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Haymarket Books Live is a regular online series of urgent political discussions, book launches, organizer roundtables, poetry jams, and more, hosted by Haymarket Books. The podcast features recordings of our livestreamed video event series. Haymarket Books is a radical, independent, nonprofit book publisher based in Chicago.

Haymarket Books


    • Nov 23, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 1h 22m AVG DURATION
    • 210 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from Haymarket Books Live

    A Pause in the Storm: Episode 2 with Hadas Thier

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 88:29

    A Pause in the Storm is a new series from Haymarket Books and Gargi Bhattacharyya. Join Gargi Bhattacharyya and one Haymarket author every month to explore ways of collectively rebuilding our crumbling world. Short and accessible, these conversations encourage us to pause and reflect on how to change everything. Our chat this month features Hadas Thier, author of A People's Guide to Capitalism: An Introduction to Marxist Economics (Haymarket Books, 2020). Economists regularly promote Capitalism as the greatest system ever to grace the planet. With the same breath, they implore us to leave the job of understanding the magical powers of the market to the “experts.” Despite the efforts of these mainstream commentators to convince us otherwise, many of us have begun to question why this system has produced such vast inequality and wanton disregard for its own environmental destruction. This book offers answers to exactly these questions on their own terms: in the form of a radical economic theory. Gargi Bhattacharyya is one of the UK's leading scholars on race and capitalism. She is the author of Rethinking Racial Capitalism (2018), Dangerous Brown Men (2008), Traffick (2005) and co-author of Empire's Endgame (2020).

    The Austrian Revolution: Book Launch and Discussion w/ Mike Davis & more

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 82:14


    Join us for a discussion of Otto Bauer's magisterial work, The Austrian Revolution. Austro-Marxism is best known for its municipal-policy reforms symbolized by ‘Red Vienna'―a vital part of the left's intellectual and historical heritage. Otto Bauer's book, available in English for the first time, tells the story of the Austrian Revolution with all the immediacy of a central participant, and all the insight of a brilliant and original theorist. This book charts the disintegration of Austria-Hungary's multinational empire and the revolutionary wave that led to short-lived council republics in Hungary and Bavaria. Along with a chronology of these revolutionary events, Bauer sets out his original views on the socialist transformation of capitalist society. His ideas are relevant to a multitude of contemporary strategies and movements, including Right to the City initiatives and the experiences of progressive municipal governments, making his work a crucial resource for the left today. Order a copy of the book: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1480-the-austrian-revolution --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Hilary Wainwright is a British sociologist, political activist and socialist feminist. She is a founding editor of Red Pepper magazine. Mike Davis is the author of City of Quartz, Late Victorian Holocausts, Buda's Wagon, and Planet of Slums. He is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship and the Lannan Literary Award. Walter Baier is a Vienna based economist and co-ordinator of the network transform! europe. He was National Chairman of the Communist Party of Austria (KPÖ) from 1994 to 2006. Dunja Larise (moderator) lectures on political theory and empirical studies of international politics. She holds a PhD in political theory from the University of Vienna. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/BAB4i2Fwt5U Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    The Hard Crowd: Rachel Kushner & Wallace Shawn in Conversation

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 69:09


    Join authors Rachel Kushner and Wallace Shawn for a conversation on Kushner's latest, The Hard Crowd. Rachel Kushner's latest collection, The Hard Crowd, addresses the most pressing political, artistic, and cultural issues of our times—and illuminates the themes and real-life experiences that inform the author's fiction. Kushner takes us on a journey through a Palestinian refugee camp, an illegal motorcycle race down the Baja Peninsula, 1970s wildcat strikes in Fiat factories, her love of classic cars, and her young life in the music scene of her hometown, San Francisco. The closing, eponymous essay is her manifesto on nostalgia, doom, and writing. Wallace Shawn will join Kushner for a conversation on The Hard Crowd, our current political situation, and what it means for art to engage with our world. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Rachel Kushner's latest book, The Hard Crowd, gathers a selection of her writing from over the course of the last twenty years. Kushner is also the author of The Mars Room, and The Flamethrowers, which was a finalist for the National Book Award and a New York Times Top Five Novel of 2013. Her debut novel, Telex from Cuba, was a finalist for the 2008 National Book Award and a New York Times bestseller and Notable Book. A collection of her early work, The Strange Case of Rachel K, was published by New Directions in 2015. Her fiction has appeared in the New Yorker, Harper's, and the Paris Review. She is the recipient of a 2013 Guggenheim Fellowship and the 2016 Harold D. Vursell Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. More at http://www.rachelkushner.com. Wallace Shawn is an Obie Award–winning playwright and a noted stage and screen actor. His plays The Designated Mourner and Marie and Bruce have been produced as films, as has his adaptation of Henrik Ibsen's A Master Builder. He is co-author of the movie "My Dinner with André" and the author of the plays The Fever, The Designated Mourner, Aunt Dan and Lemon, and Grasses of a Thousand Colors, as well as the nonfiction books Essays (featuring the essay “Why I Call Myself a Socialist”) and Night Thoughts (Haymarket Books). His latest play, Evening at the Talk House, premiered at the Socialism conference in Chicago and was performed at The National Theatre in London and The New Group in New York. His plays The Designated Mourner and Grasses of a Thousand Colors will soon be available as multipart podcasts. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/GjkhBO97Bzw Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    Punishing Immigrants: U.S. Immigration Enforcement and the Prison Industrial Complex

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 115:31

    Join us for an educational lecture on immigration enforcement, the criminal punishment system, and data literacy. Calls for abolition and defund the police have at times been coupled with calls to abolish ICE and organizing against criminalization and punishment often includes targeting immigration enforcement. Immigrant rights work is increasingly connecting to the decades-long movement to abolish the prison industrial complex. This educational lecture seeks to support these efforts by encouraging political and data literacy regarding the intersection of the U.S. criminal punishment system (often called the criminal justice system) and U.S. immigration enforcement. Topics that will be covered are some of the differences between immigration law and criminal law, a brief overview of the Department of Homeland Security's immigration enforcement agencies, contemporary policies and programs that involve cooperation between immigration enforcement and police and the criminal punishment system, various categories of immigrants/immigration programs, patterns of detention and deportation, and differences between criminal and non-criminal deportations. We will also learn about some of the relevant data sources. While this event and all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able please make a solidarity donation in support of this important work. Part of the proceeds from this event will go to the UndocuBlack Network (UBN) and the Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI). Speaker: Tamara K. Nopper is a sociologist, writer, educator, and editor with experience in Asian American community organizing, immigrant rights, and anti-war activism. She is the editor of We Do This ‘Til We Free Us: Abolitionist Organizing and Transforming Justice, a book of Mariame Kaba's writings and interviews (Haymarket Books), and researcher and writer of several data stories for Colin Kaepernick's Abolition for the People series. She is a Fellow at Data for Progress, an Affiliate of The Center for Critical Race and Digital Studies, a member of the inaugural cohort of the NYU Institute for Public Interest Technology, and a 2021-2022 Faculty Fellow at Data & Society as part of a cohort focused on race and technology. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/ArmHR6QrPhw Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Grasping at the Root: White Supremacy and the So-Called “War on Terror”

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 76:43

    Join us for a discussion of white supremacy, the human rights crisis, and public policy in the twenty years since 9/11. The Institute for Policy Studies, Haymarket Books, and the Center for Constitutional Rights present “Grasping at the Root: White Supremacy and the so-called “War on Terror”, the second event of a 4-part series marking the 20th anniversary of 9/11. The conversation with scholars, lawyers and journalists is an invitation to reflect and interrogate the pillars of white supremacy upon which the U.S. constructed the last twenty years of policy. The post-9/11 human rights crisis is but the latest chapter in over half a millennium of colonialism, capitalism and war. Only in situating today's injustices within a history of U.S. domination, exceptionalism and impunity, can we begin to chart a new future rooted in accountability, solidarity and interdependence. To mark the 20th anniversary of 9/11, the Center for Constitutional Rights, Haymarket Books and our partners are pleased to present a 4-part series, "Just Resistance: 20 years of global struggle against the post-9/11 human rights crisis." The series is an opportunity to bring together our colleagues and comrades from impacted communities across the world, to center stories of survival, and to contextualize the last two decades of U.S. policy within a history of imperialism, domination and impunity. Speakers: Nana Gyamfi is the Executive Director of Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI), the largest Black-led social justice organization representing the nearly 10 million Black immigrants, refugees, and families living in the U.S. A Movement attorney for the past 25 years, Nana is co-founder of Justice Warriors 4 Black Lives and Human Rights Advocacy, both dedicated to fighting for human rights and Black liberation. She is the current President of the National Conference of Black Lawyers, and a member of the Movement for Black Lives Policy Table. Nana is a former professor in the Pan African Studies Department at California State University Los Angeles, and has long been a sought after voice for legal and political insight into issues affecting Black communities. Tiara R. Na'puti is a Chamoru scholar (Guåhan/Guam) who focuses on issues of Indigenous movements, colonialism, and militarism in the Mariana Islands archipelago. She is currently a 2021 Mellon/ACLS Scholars and Society Fellow working with Independent Guåhan a community organization educating the island's public about sovereignty and addressing climate change as an urgent challenge brought about by the island's colonial political status. She is also a new faculty member in the Department of Global & International Studies at University of California Irvine. Dr. Maha Hilal is a researcher and writer on institutionalized Islamophobia and author of the forthcoming book Innocent Until Proven Muslim: Islamophobia, the War on Terror, and the Muslim Experience Since 9/11. Her writings have appeared in Vox, Al Jazeera, Middle East Eye, Newsweek, Business Insider, and Truthout, She is also Co-Director of Justice for Muslims Collective where she focuses on political consciousness and narrative shifting programming. Dr. Hilal earned her doctorate in May 2014 from the Department of Justice, Law and Society at American University in Washington, D.C. The title of her dissertation is “Too damn Muslim to be trusted: The War on Terror and the Muslim American response." Moderator: Khury Petersen-Smith is the Michael Ratner Middle East Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, where he researches and discusses the War on Terror, the militarization of borders, and the Palestinian freedom struggle. Khury is a student of Black internationalism, researches US militarization and resistance in the Pacific, and builds solidarity against US empire. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/WRhcwcJiuEk Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Study and Struggle Critical Conversation #2: Abolition Must Be Green

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 78:39

    A conversation about centering climate justice, land, food sovereignty, and fighting environmental racism in the struggle for abolition. Study and Struggle organizes against criminalization and incarceration in Mississippi through mutual aid, political education, and community building. We provide a bilingual Spanish and English curriculum with discussion questions and reading materials, as well as financial support, to over 100 participants in radical study groups inside and outside prisons in Mississippi. These groups correspond with groups from across the country through our pen pal program. We regularly come together for online conversations hosted by Haymarket Books. The curriculum, built by a combination of currently- and formerly-incarcerated people, scholars, and community organizers, centers around the interrelationship between prison abolition and immigrant justice, with a particular attention to freedom struggles in Mississippi and the U.S. South. For our Fall 2021 four month curriculum, we have borrowed and augmented Ruth Wilson Gilmore's argument that “abolition is about presence, not absence. It has to be green, and in order to be green, it has to be red (anti-capitalist), and in order to be red, it has to be international," having added “intersectional” as a fourth analytical category that we hope moves us beyond “single-issue” organizing. Our Critical Conversations webinar series, hosted by Haymarket Books, will cover the themes for the upcoming month. Haymarket Books is an independent, radical, non-profit publisher. For more on Study and Struggle: https://www.studyandstruggle.com/ --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our second webinar theme is "Green" and will be a conversation about what it means for abolition to be life-sustaining, and how abolition demands we center questions of climate justice, land, food sovereignty, and environmental racism. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of commissary and mutual aid for our incarcerated participants. Speakers: J.T. Roane is assistant professor of African and African American Studies in the School of Social Transformation at Arizona State University. He received his PhD in history from Columbia University and he is a 2008 graduate of the Carter G. Woodson Institute at the University of Virginia. He currently serves as the lead of the Black Ecologies Initiative at ASU's Institute for Humanities Research. He is the former co-senior editor of Black Perspectives, the digital platform of the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS). Roane's scholarly essays have appeared in Souls Journal, The Review of Black Political Economy, Current Research in Digital History and Signs. His work has also appeared in venues such as Washington Post, The Brooklyn Rail, Pacific Standard, and The Immanent Frame, Roane was 2020-2021 National Endowment for the Humanities/Mellon Foundation Research Fellow at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library. Bigg Villainus is an artist, musician, founder of Overthrow Media and a radical revolutionary who has been dedicated to radical struggle and revolutionary growth for over a decade. Currently an organizer with Fight Toxic Prisons they bring a lot of abolitionist and direct action history and experience to the table. As well as a lumpen proletariat perspective and Analysis. They are firm advocates of bottom-up organizing. As well as having a firm decolonial Praxis. They have a long history of organizing with groups such as black Frontline movement, outside agitators, black lives matter, occupied, and many more. They are currently on a national tour, networking, spreading abolition and music. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/PH6CWhLKODY Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Abortion is Won in the Streets: The Past, Present, and Future of the Fight for Reproductive Freedom

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 86:49

    Jenny Brown and Mexico-based abortion activist Lluvia “Rayito” del Rayo Rocha Perez discuss the struggle for reproductive justice. Join author Jenny Brown in conversation with Mexico-based abortion activist Lluvia “Rayito” del Rayo Rocha Perez as they discuss the history and future of the struggle for abortion rights and reproductive freedom. In 1973, the landmark Supreme Court ruling in Roe v. Wade legalized abortion in the United States. This is usually where the story begins and ends. But legal abortion was not handed down by the courts, it was won in the streets through years of grassroots mobilizations and political organizing led by activists during the Women's Liberation movement. With all eyes on Texas, where the state legislature has passed a devastating 6-week abortion ban, today's abortion rights movement must again take to the streets to turn back a wave of rightwing attacks on abortion access. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Jenny Brown was a leader in the fight to get the morning-after pill over the counter in the US and a plaintiff in the winning lawsuit. She writes, teaches, and organizes with the feminist group National Women's Liberation and is the author of Without Apology:The Abortion Struggle Now and Birth Strike: The Hidden Fight over Women's Work. Lluvia (“Rayito”) del Rayo Rocha Perez is an activist for abortion rights in Juarez, Mexico where the federal court recently decriminalized abortion under pressure from mobilizations of activists. This event is co-sponsored by Chicago for Abortion Rights, NYC for Abortion Rights, the DSA Socialist Feminist working group and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/76a_vewAWss Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Noam Chomsky on the Consequences of Capitalism

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 94:19


    Noam Chomsky discusses the brutal realities laid bare by the COVID-19 pandemic—and the urgent need for an alternative to capitalism. Covid-19 has revealed glaring failures and monstrous brutalities in the current capitalist system. It represents both a crisis and an opportunity. Everything depends on the actions that people take into their own hands. Join Noam Chomsky for a conversation with E. Tammy Kim. Noam Chomsky is Institute Professor (emeritus) in the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Laureate Professor of Linguistics and Agnese Nelms Haury Chair in the Program in Environment and Social Justice at the University of Arizona. He is the author of numerous best-selling political works, which have been translated into scores of countries worldwide. Among his most recent books are Who Rules the World?, Requiem for the American Dream, and What Kind of Creatures Are We? Haymarket has published twelve of his classic works with new introductions, as well as his books Masters of Mankind, Hopes and Prospects, Intervenciones, On Palestine and Gaza in Crisis (with Ilan Pappé and Frank Barat), Optimism Over Despair and The Precipice (with C. J. Polychroniou), and Consequences of Capitalism (with Marv Waterstone). In spring 2022, Haymarket is publishing a new compilation of Chomsky's 1984–1996 interviews with David Barsamian, Chronicles of Dissent. E. Tammy Kim is a freelance magazine reporter, a contributing opinion writer at The New York Times, and a co-host of the Time to Say Goodbye podcast, based in Brooklyn, New York. Her work has appeared in outlets including The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The New York Review of Books, Columbia Journalism Review, and The Nation. She previously worked on the editorial staff of The New Yorker and as a national features writer at Al Jazeera America. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is a partnership between Lannan Foundation and Haymarket Books. Lannan Foundation's Readings & Conversations series features inspired writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as cultural freedom advocates with a social, political, and environmental justice focus. We are excited to offer these programs online to a global audience. Video and audio recordings of all events are available at lannan.org. Haymarket Books is a radical, independent, nonprofit book publisher based in Chicago. Our mission is to publish books that contribute to struggles for social and economic justice. We strive to make our books a vibrant and organic part of social movements and the education and development of a critical, engaged, international left. Lannan Foundation is a family foundation dedicated to cultural freedom, diversity, and creativity through projects that support exceptional contemporary artists and writers, inspired Native activists in rural communities, and social justice advocates. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/y8UciV-Frr8 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    What the Jewish Left Learned From Occupy

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 70:16

    Join Haymarket and Jewish Currents for a discussion about what the Jewish left learned from Occupy Wall Street. This fall, the tenth anniversary of Occupy Wall Street also marks a decade since what came to be known as “Occupy Judaism,” a loose series of ritual protests that emerged at Zuccotti Park and at other Occupy encampments around the country. The most visible of these took the form of a Kol Nidre, the evening service that marks the beginning of Yom Kippur, which fell on October 7th in 2011, a few weeks into Occupy Wall Street's short history. As the holiday approached, a group of Jewish participants in the nascent movement, led by organizer Daniel Sieradski, began planning a service to be held in a plaza across the street from Zuccotti Park. The event that is remembered as Occupy Yom Kippur drew hundreds of people and attracted considerable press attention, registering a new current in American Jewish life. Occupy Yom Kippur, and the broader activities of Occupy Judaism, turned out to presage a much larger wave of left Jewish movement-building. Though most Jewish organizers at Occupy were not involved in Occupy Judaism, or in Jewish organizing more generally, many of the founders of organizations like IfNotNow first came together in Zuccotti Park; the movement's energy also revitalized already-existing groups like Jews for Racial and Economic Justice (JFREJ). Ten years ago, identity-based organizing occurred only on Occupy's fringes, and anti-racist and anti-imperialist organizing, including around the occupation of Palestine, was pushed outside the movement's frame altogether. But in the years since, Occupy's limitations have impelled a generation of organizers to try to rectify its omissions, galvanizing anti-racist organizing in the US and a new wave of Palestine solidarity activism. Following a Jewish Currents oral history on the same topic, this event will explore how the contemporary Jewish left was changed—perhaps, formed—by Occupy Wall Street ten years ago. Speakers: Daniel Sieradksi is a web developer and digital strategist as well as an advocacy journalist, digital organizer, and movement-builder. He has worked with a variety of organizations, including Repair the World, JTA News, JDub Records, the JCC in Manhattan, the Educational Alliance, Jewish Funds for Justice, and the New Israel Fund. Sieradski is the former publisher of the pioneering weblog Jewschool.com and the founder of Occupy Judaism. Tamara Shapiro (Tammy) is the Program Director for the NYC Network of Worker Cooperatives. Previously she was one of the lead coordinators of Occupy Sandy, a citizen-led relief effort, as well as Rockaway Wildfire and Worker Owned Rockaway Cooperatives, a worker-owned coop incubation project with residents hit by the hurricane. She also served as a lead strategist and facilitator of the InterOccupy network, created and implemented a networked hub structure for The People's Climate March, and worked at The Murphy Institute for Labor Studies. Prior to these roles, she was the first Director of J Street U, and one of the founders of IfNotNow. Audrey Sasson is the Executive Director of Jews for Racial & Economic Justice, and the organization's first Mizrahi leader to serve in the position. She has 25 years of broad movement experience as a social worker, organizer, coalition-builder, and campaign director, on issues ranging from immigrant worker struggles and tenant rights to sustainable economies and racial justice. Arielle Angel is the editor-in-chief of Jewish Currents. This event is sponsored by Haymarket Books and Jewish Currents. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/le12N2Q06t0 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    The Border Crossed Us: The Case for Opening the US-Mexico Border

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 92:31


    Join us for a discussion about how re-building the international labor movement requires solidarity with migrant workers and opening borders Join Justin Akers Chacón, Yanny Guzmán, and Magally “Maga” Miranda Alcázar for a discussion about the history and function of the US-Mexico border, why we should fight to open it, and the way forward for the migrant justice movement. This event marks the release of Justin Akers Chacón's latest book, The Border Crossed Us: The Case for Opening the US-Mexico Border. Contemporary North American capitalism relies heavily on an inter-connected working class which extends across the border. Cross-border production and supply chains, logistics networks, and retail and service firms have aligned and fused a growing number of workers into one common class, whether they live in the US or Mexico. While money moves without restriction, the movement of displaced migrant workers across borders is restricted and punished. But despite the growth and violence of the police state dedicated to the repression of transborder populations—the migra-state—migrant workers have been at the forefront of class struggle in the United States. This timely book persuasively argues that labor and migrant solidarity movements are already showing how and why, in order to fight for justice and re-build the international union movement, we must open the border --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Justin Akers Chacón is an activist, labor unionist, and educator living in the San Diego-Tijuana border region. He is a Professor of Chicana/o History at San Diego City College. His most recent book is The Border Crossed Us: The Case for Opening the US-Mexico Border. He is also the author of No One is Illegal (with Mike Davis) and Radicals in the Barrio. Magally “Maga” Miranda Alcázar (she/they) is a graduate student in Chicana/o and Central American Studies at UCLA. Using methods that emphasize the co-production of knowledge with rank-and-file workers, their research explores the contested meanings of care, work and Latinidad in the context of the global economy of care. Maga is also the co-founder of the multimedia platform SAL(T): Xicana Marxist Thoughts. Yanny Guzmán is a Xicana living on Lenape land, now known as the Bronx. She is a daughter of immigrant parents indigenous to Mexico and Ecuador. She is a socialist, activist, organizer and rank & file union member. Currently she is a tenant organizer and member of the South Bronx Tenants Movement, a legal advocate for low income tenants in the Bronx, and a member of Southern Solidarity, a grassroots, community-based group of volunteers in solidarity with the unhoused in their quest toward liberation. She previously was a writer, reporter, website administrator, and a graphic designer for the Working Class Heroes Radio. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Order a copy of The Border Crossed Us: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1655-the-border-crossed-us --------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is sponsored by Haymarket Books. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of our important publishing and programming work. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/IBZi8dVGrZU Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    Angela Davis, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, & Mike Davis on Abolition, Cultural Freedom, Liberation

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 84:56


    Join 2020 Lannan Prize recipients Angela Y. Davis, Mike Davis, and Ruth Wilson Gilmore for a conversation hosted by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor. The Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize for 2020 was awarded to Angela Y. Davis for her lifetime achievements as a public intellectual advocating for racial, gender, and economic justice; to Mike Davis for his life's work as a public intellectual who encourages critical analysis of society in the service of constructing an alternative, post-capitalist future in both theory and practice; and Ruth Wilson Gilmore for a lifetime of achievement as a public intellectual working toward the decarceration of California, the United States, and the world. Join all three, along with Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor for a conversation on abolition, cultural freedom, and liberation. Speakers: Mike Davis, professor emeritus of creative writing at UC Riverside, joined the San Diego chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality in 1962 at age 16 and the struggle for racial and social equality has remained the lodestar of his life. His City of Quartz challenged reigning celebrations of Los Angeles from the perspectives of its lost radical past and insurrectionary future. His wide-ranging work has married science, archival research, personal experience, and creative writing with razor-sharp critiques of empires and ruling classes. He embodies the Lannan vision of working at the intersection of art and social justice. Angela Y. Davis is Distinguished Professor Emerita in the History of Consciousness and Feminist Studies Departments at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Dr. Davis grew up in Birmingham, Alabama, and has been an activist and Marxist-Feminist in the Black Power and abolitionist movements since the late 1960s. In the 1980s, her book Women, Race and Class helped to establish the concept of intersectionality. She also helped to develop the concept of prison abolition, especially in her books Are Prisons Obsolete? . Ruth Wilson Gilmore is Professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences and Director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the City University of New York Graduate Center. Co-founder of many grassroots organizations including the California Prison Moratorium Project, Critical Resistance, and the Central California Environmental Justice Network, Gilmore is author of the prize-winning Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California. Recent publications include, co-edited with Paul Gilroy, Stuart Hall: Selected Writings on Race and Difference. Forthcoming projects include Change Everything: Racial Capitalism and the Case for Abolition; Abolition Geography: Essays Toward Liberation. Gilmore has lectured in Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor writes and speaks on Black politics, social movements, and racial inequality in the United States. She is author of From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation (a Lannan Cultural Freedom Especially Notable Book Award recipient) and editor of How We Get Free. Her third book, Race for Profit was a finalist for a National Book Award for nonfiction, and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for History. She is a contributing writer at The New Yorker and professor at Princeton University. This event is a partnership between Lannan Foundation and Haymarket Books. Lannan Foundation's Readings & Conversations series features inspired writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as cultural freedom advocates with a social, political, and environmental justice focus. Lannan Foundation is a family foundation dedicated to cultural freedom, diversity, and creativity through projects that support exceptional contemporary artists and writers, inspired Native activists in rural communities, and social justice advocates. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/WLO0UuSnPzU Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    Revolutionary Rehearsals in the Neoliberal Age w/ Frances Fox Piven & more

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 89:43

    Join Haymarket Books and Spectre Journal for a conversation on revolution in the contemporary era. The last three decades have seen an increase in the number of political upheavals that challenge existing power structures, many of them taking the form of urban revolts. Revolutionary Rehearsals in the Neoliberal Age explores a series of these upheavals--in Eastern Europe, South Africa, Indonesia, Argentina, Bolivia, Venezuela, sub-Saharan Africa (including Congo, Zimbabwe, Burkina Faso) and Egypt. In this book launch scholars of and participants in some of these revolutionary upheavals will consider what lessons we can draw from these moments and movements that brought the system to its knees, before it rallied and turned back the tides of sweeping change. Order a copy of the book from Haymarket: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1653-revolutionary-rehearsals-in-the-neoliberal-age --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Cinzia Arruzza is associate professor of philosophy at the New School for Social Research and Eugene Lang College. She is the Vice-President of the New School AAUP chapter and the co-author of Feminism for the 99%. A Manifesto. She is a member of the editorial board of Spectre Journal. Gareth Dale teaches politics at Brunel University. He is the author of The East German Revolution of 1989. Frances Fox Piven is a distinguished professor of political science and sociology at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. She is a co-author, with Richard A. Cloward, of The Breaking of the American Social Compact; a co-author, with Lorraine C. Minnite and Margaret Groarke, of Keeping Down the Black Vote: Race and the Demobilization of American Voters; and the author of The War at Home: The Domestic Costs of Bush's Militarism and Who's Afraid of Frances Fox Piven?: The Essential Writings of the Professor Glenn Beck Loves to Hate. She lives in New York City. Sameh Naguib teaches sociology at the American University in Cairo and has written extensively on politics in Egypt and the Middle East. He is also a founding member of the Revolutionary Socialist Movement in Egypt. --------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is sponsored by Spectre Journal and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/OyRXyOXZyv0 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Not a Nation of Immigrants: Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, History w/ Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 86:02

    Join Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Bill Fletcher Jr. for an urgent discussion of settler colonialism, white supremacy, and a history of exclusion Not “A Nation of Immigrants”: Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, and a History of Erasure and Exclusion, a new book from Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, debunks the pervasive and self-congratulatory myth that our country is proudly founded by and for immigrants, and urges readers to embrace a more complex and honest history of the United States. Whether in political debates or discussions about immigration around the kitchen table, many Americans, regardless of party affiliation, will say proudly that we are a nation of immigrants. In this bold new book, historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz asserts this ideology is harmful and dishonest because it serves to mask and diminish the US's history of settler colonialism, genocide, white supremacy, slavery, and structural inequality, all of which we still grapple with today. While some of us are immigrants or descendants of immigrants, others are descendants of white settlers who arrived as colonizers to displace those who were here since time immemorial, and still others are descendants of those who were kidnapped and forced here against their will. This paradigm shifting new book from the highly acclaimed author of An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States charges that we need to stop believing and perpetuating this simplistic and ahistorical idea and embrace the real (and often horrific) history of the United States. ——————————————————————————————————— Get the book, Not “A Nation of Immigrants” from Beacon Press: http://www.beacon.org/Not-A-Nation-of-Immigrants-P1641.aspx ——————————————————————————————————— Speakers: Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz is a historian, writer, speaker, and professor emerita at California State University East Bay. She is author of numerous scholarly Indigenous related books and articles, including Roots of Resistance: A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico and The Great Sioux Nation, as well as a memoir trilogy and is author of the award-winning book, An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States. Her book Loaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment was published in 2018, and her new book, Not “A Nation of Immigrants”: Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, and a History of Erasure and Exclusion is out now from Beacon Press. Bill Fletcher Jr is the former president of TransAfrica Forum; a Senior Scholar with the Institute for Policy Studies; and in the leadership of several other projects. Fletcher is the co-author (with Peter Agard) of The Indispensable Ally: Black Workers and the Formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1934-1941; the co-author (with Dr. Fernando Gapasin) of Solidarity Divided: The crisis in organized labor and a new path toward social justice, and the author of “They're Bankrupting Us!” And 20 Other Myths about Unions. Fletcher is a syndicated columnist and a regular media commentator on television, radio and the Web. This event is sponsored by Beacon Press and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/bNvn0jVWcfw Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Fortress Europe, Fortress USA: How Borders Work

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 93:48


    Join Haymarket Books and Salvage for a discussion of Fortress Europe, Fortress USA: How Borders Work Contemporary capitalism relies heavily on an inter-connected working class which extends across borders. Cross-border production and supply chains, logistics networks, and retail and service firms have aligned and fused a growing number of workers into one common class, regardless of where they happen to live. While money moves without restriction, the movement of displaced migrant workers across borders is restricted, punished—often violently so. And all of this is before imperial adventures and decades of neoliberal structural adjustment policies conspire to create the dire circumstances that lead to “refugee crises.” In both the US and across Europe this context has been seized on and converted to political fodder by mainstream parties of the liberal and the reactionary varieties. While often flavored differently—from outright scapegoating of migrants to handwringing calls for ‘kinder-gentler' deportation regimes—the growth and violence of the police state dedicated to the repression of transborder populations has proceeded unabated for decades. Drawing on Justin Akers Chacón's new book "The Border Crossed Us", and Chloe Haralambous's work with Sea-Watch, this Salvage Live event will look at the differences and similarities between Fortress USA and Fortress Europe, examine how to effectively dismantle their respective border regimes, and aim to explain how borders work (and for whom). The conversation will be hosted by Annie Olaloku-Teriba and Barnaby Raine. This discussion will be part of the ongoing Salvage Live events series, hosted by Haymarket Books. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Justin Akers Chacón is an activist, labor unionist, and educator living in the San Diego-Tijuana border region. He is a Professor of Chicana/o History at San Diego City College. His most recent book is The Border Crossed Us: The Case for Opening the US-Mexico Border. He is also the author of No One is Illegal (with Mike Davis) and Radicals in the Barrio. Chloe Haralambous is a member of Sea-Watch, participating in and coordinating maritime rescue missions in the Central Mediterranean migration corridor to Europe, and the co-founder of the Mosaik Support Center for Refugees and Locals on the Greek island of Lesvos. She is also a PhD candidate in comparative literature at Columbia University. Annie Olaloku-Teriba is a writer and podcaster whose research focuses on how neoliberalism has transformed the theory and practice of ‘race.' Barnaby Raine is writing his PhD at Columbia University on visions of ending capitalism. He teaches at the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/bPCaw1e-3dA Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    The Second International and Revolutionary Marxism

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 90:03


    Join Mike Taber, Eric Blanc, Lars Lih, and Anne McShane for a book launch celebrating the release of Under the Socialist Banner: Resolutions of the Second International, 1889–1912, edited by Taber. Recent years have seen a massive growth of interest in socialism, particularly among young people. But few are fully aware of socialism's revolutionary history. For this reason, an appreciation of the Second International—often called the “Socialist International”—during its Marxist years is particularly relevant. What is the record of the Second International in its Marxist years? What is its legacy, and what lessons does it offer for today? These and other questions will be discussed. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Order a Copy of Under the Socialist Banner: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1649-under-the-socialist-banner --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Eric Blanc is the author of Red State Revolt: The Teachers' Strike Wave and Working-Class Politics and Revolutionary Social Democracy: Working-Class Politics Across the Russian Empire, 1882-1917. Lars T. Lih is an independent scholar who lives in Montreal. He is the author of Bread and Authority in Russia, 1914-1921, co-author of Stalin's Letters to Molotov , author of Lenin Rediscovered: What Is to Be Done? In Context , and co-editor, with Ben Lewis, of Zinoviev and Martov: Head to Head in Halle . He has also authored a short biography entitled Lenin . At present, he is working on a study of the 1917 revolution that brings out the overlooked role of consensus and continuity in the Bolshevik outlook. Mike Taber is the editor of Under the Socialist Banner: Resolutions of the Second International, 1889–1912. He has edited and prepared a number of other books related to the history of revolutionary and working-class movements—from collections of documents of the Communist International under Lenin to works by figures such as Leon Trotsky, Malcolm X, and Che Guevara. Anne McShane has been involved in Marxist politics for over 30 years. She has a particular interest in the struggle for women's emancipation within socialist projects and has completed a PhD on the role of the Zhenotdel (Women's Department of the CPSU) in Soviet Central Asia. She works as a human rights lawyer in Ireland. This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and Verso Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/wcdUfdo2C_w Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    What's Happening in Myanmar?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 90:27

    Join us to discuss the popular uprising in Myanmar and its global repercussions in labor, feminist dynamics, and for ethnic minorities. A panel of women will discuss three specific aspects of this momentous upheaval: labor struggles, the feminist dynamic, and the role of ethnic minorities. Since February, an uprising has been in progress against a military coup in Myanmar. The military, which has been in power since 1948 when the country became independent from Britain, declared the coup to overturn the results of a legitimate election in which the National League for Democracy gained a majority of seats in the parliament. Over 1000 protesters have been killed, over 4000 arrested and 20 sentenced to death since the coup. The majority of the population have been denied any type of COVID care or vaccination. A general strike involving most sectors of the population has been ongoing. Women, who have been explicitly challenging misogyny and the second-class status of women in Burmese society, have come out in support of the uprising. Various oppressed national minority populations, including the Rohingya, have also joined the uprising. The opposition National Unity Government is now calling for a federalist alternative to the military-civilian government that ruled from 2015 on. The combined might of the capitalist state-army, which promotes ethno-religious chauvinism and misogyny, and the important strategic role which Myanmar plays for various global powers, makes its military government hugely powerful. Authoritarian powers around the world are also learning from the coup for their own fascistic purposes. The struggle in Myanmar and similar struggles around the world cannot move forward without global grassroots solidarity to oppose the military government and to give voice to Myanmar women, striking labor activists and ethnic minorities. Speakers: Debbie Stothard is an active promoter of human rights in Burma and the ASEAN region. During her 32-year career, she has worked as a journalist, community education consultant, governmental advisor, and trainer in Malaysia, Australia, and Thailand. In 1996, she founded the Alternative ASEAN Network on Burma (ALTSEAN-Burma) and was elected Secretary-General of the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH) in 2013. She developed the first women-specific human rights training program for Myanmar in 1997, an initiative which is ongoing, and has supported many local and national young women leaders in Myanmar. Yasmin Ullah is an independent Rohingya social justice activist. She was born in the Northern Rakhine state of Myanmar. Her family fled to Thailand in 1995 when she was a child and she remained a stateless refugee until moving to Canada in 2011. Yasmin has served as the President of the Rohingya Human Rights Network, a non-profit group led by activists across Canada advocating and raising public awareness of the Rohingya genocide. Myra Dahgaypaw is the Managing Director of the U.S. Campaign for Burma. She is a Karen human rights activist from Karen State, Eastern Burma. She was an internally displaced person and a refugee prior to resettling in the U.S. at age of 13. Myra has played a strong role in her community as an organizer and a human rights advocate. Previously, Myra worked as a human rights advocate at the United Nations with the Burma Fund United Nations Office. Moderator Frieda Afary is an Iranian American librarian, translator, and activist. She produces the blog Iranian Progressives in Translation and writes about the Middle East and the politics of solidarity for a variety of publications, including New Politics magazine. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/hyXXPJxnq6Y Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    A Pause in the Storm: Episode 1 with Rory Fanning

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 33:16

    A Pause in the Storm is a new series from Haymarket Books and Gargi Bhattacharyya. Join Gargi Bhattacharyya and one Haymarket author every month to explore ways of collectively rebuilding our crumbling world. Short and accessible, these conversations encourage us to pause and reflect on how to change everything. Our chat this month features Rory Fanning, author of Worth Fighting For (Haymarket, 2014). In 2008, Rory walked across the United States for his friend Pat Tillman. Pat's death by friendly fire in Afghanistan was covered up just days before Rory left the Army Rangers as a conscientious objector. Worth Fighting For traces Rory's journey across the US, but also his political journey towards becoming a socialist and anti-imperialist. Gargi Bhattacharyya is one of the UK's leading scholars on race and capitalism. She is the author of Rethinking Racial Capitalism (2018), Dangerous Brown Men (2008), Traffick (2005) and co-author of Empire's Endgame (2020).

    Mi María: Surviving the Storm—Voices from Puerto Rico

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 71:46

    Join us for a conversation about recovering from climate disaster and building community within the context of colonialism in Puerto Rico. Celebrate the launch of Mi María: Surviving the Storm, a new book from Voice of Witness and Haymarket Books, with a roundtable conversation about the aftermath of Hurricane María in Puerto Rico. Mi María: Surviving the Storm brings together 17 first-person stories that explore how government neglect and colonialism impact recovery, how communities come together in the wake of disaster, and how precarity and inequity are exacerbated on the frontlines of the climate crisis. Weaving together long-form oral histories and shorter testimonios, the book offers a multivocal history of the storm and its long aftermath as people waited for relief and aid that rarely arrived and communities collectively organized to support one another in recovery. This event is cosponsored by Haymarket Books and Voice of Witness. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able please make a solidarity donation in support of our important educational and publishing work. Donations from this event will support our work with Voice of Witness. You can also support by purchasing the book, Mi María: Surviving the Storm, online here: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1746-mi-maria-surviving-the-storm Speakers: Dr. Ricia Chansky is a professor in the English department at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez and the co-editor of Mi María: Surviving the Storm. She is the co-editor of the scholarly journal, a/b: Auto/Biography Studies and the editor of the Routledge Auto/Biography Studies book series. Ricia is also a Research Affiliate at the York University Centre for Research in Latin America and the Caribbean and a Global Fellow at the Brown University Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Studies. For her work directing the large-scale public humanities project, “Mi María: Puerto Rico after the Hurricane,” Ricia won the MLA Innovation in the Humanities Award and the Oral History Association's Post-Secondary Teaching Award, and was selected as a partner in the Humanities Action Lab. She has been recognized by the Simon Wiesenthal Center/Museum of Tolerance as a Global Human Rights Leader in the Climate Crisis. Zaira Arvelo Alicea is a narrator in Mi María: Surviving the Storm and the Curriculum Specialist for the project. Zaira is a writer, editor, and educator with a focus on English language learners (ELLs) and equity in the continental US and Puerto Rico. She was born in Lares, Puerto Rico, a mountainous town in the archipelago with a tradition of anticolonial insurgency. Zaira and her husband survived Hurricane María by floating on an air mattress for sixteen hours, trapped in their home. Her story highlights several failures in the federal disaster-response system, which led them to remain homeless for well over a year after the hurricane. She currently lives on Puerto Rico's largest island where she spearheads a small business. Lorel Cubano Santiago is a narrator in Mi María: Surviving the Storm and a community organizer with a background in tourism. She is the founder of the Old San Juan Heritage Foundation and the community arts center Colectivo PerlArte. After Hurricane María, Lorel mobilized mutual aid efforts with her community to feed hundreds of people despite not receiving any aid from the supply ships that docked just minutes away from their neighborhood of La Perla in San Juan. Brenda Flores Santiago is a researcher, translator, and oral historian. Brenda was a student interviewer for the Mi María project at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez. She is currently a graduate student in the Master of Arts in Translation and Interpreting program at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/4J-e1ITH3ZQ Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Study and Struggle #1: Intersectionality w/ Mariame Kaba & Moni Cosby

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 84:52

    A Study and Struggle critical conversation about what it means for abolition to be intersectional. Study and Struggle organizes against criminalization and incarceration in Mississippi through mutual aid, political education, and community building. We provide a bilingual Spanish and English curriculum with discussion questions and reading materials, as well as financial support, to over 100 participants in radical study groups inside and outside prisons in Mississippi. These groups correspond with groups from across the country through our pen pal program. We regularly come together for online conversations hosted by Haymarket Books. The curriculum, built by a combination of currently- and formerly-incarcerated people, scholars, and community organizers, centers around the interrelationship between prison abolition and immigrant justice, with a particular attention to freedom struggles in Mississippi and the U.S. South. For our Fall 2021 four month curriculum, we have borrowed and augmented Ruth Wilson Gilmore's argument that “abolition is about presence, not absence. It has to be green, and in order to be green, it has to be red (anti-capitalist), and in order to be red, it has to be international," having added “intersectional” as a fourth analytical category that we hope moves us beyond “single-issue” organizing. Study and Struggle provides a bilingual curriculum to all our imprisoned comrades in Mississippi with the support of our friends at 1977 Books and makes it fully available online for other study groups to use as they see fit. Our Critical Conversations webinar series, hosted by Haymarket Books, will cover the themes for the upcoming month. Haymarket Books is an independent, radical, non-profit publisher. For more on Study and Struggle: https://www.studyandstruggle.com/ ---------------------------------------------------- Our first webinar theme covers "intersectionality" and will be a conversation about what it means for abolition to be intersectional and how abolition demands a reimagination of relationships, accountability, and what it means to be in community and to care for one another. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of commissary and mutual aid for our incarcerated participants. ---------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Mariame Kaba is an organizer, educator and curator who is active in movements for racial, gender, and transformative justice. She is the author of We Do This 'Til We Free Us: Abolitionist Organizing and Transforming Justice. She is the founder and director of Project NIA, a grassroots organization with a vision to end youth incarceration. Mariame is currently a researcher at Interrupting Criminalization: Research in Action at the Barnard Center for Research on Women, a project she co-founded with Andrea Ritchie in 2018. She co-authored the guidebook Lifting As They Climbed and published a children's book titled Missing Daddy about the impacts of incarceration on children and families. Kaba is the recipient of the Cultural Freedom Prize from Lannan Foundation. Moni Cosby is a Chicago activist, mother, grandmother, writer and abolitionist who was incarcerated by the state of Illinois for 20 years. She has dedicated her life to ending all forms of violence that Black, Indigenous and People of Color, particularly women, encounter daily. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/eIVOxim1qS8 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    The Kaepernick Effect: How A Knee Inspired a Generational Revolt w/ Dave Zirin & Eddie S. Glaude Jr.

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 57:08


    Join Dave Zirin and Eddie S. Glaude Jr. for a discussion and launch of Dave's book "The Kaepernick Effect." In 2016, amid an epidemic of police shootings of African Americans, the celebrated NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick began a series of quiet protests on the field, refusing to stand during the U.S. national anthem. By “taking a knee,” Kaepernick bravely joined a long tradition of American athletes making powerful political statements. This time, however, Kaepernick's simple act spread like wildfire throughout American society, becoming the preeminent symbol of resistance to America's persistent racial inequality. Critically acclaimed sports journalist and author of A People's History of Sports in the United States, Dave Zirin chronicles “the Kaepernick effect” for the first time, through interviews with a broad cross-section of professional athletes across many different sports, college stars and high-powered athletic directors, and high school athletes and coaches. In each case, he uncovers the fascinating explanations and motivations behind a mass political movement in sports, through deeply personal and inspiring accounts of risk-taking, activism, and courage both on and off the field. Dave will be joined for this book launch by Eddie S. Glaude Jr. Speakers: Dave Zirin is the sports editor of The Nation, a columnist for The Progressive, and the host of the Edge of Sports podcast. His many books include A People's History of Sports in the United States, Game Over, Bad Sports, and The Kaepernick Effect. Zirin has also been a regular guest on MSNBC, CNN, and ESPN. He lives near Washington, DC. Eddie S. Glaude Jr. is a scholar who speaks to the black and blue in America. His most well-known books, Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul, and In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America, take a wide look at black communities and reveal complexities, vulnerabilities, and opportunities for hope. He is the William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies and chair of the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University. His most recent book is Begin Again: James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons For Our Own. Order a copy of The Kaepernick Effect: https://bookshop.org/a/1039/9781620976753 --------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and The New Press. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/3sstEC6LJq8 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire, Twenty Years After 9-11 w/ Deepa Kumar, Naomi Klein, & more

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 85:55


    Join Deepa Kumar, Noura Erakat, Naomi Klein, Jasbir Puar, and Keenaga-Yamahtta Taylor to discuss Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire. In Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire, leading scholar Deepa Kumar traces the history of Islamophobia from the 16th century to the “War on Terror.” In the twenty years since 9/11, she writes, Islamophobia has functioned in the United States both as a set of coercive policies and as a body of ideas that take various forms: liberal, conservative, and rightwing. This particular form of bigotry continues to have horrific consequences not only for people in Muslim-majority countries who become the targets of an endless War on Terror, but for Muslims and those who “look Muslim” in the West as well. Importantly, Kumar contends that Islamophobia is not simply religious intolerance or the reaction of an empire in crisis; it must be recognized instead as racism—the kind that manifests in mass surveillance, arbitrary arrests, and deportation, much like other forms of centuries-old systemic racism. And this anti-Muslim racism in turn sustains empire. Order a Copy of Islamophobia: https://www.versobooks.com/books/3839-islamophobia-and-the-politics-of-empire Speakers: Noura Erakat is a human rights attorney, Associate Professor of Africana Studies at Rutgers University, and non-resident fellow of the Religious Literacy Project at Harvard Divinity School. Noura is the author of Justice for Some: Law and the Question of Palestine. She is co-founding editor of Jadaliyya and editorial board member of the Journal of Palestine Studies. Noura has also produced video documentaries, including "Gaza In Context" and "Black Palestinian Solidarity." She has appeared on CBS News, CNN, Fox News, and NPR, among others. Naomi Klein is the bestselling author of The Shock Doctrine, This Changes Everything, No Is Not Enough, and the young adult book How to Change Everything: The Young Human's Guide to Protecting the Planet and Each Other. She is Senior Correspondent for The Intercept, a Puffin Writing Fellow at Type Media Center and Professor of Climate Justice at the University of British Columbia. Deepa Kumar is an award-winning scholar and social justice activist. She is Professor of Media Studies at Rutgers University. Her critically acclaimed book Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire (2012) has been translated into five languages. The second and fully revised edition, published in 2021, marks twenty years of the War on Terror. Dr. Kumar has authored more than 80 books, journal articles, book chapters, and articles in independent and mainstream media. She has shared her expertise in numerous media outlets such as the BBC, The New York Times, NPR, USA Today, the Danish Broadcast Corporation, TeleSur and other national and international news media outlets. Jasbir K. Puar is Professor of Women's and Gender Studies at Rutgers University. She is the author of the award-winning books The Right to Maim: Debility, Capacity, Disability, and Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times. Her scholarly and mainstream writings have been translated into more than 15 languages. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor writes and speaks on Black politics, social movements, and racial inequality in the United States. ​She is author of Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership, which was a semifinalist for the 2019 National Book Award and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History in 2020. She is a contributing writer at The New Yorker, and a Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and Verso Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/XoyuCSmd-JA Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    Whose Security? Communities Resisting Post-9/11 Global Security Framework

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 87:53

    In this inaugural event of a 4-part series marking the 20th anniversary of 9/11, artists, lawyers and scholars will be reflecting on the impact of the post-9/11 “global security” framework on communities fighting for their rights to be, to move, to believe and to resist. From the indefinite detention of Muslim men in Guantanamo, to the unending repression of the Black freedom movement, to suppression of advocacy for Palestine, and to the racist immigration and border regimes, panelists will trace the harms of post-9/11 policies with an emphasis on the ever-expanding terrorism framework. The conversation will highlight stories of creative resistance to U.S. policies of criminalization and dehumanization, and point towards new horizons of community safety and collective flourishing. Speakers: Sadie Barnette's multimedia art practice illuminates her own family history as it mirrors a collective history of repression and resistance in the United States. Barnette holds a BFA from CalArts and an MFA from the University of California, San Diego. She has been awarded grants and residencies by the Studio Museum in Harlem, Art Matters, Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, and the Headlands Center for the Arts. Omar Farah is a Senior Staff Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights and is the lead lawyer in Color of Change v. Department of Homeland Security and Federal Bureau of Investigation, which seeks records that reveal the government's expansive surveillance of the Movement for Black Lives. Silky Shah is the Executive Director of Detention Watch Network (DWN), a national coalition building power to abolish immigration detention in the US. She has worked as an organizer on issues related to immigration detention, mass incarceration, and racial and migrant justice for over 15 years. In her time at DWN she has helped transform the organization into a national leader in the immigrant rights movement, leading campaigns to expose the system and building the capacity of grassroots members to take action. Tarek Z. Ismail is an Associate Professor of Law at the CUNY School of Law. Prior to joining CUNY Law's faculty, he served as Senior Staff Attorney at the Creating Law Enforcement Accountability & Responsibility (CLEAR) project, which primarily aims to address the legal needs of Muslim, Arab, South Asian, and other communities in the New York City area that are particularly affected by national security and counterterrorism policies and practices deployed by various law enforcement agencies. Nadia Ben-Youssef (moderator) is the Advocacy Director at the Center for Constitutional Rights. Together with the legal, advocacy, and communication teams, Nadia identifies opportunities for the Center for Constitutional Rights to make strategic cultural and political interventions that shift public narrative and policy on human and civil rights. She has expertise in international human rights fora and mechanisms, and extensive experience developing advocacy strategies to influence U.S. decision-makers. This event is sponsored by Center for Constitutional Rights and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/9aZAajigt84 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Violent Order: Racial Capitalism, Settler Colonialism, and the Nature of the Police

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 85:15

    Join us for a book launch discussion of the nature of the police project and its rootedness in racial capitalism and settler colonialism. Join David Correia, Melanie K Yazzi, Tyler Wall and Julie Sze in a discussion that will explore that idea that police and police violence are modes of environment-making. The police project, in order to fabricate and defend capitalist order, must patrol an imaginary line between society and nature, it must transform nature into inert matter made available for accumulation. Police don't just patrol the ghetto or the Indian reservation, the thin blue line doesn 't just refer to a social order, rather police announce a general claim to domination—of labor and of nature. Order the book,Violent Order: Essays on the Nature of Police from Haymarket!: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1663-violent-order Speakers: David Correia is a Professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of Properties of Violence (University of Georgia Press, 2013), co-author with Tyler Wall of Police: A Field Guide (Verso, 2018), and co-author with Nick Estes, Melanie Yazzie, and Jennifer Denetdale of Red Nation Rising Nation: From Bordertown Violence to Native Liberation (PM Press, 2021). He is a co-founder of AbolishAPD, a research and mutual aid collective in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Julie Sze is Professor of American Studies at UC Davis. She has written 3 books, most recently Environmental Justice in a Moment of Danger and over 60 articles and book chapters, on environmental justice, the environmental humanities, geography, and public policy. She collaborates with environmental scientists, engineers, social scientists and community-based organizers in California and New York. Tyler Wall is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He is the coauthor with David Correia of Police: A Field Guide. Melanie K. Yazzie, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Native American Studies and American Studies at the University of New Mexico. She specializes in Navajo/American Indian history, political ecology, Indigenous feminisms, queer Indigenous studies, and theories of policing and the state. She also organizes with The Red Nation, a grassroots Native-run organization committed to the liberation of Indigenous people from colonialism and capitalism. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/aja0_wFeUsI Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Abolition Means No War: The New Generation of Anti-Imperialists w/ Dissenters & Rampant Magazine

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 82:34

    Join Dissenters and Rampant Magazine to discuss abolition, imperialism, and building a movement for our global liberation. While the United States sends drones and drops bombs in the Middle East and Africa, militarized police at home are killing Black people and filling detention centers on the Mexico border. These are two sides of the same imperialist coin. Sprawling military bases around the world support the everyday brutal violence of empire and US-backed military coups tear apart homes and force migration. Their wars haunt our families and bring violence into our homes and neighborhoods. It is time we abolish their wars. Dissenters is leading a new generation of young people to reclaim our resources from the war industry, reinvest in life-giving services, and repair collaborative relationships with the earth and people around the world. Join Dissenters and Rampant Magazine for a discussion about rebuilding a movement against imperialism and creating a new global future built from mutual care, real safety, and liberation. Speakers: Hoda Katebi is an Iranian-American writer, abolitionist organizer, and creative educator based between Chicago and the Bay. Her work has been hailed from the BBC to the New York Times to the pages of VOGUE and featured and cited in books, journals, and museums around the world. Hoda is the host of #BecauseWeveRead, a radical digital book club and discussion series mobilizing local communities with 25+ chapters globally; founding member of Blue Tin Production, an apparel manufacturing workers co-operative run by working class women of color setting new international standards in labor and sustainability within fashion supply chains; a national lead with Believers Bail Out, a bail fund using Zakat to bail Muslims from pretrial & immigration incarceration; and organizing strategist for anti-war movements with the No War Campaign. She is the author of the book Tehran Streetstyle (2016), contributor to the book I Refuse to Condemn: Resisting Racism in Times of National Security (Manchester Press 2020), and her writing has appeared in publications including Newsweek, Washington Post, and the Columbia Journalism Review. Destiny Harris is a Black, queer abolitionist and organizer from the west side of Chicago. She is a student at Howard University. Her work is at the intersection of abolition, anti-war, anti-militarism and environmental liberation. Destiny believes in the power of storytelling, poetry and culture as means of mobilization that should always be driving our movements. She has organized throughout Chicago on campaigns like #DefundCPD, #CopsOutCPS and the #NoCopAcademy campaign which aimed to combat the narrative that our communities need police. Nadya Tannous is the General Coordinator of the Palestinian Youth Movement. PYM is a transnational, independent, grassroots movement of young Palestinians in Palestine and in exile worldwide as a result of the ongoing Zionist colonization and occupation of our homeland. brian bean is a Chicago-based socialist activist, writer, and speaker originally from North Carolina. He is one of the founding editors of Rampant Magazine. His work has been published in Jacobin, Red Flag, International Viewpoint, Bel Ahmar بالأحمر) ) and other publications. He is co-editor of Palestine: A Socialist Introduction (Haymarket Books) and recently co-authored the article, "Rebuilding the Anti-Imperialist Movement in a New Era." This event is co-sponsored by Dissenters, Rampant Magazine, and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/CgPhsFpbLoQ Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Strong Communities Make Cops Obsolete w/ Geo Maher, Robin DG Kelley, & Alex Vitale

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 85:23

    If police are the problem, what's the solution? Tens of millions of people poured onto the streets for Black Lives Matter, bringing with them a wholly new idea of public safety, common security, and the delivery of justice, communicating that vision in the fiery vernacular of riot, rebellion, and protest. Geo Maher's new book, A World Without Police transcribes these new ideas—written in slogans and chants, over occupied bridges and hastily assembled barricades—into a compelling, must-read manifesto for police abolition. Compellingly argued and lyrically charged, A World Without Police offers concrete strategies for confronting and breaking police power, as a first step toward building community alternatives that make the police obsolete. Geo will be joined by Robin D.G. Kelley and Alex Vitale to pick up on these urgent themes and to examine the alternatives to Police and policing. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Order a Copy of A World Without Police: https://www.versobooks.com/books/3783-a-world-without-police --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Geo Maher has previously taught at Vassar College, San Quentin State Prison, and the Venezuelan School of Planning in Caracas. He is the author of five books, including We Created Chavez, Decolonizing Dialectics, Building the Commune, Spirals of Revolt, and A World Without Police. Robin D.G. Kelley is Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History at UCLA and the author of many books, including Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination, Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class, and Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression. Alex S. Vitale is Professor of Sociology and Coordinator of the Policing and Social Justice Project at Brooklyn College and a Visiting Professor at London Southbank University. He has spent the last 30 years writing about policing and consults both police departments and human rights organizations internationally. Prof. Vitale is the author of City of Disorder: How the Quality of Life Campaign Transformed New York Politics and The End of Policing. His academic writings on policing have appeared in Policing and Society, Police Practice and Research, Mobilization, and Contemporary Sociology. He is also a frequent essayist, whose writings have been published in New York Times, Washington Post, Guardian, The Nation, Vice News, Fortune, and USA Today. He has also appeared on CNN, MSNBC, CNBC, NPR, PBS, Democracy Now, and The Daily Show with Trevor Noah. This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and Verso Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/Shj1A0_r5MQ Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Hillbilly Nationalists The Young Patriots & the Rainbow Coalition

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 87:26

    Join Young Patriots co-founder Hy Thurman and Amy Sonnie and James Tracy for a book launch discussion of 'Hillbilly Nationalists'. In 1969, the Young Patriots Organization (YPO) emerged out of Chicago's Uptown neighborhood to organize poor white people against capitalism and white supremacy. They worked alongside the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense and the Puerto Rican Young Lords in the Original Rainbow Coalitions. The YPO embodied the politics that sought to build multiracial working-class unity while respecting the self-determination and autonomy of their comrades of color. Join YPO co-founder Hy Thurman, Amy Sonnie and James Tracy, co-authors of Hillbilly Nationalists, Urban Race Rebels and Black Power: Interracial; Solidarity in 1960s-70s New Left Organizing, Expanded Anniversary Edition, (Melville House Publishing) in conversation with Rampant Magazine. Get the new, expanded Anniversary Edition of Hillbilly Nationalists, Urban Race Rebels and Black Power: Interracial; Solidarity in 1960s-70s New Left Organizing from Melville House Publishing here: https://www.mhpbooks.com/books/hillbilly-nationalists-urban-race-rebels-and-black-power ---------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Amy Sonnie is the co-author of Hillbilly Nationalists, Urban Race Rebels and Black Power: Interracial; Solidarity in 1960s-70s New Left Organizing (Melville House Publishing). Hy Thurman is a co-founder of the Young Patriots Organization and author of Revolutionary Hillbilly: Notes From the Struggle at the Edge of the Rainbow (Regent Press). James Tracy is co-author of Hillbilly Nationalists, Urban Race Rebels and Black Power: Interracial; Solidarity in 1960s-70s New Left Organizing (Melville House Publishing). Moderator: Eric Kerl is a Kentuckian living, working, organizing, and writing in Chicago. He is the author of White Bred: Hillbillies, White Trash, and Rednecks against White Supremacy (forthcoming from Haymarket Books) and is on the editorial collective of Rampant Magazine. ---------------------------------------------------- This event is co-sponsored by Rampant Magazine, Melville House Publishing, Howard Zinn Book Fair, and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/JBL-hyLqjhk Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Reaction and Revolution: Responses to Domenico Losurdo's 'Nietzsche'

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 108:49


    Join us for a discussion marking the paperback release of Domenico Losurdo's monumental study of Friedrich Nietzsche. ---------------------------------------------------- Recently translated into English by Gregor Benton, Losurdo's book is epic in scope, covering a wide range of philosophical and historical issues that not only situate Nietzsche in his 19th century context, but addresses some of the most burning theoretical and political issues of our times. Losurdo's Nietzsche represents one of the greatest examples of Marxist scholarship and criticism, and we will discuss the book's significance for not only how we see Nietzsche, but how we understand socialist theory today. Losurdo's Nietzsche shows us that the problems of the 19th century are not over yet. ---------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Harrison Fluss received his PhD in philosophy at Stony Brook University. He is a professor at Manhattan College, NYC and wrote the introduction to the English edition of Nietzsche, The Aristocratic Rebel. Benjamin Noys is Professor of Critical Theory at the University of Chichester. He is the author of The Persistence of the Negative, Malign Velocities, and the forthcoming The Matter of Language. Tijana Okić holds a PhD in Philosophy from the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. She is a longstanding activist of the “Committee for the Abolition of Illegitimate Debt” (CADTM), and is the editor of “The Lost Revolution: Yugoslav Women's Antifascist Front between Myth and Forgetting.” Her research includes issues of German Idealism, contemporary French philosophy, feminist philosophy, Marxism, the history of race and ethnicity, and the problems of memory in Yugoslav history. Daniel Tutt has degrees from American University and the European Graduate School. He is the author of the forthcoming book Psychoanalysis and the Politics of the Family: The Crisis of Initiationwith the Palgrave Lacan Series. His research is concerned with the intersection of contemporary politics, Marxism and Lacanian psychoanalysis. You can read his review of Losurdo's Aristocratic Rebel entitled “Nietzsche in His Time: The Struggle Against Socratism and Socialism” on the Historical Materialism website. ---------------------------------------------------- Order a copy of Nietzsche, The Aristocratic Rebel: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1565-nietzsche-the-aristocratic-rebel ---------------------------------------------------- Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/2sTqD62y2Do Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    White Skin, Black Fuel: Fossil Fascism and Colonialism's Inky Legacy

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 87:46

    Join us for an urgent discussion on the rise of the far right and what it means for the battle against climate change. Fossil-fueled technologies were born in the soot-covered pits of British colonialism and have held onto their racist legacy to this day. As the burning of carbon makes climate related catastrophe a near weekly occurrence, Fossil capital has of late turned to willing accomplices among the growing far-right to displace blame and defend the status quo. In a world of rising sea levels, scorching temperatures, and crippling droughts, the right-wing in country after country has risen to pin the blame on migrants, Muslims, and other scapegoats as they offer their own solutions to a warming world: close the borders and save the nation from climate break down. In the first study of the far right's role in the climate crisis, White Skin, Black Fuel presents an eye-opening sweep of this novel political constellation, drawing out its deep historical roots, and arguing that to confront this crisis requires combating the racist forces of reaction who would enable it. Order a Copy of White Skin, Black Fuel: https://www.versobooks.com/books/3812-white-skin-black-fuel --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Dounia Boukaouit is an Independent researcher, Human Ecology graduate, and ICES Conference Coordinator and Research Assistant at Uppsala University. Ståle Holgersen is a human geographer at Uppsala University, Sweden. Research interests include political economy and ecology, urban planning and housing, and crises. His forthcoming book Kapitalismens kriser (Daidalos 2021) explores relations between ecological and economic crises. Andreas Malm is a scholar of human ecology, and the author of The Progress of this Storm and of Fossil Capital, which won the Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial Prize. Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò (moderator) is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Georgetown University. His forthcoming book Reconsidering Reparations (November 2021, Oxford University Press) explores links between reparations and climate justice. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and Verso Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/pspu3GuoFbY Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    What's Happening in Iran?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 76:14

    Join a panel of analysts to discuss the current protests and class struggle in Iran and the political dynamics of the region. Please join Internationalism from Below, Haymarket Books, and New Politics Magazine for this forum on the current protests rocking the Islamic Republic, class and labor politics in Iran, gender and ethnic minorities in the country, revolutionary and counter-revolutionary dynamics in the Middle East, the myth of the “Axis of Resistance” — and how progressives and internationalists should make sense of these critical developments. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Frieda Afary is an Iranian American librarian, translator, and activist. She produces the blog Iranian Progressives in Translation and writes about the Middle East and the politics of solidarity for a variety of publications, including New Politics magazine. Her essay “The Iranian Uprising of 2019-2020” appeared in the recent book A Region in Revolt: Mapping the Recent Uprisings in North Africa and West Asia, edited by Jade Saab and published by Daraja Press. Latest article: “Iran: A New Wave of Mass Protests and Strikes” (New Politics): https://newpol.org/iran-a-new-wave-of-mass-protests-and-strikes/ Kaveh Ehsani is associate professor of International Studies at DePaul University in Chicago. His books include Social History of Oil in Iran (in Persian) and Working for Oil: Comparative Social Histories of Labor in the Global Oil Industry. He has worked as a regional planner at the World Bank and the UNDP. As a development planner in Iran he worked on water resources planning, drought, urban governance, and post-war reconstruction in Khuzestan Province. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Middle East Research and Information Project (MERIP) and is a contributing editor of the journals Goftogu (based in Tehran), Middle East Report, and Iranian Studies. Latest article: “The Moral Economy of the Iranian Protests” (Jacobin): https://www.jacobinmag.com/2018/01/iranian-protests-revolution-rouhani-ahmadinejad Danny Postel is Assistant Director of the Center for International and Area Studies at Northwestern University and a member of Internationalism from Below. He is co-editor of The People Reloaded: The Green Movement and the Struggle for Iran's Future, The Syria Dilemma, and Sectarianization: Mapping the New Politics of the Middle East. Formerly Senior Editor of openDemocracy magazine, he has written for Boston Review, The Cairo Review of Global Affairs, Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, Democratic Left, Dissent, The Guardian, In These Times, Middle East Report (MERIP), The Nation, New Politics, and The Progressive, among other publications. Latest article: "The Other Regional Counter-Revolution: Iran's Role in the Shifting Political Landscape of the Middle East" (New Politics): https://newpol.org/the-other-regional-counter-revolution-irans-role-in-the-shifting-political-landscape-of-the-middle-east/ Moderator Sam Salour is a member of the Tempest Collective and a sociology PhD student at UC Santa Barbara. Latest article: “Striking echoes in Iran: A report from the oil and gas strikes”: https://www.tempestmag.org/2021/08/striking-echoes-in-iran/ --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is co-sponsored by Internationalism from Below, Haymarket Books, and New Politics. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/97kbenZHuSU Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    What's Happening in Cuba?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 86:10

    Join a panel of analysts to discuss the recent protests in Cuba and how they relate to solidarity, anti-imperialism, and socialism. Recent protests in Cuba have generated debate on the international Left. What were the protests about and how should progressives make sense of them? What do the protests mean for debates about anti-imperialism, socialism, solidarity and internationalism? Join us for this important discussion with three Cuban leftist intellectuals and activists. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Alina Bárbara López Hernández is a Cuban intellectual and writer based in Matanzas, Cuba. She is a longtime contributor to the influential Cuban publication La Joven Cuba and is the author of several books, including Segundas lecturas: intelectualidad, política y cultura en la república burguesa, El (des)conocido Juan Marinello: estudio de su pensamiento político, and En tiempos de blogosfera. Odette Casamayor-Cisneros is a Cuban-born scholar and writer. She is associate professor of Latin American cultural studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Centered on Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latinx experiences, her current academic, fiction and nonfiction works examine self-identification processes and the production of counter-hegemonic knowledge in the global African diaspora. She is the author of Utopia, Dystopia and Ethical Weightlessness: Cosmological Reconfigurations in post-Soviet Cuban Fiction (in Spanish) and is currently writing “On Being Blacks: Self-Identification Processes and Counter-Hegemonic Knowledge in Contemporary Cuban Cultural Production.” Samuel Farber was born and raised in Marianao, Cuba. He was active in the Cuban high school student movement against the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista in the 1950s, and has been involved in socialist politics for more than fifty years. He is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Brooklyn College and the author of several books on Cuba, including Cuba Since the Revolution of 1959 and The Politics of Che Guevara: Theory and Practice (both published by Haymarket) and The Origins of the Cuban Revolution Reconsidered. He is a frequent contributor to New Politics magazine and is a member of Internationalism from Below. Moderator: Natalia Tylim is active in the NYC-DSA labor branch. She's a restaurant worker and a founding member of DSA's Restaurant Organizing Project. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is co-sponsored by Internationalism from Below, Haymarket Books, and New Politics. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/VkngZbCywqY Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Salvage Live: Decolonisation and its Discontents

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 83:14

    Join Salvage and Haymarket Books for a conversation on Decolonisation and its Discontents with Kevin Ochieng Okoth. About this event Decolonization has become a recurring subject in an endless stream of op-eds, think pieces, and books. Yet despite so much ink spent on the topic there seems to be little agreement on what exactly we want to achieve by ‘decolonizing' something. Answering this, and clarifying what is at stake in these conversations, requires posing additional questions like ‘what is our relationship to the institution or discipline we want to decolonize? Are we asking for those things to be reformed, or do we want them abolished altogether? Or is decolonizing a method of critique, intended to expose the colonial and racist foundations of its target? And, crucially, how do contempary movements for decolonization—emerging almost exclusively from universities, museums and art institutions—relate to the aims and achievements of the national liberation movements that dismantled colonial states? Building on Kevin Ochieng Okoth's forthcoming article in Salvage #10, Annie Olaloku-Teriba and Barnaby Raine will aim to answer these questions and discuss what today's calls to decolonize can learn from the struggles that defeated imperial powers in the twentieth century. This discussion will be part of the ongoing Salvage Live events series, hosted by Haymarket Books. https://www.salvage.zone for more info. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Kevin Ochieng Okoth is a writer and researcher living in London. He is a corresponding editor at Salvage. Annie Olaloku-Teriba is a writer and podcaster whose research focuses on how neoliberalism has transformed the theory and practice of ‘race.' Barnaby Raine is writing his PhD at Columbia University on visions of ending capitalism. He teaches at the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research. --------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and Salvage. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of our important publishing and programming work. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/m9bIvWBVWJQ Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Counting Crime: A Lecture on the Politics of Crime Data and Its Uses w/ Tamara K. Nopper

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 113:32

    Join Tamara K. Nopper for an urgent discussion of the politics, history, and methods of counting crime—and who benefits from crime data. Politicians, pundits, and mainstream media are claiming crime is going up and some are blaming defund the police campaigns. But how we measure crime is a socially constructed, political process and more data literacy on this topic can be useful in this political moment. In this educational lecture we will learn about some of the history of counting crime during the post-Emancipation period, who has pushed for crime data to be collected, some of the major data sources (including the samples and methods), and how crime data is deployed for various purposes. While this event and all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of this important work. Part of the proceeds from this event will go to the National Bail Fund Network. ***This event is recorded with live captioning and ASL at the Haymarket Youtube Channel.*** Speaker: Tamara K. Nopper is a sociologist, writer, and editor. She is the editor of We Do This ‘Til We Free Us: Abolitionist Organizing and Transforming Justice, a book of Mariame Kaba's writings and interviews (Haymarket Books), and researcher and writer of several data stories for Colin Kaepernick's Abolition for the People series. She is a Fellow at Data for Progress, an Affiliate of The Center for Critical Race and Digital Studies, and a member of the inaugural cohort of the NYU Institute for Public Interest Technology. She is also an incoming 2021-2022 Faculty Fellow at Data & Society. This event is sponsored by Interrupting Criminalization, Survived & Punished, Community Resource Hub for Safety & Accountability, 18 Million Rising (18MR), Critical Resistance, Civil Rights Corps, and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/I0tE96ICNF0 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Gay 4 History: A Dialogue Across Eras

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 86:18

    A conversation examining the history of struggles over gender and sexuality as it relates to emancipatory struggles today. About this event What do emancipatory struggles over gender and sexuality have to do with history, and what does history do for the wider project of emancipation as such? The authors and editors of Histories of the Transgender Child, Transgender Marxism, and Sexual Hegemony discuss the difficulty of drawing directly from, or detaching ourselves altogether from nominally discontinuous social categories, and how historical citation operates to transform the present. ***Register through Eventbrite to receive a link to the video conference on the day of the event. This event will also be recorded and have live captioning.*** --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Jules Gill-Peterson is an Associate Research Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University. She is the author of Histories of the Transgender Child (University of Minnesota, 2018), winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Jules is also a General Co-Editor at TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly. Jules Gleeson is a writer, comedian and historian. She has published essays in outlets including Viewpoint Magazine, Invert Journal and VICE, and performed internationally at a wide range of communist and queer cultural events. Max Fox is the editor of Christopher Chitty's posthumous Sexual Hegemony (2020), the translator of Guy Hocquenghem's posthumous The Amphitheater of the Dead (2018) and a founding editor of Pinko magazine. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/76YYms_S830 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    If God Is A Virus Poems w/ Seema Yasmin, Aracelis Girmay, & more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 83:12

    Seema Yasmin gathers a powerful line-up of poets—George Abraham, Aracelis Girmay, José Olivarez, Janice Lobo Sapigao, and Yalini Thambynayagam—to celebrate Yasmin's poetry collection, If God Is A Virus. Based on original reporting from West Africa and the United States, and the poet's experiences as a doctor and journalist, If God Is A Virus charts the course of the largest and deadliest Ebola epidemic in history, telling the stories of Ebola survivors, outbreak responders, journalists and the virus itself. These documentary poems explore which human lives are valued, how editorial decisions are weighed, what role the aid industrial complex plays in crises, and how medical myths and rumor can travel faster than microbes. These poems also give voice to the virus. Eight percent of the human genome is inherited from viruses and the human placenta would not exist without a gene descended from a virus. If God Is A Virus reimagines viruses as givers of life and even authors of a viral-human self-help book. Featuring: Dr. Seema Yasmin is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, medical doctor, disease detective and author. She was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news reporting in 2017 with her team from The Dallas Morning News for coverage of a mass shooting. Yasmin was a disease detective in the Epidemic Intelligence Service at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention where she chased outbreaks in maximum-security prisons, American Indian reservations, border towns and hospitals. Currently, Dr. Yasmin is a Stanford professor, medical analyst for CNN and science correspondent for Conde Nast Entertainment. Find her at seemayasmin.com, Twitter @DoctorYasmin and Instagram: @drseemayasmin. Aracelis Girmay is the author of three books of poems: the black maria (BOA, 2016); Teeth (Curbstone Press, 2007), winner of a GLCA New Writers Award; and Kingdom Animalia (BOA, 2011), the winner of the Isabella Gardner Award and finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. Girmay currently serves as the Margaret Bundy Scott Professor in the English Department. George Abraham is a Palestinian-American poet, educator, and engineer who grew up on unceded Timucuan lands. They are the author of their debut collection Birthright, winner of the Big Other Book Award, finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in Bisexual Poetry, and was named on Best of 2020 lists with The Asian American Writers' Workshop and The New Arab. Janice Lobo Sapigao (she/her) is a daughter of immigrants from the Philippines, and the author of two books of poetry: microchips for millions and like a solid to a shadow. She's been profiled in Content Magazine, Mercury News, SF Gate, and Metro Silicon Valley. Her work has appeared in literary magazines such as Apogee Journal, Entropy, The Offing, poets.org, Split This Rock's Poem-of-the-Week, and Waxwing Literary Journal. José Olivarez is the son of Mexican immigrants. His debut book of poems, Citizen Illegal, was a finalist for the PEN/Jean Stein Award and a winner of the 2018 Chicago Review of Books Poetry Prize. It was named a top book of 2018 by The Adroit Journal, NPR, and the New York Public Library. Along with Felicia Chavez and Willie Perdomo, he co-edited the poetry anthology, The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 4: LatiNext. https://joseolivarez.com/ YaliniDream is a touring performing artist, organizer, somatics practitioner, and consultant with over twenty years' experience using artistic tools for healing, organizing, and dignity with communities contending with violence and oppression. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/QPIZZhVeTGY Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation w/ Michelle Alexander & Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 82:20

    Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor and Michelle Alexander on the history and politics of the most recent phase of the Black Freedom struggle. First published in 2016, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor's From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation is an indispensable account of the history and political trajectory of the most recent stage in the Black Freedom Movement. To mark the timely release of an updated and expanded edition of the book, Taylor will join Michelle Alexander for a wide-ranging discussion of the history, present, and possible futures of the struggle for Black Liberation. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Order the expanded second edition of From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation here! Speakers: Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor writes and speaks on Black politics, social movements, and racial inequality in the United States. ​She is author of Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership, which was a semifinalist for the 2019 National Book Award and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History in 2020. She is also editor of How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collective, which won the Lambda Literary Award for LGBQT nonfiction in 2018. She is a contributing writer at The New Yorker, and a Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. Michelle Alexander is a highly acclaimed civil rights lawyer, advocate, legal scholar and author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness — the bestselling book that helped to transform the national debate on racial and criminal justice in the United States. Currently she is a visiting professor at Union Theological Seminary in New York City and a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/oaH8pfgS88M Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Sisi's Many Jails — From Gaza to Tora

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 87:00

    Join a panel of experts for a discussion of el-Sisi's role in repressing human rights in Egypt and Palestine. Trump's reference to Egyptian leader Abdel Fattah el-Sisi as his “favorite dictator” revealed the former US president's penchant for lawlessness and authoritarian rule. But the Biden administration continues to provide carte blanche for Sisi's widespread repression and human rights abuses, based on the premise that Egypt plays an important role in enforcing US policies for the region, in particular as a mediator between Palestinians and Israel. This Realpolitik logic of unconditional support for tyrants is shortsighted. The Sisi regime is currently imprisoning an estimated 60,000 political prisoners while it also plays a central role in maintaining the longstanding blockade of Gaza and jails Palestine solidarity activists in Egypt. This forum will address the state of human rights in Egypt, Sisi's role in besieging Palestinians (in collusion with Israel and the Palestinian Authority), how US policy fuels repression in Egypt and Egypt's nefarious role in Israel-Palestine, and what progressives can do to improve human rights conditions for Egyptians and Palestinians. Speakers: Raed Jarrar is Advocacy Director for Democracy for the Arab World Now (DAWN). Since immigrating to the U.S. in 2005, he has worked as a lobbyist on political issues pertaining to the U.S. engagement in the Arab world. Widely recognized as an expert on political, social, and economic developments in the MENA region, he has testified in numerous Congressional hearings and briefings. He is a frequent guest on national and international media outlets in Arabic and English, including CNN, MSNBC, NPR, the BBC, Al Jazeera, and Sky News Arabia. Yasmin Omar, a human rights lawyer, is Egypt Legal Associate at the Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy (TIMEP). She has been a practicing human rights lawyer for the last nine years. She has worked with several NGOs in Egypt and is a member of the Front of Defense for Egyptian Protesters. She holds an L.L.M. from Syracuse University with a focus on counter-terrorism, national security, and refugee and asylum law. Omar Shakir, Israel and Palestine Director at Human Rights Watch, investigates human rights abuses in Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza. Prior to his current role, he was a Bertha Fellow at the Center for Constitutional Rights, where he focused on US counterterrorism policies, including legal representation of Guantanamo detainees. As the 2013-14 Arthur R. and Barbara D. Finberg Fellow at Human Rights Watch, he investigated human rights violations in Egypt, including the Rab'a massacre, one of the largest killings of protesters in a single day. Ted Swedenburg (moderator) is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Arkansas. He is the author of Memories of Revolt: The 1936-39 Rebellion and the Palestinian National Past and co-editor of Palestine, Israel and the Politics of Popular Culture and Displacement, Diaspora and Geographies of Identity. ---------------------------------------------------- This event is co-sponsored by the Middle East Research & Information Project (MERIP), US Committee to End Political Repression in Egypt, Democracy for the Arab World Now (DAWN), Internationalism from Below, and Haymarket Books. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of our important publishing and programming work. Learn more about our sponsors: MERIP: https://merip.org/ DAWN: https://usegyptsolidarity.org/ Internationalism From Below: https://www.facebook.com/intlfrombelow/ Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/2Gbf3Tfkwc0 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Songlands: John Feffer and Tope Folarin in Conversation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 87:38

    Join John Feffer and Tope Folarin as they discuss Feffer's "Songlands," the stand-alone finale to the Splinterlands trilogy. 2052. The world is a mess. The climate change meltdown has triggered an endless cycle of natural disasters. Nationalist paramilitaries battle against religious extremists. Multinational corporations, with their own security forces, have replaced global institutions as the only real power-brokers. Waves of pandemics have closed borders with such regularity that travel has become mostly virtual. describes humanity 's last shot at solving the world 's problems. Can Aurora assemble a team to reverse the splintering of the international community and avert an even more dystopian future? Speakers: John Feffer is a playwright and the author of several books including Aftershock: A Journey into Eastern Europe's Broken Dreams and the novels Splinterlands, and Frostlands. His articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Nation, Salon, and others. He is the director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies. Tope Folarin is a Nigerian-American writer based in Washington DC. He serves as Executive Director of the Institute for Policy Studies, and as the Lannan Visiting Lecturer in Creative Writing at Georgetown University. He has garnered many awards for his writing, including the Caine Prize for African Writing and the Whiting Award for Fiction. He was educated at Morehouse College and the University of Oxford, where he earned two Masters degrees as a Rhodes Scholar. His debut novel, A Particular Kind of Black Man, was published by Simon & Schuster. Order a copy of Songlands: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1654-songlands Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/0G3VcvWfzeU Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    From #StopAsianHate to Cross-Racial Solidarity w/ Rashida Tlaib, Danny Glover, & more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 91:25

    Join Rashida Tlaib, Danny Glover, and Maya Soetoro-Ng for a conversation on how we combat anti-Asian racism. The national wave of anti-Asian violence and attacks has sparked an upsurge in activism and critical conversations about cross-racial solidarity. Join us as we discuss these issues in tribute to James and Grace Lee Boggs on the anniversary of the death of Vincent Chin. Speakers: Danny Glover is an award-winning actor, producer and humanitarian with a performance career that spans more than 30 years. Off-screen, Glover has gained respect for his wide-reaching community activism and philanthropic efforts. Internationally, Glover has served as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Development Program, focusing on issues of poverty, disease and economic development in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean. He currently serves as UNICEF Ambassador. Rashida Tlaib is a well-known progressive warrior and, in her own words, “a mother working for justice for all.” Rashida made history in 2008 by becoming the first Muslim woman to ever serve in the Michigan Legislature. She is beloved by residents for the transformative constituent services she provided, and for successfully fighting the billionaires and corporations that tried to pollute her district. She is currently the Congresswoman for Michigan's 13th Congressional District, which includes the city of Detroit and many surrounding communities. Maya Soetoro-Ng serves as a consultant to the Obama Foundation, working closely with their international team to develop programming in the Asia Pacific region. Prior to her work with the Obama Foundation, she was the Director of the Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa where, in addition to leading outreach and development initiatives, she also taught Leadership for Social Change, History of Peace Movements, Peace Education, and Conflict Management for Educators. Maya has published a number of book contributions as well as a picture book entitled Ladder to the Moon and is currently under contract to write a Young Adult novel entitled Yellowwood. Maya sits on many voluntary boards and is the co-founder of the nonprofit Ceeds of Peace, which creates peacebuilding action plan workshops for educators, families and community leaders and is the co-founder of the Institute for Climate and Peace which advances effective and inclusive processes to build peaceful and climate-conscious futures for the wellbeing of all. Scott Kurashige (moderator) is professor and chair in the Department of Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies at TCU, president of the James and Grace Lee Boggs Foundation, and past-president of the American Studies Association. He is the author of The Shifting Grounds of Race: Black and Japanese Americans in the Making of Multiethnic Los Angeles and co-wrote the The Next American Revolution with Grace Lee Boggs. ---------------------------------------------------- This event is sponsored by the James and Grace Lee Boggs Foundation and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/pu_N1hfn0j0 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Beyond #StopAsianHate: Criminalization, Gender, & Asian Abolition Feminism

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 117:22

    Abolitionist feminists discuss how white supremacy and criminalization shape the experiences of gendered racial violence for Asian people. Violence targeting Asian Americans in an era of global pandemic and economic rupture have raised clashing Asian American responses -- anti-Asian hate crimes legislation, one the one hand, and feminist abolitionist strategies, on the other. For sex workers, criminalized and incarcerated people, and survivors of domestic and sexual violence, the fight to end anti-Asian violence cannot be isolated to conversations of racism alone. Join us for a panel discussion with (Southeast and East) Asian American abolitionist organizers on how white supremacy and criminalization shape the experiences of gendered racial violence for Asian people. Panelists will focus on the ways that stigma, abandonment, and violence from within Asian American communities can lead to false solutions and increased harm for the most vulnerable among us. In doing so, we will explore what organizing looks like and the interventions that Asian American abolitionist feminists are making in our political work and in our lives. Speakers: Yves Tong Nguyen (they/she) is a queer and disabled Viet cultural worker and sex worker whose organizing home is with Survived & Punished NY and Red Canary Song. Yves is concerned with supporting survivors of all forms of violence through organizing and informal community support. Ny Nourn (she/her) works as a Community Advocate at Advancing Justice - Asian Law Caucus (ALC). She is an organizer with Survived and Punished California, Council Member with the Asian Prisoner Support Committee, and member of the California Coalition for Women Prisoners, supporting the release of incarcerated domestic violence survivors and immigrants facing deportation. Ny is also a formerly incarcerated domestic violence survivor, who after serving 16 years in prison was immediately detained by ICE. After many months of advocacy from community groups across California, Ny walked out of ICE detention. In June of 2020, Ny was granted a full and unconditional pardon preventing her deportation to Cambodia. Hyejin Shim (she/her) is a queer Korean organizer based in Oakland, California. She is a cofounder of Survived and Punished, and organizes with Survived and Punished CA. She has a decade's experience in local and national anti-violence work, particularly with queer/trans immigrant and refugee survivors of gender violence. Connie Wun, PhD, (she/her) is co-founder of AAPI Women Lead. She has been an educator, researcher, writer and organizer working on issues of racial and gender violence for nearly 25 years. She is a 2020 Soros Justice Fellow and is currently leading community-driven research projects on state violence, sexual violence, race and gender. Moderator: Stephanie Cho (she/her) is the Executive Director of Asian Americans Advancing Justice-Atlanta. She has over 20 years of experience in labor and community organizing, strategy planning, and fundraising at the local and national level. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/qntARpxQ1WQ Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Twenty-First Century Fascism in the US w/ Richard Seymour & Nikhil Pal Singh

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 99:04


    Join Salvage and Haymarket Books for a conversation on fascism in America with Richard Seymour and Nikhil Pal Singh The January ‘insurrection' renewed arguments about whether the United States is experiencing a form of incipient fascism. While liberal ‘Resistance' figures like Timothy Snyder characterize Donald Trump as an ‘authoritarian' who was always bound to impose emergency dictatorship, the Left's arguments have been more complicated. The conditions for classical fascism—imperialist crisis, class civil war, socialist revolution, anticolonial struggle, the emergence of new nation-states fighting for a share of the colonial system, and the stresses of capitalist modernization—are absent. Rather, today's crises pertain to long-running problems of accumulation, the breakdown of neoliberal globalization, the crisis of political hegemony, and the ecological emergency. In the absence of mass fascist parties, paramilitary organizations and civic associations, the new far right has congealed largely through social media. From Donald Trump's unique role as a social industry agitator to the upsurge of armed white supremacist militias against Black Lives Matter, the question is whether the reactionary authoritarian mobs coalescing today represent an inchoate fascism, or the dying convulsions of declining sources of conservatism from whiteness to patriarchy. Building on Richard Seymour's forthcoming article in Salvage #10, Annie Olaloku-Teriba and Barnaby Raine will host a conversation between Richard and Nikhil Pal Singh on how the left should understand today's growing far right. This discussion will be part of the ongoing Salvage Live events series, hosted by Haymarket Books. ---------------------------------------------------- Nikhil Pal Singh is Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and History at New York University. Richard Seymour is a writer and a founding editor of Salvage. His most recent book is The Twittering Machine. Annie Olaloku-Teriba is a writer and podcaster whose research focuses on how neoliberalism has transformed the theory and practice of ‘race.' Barnaby Raine is writing his PhD at Columbia University on visions of ending capitalism. He teaches at the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research. ---------------------------------------------------- This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and Salvage. Find out more about Salvage: https://salvage.zone Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/QsZ4nxytAUQ Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    Imagining a World Without Borders w/ Harsha Walia, Todd Miller, & John Washington

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 95:16


    A discussion about the violent history and present reality of the border industrial complex, and why and how we must dismantle it. Join acclaimed writer-activists Harsha Walia, Todd Miller, and John Washington for a timely discussion about the violent origins of national borders, the money and ideology behind the border industrial complex, and why a world without borders is urgently necessary for a more just and sustainable future. Speakers: Todd Miller has researched and written about border issues for more than 20 years. He resides in Tucson, Arizona, but also has spent many years living and working in Oaxaca, Mexico. His work has appeared in the New York Times, The Guardian, TomDispatch, The Nation, San Francisco Chronicle, In These Times, Guernica, and Al Jazeera English, among other places. Miller is the author of three previous books: Empire of Borders: The Expansion of the U.S. Border Around the World (Verso, 2019), Storming the Wall: Climate Change, Migration, and Homeland Security (City Lights, 2017), which was awarded the 2018 Izzy Award for Excellence in Independent Journalism, and Border Patrol Nation: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Homeland Security (City Lights, 2014). His newest book, published by City Lights in 2021, is Build Bridges, Not Walls: A Journey to a World Without Borders. He's a contributing editor on border and immigration issues for NACLA Report on the Americas and its column “Border Wars.” Follow him at @memomiller. Harsha Walia is the award-winning author of Undoing Border Imperialism (2013) and, most recently, Border and Rule. Trained in the law, she is a community organizer and campaigner in migrant justice, anti-capitalist, feminist, and anti-imperialist movements, including No One Is Illegal and Women's Memorial March Committee. John Washington is a writer, translator, and activist. His first book, The Dispossessed: A Story of Asylum at the US-Mexico Border and Beyond, about the ancient origins and current legal regime of asylum, traces one persecuted Salvadoran man's long and arduous search for refuge. A regular contributor to The Nation magazine and The Intercept, Washington writes about immigration and border politics, as well as criminal justice, photography, and literature. Washington is an award winning translator, having translated Óscar Martinez, Anabel Hernández, and Sandra Rodriguez Nieto, among others. A long-term volunteer with No More Deaths, he has been working with activist organizations in Mexico, California, Arizona, and New York for more than a decade. Find him at @jbwashing. This event is co-sponsored by Haymarket Books and City Lights. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/1P4q1-HJ7a4 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    Smoking Lovely: The Remix! w/ Willie Perdomo and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 72:28

    Willie Perdomo brings a legendary roster of poets to celebrate his radically revised new edition Smoking Lovely: The Remix. Hosted by José Olivares, Willie Perdomo will be joined in celebration by Ashley August, Cortney Lamar Charleston, Gabriel Cortez, María Fernanda, Roberto Garlos Garcia, Jasminne Mendez, Anacaona Rocio Milagro, Yesenia Montilla, Janel Pineda, Joseph Rios, and Vincent Toro. Speakers: Willie Perdomo is the author of The Crazy Bunch and The Essential Hits of Shorty Bon Bon, and Where a Nickel Costs of Dime. Winner of the Foundation for Contemporary Arts Cy Twombly Award for Poetry, the New York City Book Award in Poetry, and the PEN Open Book Award, Perdomo was also a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the Poetry Society of America Norma Farber First Book Award. He is co-editor of the anthology, LatiNext, and his work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Poetry, Washington Post, The Best American Poetry 2019, and African Voices. Also featuring: José Olivarez Ashley August Cortney Lamar Charleston Gabriel Cortez María Fernanda Roberto Carlos Garcia Jasminne Mendez Anacaona Rocio Milagro Yesenia Montilla Janel Pineda Joseph Rios Vincent Toro Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/9HqfrvsOGbw Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Black Women's Radical Resistance in Britain

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 77:34

    Join Dr. Beverley Bryan and Jade Bentil for an intergenerational conversation about Black women's radical resistance in Britain. Black women's radical resistance and resilience in Britain has and continues to fuel, sustain, and transform social movements in the European context and outside of it. As leaders, organizers, survivors, and resistors, Black women's activism in Britain and in the African Diaspora is critical to past, present, and even future understandings of the Black radical tradition. With this, how do we honor, celebrate, and learn from Black British Women Radicals who paved the way for us to be here? The event, “Black Women's Radical Resistance in Britain” will feature an intergenerational conversation between two radical Black women activists and academics. ---------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Dr. Beverley Bryan, founder member of the Brixton Black Women's Group and the Organisation of Women of African and Asian Descent (OWAAD) and a member of the British Black Panther Movement Jade Bentil, a Black feminist historian and author of the forthcoming book, REBEL CITIZEN, which draws upon oral history interviews to explore the intimate recollections of African and African-Caribbean women who migrated to Britain following the Second World War. The conversation will interrogate historical and contemporary political memories and struggles of Black women's resistance, radicalism, belonging, and the futurity of their movement building in Britain and beyond. ---------------------------------------------------- The event is a collaboration between Black Women Radicals and Haymarket Books and is a part of Black Women Radicals “Afrofeminisms in Europe” series, which is a political meditation, interrogation, and celebration of European Afrofeminisms and Black feminisms. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/nVjR-HB5dUI Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    The Legacy of the Paris Commune 1871-2021 w/ Gilbert Achcar & Carolyn Eichner

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 91:03


    Join a Gilbert Achcar, Carolyn Eichner, Phil Gasper, and Helen Scott to discuss the enduring legacy of the great Paris Commune and its lessons for today. In March 1871, in the aftermath of France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War, ordinary Parisians rose up and took control of their city for themselves. The Paris Commune only lasted for a little over two months, but during that time the Communards enacted a remarkable number of far-reaching democratic measures. The Commune was eventually drowned in blood by the old regime, but it had an enormous impact on the international socialist and working-class movement. Marx wrote The Civil War in France praising the Commune's achievements, which remained inspirational for generations of later socialists. On its 150th anniversary, join us for a discussion of the Commune's accomplishments and weaknesses, and the lessons it holds for the radical left today. Get a copy of Revolutions here: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1476-revolutions ---------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Gilbert Achcar teaches at SOAS, University of London. He is the author of many books and a contributor to many publications. He wrote the chapter on the Paris Commune in Revolutions (Haymarket, 2020). Carolyn J. Eichner is a feminist historian at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and author of the forthcoming The Paris Commune: A Brief History (Rutgers, 2021) and Feminism's Empire (Cornell, 2022). Her book Surmounting the Barricades: Women in the Paris Commune (Indiana, 2004) has been translated as Franchir les barricades: les femmes dans la Commune de Paris (Editions de la Sorbonne, 2020). Phil Gasper is co-editor of New Politics and a member of the Tempest Collective. He is the editor of an annotated edition of The Communist Manifesto (Haymarket, 2005) and of Imperialism and War: Classic Writings by V.I. Lenin and Nikolai Bukharin (Haymarket, 2017). ---------------------------------------------------- Sponsored by: Tempest Collective, Haymarket Books, New Politics, and the Havens Wright Center for Social Justice (UW-Madison). Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/jd3wYEZPLEA Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    Crisis at the Border: Contestation, Sovereignty, and Statelessness w/Harsha Walia & Suchitra Vijayan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 85:17

    Suchitra Vijayan and Harsha Walia discuss contested border regions and the crises of statelessness experienced by the people who live there. Scholar Hardeep Dhillon will moderate this discussion between acclaimed writers Suchitra Vijayan and Harsha Walia about contestations over borders, sovereignty, and nationalism and national identity. This discussion will reference both writers' most recent books: Suchitra Vijayan's Midnight's Borders: A People's History of Modern India and Harsha Walia's Border and Rule: Global Migration, Capitalism, and the Rise of Racist Nationalism. ---------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Suchitra Vijayan was born and raised in Madras, India. Her work has appeared in The Washington Post, GQ, The Boston Review, The Hindu, and Foreign Policy, and she has appeared on NBC news. A Barrister by training, she previously worked for the United Nations war crimes tribunals in Yugoslavia and Rwanda before co-founding the Resettlement Legal Aid Project in Cairo, which gives legal aid to Iraqi refugees. She is an award-winning photographer, the founder and executive director of the Polis Project, a hybrid research and journalism organization. She lives in New York. Harsha Walia is the award-winning author of Undoing Border Imperialism (2013) and, most recently, Border and Rule. Trained in the law, she is a community organizer and campaigner in migrant justice, anti-capitalist, feminist, and anti-imperialist movements, including No One Is Illegal and Women's Memorial March Committee. Hardeep Dhillon attended U.C. Berkeley before completing her doctorate in History with a secondary in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGS) at Harvard University. Her dissertation examined the global development of U.S. immigration and border controls through the lens of Asian exclusion at the turn of the twentieth century. Hardeep's larger research interests include histories of law, mobility, empire, racial capitalism, and settler colonialism. In Fall 2021, Hardeep will join the American Bar Foundation (ABF) as the incoming postdoctoral fellow in the ABF/National Science Foundation Fellowship Program in Law and Inequality. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/IfJ8-2IDOiE Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Visions and Strategies for Community Safety w/ Ash-Lee Woodard Henderson, Andrea Ritchie & more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 81:01

    Join us for a discussion with Ash-Lee Henderson, Jonel Beauvais, Che Johnson-Long, Andrea Ritchie and Lex Steppling on visions and strategies for community safety, part of the Beyond the Bars 2021 conference. Beyond the Bars - Towards Freedom: Violence, Safety and Abolition in 2021 This year marks the 11th annual Beyond the Bars Conference, coming one year after the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in which multiple crises have unfolded, and the growth of social movements struggling for a more just and safe world have increased significantly. Given this, we hope to create deep and thoughtful conversations about the many forms of violence that our society has experienced; to surface and examine the ways in which movements are pushing for community and public safety in ways that do not reenforce the carceral state; and to explore why abolition has become so prevalent in the conversations, strategies and demands in the work of transforming approaches to justice and safety. In addition, we will take time to honor and celebrate the leadership of women impacted by incarceration, and the leadership of Black women, and all that we have and can learn from their work. And we will spend time building and amplifying the work of grassroots organizing. Conference Sponsors The Ford Foundation, Trinity Church Wall Street, the New York Women's Foundation, Columbia School of Social Work Student Services, Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty Diversity and Inclusion, the Eric H. Holder Jr. Inititiave for Civil and Political Rights, the Division of Social Science, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Columbia University. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/voMGUF8OUt8 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Toward Abolitionist Horizons w/ Dean Spade, Gina Dent & more (Beyond the Bars 2021)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 67:24

    Join us for a discussion with Gina Dent, Dean Spade, Dawn Harrington and Ivan Calaff on abolitionist horizons in 2021. Beyond the Bars - Towards Freedom: Violence, Safety and Abolition in 2021 This year marks the 11th annual Beyond the Bars Conference, coming one year after the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in which multiple crises have unfolded, and the growth of social movements struggling for a more just and safe world have increased significantly. Given this, we hope to create deep and thoughtful conversations about the many forms of violence that our society has experienced; to surface and examine the ways in which movements are pushing for community and public safety in ways that do not reenforce the carceral state; and to explore why abolition has become so prevalent in the conversations, strategies and demands in the work of transforming approaches to justice and safety. In addition, we will take time to honor and celebrate the leadership of women impacted by incarceration, and the leadership of Black women, and all that we have and can learn from their work. And we will spend time building and amplifying the work of grassroots organizing. Conference Sponsors The Ford Foundation, Trinity Church Wall Street, the New York Women's Foundation, Columbia School of Social Work Student Services, Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty Diversity and Inclusion, the Eric H. Holder Jr. Inititiave for Civil and Political Rights, the Division of Social Science, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Columbia University. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/m90ZGZ6fVG4 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Uprooting Violence w/ Keeanga Yamahtta Taylor, Aja Monet, & more (Beyond the Bars 2021)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 89:42

    Join us for a discussion on uprooting violence with Danielle Sered, Sonya Shah, Jose Saldana and Anthonine Pierre, remarks from Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor and a performance from Aja Monet. Beyond the Bars - Towards Freedom: Violence, Safety and Abolition in 2021 This year marks the 11th annual Beyond the Bars Conference, coming one year after the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in which multiple crises have unfolded, and the growth of social movements struggling for a more just and safe world have increased significantly. Given this, we hope to create deep and thoughtful conversations about the many forms of violence that our society has experienced; to surface and examine the ways in which movements are pushing for community and public safety in ways that do not reenforce the carceral state; and to explore why abolition has become so prevalent in the conversations, strategies and demands in the work of transforming approaches to justice and safety. In addition, we will take time to honor and celebrate the leadership of women impacted by incarceration, and the leadership of Black women, and all that we have and can learn from their work. And we will spend time building and amplifying the work of grassroots organizing. Conference Sponsors The Ford Foundation, Trinity Church Wall Street, the New York Women's Foundation, Columbia School of Social Work Student Services, Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty Diversity and Inclusion, the Eric H. Holder Jr. Inititiave for Civil and Political Rights, the Division of Social Science, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Columbia University. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/3aBzqIIM6LQ Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Celebrating Black Women's Leadership, Then & Now (Part II)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2021 67:06

    Join Roberta Meyers Douglas, Fallon McClure, Fenika Miller, and Tiffany Roberts for Part 2 of “Celebrating Black Women's Leadership, Then and Now” part of the 11th annual Beyond the Bars Conference. Beyond the Bars - Towards Freedom: Violence, Safety and Abolition in 2021 This year marks the 11th annual Beyond the Bars Conference, coming one year after the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in which multiple crises have unfolded, and the growth of social movements struggling for a more just and safe world have increased significantly. Given this, we hope to create deep and thoughtful conversations about the many forms of violence that our society has experienced; to surface and examine the ways in which movements are pushing for community and public safety in ways that do not reenforce the carceral state; and to explore why abolition has become so prevalent in the conversations, strategies and demands in the work of transforming approaches to justice and safety. In addition, we will take time to honor and celebrate the leadership of women impacted by incarceration, and the leadership of Black women, and all that we have and can learn from their work. And we will spend time building and amplifying the work of grassroots organizing. Conference Sponsors The Ford Foundation, Trinity Church Wall Street, the New York Women's Foundation, Columbia School of Social Work Student Services, Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty Diversity and Inclusion, the Eric H. Holder Jr. Inititiave for Civil and Political Rights, the Division of Social Science, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Columbia University. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/pX4C0fucXjk Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

    Celebrating Black Women's Leadership w/ Angela Davis, Barbara Ransby, & more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 67:06


    Join Barbara Ransby, Angela Davis, Andrea James, LaTosha Brown, and M Adams for “Celebrating Black Women's Leadership, Then & Now” part of the 11th annual Beyond the Bars Conference. Beyond the Bars - Towards Freedom: Violence, Safety and Abolition in 2021 This year marks the 11th annual Beyond the Bars Conference, coming one year after the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in which multiple crises have unfolded, and the growth of social movements struggling for a more just and safe world have increased significantly. Given this, we hope to create deep and thoughtful conversations about the many forms of violence that our society has experienced; to surface and examine the ways in which movements are pushing for community and public safety in ways that do not reenforce the carceral state; and to explore why abolition has become so prevalent in the conversations, strategies and demands in the work of transforming approaches to justice and safety. In addition, we will take time to honor and celebrate the leadership of women impacted by incarceration, and the leadership of Black women, and all that we have and can learn from their work. And we will spend time building and amplifying the work of grassroots organizing. Conference Sponsors The Ford Foundation, Trinity Church Wall Street, the New York Women's Foundation, Columbia School of Social Work Student Services, Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty Diversity and Inclusion, the Eric H. Holder Jr. Inititiave for Civil and Political Rights, the Division of Social Science, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Columbia University. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/pX4C0fucXjk Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks


    The Power of Community-Generated Research in our Work for Justice

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 89:44

    Join Haymarket Books, and a coalition of partners for a discussion of the power of community-led research, education, & knowledge creation. This is a panel discussion with speakers and groups whose deep commitment to work grounded in community, in liberatory processes, and in challenging injustice at its core, are deeply inspiring and so relevant for this moment. Speakers will share their wisdom, experience, and analysis as we think together about the ways that our work for justice is strengthened and deepened by truly embodying a commitment to community-rooted and community-generated processes --and what that looks like in practice. ---------------------------------------------------- About the groups: Makan is a Palestinian-led educational organization based in the UK. Through its knowledge and capacity-building programs, Makan strengthens voices calling for Palestinian rights across the grassroots and advocacy sphere. https://www.makan.org.uk/ Justice For Muslims Collective is a grassroots organization that works to dismantle structural and institutionalized forms of Islamophobia in the greater Washington region through political consciousness and narrative shifting, community organizing and healing justice, and building alliances. https://www.justiceformuslims.org/ Confronting white supremacy, hegemonic masculinity, heteronormativity, & colonial heritages, the Democratizing Knowledge Project focuses on producing transformative knowledges & collectivities that result in inclusive publics in higher education. Feminist Freedom Warriors (FFW) is a first of its kind digital video archive that uses oral history to document the lives & work of feminist scholar-activists of the later 20th century to today. https://democratizingknowledge.syr.edu/ http://feministfreedomwarriors.org/ PARCEO is a resource and education center, rooted in principles of Participatory Action Research, that partners with community groups & institutions seeking to deepen their work for justice. https://parceo.org/ ---------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Tamara Ben-Halim, co-founder and co-director, Makan Darakshan Raja, co-director, Justice for Muslims Collective Chandra Talpade Mohanty and Linda Carty, co-founders Democratizing Knowledge & Feminist Freedom Warriors Nina Mehta, co-director, PARCEO (Moderator) ---------------------------------------------------- Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/gdOOsPz5048 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

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