everybody. I'm Pat Loehrer. I'm director of the Centers of Global Health at Indiana University, Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center. DAVE JOHNSON: And I'm Dave Johnson. I'm Professor of Medicine here at UT Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, Texas. So Pat, we're back for another episode of the award winning "Oncology Et Cetera." PAT LOEHRER: Just seems like last month we were here time, you know? Time just flies. DAVE JOHNSON: Exactly. Before we get started, you were telling me about an interesting book you were reading-- something about friends or something. Can you elaborate? PAT LOEHRER: Sure, sure, yeah. This book I picked up-- actually, my wife picked it up. It's called First Friends. It's written by Gary Ginsburg. It's a really interesting book. It was-- basically talks about-- it probably has about eight or nine presidents but the importance of having a friend that guides him. And these were people that were, in many ways, unelected people that were close to the presidents that helped change the face of what we see today, and some of them are stories of really good friends and some of them are, I think, opportunistic friends. But it gives you a background of people like Madison and Lincoln and Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson. It's actually a fun read. DAVE JOHNSON: I'll definitely put it on my reading list. It sounds like a pretty exciting one. Well, speaking of influential people, we're really excited to jump back into our interview with Dr. Helman. In our last episode, we covered her early life and career, her work in Uganda, her views on global oncology, and her experiences in private practice and industry. In the next half of our interview, we'll learn more about her incredible career and her multiple leadership roles. Let's start by hearing about her time as chancellor of UCSF. PAT LOEHRER: Let me transition a little bit. What I'd like to do is talk a little bit about your leadership. One Of the next big roles you had, you became chancellor at UCSF, correct? SPEAKER 2: Mm-hm. PAT LOEHRER: And so as Dave said, I think you were the first woman in that role. SPEAKER 2: I was. PAT LOEHRER: You were a groundbreaker from that capacity. So now instead of working for people-- obviously, I understand that there's people you work for when you're chancellor too, but tell a little bit about that transition from industry back into academics and how that felt in the role of being a leader and then maybe the responsibility of being the first female chancellor. SPEAKER 2: There were parts of being the chancellor at UCSF, I would say most parts of it, that I just thought were fantastic. I loved being back at a hospital and clinics. Just the way the hospital and clinical enterprise at UCSF works, the chancellor is the board. And so once a month, you'd have neurology or cardiology come and tell you about what had happened, quality control, things that had gone on and I would have done that all day long. I mean, it was just so interesting. It was so important to run a great clinical enterprise that getting back closer to patients and medicine I thought was fantastic. The other thing was the educational enterprise, and UCSF, as you know, has medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, nursing. I always tell people, no undergraduates, no English majors, no marching band. And the other chancellors reminded me, no athletic director, which apparently is a very good thing. So UCSF is a very special and unusual place. And I loved the science. I would show up at research seminars and things like that as often as I could. So there were so many parts of being at UCSF that I thought were just off the charts great. The hardest thing about being at UCSF-- being the first female chancellor, I think, was challenging but not in ways that you might expect. I was used to being a woman leader in medicine and biotech, which was unusual. So being the only woman in the room, being the first, wasn't new to me. But the thing that was hard on our family was there are roles for the spouse of the chancellor that fit more neatly into more of a classic female role, hosting things. There was a tea party for the wives of the faculty that the wife of the chancellor typically had. And for some reason, Nick didn't think that that suited him. We sort of laughed about that. DAVE JOHNSON: He can't make tea? SPEAKER 2: He can't make tea to save his life. And he's a strong introvert, which made it worse. I will tell you, some of the under-recognized, underreported people in life are spouses of chancellors and presidents of universities. And talk about unpaid labor-- my goodness! And so we sort of struggled with how did Nick show up, what did that look like. Because we didn't have any role models for what that looked like. I still laugh that Bill Clinton said he would be First Laddie. So when you have a pattern recognition, life is easier. And then being one of 10 chancellors at the UC system, I struggled a little bit with the UC Regents just because it felt-- I became chancellor in 2009, and we had some fiscal realities that we were dealing with. And the pace of the UC Regents and the format of the UC Regents, I actually made a proposal for UCSF to kind of break off from the other 9. And that was not well-received, got me in the newspaper. And I did not do that again. People saw it as disloyal and not very smart. But all in all, I thought then and think now that our public universities are absolutely-- they're treasures in America. And I was really proud to be a part of it and hope that I had made a contribution. DAVE JOHNSON: Speaking of leadership, what was it like to be CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation? What caused you to step away from chancellor to philanthropy? PAT LOEHRER: It's not a step down. It's not a step down, basically. DAVE JOHNSON: It is not a step down. SPEAKER 2: So I would say a couple of things. First of all, Bill and Melinda pushed me hard to take the job. I was not looking to change. My husband worked at the Gates Foundation for a couple of years on HIV. So they knew us, and they knew Nick better than me. But they knew both of us. We awarded Melinda the University medal at UCSF. And to my great surprise and happiness, she accepted and came. I later think that she was using that as a reason to talk to me about the CEO job, but she got a twofer. And I was really compelled by the mission. Who wouldn't be? I was really compelled by the mission and the chance to get back into global health after the experience I had had in Uganda. But I'll tell you, it is the ambition of the Gate Foundation, the scope of the Gates Foundation, the resources, and the need to get something done. I tell you, it is hard work. It is really hard work-- from China to India to all of the continent of Africa and then US education. Throw that in on top of things. So I was thrilled to be a part of driving the agenda and the mission. Some really talented people who are working very hard at the Gates Foundation-- I was surprised, especially on US education, with the amount of pushback. And I worked really hard to be successful at working with Bill, who's known as a tough character and lived up to that mutation. DAVE JOHNSON: Good to know, just in case he calls Pat or me. PAT LOEHRER: Yeah, yeah, I'm not going to get a medal at UCSF either. So that's a-- DAVE JOHNSON: You never know, Pat. PAT LOEHRER: It's a non-starter. And this may not apply to you, but there's a lot of maybe disproportionate number of women who feel they suffer from this imposter syndrome. To be honest, Dave and I have talked about that. We both feel in that syndrome too. But along the way, I mean, if you think about growing up in Reno, Nevada, and suddenly now being a chancellor and head of the Gates Foundation, the National Academy of Science, was there ever this sense of the, wait a minute, you know, what's going on? Is this real? SPEAKER 2: For me, there has always been that sense. There has always been that sense, and I look at it as I hope there always will be that sense-- that the kind of need to demonstrate your value. And there's a part of the imposter syndrome that is humility and not overestimating what you can do. And so on my best days, I think that leads me to say I've got to work with really terrific people. My job is to bring out the best in others. If I lead, it's because there's a great thing we're going to accomplish, and I can help people see where we're going together. And so I definitely have had imposter syndrome. But the one thing that I probably overused and kind of grew to like too much was the thing of people underestimating me and then proving them wrong. That gets a little wearying after a while. It's like, OK, we're going to waste some time while you decide whether I'm worthy or whether I can do this. And let's not waste that time. Why don't you assign to me-- give me some confidence, and I'll live up to that. And I mentioned Art Levinson was my boss for most of the time I was at Genentech. And he had no time for imposter syndrome. He was like, look, how many promotions do you have to get before you think, OK, I can get this done? He thought that was sort of-- he just didn't have time for it. We have things to do, and he had jobs to get done. And one of the things I loved about him is he would constantly push me to say, you're capable of more than you think you are, which I think is the sign of a fantastic manager, which he was and is. And so I've tried to push myself to do that. And the thing is, like, you can do this. Come to me for help. We'll make sure you succeed, but don't underestimate yourself. And I think that's a consequence of imposter syndrome is both wasting time proving yourself and not taking on something that you think, actually, let me give that a try and stack the deck in favor of succeeding. And so I think that's the thing that-- there's a certain fierceness that I've always had that I like about myself that, like, of course we will succeed. Failure is not an option. Of course we will succeed. And I think that comes from working on things that I value a lot and care about a lot. PAT LOEHRER: You have been on a number of different boards, including Pfizer as well as Facebook. And in that capacity, you've seen a lot of leaders. Can you talk a little bit about the strengths and the weakness of various leaders as well as serving on the boards and the capacities of the different companies? SPEAKER 2: Yeah, well, first, let me say I know ASCO is actually a really good about being careful about conflicts of interest and things like that, and I am too. So when I became chancellor at UCSF and then CEO at the Gates Foundation, I avoided being on life sciences boards. And so I got asked a lot by Biotech and pharma boards to be on their boards. Initially, I joined Procter Gamble's board, where I served for, I think, about six years. And then I joined Facebook's board. And those were both fantastic experiences. And I actually joined the boards for two very different reasons. One, P&G's board, I wanted to learn about branding and consumers. And I felt like in medicine, I didn't really learn about consumers or branding as much as I needed to or might. And then Facebook's board I joined because as Dave mentioned, I was with Charles Sawyers. We wrote the precision medicine report for the National Academy. And I really love-- to this day, I love the concept of using the social network to connect people. There was sort of an infamous story or famous story-- it's actually a good story-- of patients with a certain form of myeloma who found each other on Facebook and went to Genentech and said, make a new medicine for those of us with this genetic abnormality. And we'll all enroll in a trial. And so these connections to me felt really powerful on precision medicine. And so getting to work with CEOs at Procter and Gamble, the CEO Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook, I do see the really different attributes of leaders. But when you're a board member, you see those attributes of leaders with a very different lens. What's the return to shareholders? How does the community think about them? What's the impact-- and increasingly for Facebook, what's the impact on the world? What's the impact on our social discourse and our ability to have a free and fair election? A lot of those things became much more operative on the Facebook board while I was on the board and really tough social issues that continue to this day. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah, so we could go on for another hour, hour and a half, but I have one question to ask you which may seem a little bit silly in retrospect. But if you could look back on your youthful self at 21 or 22 knowing what you know now, with all the things that you've done during the course of your career, what advice would you give yourself? And perhaps I'll addend that by saying what advice would you give particularly to young women in the medical profession who are trying to balance that work-life balance that everyone talks about and worries about and struggles with, quite frankly. SPEAKER 2: I'll give you one thing I should have done better and one thing that I think I did well. So the advice on the one thing I should have done better, I think slow down a little bit and take a bit more time for fun and enjoyment. I was extremely worried about money when I was in college, and being number two of seven-- every summer, I worked. I remember at one point in medical school, I had three weeks off, and I got a job for those three weeks at a deli making sandwiches. And I went to college for three years, crammed it into three years so I wouldn't have to pay for the fourth year. So I just think that I could have taken on more loans. I could have done some things to just dial it down a bit because you don't get those years back. And that's such a great time of your life when you're 21, 22, something like that. So I wish I'd have just slowed down a bit and not been so driven for those seven years of university and medical school that I really just either worked or studied all the time. The thing that I feel like I did well, and I would say this to anybody who's going into medicine, is there's so many opportunities. There's so many wonderful things to do. But whoever your spouse is, whoever your partner in life is, take the time and energy to make sure that's the right person for you. I feel so blessed. Actually, my husband, who I've mentioned several times in this discussion, Nick, was my roommate in San Francisco when I was an intern, like real roommate. And we've been roommates ever since. And we're very compatible. He's one of seven kids too. It's another Catholic school kid. And we just have fun together and support each other. And there's no way I could have taken these crazy jobs or done the kinds of things I've done without Nick. So having a wonderful, supportive partner makes everything better. DAVE JOHNSON: That definitely resonates with Pat and me. We're both very blessed to have wives and spouses of, for me, it's 52 years. I can't remember, Pat. Yours is close. PAT LOEHRER: I had my first date with my wife 50 years ago, yeah. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah. SPEAKER 2: OK, so you guys know what I'm talking about. PAT LOEHRER: Absolutely. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah. PAT LOEHRER: Yeah. DAVE JOHNSON: Go ahead, Pat. PAT LOEHRER: I was going to ask a question that you probably may have already answered there, but Bob Woodward just came out of an interview with Colin Powell. One of the last questions he asked him was if he could reflect on that one person that was a moral compass for him. And so for you, that one person, alive or dead, that has been not the most powerful person you've met but the one that's really influenced you the most in terms of giving you direction, who would that be for you? SPEAKER 2: Probably, if I look at through line the entire time I've been alive, it would be my dad. He had the ability to look at a room and find the person who was struggling and go over to them. And I really loved that about my dad. PAT LOEHRER: I love it. DAVE JOHNSON: One last question. So we're at the top of the hour, and I know you're a very busy person. Pat and I love to read, but we're also documentary fiends and whatnot. We're interested. What have you read recently that really resonated with you? Do you have a recommendation for us? SPEAKER 2: I will say during the pandemic, I've gotten back into reading biographies, which I love. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah. SPEAKER 2: So I did the Caro, Lyndon Baines Johnson, which, Master of the Senate is really good. But my favorite book of the last two years is The Code Breaker, Walter Isaacson's book about Jennifer Doudna. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah. SPEAKER 2: One of the things I love about Walter Isaacson is he teaches you science through his biographies. Like, I think I understand relativity based on his Einstein biography, which is great. But The Code Breaker is really super good. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah, we both read it. We couldn't agree with you more. PAT LOEHRER: Love it. Love it. DAVE JOHNSON: So Sue, again, it's been a real honor to have you as our guest, and we really appreciate the time you've taken. Thank you so much, and we hope you enjoy the beautiful weather in Alamo California, and I hope it does turn green and the rain continues for you. SPEAKER 2: Thank you so much. It's been my pleasure. Thank you both. DAVE JOHNSON: Take care. SPEAKER 2: Bye. DAVE JOHNSON: I want to take the moment to thank our listeners for tuning in to "Oncology Et Cetera," an ASCO educational podcast where Pat and I really will talk about anything and everything. So if you have an idea or a topic you'd like to share with us and like for us to pursue, please email us at education@asco.org. Thanks again, and keep in mind that Pat is a giant in oncology, but he's a short instructor. Thanks, everybody. SPEAKER 1: Thank you for listening to this week's-- to make us part of your weekly routine, click Subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive e-learning center at elearning.asco.org.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 11-18-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 5:48


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for November 18th, 2021. The US administration was counting on making businesses their enforcers for vaccination mandates. But the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is suspending said enforcement as ordered by the courts. OSHA had originally given employers with more than 100 employees until January 4 to comply under threat of thousands of dollars in fines. U.S. taxpayers are paying drugmakers billions of dollars to scale up domestic production, but not for the U.S. It's to ship out to other countries that have had poor access to vaccines. The U.S. has been criticized by the World Health Organization for moving ahead with booster shots when many countries have not had enough initial doses. Looks like we might have to re-set our list of which states are most fully vaccinated, because they might change the meaning of fully vaccinated. The U.S. is considering that and several European nations are already moving toward not counting you as fully vaccinated unless you've had a second shot of J&J or a third shot of Pfizer and Moderna. For example, by December 15, anyone over 65 in France needs a booster to revalidate their vaccination pass. And in Austria, full vaccination status expires after nine months from your last dose. How is the child vaccination effort going? The White House says about 10% of eligible kids aged 5 to 11 have gotten a dose of Pfizer since it was approved for them. That was about two weeks ago. It's more than three times faster than the adult vaccination rate when they first became available. Do you ever wonder if other people have been worrying about the same things you've been worrying about during the pandemic? A 19-country study of global helplines has revealed what most people have had anxiety over. Mostly, it's been fear of infection, loneliness, and concerns about overall physical health. Calls about relationship and money problems, as well as suicide-related issues were less prevalent than before the pandemic. The researchers were struck by how the worries were the same across nations. In the United States cases were up 23%, deaths are down 13%, and hospitalizations are down 3% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since November 3. The five states that had the most daily deaths per 100,000 are Wyoming, Montana, West Virginia, Idaho, and Kentucky. There are 9,239,157 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: New Hampshire 38%, Michigan 35%, Minnesota 34%. Rhode Island 30%. And Illinois and New Mexico 28%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Nome Census Area, AK. Big Horn, MT. Dodge, MN. San Juan, NM. Scurry, TX. Grant, NM. Mason, MI. Wadena, MN. Roosevelt, MT. And Shiawassee, MI. There have been at least 767,432 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 72.2%, Rhode Island at 71.8%, and Maine at 71.6%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia at 41.5%, Wyoming at 45%, and Alabama unchanged at 45.5%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 58.9%. Globally, cases were up 15% and deaths were flat over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 19,470,876 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 104,702. Germany 60,753. The U.K. 38,263. Russia 36,626. And Poland 24,239. There have been at least 5,122,852 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The American Idea: FDR, the Election of 1932, and the Birth of New Deal America with John Moser | Documents and Debates (#16)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Jeff welcomes Dr. John Moser, Professor of History and the Chair of the Department of History and Political Science at Ashland University, to talk about the rise of Franklin Roosevelt and the origins of his radical presidency. John and Jeff will examine these topics through a fascinating and engaging conversation on Roosevelt’s 1932 campaign speech, […]

The President's Inbox
The AUKUS Pact, With Michael Fullilove

The President's Inbox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 32:22


Michael Fullilove, executive director of the Lowy Institute in Sydney, sits down with James M. Lindsay to discuss the trilateral security agreement that Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States signed in September 2021, and the broader state of affairs in the Indo-Pacific.   Articles, Documents, and Speeches Mentioned in the Podcast   China's dossier of fourteen disputes with Australia via The Sydney Morning Herald, November 18, 2020   Natasha Kassam, Lowy Institute Poll 2021, Lowy Institute, June 23, 2021   “Remarks by President Biden, Prime Minister Morrison of Australia, and Prime Minister Johnson of the United Kingdom Announcing the Creation of AUKUS,” The White House, September 15, 2021   Jake Sullivan, “2021 Lowy Lecture,” delivered virtually at the Lowy Institute, November 11, 2021   Books Mentioned   Michael Fullilove, Rendezvous with Destiny: How Franklin D. Roosevelt and Five Extraordinary Men Took America into the War and into the World (2013)

Playmaker's Corner
Playmaker's Corner Episode 83: ‘21 Week 12 Colorado Football Recap

Playmaker's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 157:17


On this episode Simon recaps the 12th week of the 2021 Colorado football season. He talks about every playoff game this past week (including a 2A rant), and then predicts every playoff game with Kodey and Mazen. 0:00-1:16 Intro 1:17-3:13 Valor Christian vs Fort Collins 3:14-17:22 Columbine vs Arvada West 17:23-21:37 Valor Christian vs Columbine Prediction 21:38-23:29 Grandview Vs Mullen 23:30-24:20 Ralston Valley vs Cherokee Trail 24:21-26:52 Grandview vs Ralston Valley Predictions 26:53-27:17 Cherry Creek vs Mountain Vista 27:18-29:03 Regis Jesuit vs Pomona 29:04-33:48 Cherry Creek vs Regis Jesuit Predictions 33:49-34:36 Legend vs Rock Canyon 34:37-35:31 Arapahoe vs ThunderRidge 35:32-38:47 Legend vs Arapahoe Predictions 38:48-39:35 Montrose vs Denver south 39:36-59:14 Fountain Fort Carson vs Golden 59:15-1:03:25 Fountain Fort Carson vs Montrose Predictions 1:03:26-1:05:12 Palmer Ridge vs Pueblo West 1:05:13-1:06:00 Erie vs Fruita Monument 1:06:01-1:08:09 Palmer Ridge vs Erie Predictions 1:08:10-1:13:40 Dakota Ridge vs Longmont 1:13:41-1:14:28 Chatfield vs Ponderosa 1:14:29-1:16:05 Dakota Ridge vs Chatfield Predictions 1:16:06-1:16:55 Pine Creek vs Bear Creek 1:16:56-1:17:33 Loveland vs Vista Ridge 1:17:34-1:20:05 Pine Creek vs Loveland Predictions 1:20:06-1:22:04 Roosevelt vs Thomas Jefferson 1:22:05-1:22:57 Holy Family vs Pueblo South 1:22:58-1:24:44 Roosevelt vs Holy Family Predictions 1:24:45-1:26:11 Durango vs Evergreen 1:26:12-1:28:12 Mead vs Northridge 1:28:13-1:29:24 Durango vs Mead Predictions 1:29:25-1:30:00 Fort Morgan vs Green Mountain 1:30:01-1:30:31 Frederick vs Pueblo county 1:30:32-1:31:55 Fort Morgan vs Frederick Predictions 1:31:56-1:32:52- Lutheran vs Discovery Canyon 1:32:53-1:33:44 Palisade vs Pueblo East 1:33:45-1:35:30 Lutheran vs Palisade Predictions 1:35:31-1:36:31 Eaton vs Elizabeth 1:36:32-1:37:34 University vs Delta 1:37:35-1:42:45 Eaton vs University Predictions 1:42:46-1:44:00 Brush vs Resurrection Christian 1:44:00-2:22:02 Severance vs TCA 2:22:03-2:24:32 Severance vs Brush Predictions 2:24:33-2:25:50 Limon vs North Fork 2:25:51-2:26:54 Wray vs Florence 2:26:55-2:27:29 (CORRECTION Severance and Brush predictions for Kodey and Mazen) 2:27:30-2:28:56 Limon vs Wray Predictions 2:28:57-2:29:54 Centauri vs Yuma 2:29:55-2:32:11 Buena Vista vs Meeker 2:32:12-2:34:10 Buena Vista vs Centauri Predictions 2:34:20-2:35:57 Player of the Week

Every Heart Every Woman Radio
EHEW Episode 165 - Tarah Butler Jones - Getting Back on Track

Every Heart Every Woman Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 24:12


About Host, Karla Nivens: After graduating from Texas Tech University, Karla earned her teaching certificate and began her career as an elementary music teacher in the Dallas Independent School District. She also sang for Grammy award-winning Gospel recording artists Kirk Franklin, CeCe Winans, Fred Hammond, Donnie McClurkin, Crystal Lewis, Willie Neal Johnson, John P. Kee, Alvin Slaughter, Tamela Mann, and Michael Buble'. She's traveled the world and ministered to diverse audiences in music. During her travels, she had the opportunity to sing on the Jay Leno Show, Soul Train, the Stellar Awards, and the Billy Graham Crusade with Kirk Franklin. She took a hiatus while staying at home with her children for several years and re-entered the workforce as a worship leader at Highland Park United Methodist Church. Karla has worshipped with Highland Park for the past 17 years. Currently, Karla is building the Racial Justice ministry for Highland Park UMC. Karla has also served as an adjunct instructor for Visible Music College and in 2014 released a CD entitled “True Worship.” Five years ago a good friend suggested she turn her heart toward fulfilling the Great Commission. Karla began traveling on yearly mission trips to Costa Rica and Africa. On those trips the Lord began to awaken the motto He gave her in college – “Influencing Culture for the Good of the Kingdom.” As an answer to this awakening, Karla and Dr. Roosevelt founded Karla Nivens Entertainment. Under this umbrella, Karla partnered with Love Ministries, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, started a small group for women, and a radio show both titled “Every Heart Every Woman.” Karla encourages her audience to quiet the noise and restore balance in their daily lives through inspirational entertainment. The show airs Sundays as a podcast on iTunes and Podbean weekly. The show also airs in video on YouTube. In 2019, Karla released her book, True Leaders with Heart, packed with weekly meditations for leaders.

Farrier Focus Podcast
Interview with Dennis Manning, CJF

Farrier Focus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 63:27


In this episode, we talk with Certified Journeyman Farrier Dennis Manning of Roosevelt, Utah. He shares his beginnings as a farrier, lessons he learned from studying with Dr. Doug Butler, the beginnings of the AFA and the history of certification from his years of being on the certification committee, stories from his career of shoeing horses, his interest in making tools, guns, and hobbles. He also shares valuable insights into how farriers learn from his years as a teacher and principal. You'll gain great insight from this farrier legend who has been shoeing horses for more than 45 years.

Lowy Institute: Live Events
2021 Lowy Lecture — Jake Sullivan, US National Security Adviser

Lowy Institute: Live Events

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 60:30


The Lowy Institute is delighted to invite you to attend the virtual 2021 Lowy Lecture, to be delivered by US National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan. Mr Sullivan is one of the sharpest and most influential policymakers in the world and a trusted adviser to Joe Biden, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Mr Sullivan will speak on the Biden administration's foreign and security policies in an era of pandemics, growing climate risk and competition with China and Russia. His Lowy Lecture will be followed by an extended Q&A with Lowy Institute Executive Director Dr Michael Fullilove. The Lowy Lecture is the Lowy Institute's flagship annual event, at which a prominent speaker reflects on Australia and the world. Past Lecturers have included German Chancellor Angela Merkel, UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, author and broadcaster Fareed Zakaria, and three Australian prime ministers, including Scott Morrison. Jake Sullivan is the National Security Adviser to US President Joe Biden. Mr Sullivan served as Senior Foreign Policy Adviser to Hillary Clinton's 2016 election campaign, National Security Adviser to Vice President Joe Biden, Director of Policy Planning at the US Department of State, and Deputy Chief of Staff to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. In 2017, Mr Sullivan served as the Lowy Institute's Distinguished International Fellow. Dr Michael Fullilove AM is the Executive Director of the Lowy Institute. He writes widely on global affairs in publications such as The New York Times, The Atlantic and Foreign Affairs. Dr Fullilove is the author of several books, including Rendezvous with Destiny: How Franklin D. Roosevelt and Five Extraordinary Men Took America into the War and into the World (Penguin).

Out of Bounds with Bo Bounds
November 10, 2021 - Kyle Morris

Out of Bounds with Bo Bounds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 23:53


Former Florida Gators quarterback Kyle Morris, owner of Live Oaks Golf Club, joins the show on the Bell's Two Hearted Ale guest line talking SEC football. Kyle gives his thoughts on the tumultuous season for head coach Dan Mullen. Kyle discusses what's going wrong for his Gators, and whether or not he believes Mullen can right the ship long-term at Florida. Kyle discusses the new age of college football, from the recruiting boom to NIL deals, and talks about how that's impacting the game. Finally, Kyle talks about the unique things going on at Roosevelt's and The Reed House at Live Oaks as golf winds down and wedding season kicks into high gear.

Out of Bounds with Bo Bounds
November 10, 2021 - Hour 3

Out of Bounds with Bo Bounds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 44:14


Bo and Blake are talking college football and NFL live in the BankPlus Studio in hour three of the show. Bo talks Aaron Rodgers being fined from the NFL for not being vaccinated. They talk how Rodgers doesn't care what the NFL or public thinks of him because he isn't going to change for them. The guys also talk how the NFL rules are crazy because players can be fined more for not tucking in their jersey like CeeDee Lamb. In the SEC Insider Hit, Former Florida Gators quarterback Kyle Morris, owner of Live Oaks Golf Club, joins the show on the Bell's Two Hearted Ale guest line talking SEC football. Kyle gives his thoughts on the tumultuous season for head coach Dan Mullen. Kyle discusses what's going wrong for his Gators, and whether or not he believes Mullen can right the ship long-term at Florida. Kyle discusses the new age of college football, from the recruiting boom to NIL deals, and talks about how that's impacting the game. Finally, Kyle talks about the unique things going on at Roosevelt's and The Reed House at Live Oaks as golf winds down and wedding season kicks into high gear.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 11-10-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 4:53


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for November 10th, 2021. Pfizer's ready for booster shots for all adults, but are U.S. regulators? The request is in to allow anyone 18 and older to get boosters of the Pfizer vaccine. Up to now just older Americans and groups especially vulnerable to the virus have had access to dose number three. The FDA says it will move quickly on the expansion if warranted. A big change in Britain. All health care staff who work with the public will now have to be vaccinated starting in April, even if that means thousands of desperately needed healthcare workers might quit their jobs. More than 100,000 health workers are currently unvaccinated there. Quick, do you know how many different COVID vaccines there are now? Well, if you're just counting the ones approved for emergency use by the World Health Organization, there's now eight. The latest one is called COVAXIN, and it's been assessed for quality, safety, and efficacy. It sure is good to be the pharmaceutical company Merck. The U.S. government is going to buy another $1 billion worth of its COVID-19 pill. That's after a $1.2 billion purchase agreed to in June. The drug, called molnupiravir, has been shown to halve the chances of dying or being hospitalized for those most at risk of severe COVID if given early in the illness. Every desperate incentive to get people vaccinated has been offered so this will come as no surprise. A brothel in Austria is offering a free, uh, “fling” with the prostitute of your choice if you get the shot right there at the bordello. The only drawback is you have to be in the mood on Mondays from 4 to 10pm. One happy customer said, “I would have gotten vaccinated anyway.” Uh huh. In the United States cases were up 5%, deaths are down 15%, and hospitalizations are down 13% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending flat since October 25. The five states that had the most daily deaths per 100,000 are Wyoming, Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and West Virginia. There are 9,153,680 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Utah 40%, New Mexico 21%, Arizona 13%, and Colorado and Nebraska 12%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Lincoln, WV. Nome Census Area, AK. Humboldt, NV. Bethel Census Area, AK. Grant, NM. Wadena, MN. San Juan, NM. Carbon, UT. Roosevelt, MT. And Holt, NE. There have been at least 757,230 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 71.7%, Rhode Island at 71.4%, and Connecticut at 71.1%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia unchanged at 41.1%, Wyoming unchanged at 44.4%, and Alabama at 45.1%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 58.4%. Globally, cases were up 10% and deaths were up 1% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 18,721,788 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 72,358. Russia 39,160. The U.K. 33,117. Germany 28,986. And Turkey 28,662. There have been at least 5,063,295 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Drea’s Point of View
Why women dress so provocatively

Drea’s Point of View

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 5:27


Intro from @nikkos_ramone. Outro from @lifeofloganpodcast. Transcription created on Nov 7, 2021 at 12:00:05 AM My good friend Roosevelt on the X and Y show did an episode recently asking if men should have control over the way women dressed . I listen to that episode and we both agreed that he should not. we agreed that they dress provocatively especially when they're in a relationship or married. he said that women love attention and no real man would allow his woman to dress like that. I came back with Some men actually like their women or prefer the women to dress the way they do especially if they get some form of breast enhancement. Welcome to Drea's Point of View. I am your hostess Drea. if you are a new listener welcome and if yours is a listener welcome back I want you to hit that subscribe button so you can get that double dose of me every week. Please make sure you follow me on Instagram and Facebook at drea's point of view As well as on Twitter at Drea point. I thought about it and said well men love attention too. They walk around in fitted suits, muscle shirts , they get tatted up and they drive around in cars that have the top down with music blasting they have their pants sagging down so what's the difference . I thought about doing an episode like who wants more attention but thought that It would be more interesting to learn why some women dress the way they do since I see a lot of a woman dressing leaving nothing to the imagination especially when they are with men not when they're alone. The journal personality and individual differences Machiavelli says They seek central attention and narcissism relax the need for attention and then it's also been said that daddy issues play apart. iIt's when they were not loved as children so they see the need for that as an adult. attention seeking behavior is caused by loneliness or lack of self-esteem. Part of the reason for the lack of attire has to do with histrionic personality disorder. when you feel unappreciated, when you are not getting enough attention. It pertains to narcissism where are you may dress or act a certain way especially like in the workplace. I know back in the day my dad used to buy most of the clothes for my mom and Jim wearing that stuff when they went out he may have bought certain stuff for her to wear in the house but that's a different Story. I want to leave you with a quote from Muhammad Ali you must not lose faith in humanity. humanity is like an ocean If a few drops of the ocean are dirty , the ocean does not become dirty. make sure you go to www.therdreaspointofviee.com catch up on my episodes give me review buy some merchandise even buy me a coffee. thanks so much for listening. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dreaspointofview/message

Snow Files
S3-EP40: Q&A: The Twin Blue Line - Isaac Gaston - Alternative Suspect

Snow Files

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 32:02


Bruce, Tam and Lesley discuss alternative suspect Isaac "Ike" Gaston. Isaac “Ike” Gaston was a dead ringer for Gutierrez's composite, and he lived within a mile of the crime. He also had a long criminal history spanning some 40 years which included violence - such as assault, burglary, robbery, and sexual misconduct with a minor. Even while Gaston was awaiting sentencing for another charge in county jail, he assaulted four correctional officers in a vile way. 10 years ago, we only had Isaac's picture, and no other information. But thanks to a few social media leads, we learned his name and later discovered his identity, and subsequent police reports related to tips for Gaston. As for how he was cleared of the murder, that's anyone's guess. Tune in to Season 3 of Snow Files when we explore alternative suspects that were never revealed at the trial. Music Credits: Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/ (https://www.epidemicsound.com/) Ghosts Everywhere, Experia YouTube Audio Library: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music (https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music) Theme Song: Black Moons, The 126ers The Lone Woodlouse - Rachel K. Collier Support Documents Leads: http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/L-25-A.pdf (25-A) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/L-27-A.pdf (27-A) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/L-29-A.pdf (29-A) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/L-34-A.pdf (34-A) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/L-107-A.pdf (107-A) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/L-160-A.pdf (160-A) Newspaper Articles: http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/Newspaper-Gaston-1973-1994.pdf (Pantagraph 1973-1994) Graphics: http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/Graphics.pdf (Route from N. and S. Roosevelt to Clark Oil & Gutierrez Composite Compared to Gaston (1989)) Support this podcast

The Retrospectors
On This Day: Roosevelt's Panamanian Photoshoot

The Retrospectors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 9:17


Presidential diplomacy now routinely involves hundreds of trips on Air Force One - but, until Theodore Roosevelt travelled to inspect the Panama Canal on 9th November, 1906, no serving US President had ever ventured abroad.It was the biggest infrastructure project a President had ever undertaken, costing hundreds of millions of dollars and tens of thousands of lives. To reassure Americans he was at the helm, Roosevelt was photographed sitting atop a steam shovel, wearing a pristine white suit.In this episode, Arion, Rebecca and Olly reveal the most recent President to remain ‘at home' throughout his Presidency; consider whether Roosevelt had ADHD; and explain why one of George H W Bush's foreign trips inadvertently inspired the Japanese to create a new word for vomiting. Further Reading:• ‘7 Little-Known Legacies of Teddy Roosevelt' (HISTORY, 2020): https://www.history.com/news/teddy-roosevelt-legacies• ‘The Panama Canal's Forgotten Casualties' (The Conversation, 2018): https://theconversation.com/the-panama-canals-forgotten-casualties-93536• ‘George H.W. Bush Vomits' (January 8, 1992): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_KVL-wtpggFor bonus material and to support the show, visit Patreon.com/RetrospectorsWe'll be back tomorrow! Follow us wherever you get your podcasts: podfollow.com/RetrospectorsThe Retrospectors are Olly Mann, Rebecca Messina & Arion McNicoll, with Matt Hill.Theme Music: Pass The Peas. Announcer: Bob Ravelli. Graphic Design: Terry Saunders. Edit Producer: Emma Corsham.Copyright: Rethink Audio / Olly Mann 2021. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Playmaker's Corner
Playmaker's Corner Episode 80: AYL Championship Recaps and ‘21 3A Playoff Preview

Playmaker's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 145:43


On this episode the boys preview the 3A playoffs by talking about all the teams, and their matchups in the first round of the playoffs. Simon also recaps the Arapahoe Youth League 8th grade Championship games, and gives out player of the game awards to these championship teams. Be on the lookout for the weekly playoff recap for the rest of the Colorado levels on wednesday, and for our top 5 seniors series to come back starting friday with linebackers! 0:00-2:10 Intro 2:11- 8:46 Bruins White vs Spartans Chrome 8:46- 32:44 Spartans Black vs SJ Grey (Outlaws) 32: 44- 44:41 Bruins Blue vs Parker Hawks 44:41-54:12 Thunder Grey vs Raptors White 54:13-56:18 3A Playoff Preview Intro 56:19-1:07:17 Roosevelt vs Thomas Jefferson 1:07:18-1:19:54 Holy Family vs Pueblo South 1:20:01-1:32:41 Durango vs Evergreen 1:32:42-1:46:19 Mead vs Northridge 1:46:20-1:55:26 Fort Morgan vs Green Mountain 1:55:28-2:04:14 Frederick vs Pueblo County 2:04:15-2:12:40 Palisade vs Pueblo East 2:12:42-2:24:39 Lutheran vs Discovery Canyon 2:24:40-2:25:43 Outro https://linktr.ee/PlaymakersCorner Social Media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/PlaymakerCorner Tik Tok: Playmakers Corner Instagram: https:https://www.instagram.com/playmakerscorner/?hl=en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PlaymakerCorner Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUEcv0BIfXT78kNEtk1pbxQ/featured Listen to us on: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4rkM8hKtf8eqDPy2xqOPqr Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-cycle-365/id1484493484?uo=4 Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/the-cycle-365 Google Podcasts: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9mODg4MWYwL3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz

Arizona's Morning News
KTAR Timeline for November 5th

Arizona's Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 1:22


President Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected to a third term in office on November 5th, 1940. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 11-05-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 4:58


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for November 5th, 2021. As we reported yesterday, over 750,000 American lives have been lost to COVID. No other even in the country's history, including the four-year-long Civil War, has generated more death and loss. 750,000 is also more than the populations of Vermont, Wyoming, or Alaska, which means we've lost the equivalent of an entire state. The World Health Organization is getting increasingly concerned about Europe. The continent has seen a more than 50% jump in cases in the last month. It's become the epicenter of the pandemic even though there's plenty of vaccine. Inexplicably, poorer countries with less than 1% of the world's vaccines like Africa and Southeast Asia saw cases fall 9% last week. Britain is first to grant conditional authorization to the first pill shown to successfully treat COVID, manufactured by Merck. It's for adults 18 and older who've tested positive and have at least one risk factor for severe disease like obesity or heart disease. The regime is four pills twice a day for five days. We're heading into flu season and flu shot season, so you might be wondering, is it safe to get the COVID vaccine and a flu shot at the same time. Well, the World Health Organization says yes, and that when you do, it doesn't compromise the effectiveness of either. It's still a major and deadly health issue, but a new poll suggests Americans are just about done with COVID as a political issue. The Reuters poll shows only 12% of U.S. adults rated public health issues as a top national priority. That's down from 20% in February. What do they care about now? Inflation, economic growth, and supply chain issues that are leaving some shelves noticeably bare. In the United States cases were down 6%, deaths are down 18%, and hospitalizations are down 16% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending flat since October 25. The five states that have the most deaths per million are Mississippi, Alabama, New Jersey, Louisiana, and New York. There are 9,220,830 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: New Mexico 19%, Vermont 15%, Colorado 14%, Nebraska 11%, and Arizona and New Hampshire 9%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Nome Census Area, AK. Park, MT. Grant, NM. Goshen, WY. Wadena, MN. Inyo, CA. Roosevelt, MT. Rolette, ND. San Juan, NM. And Carbon, UT. There have been at least 751,554 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 71.4%, Rhode Island at 71.1%, and Connecticut at 70.9%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia unchanged at 41%, Wyoming at 44.2%, and Alabama at 44.9%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is unchanged at 58.1%. Globally, cases were up 6% and deaths were up 3% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 18,459,078 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 81,033. Russia 40,217. The U.K. 37,269. Germany 35,662. And Turkey 29,482. There have been at least 5,029,033 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency
Season II, Episode V: Teddy Roosevelt & The Great Coal Strike of 1902

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 58:09


Welcome to The Past, The Promise, The Presidency Season II, Episode V: Teddy Roosevelt & The Great Coal Strike of 1902. In 1902, miners under the leadership of John Mitchell and the United Mine Workers went on strike to protest long hours, low pay, and unsafe working conditions. Mine operators and owners were determined not to concede to the miners' demands or recognize their right to organize as workers. With winter approaching, millions of Americans faced freezing conditions and would be unable to heat their homes without the anthracite coal that their work provided. Enter Theodore Roosevelt, the young, active president eager to put an end to the conflict and to make his mark on the presidency.  T.R. invited both Mitchell and the mine operators to a private conference in the oval office. The meeting itself was a sign of Mitchell and the mine workers' legitimacy, and he could afford to be accommodating and pleasant. The coal operators, on the other hand, resented T.R.'s interference, refuse to compromise and swore they'd produce enough coal for the nation's needs that winter without the help of Roosevelt or the unionizing coal workers.When the operators failed to follow through on that promise, and with Americans increasingly cold and anxious as a consequence, T.R. sprung into action once more. He proposed an independent commission to resolve the dispute and turned to his sometimes friend, sometimes foe, banker JP Morgan, to pressure the mine operators into agreeing to the commission. What did the commission decide, and did both sides agree to the terms?What can the Great Coal Strike of 1902 teach us about the power of the president to intervene in disputes between unions and big business?First we chatted with Susan Berfield, an award winning writer and reporter for Bloomberg. She's also the author of The Hour of Fate: Theodore Roosevelt, J.P. Morgan, and the Battle to Transform American Capitalism. We then spoke with Michael Cullinane, a professor at the University of Roehampton, London and the author of Theodore Roosevelt's Ghost: The History and Memory of an American Icon.

The Opperman Report'
Deception, Intrigue, and the Road to War (Vol. 1 of 2): A Chronology of Significant Events Detailing President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Succe

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 125:16


Deception, Intrigue, and the Road to War (Vol. 1 of 2): A Chronology of Significant Events Detailing President Franklin D. Roosevelt's SucceOver 75 years after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that launched America's entry into the Second World War, one persistent question remains unanswered: "Did President Franklin D. Roosevelt have foreknowledge of the attack---and did he (and his senior military leadership) then withhold that knowledge from his overseas commanders in Hawaii?" Douglas P. Horne, a former Naval Officer who recently completed 40 years of combined military-and-civilian service to the Federal Government, deals directly with this most difficult of all questions about World War II, in the first major "Revisionist" work about Pearl Harbor written in the last decade. Contrary to recent assertions by mainstream historians that the Revisionist hypothesis is now dead, Horne finds it to be more robust than ever. In the first known work that studies FDR's foreign policy "on the road to Pearl Harbor" as a timeline, or chronology (which assesses numerous factors---including codebreaking, diplomacy, military strategy, the unfolding events in Europe, and the personality and words of FDR himself), the author compellingly presents his own unique findings regarding the longstanding allegation by Revisionists that FDR used the impending Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor as a "back door to war." Horne concludes there is, indeed, persuasive evidence that once FDR's undeclared naval war against Hitler in the north Atlantic failed to provide the desired casus belli (which would have allowed him to request a declaration of war against Nazi Germany), then consequently, permitting the Imperial Japanese Navy to attack Pearl Harbor---without providing any specific advance warning to the Hawaiian field commanders (i.e., allowing the Japanese to "fire the first shot" and commit "an overt act of war")---became the last, best chance for FDR to get a united America into the Second World War. FDR's overriding goal throughout 1940-41 was the imperative to get America involved, as a belligerent, in the war against Hitler's Germany, and the Japanese attack accomplished that goal, as Roosevelt knew it would. Both the timing of when FDR apparently received his foreknowledge of the impending attack, and the mechanism by which it was likely delivered, are thoroughly considered in this work. Author Douglas Horne also provides a critical assessment of the most recent Revisionist works, and using a new approach to the "big question" about Pearl Harbor, provides a bold new interpretation of events that will surprise most readers.4 years ago #(vol., #1, #a, #and, #chronology, #d., #deception, #detailing, #events, #franklin, #intrigue, #of, #president, #road, #roosevelt's, #significant, #the, #to, #war

The Opperman Report
Deception, Intrigue, and the Road to War (Vol. 1 of 2): A Chronology of Significant Events Detailing President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Succe

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 125:16


Deception, Intrigue, and the Road to War (Vol. 1 of 2): A Chronology of Significant Events Detailing President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Succe Over 75 years after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that launched America's entry into the Second World War, one persistent question remains unanswered: "Did President Franklin D. Roosevelt have foreknowledge of the attack---and did he (and his senior military leadership) then withhold that knowledge from his overseas commanders in Hawaii?" Douglas P. Horne, a former Naval Officer who recently completed 40 years of combined military-and-civilian service to the Federal Government, deals directly with this most difficult of all questions about World War II, in the first major "Revisionist" work about Pearl Harbor written in the last decade. Contrary to recent assertions by mainstream historians that the Revisionist hypothesis is now dead, Horne finds it to be more robust than ever. In the first known work that studies FDR's foreign policy "on the road to Pearl Harbor" as a timeline, or chronology (which assesses numerous factors---including codebreaking, diplomacy, military strategy, the unfolding events in Europe, and the personality and words of FDR himself), the author compellingly presents his own unique findings regarding the longstanding allegation by Revisionists that FDR used the impending Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor as a "back door to war." Horne concludes there is, indeed, persuasive evidence that once FDR's undeclared naval war against Hitler in the north Atlantic failed to provide the desired casus belli (which would have allowed him to request a declaration of war against Nazi Germany), then consequently, permitting the Imperial Japanese Navy to attack Pearl Harbor---without providing any specific advance warning to the Hawaiian field commanders (i.e., allowing the Japanese to "fire the first shot" and commit "an overt act of war")---became the last, best chance for FDR to get a united America into the Second World War. FDR's overriding goal throughout 1940-41 was the imperative to get America involved, as a belligerent, in the war against Hitler's Germany, and the Japanese attack accomplished that goal, as Roosevelt knew it would. Both the timing of when FDR apparently received his foreknowledge of the impending attack, and the mechanism by which it was likely delivered, are thoroughly considered in this work. Author Douglas Horne also provides a critical assessment of the most recent Revisionist works, and using a new approach to the "big question" about Pearl Harbor, provides a bold new interpretation of events that will surprise most readers. 4 years ago #(vol., #1, #a, #and, #chronology, #d., #deception, #detailing, #events, #franklin, #intrigue, #of, #president, #road, #roosevelt's, #significant, #the, #to, #war

Snow Files
S3-40: The Twin Blue Line – Isaac Gaston, Alternative Suspect

Snow Files

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 22:46


Isaac “Ike” Gaston was a dead ringer for Gutierrez's composite, and he lived within a mile of the crime. He also had a long criminal history spanning some 40 years which included violence - such as assault, burglary, robbery, and sexual misconduct with a minor. Even while Gaston was awaiting sentencing for another charge in county jail, he assaulted four correctional officers in a vile way. 10 years ago, we only had Isaac's picture, and no other information. But thanks to a few social media leads, we learned his name and later discovered his identity, and subsequent police reports related to tips for Gaston. As for how he was cleared of the murder, that's anyone's guess. Tune in to Season 3 of Snow Files when we explore alternative suspects that were never revealed at the trial. Music: YouTube Audio Library: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music (https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music) Theme Song: Black Moons, The 126ers Displaced, Robert Ruth Support Documents Leads: http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/L-25-A.pdf (25-A) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/L-27-A.pdf (27-A) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/L-29-A.pdf (29-A) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/L-34-A.pdf (34-A) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/L-107-A.pdf (107-A) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/L-160-A.pdf (160-A) Newspaper Articles: http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/Newspaper-Gaston-1973-1994.pdf (Pantagraph 1973-1994) Graphics: http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP40-The-Twin-Blue-Line/Graphics.pdf (Route from N. and S. Roosevelt to Clark Oil & Gutierrez Composite Compared to Gaston (1989)) Support this podcast

Amerika Übersetzt
Wo ist Kamala?

Amerika Übersetzt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 29:22


Während Präsident Biden auf Europa-Tour ist und nach dem G20-Gipfel in Rom und dem Papstbesuch bei der Klima-Konferenz in Glasgow vorbeischaut, hält wer die Stellung zu Hause in DC? Eigentlich seine Vize-Präsidentin. Aber wo ist sie geblieben? Wir wurden in letzter Zeit öfters nach Kamala Harris' Rolle gefragt - und was davon zu sehen bzw. zu spüren ist? Sollte sie nicht die Vorkämpferin für die progressive Agenda sein, die der konservativen Rechte das Fürchten lehrt? Und hatte sie nicht auch die Aufgabe, die Flüchtlings-Krise an der Grenze zu lösen? Aber bislang ist davon in der Öffentlichkeit nicht viel rübergekommen.   Wir betrachten ein Jahr nach der Wahl ihre bisherige Bilanz und schauen auch insgesamt auf die historische Rolle der Vizepräsidenten und wie sie sich im Laufe der Zeit vom ständigen Stellvertreter zum Vertrauten und „letzten Mann im Raum“ entwickelt hat.Credits:Theme Music:  Reha Omayer, HamburgFind us on:Facebook: AmerikaUebersetztTwitter: @AUbersetztContact us:amerikauebersetzt@gmail.com

The Opperman Report
Doug Horne : Deception, Intrigue, and the Road to War

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 130:14


Douglas P. Horne joins us to discuss his 2 volume book. Deception, Intrigue, and the Road to War (Vol. 1 of 2) Did President Franklin D. Roosevelt have foreknowledge of the attack---and did he (and his senior military leadership) then withhold that knowledge from his overseas commanders in Hawaii? Douglas P. Horne, a 1974 Cum Laude graduate of The Ohio State University who majored in history, and author of the five-volume work "Inside the Assassination Records Review Board" (about the U.S. Government's medical cover-up of the JFK assassination), has put his 40 years of combined military-and-civilian service to the Federal Government to good use in studying the 1945-46 Congressional Investigation into the Pearl Harbor attack; a little-known 1946 U.S. Government report containing key evidence about the attack; and the most recent Revisionist works about Pearl Harbor, to produce a grand "new synthesis" which answers the persistent question: "Did FDR know about the Pearl Harbor attack before it took place?" A former U.S. Naval Officer who spent 14 years working in four different Navy jobs at Pearl Harbor, and a Japanophile who has always been fascinated by the Imperial Japanese Navy, Horne has applied his own Navy job experience, and his understanding of how the government operates, to a plethora of data about the Pearl Harbor attack, to produce a work of high tension and drama that attempts to deal honestly with the most significant foreign policy event in America's 20th century history. Mr Horne is the man to thank for obtaining the documents exposing Operation Northwoord 4 years ago #and, #deception, #doug, #ed, #horne, #intrigue, #opperman, #report, #road, #the, #to, #war

The Opperman Report'
Doug Horne : Deception, Intrigue, and the Road to War

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 130:14


Douglas P. Horne joins us to discuss his 2 volume book. Deception, Intrigue, and the Road to War (Vol. 1 of 2)Did President Franklin D. Roosevelt have foreknowledge of the attack---and did he (and his senior military leadership) then withhold that knowledge from his overseas commanders in Hawaii?Douglas P. Horne, a 1974 Cum Laude graduate of The Ohio State University who majored in history, and author of the five-volume work "Inside the Assassination Records Review Board" (about the U.S. Government's medical cover-up of the JFK assassination), has put his 40 years of combined military-and-civilian service to the Federal Government to good use in studying the 1945-46 Congressional Investigation into the Pearl Harbor attack; a little-known 1946 U.S. Government report containing key evidence about the attack; and the most recent Revisionist works about Pearl Harbor, to produce a grand "new synthesis" which answers the persistent question: "Did FDR know about the Pearl Harbor attack before it took place?" A former U.S. Naval Officer who spent 14 years working in four different Navy jobs at Pearl Harbor, and a Japanophile who has always been fascinated by the Imperial Japanese Navy, Horne has applied his own Navy job experience, and his understanding of how the government operates, to a plethora of data about the Pearl Harbor attack, to produce a work of high tension and drama that attempts to deal honestly with the most significant foreign policy event in America's 20th century history.Mr Horne is the man to thank for obtaining the documents exposing Operation Northwoord4 years ago #and, #deception, #doug, #ed, #horne, #intrigue, #opperman, #report, #road, #the, #to, #war

Shaping Opinion
Encore: George Marshall Reshaped the World After WWII

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 62:14


Author and historian Rachel Yarnell Thompson joins Tim to talk about the man with a plan, George Marshall, whose “Marshall Plan” reshaped Europe and the world after World War Two. After playing important military roles in winning both World War One and World War Two, he was tapped for what would become his most well-recognized legacy, the rebuilding of the free world. Rachel is the author of: Marshall—A Statesman Shaped in the Crucible of War. This Encore Episode was first released on November 11, 2019. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Encore_-_George_Marshall.mp3 George C. Marshall was named the Army chief of staff in Washington on the day that Nazi tanks rolled through Poland on their way to near complete domination of Eastern and Western Europe. He was the first five-star general in American history. From that day forward, he transformed the American military into a level of power never before seen. He oversaw the country's and the allies' military strategy that led to unconditional victories in Europe and in the Pacific. In addition to Europe and the Pacific, he oversaw military operations in China and the Mediterranean. He had the respect of world leaders that included President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill, and of course throughout all of the armed forces. He was credited with finding the generals who would win the war, including generals Dwight D. Eisenhower, Omar Bradley and George Patton. He was one of the architects of the D-Day invasion and was set to command the invasion of Normandy, when FDR decided to keep General Marshall in Washington. FDR said to his general, “I didn't feel that I could sleep at ease if you were out of Washington.” George Marshall's accomplishments are many. Once the war ended, he retired from the military, and in one day was called upon by President Harry Truman to address China's civil war as the president's special envoy. President Truman tapped Marshall to serve as his Secretary of State, dealing with the Berlin Blockade, and then to develop and implement the European Recovery Program, better known as the Marshall Plan. Along the way, George Marshall would become president of the American Red Cross, and President Truman's Secretary of Defense during the Korean War. He earned the Nobel Peace Prize. George Marshall was a study in contrasts. He was the commander of the most powerful military the world, yet he was seen as a man of quiet, even humble confidence in his own ideas. He operated in a highly political environment with the world's leading politicians, yet he refused to become political. Often, when he was asked of his own party affiliation, he said he was an Episcopalian. In the process, he won the respect, admiration and the trust of both Democrat and Republican leaders. Our Gratitude Our thanks to Rachel Yarnell Thompson and the George C. Marshall International Center for providing their time and resources in support of production of this episode, including photo depictions. Links The George C. Marshall International Center The George C. Marshall Foundation George C. Marshall's Nobel Prize Biography, The Nobel Prize Committee George C. Marshall, History.com The Marshall Plan, Secretary of State Office of the Historian The Marshall Plan, National Archives About this Episode's Guest Rachel Yarnell Thompson Rachel Yarnell Thompson is The George C. Marshall International Center's Special Projects Director. The Center is located near the Marshall House, known locally as Dodona Manor, the general's former residence in Leesburg, Virginia. She is also the author of the book, Marshall—A Statesman Shaped in the Crucible of War.

Spartacus Roosevelt Podcast
Spartacus Roosevelt Podcast, Episode 258: Albedo and Occlusion

Spartacus Roosevelt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021


"Preeminent Minds" by Nolan Potter from Music is Dead; "Call and Response" by Golden Hallway Music from Rules and Chance; "Disordered Minds" by Grouper from Shade; "Smilehenge" by Tonstartssbandht from Petunia; "Black Stone" by Mount Kimbie from Black Stone Blue Liquid; "Destroy Us" by Beachy Head from their self titled album; "Poleyn" by Smote from Drommon; "Apartment Loop #2" by Bruno Bavota from For Apartments: Songs and Loops; "Preoccupation" by Black Marble from Fast Idol; "Ana Lisan Wahad" by Jerusalem In My Heart from Qalaq; "Recessinater" by Birds of Maya from Valdez

The John Batchelor Show
1803: 2/2: Court-packing in the 21st Century; and what is to be done? @RichardAEpstein @HooverInst

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 9:55


Photo:  Joseph T. Robinson. Franklin Roosevelt's Ninth Fireside Chat was on the Judiciary Reorganisation Bill, in March 1937. The Senate Majority Leader, Joseph T. Robinson, was entrusted by President Roosevelt with the court reform bill's passage; Robinson's unexpected death doomed the proposed legislation. The Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937, frequently called the "court-packing plan", was a legislative initiative proposed by U.S. PresidentFranklin D. Roosevelt to add more justices to the U.S. Supreme Court in order to obtain favorable rulings regarding New Deal legislation that the Court had ruled unconstitutional. The central provision of the bill would have granted the president power to appoint an additional justice to the U.S. Supreme Court, up to a maximum of six, for every member of the court over the age of 70 years. 2/2: Court-packing in the 21st Century; and what is to be done?  @RichardAEpstein @HooverInst https://www.hoover.org/research/supreme-court-commission-comes-through Richard A Epstein, @RichardAEpstein Tisch Professor of Law NYU Bedford Senior Fellow; Hoover Institution;  senior lecturer, University of Chicago Law School.   

The John Batchelor Show
1803: 1/2 Court-packing in the 21st Century; and what is to be done? @RichardAEpstein @HooverInst

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 13:45


Photo:  The Hughes Court, 1932–1937. Front row: Justices Brandeis and Van Devanter, Chief Justice Hughes, and Justices McReynolds and Sutherland. Back row: Justices Roberts, Butler, Stone, and Cardozo. The Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937, frequently called the "court-packing plan", was a legislative initiative proposed by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt to add more justices to the U.S. Supreme Court in order to obtain favorable rulings regarding New Deal legislation that the Court had ruled unconstitutional. The central provision of the bill would have granted the president power to appoint an additional justice to the U.S. Supreme Court, up to a maximum of six, for every member of the court over the age of 70 years. 1/2   Court-packing in the 21st Century; and what is to be done?  @RichardAEpstein @HooverInst https://www.hoover.org/research/supreme-court-commission-comes-through Richard A Epstein, @RichardAEpstein Tisch Professor of Law NYU Bedford Senior Fellow; Hoover Institution;  senior lecturer, University of Chicago Law School.   

Texas Football Today
Lubbock Roosevelt coach Matt Landers, instant reaction to Matt Wells' firing, overreacting to the football weekend, new DCTF/AP rankings and more — Episode 1,268 (October 25, 2021)

Texas Football Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021


Lubbock Roosevelt coach Matt Landers, instant reaction to Matt Wells' firing, overreacting to the football weekend, new DCTF/AP rankings and more

The Kindle Chronicles
2TKC4 Coffee with My Father

The Kindle Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 51:33


Notes from his 10th Decade  Links The Second Most Powerful Man in the World: The Life of Admiral William D. Leahy, Roosevelt's Chief of Staff by Phillips Payson O'Brien “China's Hypersonic Wake-Up Call” by The Editorial Board at The Wall Street Journal - October 18, 2021 (Behind pay wall) Skylight Frame: 10-inch WiFi Digital Picture Frame - $159 at Amazon.com The Heritage Foundation's 2020 Index of U.S. Military Strength  The Edge of the Road podcast (recently updated after a two-year hiatus) If you'd like brief updates on technology, books, marriage, and puppies, you can follow along with my Morning Journal flash briefing. From your Echo device, just say, “Alexa, enable Morning Journal.” Then each morning say, “Alexa, what's my flash briefing?” I post a five-minute audio journal each weekday except usually by 8 a.m. Eastern Time.  Right-click here and then click "Save Link As..." to download the audio to your computer, phone, or MP3 player.

Every Heart Every Woman Radio
EHEW Episode 164 - Karla Nivens -- Practical Ways to Invite Diversity In

Every Heart Every Woman Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 18:43


About Host, Karla Nivens: After graduating from Texas Tech University, Karla earned her teaching certificate and began her career as an elementary music teacher in the Dallas Independent School District. She also sang for Grammy award-winning Gospel recording artists Kirk Franklin, CeCe Winans, Fred Hammond, Donnie McClurkin, Crystal Lewis, Willie Neal Johnson, John P. Kee, Alvin Slaughter, Tamela Mann, and Michael Buble'. She's traveled the world and ministered to diverse audiences in music. During her travels, she had the opportunity to sing on the Jay Leno Show, Soul Train, the Stellar Awards, and the Billy Graham Crusade with Kirk Franklin. She took a hiatus while staying at home with her children for several years and re-entered the workforce as a worship leader at Highland Park United Methodist Church. Karla has worshipped with Highland Park for the past 17 years. Currently, Karla is building the Racial Justice ministry for Highland Park UMC. Karla has also served as an adjunct instructor for Visible Music College and in 2014 released a CD entitled “True Worship.” Five years ago a good friend suggested she turn her heart toward fulfilling the Great Commission. Karla began traveling on yearly mission trips to Costa Rica and Africa. On those trips the Lord began to awaken the motto He gave her in college – “Influencing Culture for the Good of the Kingdom.” As an answer to this awakening, Karla and Dr. Roosevelt founded Karla Nivens Entertainment. Under this umbrella, Karla partnered with Love Ministries, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, started a small group for women, and a radio show both titled “Every Heart Every Woman.” Karla encourages her audience to quiet the noise and restore balance in their daily lives through inspirational entertainment. The show airs Sundays as a podcast on iTunes and Podbean weekly. The show also airs in video on YouTube. In 2019, Karla released her book, True Leaders with Heart, packed with weekly meditations for leaders.  

Novara Media
Planet B: Noam Chomsky on Roosevelt's Legacy and Indigenous Demands

Novara Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 36:43


Noam Chomsky warns against a Green New Deal that would save capitalism rather than dismantling it in an extended interview from Planet B: Everything Must Change. The eminent activist and political writer talks to Dalia Gebrial about his vision of a Green New Deal and the lessons we can take from Franklin D. Roosevelt’s original […]

The EdUp Experience
332: Building a Platform of Knowledge - with Mark Roosevelt, President, St. John's College

The EdUp Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 42:42


We welcome YOU back to America's leading higher education podcast, The EdUp Experience! In this episode, President Series #108, YOUR guest is Mark Roosevelt, President, St. John's College, YOUR special co-host is Dr. Bill Pepicello, former President at the University of Phoenix, YOUR host is Dr. Joe Sallustio, & YOUR sponsor is MDT Marketing! Joe & Bill talk with Mark about the components of a world-class liberal arts education. What's a "books" university? Did you know that students at St. John's College have to read over 200 books as a part of their curriculum? This education is steeped in tradition! Mark Roosevelt became president of St. John's College in Santa Fe on January 1, 2016. He is the seventh president of the campus. Roosevelt brings a history of accomplishing daunting tasks & a lifelong commitment to educational quality and equity. He earned his undergraduate and law degrees at Harvard, where as a student he entered Massachusetts politics at a time of extraordinary racial conflict, serving as the campaign manager for the first African American ever elected to the Boston School Committee. Another awesome episode with YOUR sponsor MDT Marketing! Get YOUR free marketing consultation today! mdtmarketing.com/edup Thank YOU so much for tuning in. Join us on the next episode for YOUR time to EdUp! Connect with YOUR EdUp Team - Elvin Freytes & Dr. Joe Sallustio ● Learn more about what others are saying about their EdUp experience ● Join YOUR EdUp community at The EdUp Experience! ● YOU can follow us on Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube Thank YOU for listening! We make education YOUR business!

Urgent Care with Joel Kim Booster + Mitra Jouhari
Michelle ObamHaha/LOLanor Roosevelt

Urgent Care with Joel Kim Booster + Mitra Jouhari

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 58:35


Wee ooh wee ooh wee ooh for the 100th time chefs! This week Joel and Mitra/ Mitra and Joel celebrate the pod's 100th episode by giving advice on quitting a book club, keeping away from a bad cousin, how to socially interact with a group of comedians, and much more.   Ask us some q's! Our number is 323-334-0371 + our email is: urgentcarepod@gmail.com CONTACT US, IF YOU DARE

The Scorer's Table with Eric Devendorf
Roosevelt Bouie on being one of Jim Boeheim's first recruits, getting jersey retired & passing on the NBA

The Scorer's Table with Eric Devendorf

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 94:54


This week Roosevelt Bouie joins Eric Devendorf on The Scorer's Table! The two discuss how he went from a small town kid to one of Jim Boeheim's first true stars, his time playing with Louis Orr, why he decided to pass on playing for the Dallas Mavericks out of college, what Syracuse means to him, his expectations for this year's team & much more. Subscribe to The Scorer's Table wherever you get podcasts and watch every episode on the Field of 68 Twitter and YouTube page. Intro music: Cherry Metal by Arthur Vyncke | https://soundcloud.com/arthurvost Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en_US

Revealing Healing
Epiosde 106: Motivational Daily Quote - Elenaor Roosevelt

Revealing Healing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 2:06


Don't miss the motivational daily quote. Today is Eleanor Roosevelt! Find more quotes at MotivationalDailyQuote.com

DarrenDaily On-Demand
5 Simple Truths to Conquering Your Fear Part 2

DarrenDaily On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 4:31


What is it that we actually fear? In 1932 in his First Inaugural Address, Franklin D. Roosevelt said something that would change the course of history. Listen, and it will change the course of your future. Get more personal mentoring from Darren each day. Go to DarrenDaily http://darrendaily.com/ to learn more.

The Conspiracy Show with Richard Syrett
CRIMES AND COVERUPS IN AMERICAN POLITICS

The Conspiracy Show with Richard Syrett

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 106:45


Richard welcomes a writer/historian to discuss the history of un-Americanism and secular saints, like Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, and Franklin D. Roosevelt.