Podcasts about Roosevelt

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Best podcasts about Roosevelt

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Latest podcast episodes about Roosevelt

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 1/27/23

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2023 117:18


On Friday's Mark Levin Show, today is the 78th anniversary of liberating Auschwitz from the Nazis, which is why it's no coincidence there was a shooting at a synagogue in Jerusalem by a Palestinian terrorist. Biden's policy of sending tax dollars to Hamas is used to fund terror attacks like this, unlike President Trump who eliminated it. President Roosevelt limited the number of Jews who could come to the U.S while working with the media to cover up what was being done to Jews in Europe by the Nazis. Mankind can be evil beyond imagination, which is why all the talk and promotion of racism and hating America is something we need to fight. Also, we have a nation being crippled by debt while Congress passes a 1.7 trillion-dollar budget stuffed with liberal projects and programs. Mitch McConnell and Chuck Schumer never read the bill – they pulled staffers together to stitch a bill together with over 3000 earmarks, and specifically removed funding for the southern border. This is the Roman senate happening right before our eyes. Later, the footage of the police killing of Tyre Nichols is just horrific and crossed a line regardless of race, and we will see what happens to the officers. We don't even know the full story yet, but on the film, we can see five grown men brutally beat someone to death. Politicians act like passing laws will fix tragedies like this from happening, but they won't because we have a culture issue.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

KPFA - Letters and Politics
George Kennan: The Architect of the Cold War Who Opposed the War

KPFA - Letters and Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 59:59


Guest: Frank Costigliola is a Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Connecticut. He is the author of The Kennan Diaries, Roosevelt's Lost Alliances, and his latest, Kennan: A Life between Worlds. The post George Kennan: The Architect of the Cold War Who Opposed the War appeared first on KPFA.

The Potter's House At One LA
Seeing Men as Trees - Roosevelt Stewart

The Potter's House At One LA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 69:27


For The Called, visit www.calledleaders.com. To give to ONE, visit https://www.one.online/give

Holy Donors
S11E2: The President | Physical Sufferings and Heroism

Holy Donors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 26:35


Welcome back as we continue our story about our next potential holy donor, John F. Kennedy. We return to JFK's story as he (Jack) is getting ready to go to college and as his father, Joe Sr., is entering politics with the help of President Roosevelt. Joe Sr. still very much believes power is found in government leadership, and he continues to encourage a political future for his children, especially Joe Jr. Jack follows in his father's and older brother's footsteps and goes to Harvard, still physically unwell, and trying unsuccessfully to be a college athlete. When Joe Sr. becomes US ambassador to Great Britain, JFK heads to London with him for a summer, and he travels Europe, observing pre-WW2 conditions. When World War II begins, Joe Sr. pulls some strings to allow Jack to enlist in the Navy despite his physical ailments. Jack successfully leads his patrol torpedo boat crew to survival after their boat is destroyed at sea, yet his naval service worsens his health, and he returns home to pain and surgery. As Jack settles in back home, the family gets news of Joe Jr.'s death in a plane explosion. Upon losing his oldest son, Joe Sr. turns his dreams of political leadership to Jack, and he clearly finds success. Join us next week as we learn how Jack becomes our nation's first Catholic president!---Recommended reading: "Jack: A Life Like No Other" by Geoffrey Perret"An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy" by Robert Dallek---Holy Donors is brought to you by Petrus Development (petrusdevelopment.com) in cooperation with RED-C Catholic Radio (redcradio.org).For more about Holy Donors please visit our website at holydonors.com or find us @HolyDonors on Instagram and Facebook.Holy Donors: Bringing you inspiring stories of radical generosity that have changed the world.

We Think It's A Sports Show
Episode 111 | “Overdue Bills” Feat (Naaman Roosevelt)

We Think It's A Sports Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 68:41


On this episode the guys sit down with Naaman Roosevelt former Buffalo Bill. It was a mix of the WTIASS crew and Overdue Bills as Matt, Icebox and Rad discuss his playing days and what he's been up to now. Tap in! 

Fighting On Film
The Wind and the Lion (1975)

Fighting On Film

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 62:30


This week we look at the John Milius epic tale of diplomacy versus military intervention in the early 1900s as Sean Connery's Raisui kidnaps an American citizen, will the troops be called in or will politics save the day? The Wind and Lion is in the style of a 40s/50s epic with great turns from Connery, Bergen, and Brian Kieth as an uncanny Roosevelt lookalike in Milius's second feature. Follow us on Twitter @FightingOnFilm and on Facebook. For more check out our website www.fightingonfilm.com Thanks for listening!  

Against The Odds
Uncharted: Teddy Roosevelt's Amazon Expedition | River of Doubt | 2

Against The Odds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 43:35


As Theodore Roosevelt's expedition sets off down the River of Doubt, it doesn't take long for the going to get rough. Their canoes are no match for the boiling rapids, forcing them to trek through an unforgiving jungle rife with insects, predators and disease. As their movement slows, their food supplies dwindle. Roosevelt's son Kermit takes a bold risk to speed their progress . . . but the turbulent waters deliver more peril than he bargained for.Listen early and ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/againsttheodds.Support us by supporting our sponser!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Humanitou: Conversations of Humanness + Creativity
Being 'The Man In The Arena' with Brené Brown & Teddy Roosevelt

Humanitou: Conversations of Humanness + Creativity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 9:34


In this short solo episode, Adam Williams shares about his experience with the conflicting voices in his head, including Brené Brown's, Teddy Roosevelt's and his imagined critics', every time he creates as a writer, poet, artist, podcaster ... whatever the creative medium. Read and listen to more at humanitou.com, where you also can see two artworks Adam made to go with this episode's show notes and related blog post on the website. You also can read the addendum, "Roosevelt's Bullet." _____ Music by Joe Johnson All things podcast by Adam Williams (humanitou.com)

Having Read That with Brian Vakulskas
BRAD MELTZER – THE NAZI CONSPIRACY: The Secret Plot to Kill Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill

Having Read That with Brian Vakulskas

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 13:49


Author: Brad Meltzer (with Josh Mensch) Book: THE NAZI CONSPIRACY: The Secret Plot to Kill Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill Publishing: Flatiron Books (January 10, 2023) Synopsis (from the Publisher): From the New York Times bestselling authors of The First Conspiracy and The Lincoln Conspiracy comes the little-known true story of a Nazi plot to kill […] The post BRAD MELTZER – THE NAZI CONSPIRACY: The Secret Plot to Kill Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill appeared first on KSCJ 1360.

David Laroche le podcast
Comment atteindre l'EXCELLENCE dans TOUS les domaines ?

David Laroche le podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 8:32


Comment progresser vers l'excellence ? Comment arrêter de se prendre la tête et être talentueux ? Souvent, le chemin de l'excellence passe par une phase d'imitation, d'absorption et c'est important car, en faisant ça, tu retiens les modèles mentaux et les subtilités de ton mentor. D'ailleurs, je reviens sur l'histoire du mentoring et tu vas être surpris d'apprendre ce que les gens faisaient à l'époque. Dans cet épisode de mon Podcast, je t'aide à viser un objectif clair en reprenant le parcours de Théodore Roosevelt notamment, je t'explique comment atteindre l'excellence sans difficultés et sans en avoir une vision fantasmée. L'excellence naît dans les détails. Alors, demande-toi si tu veux le confort de l'amateur ou le résultat et le kiff de l'excellence ? ;)

Inside the Writer's Studio
Brad Meltzer (1/15/2023) Inside the Writer's Studio Episode #112

Inside the Writer's Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 43:54


Charlie talks with bestselling author of thrillers, tv writer, and historian Brad Meltzer about his new book The Nazi Conspiracy—about a plot to assassinate Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin at the height of WWII. They discuss research, structure, storytelling, and the relevance of books like The Nazi Conspiracy to the world we live in today.

The History of the Twentieth Century
310 A Switch in Time

The History of the Twentieth Century

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 48:25


Roosevelt was re-elected in 1936 by an historic margin, but the years 1937-38 saw him stumble.

The Freddy Roosevelt Podcast
Episode 04: Freddy & Meeka Interviews Krita Cali

The Freddy Roosevelt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 89:45


Freddy & Meeka Interviews Krita aka KritaCali. Krita is very respected on the west coast as a artist and videoophery. He speaks about alot of things thats going on with some people that have issues with him and some of his close friends.

HistoryPod
14th January 1943: Roosevelt and Churchill meet at the Casablanca Conference in Morocco

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023


The Casablanca Conference saw the Combined Chiefs of Staff join American President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to discuss the future strategy for fighting the Second World ...

Unsinkable: The Titanic Podcast
Admiration Won: The Life + the Mythology of Major Archibald Butt

Unsinkable: The Titanic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 68:40


Buy Unsinkable merch, finally! Shirts + sweatshirts on sale here: https://www.bonfire.com/unsinkable-the-first-t-shirt/ *Support the pod, wear the pod, and help keep Unsinkable ad-free and independent!Today I post an episode long in the making. This is an examination of the complex and rich life of Major Archibald Butt, highly mythologized Titanic First Class victim who served as military aide to TWO U.S. Presidents and wooed all of Washington, D.C., it seems, with charm and grace. He was in Europe in 1912 with his close friend Frank Millet, renowned artist, who many believe may have actually been his romantic partner. I talk about this head-on and examine the ways the Titanic community has written this "debate." Should it even be a debate? I am saddened by the mere thought of someone not being able to live their true identity, and I take at look at the oft-ignored more tragic parts of Archie's story. I also look head-on at issues of race and his identity as a southerner. This is a deep one, this is a good one.Thanks for listening!Support the showSupport Unsinkable on Patreon: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/unsinkable-the-titanic-podcast/id1585578882Support the pod by buying Titanic-related books through my Bookshop Storefront: https://bookshop.org/shop/unsinkablepodFind me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/unsinkablepod/Shoot me an email if you like: UnsinkablePod@gmail.com

Work From Your Happy Place with Belinda Ellsworth
The “Must-Haves” to Stage Your Way to Success in Theatre with Daniel Cooney

Work From Your Happy Place with Belinda Ellsworth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 56:39


Most people enter music and theatre careers because of a passion for the arts. Musical theatre performance, which includes acting, singing, and dancing, is not just a career or a way to earn a living. It fosters social awareness through exposure to the social issues, events, and unique cultures that are portrayed in scripts. That is why students should not only develop their performance skills, but also endeavor to discover the works of literature that inspire works of art.Taking the first step after music school can be tricky and overwhelming. You need resilience, patience, and persistence to get through auditions and reach your desired destination. Building a network of other successful artists can help you achieve success more quickly. Putting in the work is essential as taking shortcuts may seem easier initially but will only lead to more disappointments later on. In this episode, Daniel Cooney takes us through his experience of navigating the world of theatre as a vocation. He talks about the triumphs and struggles he has faced and offers advice to aspiring actors. He shares three essential skills that all actors should strive to possess in order to be truly successful in their craft. Get ready to hear inspiring stories and tips from a professional actor.Snapshot of the Key Points from the Episode:[02:31] Dan's backstory and his journey on Broadway. Dan's first auditions and shows.[06:46] His transition from New York to Roosevelt and how that impacted his career.[08:48] One of Dan's stand-out performances[09:55] What it was like going from a performer to being a teacher in Roosevelt.[12:50] What do students pursuing music and theatre do to land their first jobs?[15:31] Activities that kids need to be doing during summer in regard to theatre.[18:35] Common challenges that theatre students face as they transition to the world of performance.[23:16] What graduates need to do to continue their lifelong education in theatre.[25:51] What motivated Dan to open a theatre?[40:23] What should an actor do to prepare for auditions? How to cope with the new wave of video communication?[45:57] What are the three must-have skills for actors?About Daniel Cooney - Daniel is the Co-Founder/Producing Artistic Director of The Encore Theatre in Dexter, MI, and is the Head of Musical Theatre at CCPA (Roosevelt University - Chicago, IL). His Broadway credits include Mamma Mia (Bill), Les Miserables, 9 to 5 the Musical, and Bonnie and Clyde..Off-Broadway: Heathers (Kurt's Dad/Veronica's Dad), The Thing About Men (Man).National Tours: Evita (Che), Fiddler on the Roof (Perchik), The Civil War, and Les Miserables. Daniel has directed at The Encore: Into the Woods (Wilde Award Nomination), Les Miserables, Evita, Sweeney Todd (Wilde Award Nominee: Best Musical), The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, Damn Yankees, Jesus Christ Superstar, The Last 5 Years, Godspell, and Nevermore. Performances at The Encore: Evita (Che), Jesus Christ Superstar (Judas), and Nevermore (Edgar Allen Poe).How to connect with Daniel Cooney:Website: www.theencoretheatre.orgLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dan-cooney-0693b032/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Encore.Musical.TheatreInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theencoretheatre/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLkXC1WrZx4wRs_vIi1zifQAbout the Host -Belinda Ellsworth is a Speaker, Trainer, Best-Selling Author, and PodcasterShe has been a professional speaker, mover, and shaker for more than 25 years. Having built three successful companies, she has helped thousands of entrepreneurs make better decisions, create successful systems, and build business strategies using her "Four Pillars of Success" system.Belinda has always had a passion and zest for life with the skill for turning dreams into reality. How to Connect with Belinda:Facebook -https://www.facebook.com/workfromyourhappyplaceLinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/belindaellsworthInstagram -https://www.instagram.com/workfromyourhappyplace/Website - www.workfromyourhappyplace.comQuotes:“We all have unique skills and passions that make us great at what we do. Find yours, and own your lane.”“Avoiding the work at the end of the day is more painful than not doing the work.”“Making the transition from college to the real world can be intimidating, but with determination and hard work, you can make it.”

The Daily Sun-Up
A closer look at Gov. Jared Polis' second inauguration; Roosevelt heads to Keystone Ranch

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 17:34


We're featuring scenes from Gov. Jared Polis' second inauguration, including a portion of his inaugural address. Our politics team was there for the whole thing. They'll break down the big lines from the Democrat's speech. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Against The Odds
Uncharted: Teddy Roosevelt's Amazon Expedition | Headwaters | 1

Against The Odds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 44:37 Very Popular


In 1913, former President Theodore Roosevelt embarked on a perilous expedition to map one of the last unexplored rivers in the Amazon. Roosevelt was joined by his son Kermit, famed Brazilian explorer Candido Rondon, and a team of naturalists and porters. But as the party sets off on a 400 mile trek across the highlands to reach the headwaters, they discover they are woefully unprepared for the dangers that await them in the wild.Listen early and ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/againsttheodds.Support us by supporting our sponser!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Bill Handel on Demand
BHS - 8A - Brad Meltzer on His New Book and 'Do They Have A Case?' with Wayne Resnick

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 28:32


Author Brad Meltzer joins the show to share his new book titled "THE NAZI CONSPIRACY: The Secret Plot To Kill Roosevelt, Stalin, And Churchill" hitting shelves tomorrow! Wayne Resnick comes on for an all-new, overdue edition of 'Do They Have A Case?'

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Author Brad Meltzer on His New Book "THE NAZI CONSPIRACY: The Secret Plot to Kill Roosevelt, Stalin and Churchill"

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 12:59


Author Brad Meltzer joins The Bill Handel Show to share his latest book "THE NAZI CONSPIRACY: The Secret Plot To Kill Roosevelt, Stalin, And Churchill." The book hits shelves tomorrow, January 10th!

The Potter's House At One LA
You're In DEMAND (Fight ME!) - Roosevelt Stewart

The Potter's House At One LA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 46:30


To give to ONE, click the link! https://www.one.online/give

The Emergency Management Network Podcast
Becoming A Resilient Leader

The Emergency Management Network Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 12:46


When I was thinking about resilient leaders, Teddy Roosevelt was the first to come to mind. It is not his bravado that interested me; what draws me to him, he should have never even made his way to local politics, let alone his rise to the President of the United States. TR was the first modern President; he fought his demons and tragedies. He was constantly proving himself, not to others, but to himself. He became the most beloved and hated personality in the world. Today, TR is still studied, written about and in some cases revered despite his flaws and, in some ways, because of them.Teddy Roosevelt was born into a wealthy family in New York City on October 27, 1858. His father, Theodore Roosevelt Sr., was a glass importer and one of New York City's leading philanthropists. His mother, Martha Bulloch Roosevelt, came from a prominent family in Georgia. Roosevelt had an older sister, Anna, and a younger brother, Elliott.Despite his privileged upbringing, Roosevelt's childhood was marked by tragedy and illness. His father died of stomach cancer, leaving his mother to raise him and his siblings independently. Roosevelt's mother was a loving and supportive parent, but she struggled with depression and was often bedridden.Roosevelt himself struggled with health problems throughout his childhood. He was a sickly child, suffering from asthma and other respiratory issues. He was also prone to recurrent fevers and was often confined to bed for long periods. Despite these challenges, Roosevelt was determined to overcome his physical limitations and lead an everyday, active life. He began exercising and practicing deep breathing techniques, which helped him improve his lung capacity and strengthen his body.The story goes that as young Theodore Roosevelt approached puberty, still frail, puny and nearsighted, his father (a robust man) said to him, “Theodore, you have the mind, but you do not have the body. You must make your body.” Accordingly, he transformed an upstairs room into a mid-19th-century gymnasium with assorted weights and barbells, punching bags and boxing gloves – and a 19th-century personal trainer to instruct. Thus equipped, TR (the one we know) embraced the strenuous life and shaped up.Roosevelt's mother recognized his love of reading and encouraged his intellectual curiosity. She hired tutors to teach him at home and provided him with many books to read. Roosevelt became an avid reader interested in history and adventure stories. He excelled academically and was a top student at his prep school, Groton School.Despite the challenges he faced, Roosevelt's childhood was a happy and fulfilling one. He was surrounded by a loving family and had the opportunity to pursue his passions and interests. His mother's influence was significant, as she provided him with the support and encouragement he needed to overcome his physical limitations and succeed in life. Roosevelt's childhood experiences would shape his character and inspire him to become the man he would later become - a man of incredible resilience and determination.TR's resolve was tested On February 14, 1884, when he received the devastating news that his wife and his mother had died on the same day.Roosevelt married his first wife, Alice Hathaway Lee, in 1880. The couple had a baby girl, Alice, in 1884. However, just a few days after Alice's birth, Roosevelt's wife fell ill with kidney failure and died.Just hours after Roosevelt's wife died, his mother, Martha Bulloch Roosevelt, also passed away. She had been suffering from a fever, and her health had declined for some time. Roosevelt was heartbroken by the loss of his mother, who had always been a constant source of support and encouragement for him.The double loss devastated Roosevelt, who was just 25 years old. He was overwhelmed with grief and struggled to come to terms with the loss of his wife and mother on the same day. Roosevelt's father had also died when he was 19, and the loss of his mother left him feeling alone and adrift.Despite his grief, Roosevelt refused to let the loss of his wife and mother define him. He threw himself into his work, focusing on his career and leaving his young daughter in the care of his sister. Roosevelt turned to outdoor activities like hunting and hiking to help him cope with his grief. Some historians believe Teddy Roosevelt suffer from depression. He would take to the woods for months at his low.The double loss of Teddy Roosevelt's wife and mother on the same day was a devastating and life-changing event. Roosevelt's resilience and determination helped him overcome his grief and move forward with his life. He remained committed to his family, work, passions, and enduring spirit helped him emerge from tragedy even stronger than before.To escape the thoughts of his wife, Roosevelt decided to move to the west and start a new chapter in his life In Montana. He purchased a ranch in the Badlands of North Dakota, which he named the Elkhorn Ranch. He became a Law Man, hunted down a wanted man, and spent weeks in the wilderness. Roosevelt had always been an avid outdoorsman and was drawn to the rugged beauty of the Badlands.Roosevelt also found time to pursue many interests in the west. He was an avid hunter and spent many hours hunting big game, including bison, elk, and bear. Roosevelt also enjoyed fishing and spent countless hours on the rivers and streams of Montana and North Dakota, casting his line in search of the perfect catch.TR was an amateur wildlife biologist. In his early years, when he was sick as a child, he learned taxidermy and had a collection of birds and rodents in his New York City home. The servants in his home refused to enter his room because of all the dead animals. TR even opened his natural history museum when he was eight. This skill played an essential part in his journey in the Badlands. In addition to enjoying the outdoors, TR cataloged birds and other species of animals. He noticed that the Badlands was dying. It was here that Roosevelt became a true conservationist.In addition to his long hunting trips, he also took an active role in managing the ranch. TR worked closely with his cowboys, learning all aspects of ranching and helping oversee the Elkhorn Ranch's day-to-day operations. Roosevelt was a hands-on owner known for his strong work ethic and dedication to his ranching operation.Despite his love of ranching, Roosevelt also found time to pursue other interests in the west. He was an avid hunter and spent many hours hunting big game, including bison, elk, and bear. Roosevelt also enjoyed fishing and spent countless hours on the rivers and streams of Montana, casting his line in search of the perfect catch.Because of Roosevelt's time in Montana, he became committed to conservation. He was a strong advocate for protecting the region's natural beauty and worked tirelessly to preserve the wilderness of the Badlands. Roosevelt established the Elkhorn Ranch as a wildlife sanctuary and became a popular destination for birdwatchers and nature enthusiasts.In addition to his conservation efforts, Roosevelt became involved in Montana's local politics. He was a vocal supporter of the progressive movement and worked to promote reform and improve the lives of ordinary people in the state. Roosevelt's influence and leadership were widely recognized in Montana, and he became a beloved and respected figure in the community.Overall, Teddy Roosevelt's time in Montana was significant and formative. He proved to himself that he was resilient and could move on from the troubles that he had left in New York. He lost most of his cattle, which was financially bad for him. However,  He developed a deep love for the outdoors and the wilderness, and his ranching and conservation efforts in the state helped shape his legacy as a champion of the environment. Roosevelt's time in Montana also allowed him to reconnect with his roots and rediscover his passion for adventure and exploration. TR returned to NY to take on the political machines and get involved in his other passion, public service.What To Read2023 Quarterly Reading ListBy Marc C. BakerWe are going to do things a little differently this year. Instead of releasing twelve books at once for the whole year, we will release three books each quarter. This will give us some more flexibility to choose books that apply to current events as they may arise. Here are my picks for the first quarter of 2023.Emergency Managers are not the “Switzerland” of DisastersBy Michael Prasad, MA, CEMSwitzerland's current policy of neutrality means it doesn't take part in armed conflicts and doesn't support any warring party. Why do some think of Emergency Management as being neutral?PodcastsBusiness Continuity TodayWhat are the challenges for Business Continuity for 2023?As we enter 2023, businesses face various challenges that could impact their ability to remain operational and competitive. From the ongoing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic to the increasing frequency and severity of natural disasters, companies must be prepared to navigate various challenges to ensure the continuity of their operations.The Todd De Voe ShowBecoming a Resilient Leader Resilient leadership is the ability to effectively navigate and overcome challenges, setbacks, and adversity to achieve success. It involves adapting to change, returning from failure, and remaining positive and focused even under challenging circumstances. Resilient leaders can draw on their inner strength and resources to persevere and find solutions to problems rather than becoming overwhelmed or discouraged. They can maintain their sense of purpose and direction and inspire and motivate others to do the same. Resilient leadership requires a combination of mental and emotional toughness, self-awareness, self-regulation, and a willingness to learn and grow. It is a critical trait for anyone in a leadership position and can help organizations and teams achieve their goals and thrive in an increasingly complex and dynamic world. Get full access to The Emergency Management Network at emnetwork.substack.com/subscribe

Outdoor Line
Hour 2: Austin Moser on Rufus Woods Rainbow and Roosevelt Kokanee

Outdoor Line

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 39:59


Tom and Joey preview the Marine Area 10 opener with Justin Wong of Cut Plug charters, and they check in on Rufus Woods and the Roosevelt with Austin Moser of Austin's Northwest Adventures. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Books in Literary Studies
Book Talk 56: Roosevelt Montás on "Great Books"

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 71:40


Roosevelt Montás is Senior Lecturer in American Studies and English at Columbia University. A specialist in Antebellum American literature and culture and in American citizenship, he focuses mainly on the history, meaning, and future of liberal education. This question motivates his book Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Why They Matter for a New Generation (Princeton University Press, 2021). “Great Books” dominate “the Core” at Columbia University, where undergraduates must complete two years of non-departmental humanities courses. Montás teaches in the Core and was for ten years the director of the Center for the Core Curriculum. From this vantage point, he considers the function of “great books” today, particularly for members of historically marginalized communities like himself. In Rescuing Socrates, he recounts how a liberal education transformed his life as a Dominican-born American immigrant. As many academics deem the Western canon to be inherently chauvinistic and the general public increasingly questions the very value of the humanities, Montás takes a different approach. He argues: “The practice of liberal education, especially in the context of a research university, is pointedly countercultural.” The New York Times praised the book for its compelling argument “for the value of a Great Books education as the foundation for receiving the benefits of everything else a school has to offer.” I spoke with Montás about the complicated value of “great books,” the potential of a humanities education, and his conviction that a teacher in the humanities can trigger for students the beginning of a lifelong investigation of the self. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in Higher Education
Book Talk 56: Roosevelt Montás on "Great Books"

New Books in Higher Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 71:40


Roosevelt Montás is Senior Lecturer in American Studies and English at Columbia University. A specialist in Antebellum American literature and culture and in American citizenship, he focuses mainly on the history, meaning, and future of liberal education. This question motivates his book Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Why They Matter for a New Generation (Princeton University Press, 2021). “Great Books” dominate “the Core” at Columbia University, where undergraduates must complete two years of non-departmental humanities courses. Montás teaches in the Core and was for ten years the director of the Center for the Core Curriculum. From this vantage point, he considers the function of “great books” today, particularly for members of historically marginalized communities like himself. In Rescuing Socrates, he recounts how a liberal education transformed his life as a Dominican-born American immigrant. As many academics deem the Western canon to be inherently chauvinistic and the general public increasingly questions the very value of the humanities, Montás takes a different approach. He argues: “The practice of liberal education, especially in the context of a research university, is pointedly countercultural.” The New York Times praised the book for its compelling argument “for the value of a Great Books education as the foundation for receiving the benefits of everything else a school has to offer.” I spoke with Montás about the complicated value of “great books,” the potential of a humanities education, and his conviction that a teacher in the humanities can trigger for students the beginning of a lifelong investigation of the self. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast
Book Talk 56: Roosevelt Montás on "Great Books"

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 71:40


Roosevelt Montás is Senior Lecturer in American Studies and English at Columbia University. A specialist in Antebellum American literature and culture and in American citizenship, he focuses mainly on the history, meaning, and future of liberal education. This question motivates his book Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Why They Matter for a New Generation (Princeton University Press, 2021). “Great Books” dominate “the Core” at Columbia University, where undergraduates must complete two years of non-departmental humanities courses. Montás teaches in the Core and was for ten years the director of the Center for the Core Curriculum. From this vantage point, he considers the function of “great books” today, particularly for members of historically marginalized communities like himself. In Rescuing Socrates, he recounts how a liberal education transformed his life as a Dominican-born American immigrant. As many academics deem the Western canon to be inherently chauvinistic and the general public increasingly questions the very value of the humanities, Montás takes a different approach. He argues: “The practice of liberal education, especially in the context of a research university, is pointedly countercultural.” The New York Times praised the book for its compelling argument “for the value of a Great Books education as the foundation for receiving the benefits of everything else a school has to offer.” I spoke with Montás about the complicated value of “great books,” the potential of a humanities education, and his conviction that a teacher in the humanities can trigger for students the beginning of a lifelong investigation of the self.

New Books in Intellectual History
Book Talk 56: Roosevelt Montás on "Great Books"

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 71:40


Roosevelt Montás is Senior Lecturer in American Studies and English at Columbia University. A specialist in Antebellum American literature and culture and in American citizenship, he focuses mainly on the history, meaning, and future of liberal education. This question motivates his book Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Why They Matter for a New Generation (Princeton University Press, 2021). “Great Books” dominate “the Core” at Columbia University, where undergraduates must complete two years of non-departmental humanities courses. Montás teaches in the Core and was for ten years the director of the Center for the Core Curriculum. From this vantage point, he considers the function of “great books” today, particularly for members of historically marginalized communities like himself. In Rescuing Socrates, he recounts how a liberal education transformed his life as a Dominican-born American immigrant. As many academics deem the Western canon to be inherently chauvinistic and the general public increasingly questions the very value of the humanities, Montás takes a different approach. He argues: “The practice of liberal education, especially in the context of a research university, is pointedly countercultural.” The New York Times praised the book for its compelling argument “for the value of a Great Books education as the foundation for receiving the benefits of everything else a school has to offer.” I spoke with Montás about the complicated value of “great books,” the potential of a humanities education, and his conviction that a teacher in the humanities can trigger for students the beginning of a lifelong investigation of the self. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Education
Book Talk 56: Roosevelt Montás on "Great Books"

New Books in Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 71:40


Roosevelt Montás is Senior Lecturer in American Studies and English at Columbia University. A specialist in Antebellum American literature and culture and in American citizenship, he focuses mainly on the history, meaning, and future of liberal education. This question motivates his book Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Why They Matter for a New Generation (Princeton University Press, 2021). “Great Books” dominate “the Core” at Columbia University, where undergraduates must complete two years of non-departmental humanities courses. Montás teaches in the Core and was for ten years the director of the Center for the Core Curriculum. From this vantage point, he considers the function of “great books” today, particularly for members of historically marginalized communities like himself. In Rescuing Socrates, he recounts how a liberal education transformed his life as a Dominican-born American immigrant. As many academics deem the Western canon to be inherently chauvinistic and the general public increasingly questions the very value of the humanities, Montás takes a different approach. He argues: “The practice of liberal education, especially in the context of a research university, is pointedly countercultural.” The New York Times praised the book for its compelling argument “for the value of a Great Books education as the foundation for receiving the benefits of everything else a school has to offer.” I spoke with Montás about the complicated value of “great books,” the potential of a humanities education, and his conviction that a teacher in the humanities can trigger for students the beginning of a lifelong investigation of the self. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/education

Think About It
Book Talk 56: Roosevelt Montás on "Great Books"

Think About It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 71:40


Roosevelt Montás is Senior Lecturer in American Studies and English at Columbia University. A specialist in Antebellum American literature and culture and in American citizenship, he focuses mainly on the history, meaning, and future of liberal education. This question motivates his book Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Why They Matter for a New Generation (Princeton University Press, 2021). “Great Books” dominate “the Core” at Columbia University, where undergraduates must complete two years of non-departmental humanities courses. Montás teaches in the Core and was for ten years the director of the Center for the Core Curriculum. From this vantage point, he considers the function of “great books” today, particularly for members of historically marginalized communities like himself. In Rescuing Socrates, he recounts how a liberal education transformed his life as a Dominican-born American immigrant. As many academics deem the Western canon to be inherently chauvinistic and the general public increasingly questions the very value of the humanities, Montás takes a different approach. He argues: “The practice of liberal education, especially in the context of a research university, is pointedly countercultural.” The New York Times praised the book for its compelling argument “for the value of a Great Books education as the foundation for receiving the benefits of everything else a school has to offer.” I spoke with Montás about the complicated value of “great books,” the potential of a humanities education, and his conviction that a teacher in the humanities can trigger for students the beginning of a lifelong investigation of the self. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Value Investing with Legends
Mitch Julis - Finding the Opportunity in Complexity

Value Investing with Legends

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 81:48


To be a good value investor, you must be a good credit analyst.   Over the years, I learned so much from the many investors I've met through Heilbrunn. I've shamelessly incorporated these ideas and insights into my lecture notes and the curriculum. Today's guest is one such person.   Mitch Julis has had a disproportionately large impact on both my thinking and the program design. Now he joins me for a conversation about the rich interactions between the nature of the firm's business operation and the liability side of the balance sheet.   Mitchell R. Julis is the Co-Founder, Co-Chairman, and Co-Chief Executive Officer of Canyon Partners, LLC. Mitch is a graduate of the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University, Harvard Law School, and Harvard Business School. He received an honorary doctorate from Yeshiva University of New York in 2011. Before forming Canyon, Mitch directed a group of professionals responsible for a distressed and special situation securities portfolio at Drexel Burnham Lambert. He was a bankruptcy and creditors' rights attorney at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz in New York.   In this episode, Mitch and I discuss his journey from Bronx to Beverly Hills, the juxtaposition of accounting and accountability, why increasing spending power can undermine our federal system of competition, the four P's of understanding governance, Mitch's accidental entry into restructuring and bankruptcy law, arbitrage opportunities that arise in distressed situations, his approach to risk assessment, and so much more!     Key Topics:   Welcome Mitch to the show (0:39) Mitch's rich childhood in the Bronx (3:14) The journey to Princeton and Mitch's goal to go to the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs (9:35) The juxtaposition of accounting and accountability (15:47) Why increasing spending power can undermine our federal system of competition (18:09) How the four P's of understanding governance play out in real-world situations (23:58) Mitch's accidental entry into restructuring and bankruptcy law (29:31) Challenging the Countryman definition of executory contract at Harvard Law (33:12) Mitch's unexpected career moves (35:39) How Mitch's time at Drexel shifted his thinking about financial markets (38:30) Exploring arbitrage opportunities that arise in distressed situations (42:05) Using accounting to its maximum potential when modeling the evolution of the balance sheet (49:09) Insights from Canyon's statement of changes in net financial obligations (50:09) Chapter 11 escape holes and loopholes created by the private equity world (54:49) Mitch's approach to risk assessment (57:08) How the next financial crisis will play out (1:03:50) What keeps Mitch up at night with worry? (1:11:08) Mitch's movie recommendations (1:15:14) Embracing a continuous learning mindset with humility (1:18:29) And much more!     Mentioned in this Episode:   Canyon Partners Richard E. Neustadt's Book | Presidential Power and the Modern Presidents: The Politics of Leadership from Roosevelt to Reagan Philip Hamburger's Book | Purchasing Submission: Conditions, Power, and Freedom Freddie Gershon's Book | Sweetie Baby Cookie Honey: A Novel Sujeet Indap & Max Frumes'Book | The Caesars Palace Coup: How a Billionaire Brawl Over the Famous Casino Exposed the Corruption of the Private Equity Industry The Offer on Paramount Plus Rabbi Benjamin Blech's Article | Bernie & The Godfather Spirited on Apple TV     Thanks for Listening!   Be sure to subscribe on Apple, Google, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. And feel free to drop us a line at valueinvesting@gsb.columbia.edu.   Follow the Heilbrunn Center on social media on Instagram, LinkedIn, and more!

New Books Network
Book Talk 56: Roosevelt Montás on "Great Books"

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 71:40


Roosevelt Montás is Senior Lecturer in American Studies and English at Columbia University. A specialist in Antebellum American literature and culture and in American citizenship, he focuses mainly on the history, meaning, and future of liberal education. This question motivates his book Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Why They Matter for a New Generation (Princeton University Press, 2021). “Great Books” dominate “the Core” at Columbia University, where undergraduates must complete two years of non-departmental humanities courses. Montás teaches in the Core and was for ten years the director of the Center for the Core Curriculum. From this vantage point, he considers the function of “great books” today, particularly for members of historically marginalized communities like himself. In Rescuing Socrates, he recounts how a liberal education transformed his life as a Dominican-born American immigrant. As many academics deem the Western canon to be inherently chauvinistic and the general public increasingly questions the very value of the humanities, Montás takes a different approach. He argues: “The practice of liberal education, especially in the context of a research university, is pointedly countercultural.” The New York Times praised the book for its compelling argument “for the value of a Great Books education as the foundation for receiving the benefits of everything else a school has to offer.” I spoke with Montás about the complicated value of “great books,” the potential of a humanities education, and his conviction that a teacher in the humanities can trigger for students the beginning of a lifelong investigation of the self. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Learning Curve: Columbia’s Prof. Roosevelt Montás on the Great Books & a Liberal Arts Education (#120)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 42:40


This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Professor Roosevelt Montás, Director of the Freedom and Citizenship Program at Columbia University, and author of the book, Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Why They Matter for a New Generation. Professor Montás shares his background as an […]

This American President
The Progressive Presidents Part 1 | Theodore Roosevelt and the Pursuit of Greatness

This American President

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 77:58


It has been said that "Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them." In his youth, there was little to indicate that Theodore Roosevelt was destined for greatness. He spent much of his childhood bedridden, suffering from asthma. Roosevelt, however, overcame his ailments and dedicated his life to achieving greatness in every aspect of his life: physically, intellectually, and professionally. When Roosevelt became president in 1901, he implemented progressive policies chiefly to make America a great nation. In this episode, we cover how Roosevelt's personal crusade changed the course of American history.JOIN PREMIUMListen ad-free for only $5/month at www.bit.ly/TAPpremiumFOLLOW USwww.linktr.ee/thisamericanpresidentFacebook: facebook.com/ThisAmerPresInstagram: instagram.com/thisamericanpresidentTwitter: twitter.com/ThisAmerPresCREDITSHost: Richard LimProducer: Michael NealArtist: Nip Rogers, www.NipRogers.com

Body Liberation for All
Helping White Women to Uproot Systemic Racism

Body Liberation for All

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 65:28


Over 20 years ago an offensive racial identity discussion at Harvard pushed Misasha Suzuki Graham and Sara Blanchard to simultaneously walk out of the room and kick off their decades-long friendship. As biracial women and parents of multiracial children, they have been uniquely aware of the impact that our nation's legacy of racism has on all racialized people. In their book and podcast, “Dear White Women,” Suzuki Graham and Blanchard answer the litany of questions that seemingly well-intentioned White folks have been asking people of color throughout this second wave of the civil rights movement. I don't know about you but I'm tired of explaining that racism wasn't solved during Obama's presidency. I'm thrilled to have a resource to share/chuck at the next person that pretends they desperately want to be part of the solution but only if it requires less effort than a Google search.

The Learning Curve
E120. Columbia’s Prof. Roosevelt Montás on the Great Books & a Liberal Arts Education

The Learning Curve

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 42:40


This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Professor Roosevelt Montás, Director of the Freedom and Citizenship Program at Columbia University, and author of the book, Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Why They Matter for a New Generation. Professor Montás shares his background as an immigrant from the Dominican Republic who... Source

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles
House Suspense: Could Moderate Republicans Elect a Democrat Speaker?

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 88:09


History was made today in Washington when California Republican Representative Kevin McCarthy failed to gain the necessary 218 votes to be elected Speaker of the House of Representatives. Mr. McCarthy's defeat today was the first time since 1923 that the US House needed multiple ballots to elect a Speaker. We will also discuss the possibility that Donald Trump may run as a third-party candidate in 2024. Rick Wiles, Doc Burkhart. Airdate 1/3/22. You can partner with us by visiting TruNews.com/donate, calling 1-800-576-2116, or by mail at PO Box 690069 Vero Beach, FL 32969.The Fauci Elf is a hilarious gift guaranteed to make your friends laugh! Order yours today! https://tru.news/faucielfIt's the Final Day! The day Jesus Christ bursts into our dimension of time, space, and matter. You can order the second edition of Rick's book, Final Day. https://www.rickwiles.com/final-day

Sportlanders, The Podcast
The Brian D. O'Leary Show - Is the money in sports worth more than the truth? - January 3, 2023

Sportlanders, The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 30:57


The Brian D. O'Leary Show January 3, 2023 BrianDOLeary.com   Fountain.FM Support us with Bitcoin/Satoshis over at Fountain.FM   For the best and most complete show notes, go to our Substack page. https://briandoleary.substack.com/   Update (moments before I hit publish): Horribly sad, if true. “There is a lot of speculation on the Internet about whether or not Damar Hamlin will recover from his injury. I am very sad to report that this is unlikely. While I very much hope that I am wrong about this, the evidence that is known is not favorable.” https://stevekirsch.substack.com/p/the-most-likely-scenario-is-that I link to another Steve Kirsch article later…   What happened last night on Monday Night Football? In broad strokes, we know what happened: a young ballplayer, Damar Hamlin, went into cardiac arrest during the course of play. But the reaction to this terrible event has been all over the board with virtue-signaling from all sides without a concern for the truth. There has been no legitimate reporting on the event from the news or sports media. Anything we're finding out is because of independent media. I am not sure what all of this means, but I have some thoughts… In this podcast, I analyze last night's events and it only runs about 30 minutes. But if you want to get a bird's eye view of what I'm talking about, the rest of these show notes should suffice. The talking heads on ESPN were stuck with talking about an event that nobody can really prepare for. Instead of rising to the occasion, the hours of coverage—until they strangely cut to an axe-throwing competition after the Bills-Bengals game was ultimately postponed for the night—were full of fluff and talking for talk's sake. We learned very little about what happened to Damar Hamlin other than he received CPR and went to the hospital and remained in stable but critical condition. Here's the play: https://youtu.be/r1Z9Vd53yhI The folks on ESPN emoted and talked. We learned nothing other than certain people lack composure on air when push comes to shove. Ironically, an article that came my way earlier today praised the efforts of the entire ESPN team and its coverage, going so far as to call it a “masterclass” and that “we'll be teaching their coverage of Monday night's story in journalism school for decades.” This is from a supposedly credible writer. He went on. “There was no speculation. No rumors. No reporting of what was being speculated on Twitter. Just honest conversations, straight reporting, real human emotion.” In case you'd like to know more about these factual but feckless statements, I analyze the situation in more detail on the podcast. One thing we didn't mention was Skip Bayless's reaction to all of this. In the first place, Skip is a world class jerk and he doesn't help himself when he tries to Tweet or talk himself out of the various predicaments he caused by his own words. Jason Whitlock Tweeted what are essentially my sentiments about Bayless in this situation: “It's all so phony. All of it. The outrage toward Skip and this reaction by Skip. It's all performance. Sad and embarrassing.” https://twitter.com/WhitlockJason/status/1610288252925222912?s=20&t=_GviJG4RxbG_dDpW8c832Q The problem in all this coverage is that nobody was even the least bit willing to put on the mere façade of being a journalist. As I saw it from the beginning, ESPN was in no position to find out the truth in what happened on Monday night. The network often acts like it has hard-hitting journalists, but many of them have proven to be total frauds. Some may do good work, but as a whole the sports journalism angle from ESPN is a joke. Look no further than the epic With the Benefit of Hindsight podcast by John Ziegler & Liz Habib. In the Penn State case and now in this recent episode, ESPN has a vested interest for the truth to NOT emerge! Sure, the Expert Class™ learned very quickly last night what “Commotio Cordis” might be. Essentially, it is freak timing from a blow to the area of the heart at an exact or precise beat that would cause cardiac arrest. It happens and probably most often in youth baseball of all things. Was Hamlin's injury a result of this? Unlikely, but not impossible or implausible. Could it have been a result of vaccine injury? Quite possible, but not a soul on television was willing to even bring it up. As I Tweeted last evening: “Moral hazard for ESPN if either likely scenarios are true. They'll never admit that football is a gladiatorial pursuit w/ obvious known risks that most players, coaches, fans & media choose to ignore. If he “shook a clot,” there's no way they could square the circle on that one” https://twitter.com/BrianDOLeary/status/1610127880851460099?s=20&t=_GviJG4RxbG_dDpW8c832Q A Substack to which I subscribe, written by Steve Kirsch was on top of this whole thing early. The article speaks for itself. https://stevekirsch.substack.com/p/what-caused-damar-hamlins-injury?r=1cx4az&utm_medium=ios&utm_campaign=post As it stands, the Bills-Bengals game won't resume this week. What does that mean for the NFL season, particularly the postseason? I don't know. Nor do I particularly care. They could call the game a tie. They could declare the Bengals the victors by virtue of them being up 7-3 when play was suspended. They could flip a coin. They could also push back the start of the postseason and play the game in a “Week 19.” What is Roger Goodell and the NFL going to do? Probably none of the above. All of this portends the rapid demise of football and all professional and high-level amateur sports. Neither the sports media nor the leagues themselves take the games or the health of the players all that seriously. Serious enough to take your money. Not much more. Admittedly, I am a sucker for sports and so they've all taken a lot of money from me over the course of my life. Of course, as frauds, the typical sports media operation is sure to supply you with all the correct emotions you are supposed to feel, but there is so much money involved that nobody is willing to ask the simplest questions, let alone the hard ones.   Article with a similar point of view as me…worth reading nonetheless: Whitlock: Damar Hamlin and sport of football are in critical condition by Jason Whitlock   Chuck Hughes The 28-year old Texas native is the only player to die during the course of play in an NFL game. In 1971, Hughes was playing for the Detroit Lions against the Chicago Bears. With about a minute left in regulation and the Bears ahead 28-23, the Lions were closing in on the Bears endzone, needing a touchdown to win the game. Hughes jogged back to the huddle near the Bears 15-yard line after a Lions incompletion on the previous play and fell face first on the Tiger Stadium turf. Reports say that Hughes was dead when he hit the grass. The number 85 for the Detroit Lions is retired for Chuck Hughes. The Lions also give out an annual award to the most improved player in the name of Chuck Hughes.     College football game mentioned: 1995 Army at Boston College   College football players mentioned: Ronnie McAda It is likely I witnessed McAda's best performance of his career. The guy was phenomenal that day. I saw Michael Vick play once at Alumni Stadium and he was more electric, but McAda was the most dominating quarterback I've ever seen for one game…and it was almost entirely rushing the football.   Doug Flutie Flutie was sensational in college. 1984 Heisman Trophy winner. Unbelievable player, really.   Tweet mentioned: From Jerry Lawler @JerryLawler: “I would be willing to bet that Damar Hamlin has suffered a cardiac arrest from the blunt trauma of that blow to his chest... I know what this is like from experience...” https://twitter.com/JerryLawler/status/1610098564373389312?s=20&t=_GviJG4RxbG_dDpW8c832Q   Myth mentioned: How Teddy Roosevelt changed college football Roosevelt did have something to do with changing the game, but TR was largely a blowhard who had delusional ideas about masculinity, especially his own. Thanks to some help and legislation on behalf of presidents TR and Woodrow Wilson—who was likely the worst president in American history (certainly in the top 5)—the game did change. Do I give these monsters any credit for the joy I experienced with game I grew up watching and playing? No I do not.       Liberty Classroom If you like what you read and hear from me, you'll probably want to check out Liberty Classroom if you are at all concerned about the education you may have missed out upon. Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom   For all the rest of it, go to BrianDOLeary.com for more information.

El Dollop
E156: Smedley Butler y el Complot contra Roosevelt

El Dollop

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 49:40


Smedley Butler fue un militar condecorado que participó en varias guerras como general y espía, pero la batalla más grande que peleó fue contra un grupo de millonarios que planeaban un golpe de estado para imponer un régimen fascista en todo el país. Síguenos y visita nuestro sitio oficial:instagram.com/eldolloptwitter.com/eldollopfacebook.com/eldolloppodcasteldollop.com/ 

Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University Podcasts

In episode three of the SOF/Heyman Bookshelf, host highlights Roosevelt Montás's Rescuing Socrates: How the Great Books Changed My Life and Why They Matter for a New Generation. Weaving together memoir and literary reflection, Rescuing Socrates describes Columbia University's renowned Core Curriculum and how four authors had a profound impact on Montás's life.

Spartacus Roosevelt Podcast
Spartacus Roosevelt Podcast, Episode 272: Staring into the Abyss, 2022 Retrospective

Spartacus Roosevelt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022


"Major Beef" by The Party Dozen from The Real Work; "Camp Viking Afghanistan" by Vatican Shadow from the Hospital Productions compilation JonBenet In Valhalla; "Take the Bus" by General Magic from Frantz; "Astral Walk" by Brandon Coleman featuring Keyon Harrold, Ben Williams and Marcus Gilmore from Interstellar Black Space; "Castles Burning" by Moon Attendant from One Last Summer; "Son of Troutdale" by Lowbelly from Night Town; "Unit of Hurt" by Severed and Said from Tragic Seeker; "Starstuff" by Blanck Mass from In Ferneaux; "Mobler" by Dungen from En ar for Mycket och Tusen Aldrig Nog; "The Place" by MONO from My Story, The Buraku Story. Courtesy of Temporary Residence; "A Lot of Kings" by Saint Abdullah featuring Aquiles Navarro, Kol from To Live A La West; "Wono San" by Joel Vandroogenbroek from Far View; "The Fire Sermon" by Julie's Haircut from Invocation and Ritual Dance of my Demon Twin; "Simple Headphone Mind" by Stereolab and Nurse With Wound from Pulse of the Early Brain: Switched on Volume 5

The Potter's House At One LA
I'm Carrying - Roosevelt Stewart

The Potter's House At One LA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 66:49


To give to ONE, click the link! https://www.one.online/give

The John Batchelor Show
8/8: Early Steps to Becoming a Power: /88: The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by Neil Lanctot

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 9:08


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 8/8: Early Steps to Becoming a Power:  /88:  The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by  Neil Lanctot  https://www.amazon.com/Approaching-Storm-Roosevelt-Wilson-Americas/dp/0735210594/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= In the early years of the twentieth century, the most famous Americans on the national stage were Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Jane Addams: two presidents and a social worker. Each took a different path to prominence, yet the three progressives believed the United States must assume a more dynamic role in confronting the growing domestic and international problems of an exciting new age.

The John Batchelor Show
1/8: Early Steps to Great Power: 1/8: The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by Neil Lanctot

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 10:08


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 1/8: Early Steps to Great Power:  1/8:  The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by  Neil Lanctot  https://www.amazon.com/Approaching-Storm-Roosevelt-Wilson-Americas/dp/0735210594/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= In the early years of the twentieth century, the most famous Americans on the national stage were Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Jane Addams: two presidents and a social worker. Each took a different path to prominence, yet the three progressives believed the United States must assume a more dynamic role in confronting the growing domestic and international problems of an exciting new age.

The John Batchelor Show
2/8: Early Steps to Great Power: 2/8: The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by Neil Lanctot

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 8:22


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. 1900 Jane Addams @Batchelorshow 2/8: Early Steps to Great Power:  2/8:  The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by  Neil Lanctot  https://www.amazon.com/Approaching-Storm-Roosevelt-Wilson-Americas/dp/0735210594/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= In the early years of the twentieth century, the most famous Americans on the national stage were Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Jane Addams: two presidents and a social worker. Each took a different path to prominence, yet the three progressives believed the United States must assume a more dynamic role in confronting the growing domestic and international problems of an exciting new age.

The John Batchelor Show
3/8: Early Steps to Becoming a Power: 3/8: The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by Neil Lanctot

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 11:12


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. 1900 @Batchelorshow 3/8: Early Steps to Becoming a Power:  3/8:  The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by  Neil Lanctot  https://www.amazon.com/Approaching-Storm-Roosevelt-Wilson-Americas/dp/0735210594/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= In the early years of the twentieth century, the most famous Americans on the national stage were Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Jane Addams: two presidents and a social worker. Each took a different path to prominence, yet the three progressives believed the United States must assume a more dynamic role in confronting the growing domestic and international problems of an exciting new age.

The John Batchelor Show
4/8: Early Steps to Becoming a Power: 4/8: The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by Neil Lanctot

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 9:14


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. 1911 @Batchelorshow 4/8: Early Steps to Becoming a Power:  4/8:  The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by  Neil Lanctot  https://www.amazon.com/Approaching-Storm-Roosevelt-Wilson-Americas/dp/0735210594/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= In the early years of the twentieth century, the most famous Americans on the national stage were Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Jane Addams: two presidents and a social worker. Each took a different path to prominence, yet the three progressives believed the United States must assume a more dynamic role in confronting the growing domestic and international problems of an exciting new age.

The John Batchelor Show
5/8: Early Steps to Becoming a Power: 5/8: The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by Neil Lanctot

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 11:32


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. 1912 @Batchelorshow 5/8: Early Steps to Becoming a Power:  5/8:  The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by  Neil Lanctot  https://www.amazon.com/Approaching-Storm-Roosevelt-Wilson-Americas/dp/0735210594/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= In the early years of the twentieth century, the most famous Americans on the national stage were Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Jane Addams: two presidents and a social worker. Each took a different path to prominence, yet the three progressives believed the United States must assume a more dynamic role in confronting the growing domestic and international problems of an exciting new age.

The John Batchelor Show
6/8: Early Steps to Becoming a Power: 6/8: The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by Neil Lanctot

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 7:14


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. 1915 @Batchelorshow 6/8: Early Steps to Becoming a Power:  6/8:  The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by  Neil Lanctot  https://www.amazon.com/Approaching-Storm-Roosevelt-Wilson-Americas/dp/0735210594/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= In the early years of the twentieth century, the most famous Americans on the national stage were Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Jane Addams: two presidents and a social worker. Each took a different path to prominence, yet the three progressives believed the United States must assume a more dynamic role in confronting the growing domestic and international problems of an exciting new age.

The John Batchelor Show
7/8: Early Steps to Becoming a Power: 7/8: The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by Neil Lanctot

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 11:28


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. 1915 @Batchelorshow 7/8: Early Steps to Becoming a Power:  7/8:  The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future, by  Neil Lanctot  https://www.amazon.com/Approaching-Storm-Roosevelt-Wilson-Americas/dp/0735210594/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= In the early years of the twentieth century, the most famous Americans on the national stage were Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Jane Addams: two presidents and a social worker. Each took a different path to prominence, yet the three progressives believed the United States must assume a more dynamic role in confronting the growing domestic and international problems of an exciting new age.

The Art of Manliness
How Polio Made a President

The Art of Manliness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 52:58 Very Popular


Of the dozens of men who have served as US president, Franklin Delano Roosevelt had a particularly close connection with the citizens he served. The only president elected to four terms, Americans hung FDR's picture up in their homes, wrote him thousands of letters, and regularly tuned in to listen to his fireside chats.My guest would say that much of the depth, gravitas, and empathy Roosevelt was able to convey to the country was not something inborn, but in fact grew out of a tragedy which befell him at the age of 39: the contraction of polio. Jonathan Darman is the author of Becoming FDR: The Personal Crisis That Made a President, and today on the show, he paints a portrait of what Roosevelt was like before he got polio, and how, despite charm and ambition, he was considered shallow and a political lightweight. We then discuss what it was like for FDR to get polio, what he did during years of bedridden convalescence, and how the disease and his rehabilitation changed him. We talk about how the influence of FDR's polio experience can be seen in the way he guided the country through the Depression and WWII, and the lesson in realistic optimism he offers us today.Connect With Jonathan DarmanJonathan's Website