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Morning Meditation for Women
Affirmation: I Am Unstoppable (Celebrate)

Morning Meditation for Women

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2023 10:40


Join Premium! Ready for an ad-free meditation experience? Join Premium now and get every episode from ALL of our podcasts completely ad-free now! Just a few clicks makes it easy for you to listen on your favorite podcast player.  Become a PREMIUM member today by going to --> https://WomensMeditationNetwork.com/premium They are inevitable.  The desires you hold so tenderly to your heart.  The dreams that dance within you. They will manifest, They will come alive. Because you are unstoppable. Keep your attention here, On the grand plan visible on the horizon.  And away from the grains of sand in your hand.  Focusing your head down will blind you to the bigger picture, The cosmic truth of your life: Nothing can stop you from realizing your dreams. No one can hold you down. The visions are yours to embrace, The desires, yours to make manifest. So breathe fully now, Feeling the magic in the air. And let it fill you up. I am unstoppable.  JOURNAL PROMPTS: What do you feel about this affirmation?  How are you unstoppable?    

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 96 – Unstoppable Bird and BirdNote Advocate with Nick Bayard

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 67:53


On this episode of Unstoppable Mindset, we get to speak with Nick Bayard the executive Director of BirdNote. This organization is a nonprofit that provides sound-rich programs on over 200 radio stations that discuss the challenges faced by birds. The program includes the sounds of birds. It can be heard daily. You will get to learn more about BirdNote during our episode.   Nick holds a Master's degree in Public Administration and International Development from the Harvard Kennedy School and a bachelor's degree in Environmental Studies from Brown University. He served three years in the Peace Corps Paraguay and has held several social service policy decisions in the Northwest U.S.   Nick gives us much to think about, not only about birds and BirdNote, but also he helps us think more deeply about how we live our lives and how we can help make our whole planet a more friendly and good place to live.     About the Guest: Nick Bayard is the Executive Director of BirdNote. BirdNote is a public media nonprofit organization that tells vivid, sound-rich stories about birds and the challenges they face in order to inspire listeners to care about the natural world and take steps to protect it. BirdNote Daily is their beloved flagship show that has been in production since 2005. It is a one minute, 45 second daily radio show that broadcasts on over 250 radio stations across the US. You can listen to BirdNote Daily and other longform podcasts produced by BirdNote anytime, wherever you listen to podcasts. You can also learn what BirdNote is doing to contribute to more diverse and inclusive birding and environmental communities at www.birdnote.org.    Nick holds a master's degree in Public Administration and International Development from the Harvard Kennedy School and a bachelor's degree in Environmental Studies from Brown University. He served for three years in the environmental sector of Peace Corps Paraguay and has served in leadership roles in social services and racial equity in government policy in the Pacific Northwest. Nick is an Eagle Scout and also a musician, having released an award-winning children's album, Wishing Well, with his oldest son in 2014.    Nick and his wife Sedia live in Washington State with their three kids.   Ways to connect with Nick:   BirdNote website: www.birdnote.org  BirdNote daily podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/birdnote-daily/id79155128 BirdNote's Bring Birds Back podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bring-birds-back/id1566042634 BirdNote's Threatened podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/threatened/id1538065542 BirdNote en Español podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/birdnote-en-espa%C3%B1ol/id1643711928 Nick Bayard's LinkedIn page: www.linkedin.com/in/nickbayard Nick Bayard's Twitter page: https://twitter.com/NickBayard Wishing Well children's album: https://www.amazon.com/Wishing-Well-Nick-Bayard/dp/B00IHIEUYE/ref=tmm_acd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Welcome once again to unstoppable mindset. Hi, everyone. It's a nice fall day here in Southern California, supposed to get up to 96 degrees today. It is late September. So for those who remember, it is also the time of hurricane Ian in Florida. And our thoughts are with all the people and creatures down there. But today, we get to interview someone and talk about some of those creatures. Nick Bayard is a person who has been involved in dealing with natural resources and so on. He's the Executive Director of bird note. And we're going to get to that. And all things, Nick, as we go along. So Nick, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Nick Bayard  02:05 Thank you so much. It's an honor to be here.   Michael Hingson  02:07 Well, it's our pleasure, and we really appreciate you taking the time to be here with us. Let's start just kind of learning a little bit about you, can you kind of tell us where you came from and how you got where you   Nick Bayard  02:18 are a little bit? Sure, well, I grew up in Delaware, in kind of a little bubble, to be honest, and, you know, my educational career kind of took a winding path, because I didn't really see a career out there that looks like something I wanted to do forever. I just feel like there's there's too much to try to pack into one life to commit to sort of, you know, doctor, lawyer, you know, etc. And so, I think that was both a blessing and a curse, because it led me to follow a lot of different paths. And it led to a lot of frustration too, because our, I think our society is set up to reward sort of monotony and continue building, you know, of a career over a period of time. But I wouldn't trade it for anything, because it's it's given me a lot of unique experiences, serving in the Peace Corps in South America, getting to do racial equity work and in government. And now being executive director of a wonderful organization that I've loved for a long time, came a bit out of left field, because I had done so many things that kind of added up to what the burden of board members wanted in this role that all of a sudden, things kind of fell into place for something that I never could have predicted. So it's it's been a winding road, but I'm really thrilled to be where I am and happy to get the chance to talk about it with you.   Michael Hingson  03:56 Winding roads are always kind of fun, you know, you never know where you're gonna go next. Or maybe you do but at the same time, it's always the adventure of getting there. That's at least half the fun.   Nick Bayard  04:07 And you've had that experience too, right? Yes, quite a number of lifetimes packed into one right.   Michael Hingson  04:14 It has been a fun adventure. And it continues to be and I can't complain about that a single bit. It's, you know, it's all about choices. And but it is all about embracing the adventure of life to exactly.   Nick Bayard  04:28 So what you went to college, I went to Brown University in Rhode Island and studied environmental studies and really had a wonderful experience there. And then   Michael Hingson  04:41 what got you from there to the Peace Corps?   Nick Bayard  04:43 You know, I thought I was gonna go down the path of biologist scientists, ecologist, spent a year doing a residency in environmental education in the Grand Tetons, and we're realized after that year that actually maybe halfway into that year that I would be, I would feel kind of limited myself, I guess if I were to just sort of pick that path and run with it, although lots of people do that and love it, it just wasn't for me. What I recognized is that I just didn't have enough experience out in the world to be able to even say what I wanted to commit to for, you know, even for at least the next few years, so I thought that the Peace Corps was this opportunity to, to really throw myself into the unknown and experience something completely different. And hopefully learn about people learn more about people learn more about institutions learn more about how different cultures and communities operate. And it was like, throw myself in the deep end, I got even more than I bargained for, I'd say, How so, you know, the Peace Corps was hard in ways that I didn't expect, I, I think I was conditioned to think of it as a just really an opportunity to help make the world a better place. But there's a danger of that Savior mindset. If you go to a place thinking that you have the skills or the resources to be able to help or save in a way that you've maybe seen it on TV, and you realize you're, you're with people, and you're, you know, you're not any better or worse than the folks that you're going to live with. And as a Peace Corps volunteer, you are very much reliant on your community to take care of you and teach you and that was jarring. I think it's jarring for a lot of folks who go abroad for service work. They've, there's this idea that, you know, we go and we save, or we help. But really, going with a mindset of humility, and learning and growth, I think is much more important. And so I had to sort of adjust my worldview in a lot of ways and recognize that, you know, I had never really thought about, oh, gosh, you know, I'm gonna go help a community. In every community, there are people who are unkind, who lie, who, who cheat, who steal, etc. And I don't know why I think part of my my upbringing was thinking, well, if people are underprivileged, they're all nice all the time. And it's just a community like any other. So I thought that was really interesting to go and experience, you know, humanity in a different context. And recognize that a lot of the preconceptions I had about about other parts of the world were completely wrong. And so it was perfect learning and growth. For me, that's exactly what I needed.   Michael Hingson  07:52 Interesting kind of way to put it when you talk about underprivileged and so on. Do you think today that there is underprivileged other parts of the world as you thought they were, when you were first starting out in the Peace Corps,   Nick Bayard  08:06 I think the biggest blind spot I had was really on, it wasn't even so much about global issues, it was about American history. And as I've, as I've grown, you know, and, and gotten older, the extent of the, the blind spots I had around race and racism in America, have really driven sort of this last 10 years of my my life and my career, really, from a place of just, you know, feeling like I was robbed of an understanding of how formative racism was at the at the heart of how the country was born, and how it's evolved, and how it's progressed, and why certain communities experienced the conditions that they do. And so that's something that I've really worked hard at to understand, because it's not history that I got in school, it's not history that I heard about in my community, you know, as I came to find out, that's very much by design. And so I, I don't blame myself for it. But I recognize the responsibility I have to keep to always keep learning and growing. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  09:19 Well, I think that we do oftentimes find that there. Are there any number of people who think well, we're so much better off than than they are. And I think it depends on what you mean, by better off if you think about the world being more technologically advanced, we have access to more technologies and more creature comforts, in some ways. Anyway, there's probably some truth to that. But when you get down into community, you get down into family and you get to dealing with those concepts, and the closeness and the loyalty that that people have. That's a whole different animal and it's not necessarily at all clear that we're really any better off as, as well as some people, at least from what I've heard and learned?   Nick Bayard  10:05 Yeah, I think back to, you know, I developed some really important friendships in Paraguay and really got close to folks in a way that can't really compare it to some of the friendships I've had in America even just because the cross cultural cross language divide, bridging, that is a powerful thing. And I've, I think I laughed more in Paraguay than I, I ever have in a similar stretch of time and in America, because there's, there's a sense of humor and a lightness in the Paraguayan culture that I experienced that it's just delightful. And, you know, there's, I hosted a weekly radio show. And every week, folks would, would give me jokes to tell in the, in the native language, Guarani. And it was, you know, on the radio show, we talked about things like, you know, the environment and agriculture and green manures and things like that. But the thing that really stood out to people are the jokes, because they, there were things that people connected with, and sense of humor is just a really important part of the culture. So it was, it was just interesting to to experience that the joy of being there with folks who really, really did not have infrastructure around them. Shiny water, paved roads, things like that. Just just having a great time in life. That that was a good, a good lesson for me.   Michael Hingson  11:47 Yeah. And oftentimes, I think, here in this country, we don't slow down and stop and think about life. And that's something that I've been thinking about a lot. And we're actually going to talk about it in the new book that I'm writing, which tentatively is titled The Guide Dogs Guide to Being brave, but it's about taking time each day to stop and really think about what you did that day, what worked, what didn't and just thinking about life, we don't meditate nearly enough, do we?   Nick Bayard  12:17 And you can say that, again, I don't know if you have any, go two ways to remind yourself, that's something I struggle with is just actually committing to a pause until I feel like I really need it. I don't know if you if you have any insight,   Michael Hingson  12:36 you know, what we're what we're talking about in the book are several different techniques that can help. One thing that I find a lot of people use our vision boards and treasure mapping and visioning, where you put something up on a refrigerator, or somewhere to remind you of something like if you're going to take a vacation. And you want to really keep in the mindset of getting prepared for that you put a picture of like if you're going to go to Hawaii, you put a picture of Hawaii up well, you can do the same thing with with what we're talking about here, you can put up something around the house that says Don't forget to meditate at the end of the day, or when you when you get into bed before you turn off the light. If there's someplace that you normally look, put there a note, don't forget to take five minutes or 10 minutes to meditate. And you can put reminders up to do that. And what eventually happens, if you do it, and are consistent about it, you'll create a mindset that will cause you to automatically do it. And you'll be able to go more into a mode of of meditating. I took a course in transcendental meditation in college. And what they suggested was this make it a habit to get up 20 minutes early and meditate in the morning or and take and set up a time to do it at night. Nowadays, we have other ways to help with visioning. I, for example, put a lot of reminders in my little Amazon Echo device, I got to be careful of what I say or she's going to talk to me, but But I I put reminders in of things that I want to do not just about meetings on the calendar, but other things. And that's another way to vision it doesn't have to be from an eyesight standpoint. So you if you have an echo, you can tell it to remind you at 11 o'clock every night hey, go meditate for 10 minutes. I mean, there are a lot of ways to use technology and techniques to create a visioning environment to get you into the habit of doing something.   Nick Bayard  14:46 That's great. Yeah, I My My issue is I think I have to keep coming up with new ways to get my attention but get my own attention. Sort of like exactly how sometimes the sign word Some other times, I feel like I need up a sign that all kind of slapped me in the face. Because I'm not, I'm not willing to listen to what my my past self had reminded me to do. Well, that's   Michael Hingson  15:11 why I like the idea of the echo device. And I can tell it to we have several echo devices around the house. So I can have the reminder play on every echo device as well, so that it will remind me wherever I am in the house that you can't escape it. For me, I'm pretty much in the habit of doing it all the time. But still, having the reminder doesn't hurt. Right, right, right. So there are a lot of ways to give yourself a reminder to do something that will force you to at least for the second set, it's on to listen, and hopefully that will help you move forward and doing what it is you want to do. And taking time really to stop and or at least slow down and think a little bit is always an important thing to do.   Nick Bayard  16:03 Hmm. Yeah, I think one of the challenges of work from home is there's, there's folks that do that is less, less travel, less transition. And so it's easy for things to kind of pile up and go just back to back to back. And it's like, oh, let me actually go into the other room here and sit down for a minute and or take a walk outside. That's Those are good reminders.   Michael Hingson  16:29 Yeah. And those can be verbal with an echo device, you can send yourself a calendar invite that just remind you, every day, it's such and such a time, take the time to go off and do something and you know, you may not be able to do it right at that moment. But the reminder is still there. And by having something that forces you to at least think about it that is reminders in various formats and forms. That helps. All right, right. So we can take the time to do it. The problem that I think we mostly have is, oh, I just don't have time to do that. I've got to get this done or that done. Yeah, we do have time. Mental health is one of the most important thing, if not the most important thing that we can be doing for ourselves that we normally don't pay attention to. But in reality, we can make work for us.   Nick Bayard  17:22 For sure, for sure. I think that's that's originally actually what drew me in to burn out which is, which is the organization where I am. And it's a the flagship show that we run on radio stations, and our podcast is it's called burnout daily, that people probably know it as burnout. It's a minute, 45 seconds, and it's got a catchy theme song that invites you in and invites you to pay attention to the lives of burns for just Just a minute, 45 seconds. And that seems to be enough time that you can go deeply into something but not so much time that you you can't justify just sitting there and listening. Which is originally why you know why I came to love the program so much. Well,   Michael Hingson  18:15 how long were you in the Peace Corps?   Nick Bayard  18:17 I was there for I did a a two year volunteer service term. And then I stayed on for an additional year to be the coordinator of the environment sector.   Michael Hingson  18:28 Where the volunteers were was that. I'm sorry, where was that? Where did you do that?   Nick Bayard  18:34 In Paraguay? Okay, one of two landlocked countries in South America and the other?   Michael Hingson  18:40 Yeah. Right. Yeah, there's a lot of water around South America.   Nick Bayard  18:46 Yeah. You know, and, unfortunately, if Paraguay has not been, as that benefited from a lot of the natural resources on the continent, partly due to the, you know, the history of war, there was a major war that Paraguay found itself in against Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay, and it just turned into an actual massacre of genocide. It was, I think it was just after the US Civil War ended, or it was right around that time, and something like 80% of all boys and men are killed. And then the country shrunk. And then it was President Rutherford B. Hayes who brokered an agreement to give Paraguay back some of its land and so there's actually a county in Paraguay called President Hays County or it's been caught, but as they didn't they i Yes. And so I saw more busts and sort of recognitions of President Hayes in Paraguay than I ever expected to see anywhere. It's really interesting.   Michael Hingson  19:57 There's a historic fact I didn't know Cool. And that's, that's a good thing. And and we do have a Paraguay today. And so you spent time in the Peace Corps there, which is always a good thing.   Nick Bayard  20:10 Yeah. And it was, it was interesting to go and realize that Spanish wouldn't help me very much. I spoke a little bit of Spanish. I got there. But the Peace Corps trainer is quickly put me into a class to learn the language, quad knee, which is the language that most Paraguayan speak most of the time, and the class itself was taught in Spanish. And so I was just really having a hard time with that one, because I sort of it sort of felt like, you know, trying to use tweezers with oven mitts on it's like, I barely know what you're saying, I'm supposed to understand it enough to, to learn a whole new language, it ended up working out really well. But I ended up learning it very well, very, very, very fluently,   Michael Hingson  21:02 but but those first few months were pretty rough. Well, there's nothing like immersion to force you to learn something, which is going back to what we talked about, as far as giving yourself reminders to take time to think about life. You know, it's all about immersion.   Nick Bayard  21:18 Yeah, that the other really surprising thing that happened when I was first arriving in Paraguay was I was I was just starting to go bald. And I was dealing with all the emotions around that. And having a hard time with that, and, and some of the folks in my community where I was training, would ask me about it, and prod me about it, and even make fun of me about it. And so I, I realized, okay, if I'm gonna be able to have a snappy comeback or something, I've got a, I got to figure this out, because I just, I'm having a hard enough time with this already. And just to have people kind of prodding me in on something that I'm sensitive about, you know, I, I need to learn to communicate here.   Michael Hingson  22:03 Also a good way to maybe pick up some more jokes for a future radio program.   Nick Bayard  22:09 Yeah, exactly, exactly.   Michael Hingson  22:12 So what did you do after the Peace Corps?   Nick Bayard  22:15 Well, I came back to the US and wanted to be in DC, because that's where a lot of international development work was, was based, but actually ended up working for a nonprofit that develops high quality preschools in low income neighborhoods, called appletree. Institute, and help help them raise money and develop new schools. In areas where there hadn't traditionally been been very effective schools. And, you know, it was there that I really learned how to how to pitch an organization to funders. It was a, it was a fundraising role. And so that was really valuable for me, because I got to really understand how, you know what, what's compelling to people who might want to give and what is fundraising other than really giving somebody the opportunity to support something maybe they didn't know that they wanted to support. So I came to really enjoy fundraising and realize that if it's for something that I care about, it's it's a great opportunity for me and for the people that I connect with to to make the world a better place.   Michael Hingson  23:30 Yeah. How long did you do that?   Nick Bayard  23:33 I was there for two years. After about a year and a half, I felt like, Okay, I've kind of plateaued in this role, I'm going to apply to grad school, I got a very good score on my GRE and a friend of mine and her dad told her the score, and she said, you could go to Harvard. And I had not thought of that before she said it. And it sort of got the wheels turning, like maybe see what see what Harvard has gone on. And they had a master's program and Public Administration and International Development, which was really appealing because it was quantitative, heavy. It focused on economics, which everybody in international development just kept saying, you know, you got to have that foundation. And it ended up you know, being a program that the math was so advanced that it was sort of like being hit with a ton of bricks for the first year. You know, and then after the after that first year, I get into take more courses on, you know, things like public speaking and leadership and negotiation and writing, you know, the stuff that now feels a little bit more practical to my day to day, but it was actually that was where I met my wife and so I'm especially glad that that was worked out the way that it did because it completely. It completely, you know, formed every every moment since, you know, since I met Cydia, my wife. So that's probably the most valuable thing I got from Harvard.   Michael Hingson  25:18 Well that makes makes a lot of sense. So you got your master's degree was she in the same program,   Nick Bayard  25:23 she was in the School of Education getting she was getting her second master's degree. She had gotten a master's degree from the school for international training. And this master's degree was in learning and teaching at Harvard Graduate School of Education. And everybody at Harvard was just kind of blown away by her and what she knew about learning and teaching. Because she'd done it for so long understood it so well. And I think a lot of her classmates more and more from her than they did from some of the professors, to be honest. So she's she, she really understands how people learn better than anyone I've, I've met. And she's she's really helped me whenever I've given a training or had I sort of convey a concept to a group. Well just   Michael Hingson  26:16 give her permission to remind you every day to take some time to meditate and think about life. And I bet you'll have the habit in no time. I bet you're right. Wives, wives do that. And that's a blessing. So sure. So they're, and all that math. Well, everything needs math in one way or another. But I can appreciate the fact that once you survive the math, and sometimes I wonder when, when colleges and universities do those things that you don't expect, like in a program, like you're thinking of giving you so much math, or when I was at UC Irvine, the people who went into the bioscience program, before they got to the point of being able to take all of the regular bioscience courses other than introductory courses, they had to take a year of organic chemistry. And a lot of the people in the biocide program, we're gonna go into med so they were kind of pre med and all that. And what what happened is that people who enrolled in the biocide program at UC Irvine, I know the first year I was there, 1600 people enrolled. And there were 200 left by the end of their sophomore year, because organic chemistry and other courses like that weeded them out. And the bioscience department was very deliberate about insisting that you have to do all that before you can go on, even though and the reality is, of course, you would use that organic chemistry. But still, before you can get to the real practical stuff, you've got to be able to deal with the theory. So kind of wonder if they were doing that at Harvard, if that was part of the logic.   Nick Bayard  27:54 I wonder, you know, there's, you know, you wonder how sadistic some of these design these programs. One of the things that, you know, I feel like our program at Harvard does, you know, as it is it signals to folks who know about that degree, that you can do something very intense and difficult. Even if you don't end up using a lot of the hard skills, you know, that you you worked on there. So that's, that's been valuable for when folks know about that degree program. Anybody who's been through the Harvard Kennedy School will, I think set up a little straighter when you tell them that you have an NPA ID is that's that's the one that it's really the you know, the gut punch, especially in that first year.   Michael Hingson  28:45 Yeah, well, you survived it and you moved on, what did you do after you got that   Nick Bayard  28:50 degree? I actually spent a year working on music and recognize that like, there probably wouldn't be a time in a transition period when I'd have the opportunity to, to pursue music was something I've always loved and always done for, for, you know, just a full time thing for a while. And so when I when I met Cydia, she had been with our oldest son at the time, she'd come over as a single mom with her son, Wally, to Harvard, they kind of upgraded everything and came to Cambridge. And when I met Cydia, qualia was 10. And so we kind of became a family unit pretty quickly. And obviously when you know when to do it, and I got married, and so one of the things that came of that time we were living in DC was city I said, Why don't you write a children's album? And all of a sudden, all this music just started coming out of me, inspired by my conversation was with a query. And so it was really quite a fun time to, to be able to talk to him and understand his worldview and then write some music based on what I learned. And we, we ended up recording and producing this album together called wishing well. And it became pretty popular on the children's radio stations. And Wally and I were invited to be showcased performers at the world's only at the time Children's Music Conference. kindy calm, and at the time, we were the only act that had an actual kit, and you know, in the group, so that was quite a special time. And you know, we moved back out to cometa to put a trailer back in his his school he had been in, but we stayed on the East Coast for a year and did music and, you know, made some memories.   Michael Hingson  30:54 What good memories Wow, that's pretty amazing. I'm going to have to go look for the album.   Nick Bayard  31:00 Yeah, it was it was a surprise. To me, I had never thought of writing or recording children's music till Cydia suggested it. And I've, you know, I loved music as a kid Rafi has always been a hero of mine. And things kind of came full circle when I had a chance to take. Now our two youngest kids, we have four and a six year old to see Rafi alive. Just before the pandemic hit, we had a chance to meet him and give him a hug. And it just the you know, the the waterworks were turned on I it was more emotional than I expected it to be he so what did you do after music. That was we came out to Tacoma. And I was basically, you know, trying to figure out my place in this community and had a lot of meetings with folks and learned about an opening for the director of a social service organization that was working to support youth and young adults who were struggling with education and employment or housing, mental health, substance use disorders. And getting that job and really trying to build this thing into something that was, you know, trusted by young people and offered as many services as we can offer in one place. Because the young folks that have been burned by institutions are a lot less likely to trust institutions. And so we, as an institution could could help start to rebuild that trust a little bit by creating a space where people were, were welcomed and felt accepted, felt represented, and really could could be put on a path towards success, then we can make a big difference. And so it was a it was about as there for about five years, and we were able to increase mental health services on site, we were able to expand the the housing options for young people experiencing homelessness for our county. And we're able to really start the conversation around how institutional racism in the nonprofit sector is, is making our nonprofits not only in some cases, not effective, but in other cases, actually, the perpetuators of harm and so that's, that's something that I'm really pleased came out of that experience was was an opportunity to lead some of those conversations and be part of some of those efforts to to make it tough to make a change in the sector in terms of racial equity.   Michael Hingson  33:56 What made you go out to Tacoma in general,   Nick Bayard  34:00 well Cydia and equate my my wife and oldest son before I met them, they had been here my wife was born in eastern Washington and grew up in Tacoma. And so they had had they had a wife here before they went east to, to for city to get her second master's. And so we, you know, quaintly had his friends back here and I liked what I knew of Washington and so we decided to come out here and start a life together as a family. Less snow than the East Coast. Yes, sadly for me, but happily for much others in my family, who aren't as as big snow fans as I am,   Michael Hingson  34:47 but still get to snow.   Nick Bayard  34:49 We can. That's true. That's true. But it's a wonderful place to raise a family just because it's it is like you said you can get to almost anything Whether it's you know, the city, whether it is performing arts, venues, nature hikes, mountains, rivers, lakes, the ocean, you know, it's just, it's just great. And it's sort of like the home that I never knew I wanted.   Michael Hingson  35:20 And I'll bet being in Washington, you even know where Gonzaga University is where everyone else only knows once a year during basketball season.   Nick Bayard  35:28 That's right, we have some fierce, fiercely loyal folks, you know, in those, you know, in those in those fights, and I try to stay out of it. Yeah, the sports. The sports debates,   Michael Hingson  35:45 I had the honor of being invited to speak at Gonzaga several years ago, it was a lot of fun, and very much enjoyed being up there. So that's great. I've spent a lot of time around various places in Washington, which is always a good thing. We love Washington. Although we we love Victorville where we are we love it, especially because our house is very accessible, we built the house so that it's accessible for my wife. And so we can't complain. And then as you said, working at home, you know, you have all the things that you got to do. But we can create schedules and set it up to work, right. So it works out very well for us. So we're, we're pretty, we're pleased.   Nick Bayard  36:25 That's great. I'm curious if you, if you have any reflections on, you know, the people in Washington versus the folks where you are, one of the things I learned when I came out was that, that there's just sort of this, this norm of, it's okay to just start talking to somebody without even sort of an intro, sort of like you'd be at the supermarket and you can just, you can enter the middle of a conversation with somebody you've never met. I don't know if that was your experience when he came out here.   Michael Hingson  36:55 It was, and there are parts of California where you can do some of that. But I think the whole world is changing, we're getting to be such a polarized world, because of things that are happening in politics, that shouldn't happen, that people aren't talking to each other nearly as much as they used to, I don't know whether you're finding that out there. But we are seeing a lot more of it down here than we used to,   Nick Bayard  37:19 I find myself a lot more closed off. For a couple of reasons. One being, I still mask most places I go. And I also wear hearing aids. And so the combination of the mask and hearing loss, and, you know, just the mechanics of that, and then if somebody else is wearing a mask, it makes it really hard for me to, to hear what they're saying. Because I can't read their lips. And at the same time also, like, being a little bit wary of, you know, being around folks for too long and close environments. We've been lucky with COVID we haven't, haven't had it, but just, you know, I'm looking forward to, you know, science, figuring out more about how to how to prevent it, how to treat it, how to deal with long COVID, that kind of stuff. So yes, I've I've not been as gregarious as I think I always used to be. But I hope to get back to that at some point.   Michael Hingson  38:21 We have stayed pretty close to home, I've traveled a few times to speak, done a lot of virtual things, but we stay pretty close to home, just because it is safer. And you know, we can cope with that we we are pretty good at being flexible about things changing. And when people talk about getting back to normal. That just is never going to happen. And I first thought about that after September 11. Because people kept saying after September 11 With all the things that were going on and government being closed for a week and airports being closed and all that and just all the discussions and people started saying we got to get back to normal. And it was very frustrating to me. And I finally realized that it was frustrating, because normal will never be the same again.   Nick Bayard  39:09 Right. Right. And and what opportunities do we have to identify what what was bad about the old normal that we can we can change. One of the I think real blessings over the last few years has been people have been forced or and invited, I think to to examine how they're spending their time, what they give their time and effort to. And I see people being bolder about pursuing what they love and spending more time with their families. And I think that's a wonderful byproduct of what's been a really difficult couple of years.   Michael Hingson  39:53 Yeah. And I hope that that trend will continue in that path. People will recognize that, and that companies and bosses and leaders will recognize that there's value in letting people do that, because it'll be much better for their mental health. Absolutely. Well, you ended up going at least for a while into city government in Tacoma, right?   Nick Bayard  40:17 I did, I was the assistant chief equity officer in the Office of Equity and Human Rights, which is charged with supporting equitable representation in the workforce. Making sure that our community outreach is is, is really robust, making sure that policies and procedures are equitable, and, and that they recognize the harm that's been done over over decades, you know, against certain groups, and so it's, it's an office that I have a ton of respect for, and I was really happy to be able to serve for for a couple of years. And it was really, I think, it's really valuable to, to go back and forth between different sectors to, to be able to keep fresh eyes on things, one of the things I really appreciate being able to do was being able to come into the government role with lots of grassroots community development experience, and having relationships with a lot of folks that a lot of the city employees didn't have. And so I was able to kind of be a trusted liaison for a lot of those groups and for city staff, and, you know, everybody's got their own path. But for me, being able to, you know, take that experience, somewhere where it can be of good use is, is important. And that's that's also, you know, translated to coming back to the nonprofit sector and going into public media now, is that I've got, you know, that perspective of what it's like to be in government and, you know, as as an entity that reports to, to voters and to community members in a, you know, in the way that in the way that our elections are set up, and the way that our community engagement set up. So it was, it was a, it was quite a valuable experience,   Michael Hingson  42:19 did you in dealing with all of the various issues and aspects around equity? Of course, everybody talks about diversity and so on. But generally, when they do disabilities get left out of that, did you find that you were involved at all or very much in dealing with equity from the standpoint of dealing with persons with disabilities and making sure that they get into the, to the workforce, and that were treated fairly, and so on?   Nick Bayard  42:48 Yes, there actually, prior to my arrival, there had been a long standing Tacoma area commission on disabilities. And most of the members of that commission, if not all, experience, pretty significant disabilities, you know, carry those in their lives. And so our office was charged with being the liaison for that commission. And so whenever there was, the commission would bring a concern or a policy proposal to the city come through our office. One of the projects that was underway that we helped move forward while I was there, was around accessible taxis. And it, it's a good, it was a good window into just how complex is policy challenges can be. Because, you know, the the elected officials that would have to get put put this into place, you know, had to figure out, we had to figure out how much it costs, we had to figure out where folks would need to go, we had to figure out what it would mean to retrofit a taxi company's vehicles. And then how Uber and Lyft and others will be involved with that. And it was it's a multi year process that's still underway. But what we did was we commissioned a feasibility study, so that we could get a clearer and clearer sense of what the cost and scope would need to be so that the elected officials could make a good decision based on that. Something else that commission accomplished was I'm really proud of, but I didn't have any personal part of this is that they had the council pass an ordinance to require closed captioning in all places of business, restaurants and so on. So somebody that's hearing impaired or deaf, would be able to watch TV watch a sports game and know what's going on in a way that they hadn't before. So I think the the bigger issues to tackle had to do with accessible housing and accessible streets And, and that kind of thing. And those are those that's ongoing work. Of course,   Michael Hingson  45:03 other aspects of all that that still don't get addressed very well are things that deal with with eyesight and things like Braille menus in restaurants. So we're, now you've got many companies that we in one way or another are putting kiosks in their facilities and McDonald's and McDonald's is now starting to make those kiosks talk or even accessible voting machines, so that a person who happens to be blind or low vision can go in and use an accessible machine to be able to vote independently. And there are just a lot of challenges like that, that continue to get left out of a lot of the discussions, which is unfortunate.   Nick Bayard  45:47 Very unfortunate. So a question for me is always how do how do we elevate voices like yours and and others? Who? Who oftentimes, I think the, the discussion is it the, the the attention is ends up going on, you know, the, the group or the person that can shout the loudest? Yeah. And so that's not that shouldn't be the case, it should be, you know, we should take a look at intersecting issues of privilege and access and figure out, you know, if, if we can redesign our system so that those of us who you know, have the most barriers, or have have an easy time of it, I think we'll all have an easier time of it, boy struck by the universal design concepts that make things accessible for folks with disabilities, but also make them easier to access for folks without disabilities. It's hard to argue against a lot of investment and that kind of change, I think.   Michael Hingson  46:54 And therein lies one of the real keys that is that, in reality, a lot of the things that might make life more inclusive for us really would help other people as well. But so many people emphasize just one thing that it makes it more of a challenge, like eyesight, you know, so even and one of my favorite topics I've discussed a couple of times on this podcast are the Tesla vehicles were everything is really driven by a touchscreen. And to use not only voice input, what voice output is limited or non existent, there is some voice input to be able to do things. But I as a passenger in a Tesla can't even work the radio, because it's all touchscreen driven. That's really lovely. Except that whoever does it, and the case of a driver, a driver has to look at the screen. And yes, you do have some other capabilities of the Tesla helping with driving. But the reality is that with the state of technology today, people should be watching the road. And we've got the technologies to allow us to use other senses. And we don't do it nearly as much as we should. We have not and we have not embraced in inclusive mindset yet. And when we do, then a lot of the questions that people may have and the concerns that people may have will go away, because they'll realize that what affects some will really help everyone,   Nick Bayard  48:28 for sure. I think part of the part of the reason we get stuck on some of these things is that we tend to think about things in either or terms like either either you support blind people, or you support immigrants, or you support people of color or you support the LGBTQ community. And there's these like saying these soI completely separate projects is a recipe for complete failure to make anything change. And I think what we we need to recognize is that every group contains elements of every other group. Correct. And so helping helping one group fully is going to help other groups in different ways and thinking of ways that we can invest in those, you know, in the middle of those Venn diagrams, so that so that everybody benefits. Right.   Michael Hingson  49:30 Well, so you worked in government, and then how did you get to bird note from that?   Nick Bayard  49:35 Well, I've always loved birds and been fascinated by their behavior, their anatomy, their resilience, and had had taken some ornithology masters levels classes. I when I was out in Wyoming, and, you know, it hadn't been at the front of my mind. You know, since I started family hadn't been out bird watching too much. But then I saw that, you know, the executive director job at burnout had opened up. And it was interesting to me because I didn't realize that bird note itself was independent of radio stations. As a listener, I always thought the burden out was just part of our either part of our local radio station or part of NPR. But in fact, it's an independent nonprofit. And so it, it took me seeing the job opening to understand how the organization was set up. And all of a sudden, it I was just very excited about that opportunity. Because, you know, I'd had nonprofit leadership experience, I love birds, I love the burnt out daily show, and the long form podcasts that burned out, produces. And it it seemed to me that it was just a great next step, in terms of in terms of getting to know a new field of public media, in terms of being able to take some skills I've learned elsewhere and apply them. And it was, you know, it was it was a job where I didn't know anyone going into it. And so, you know, a lot of people and myself included, you know, get jobs through, you know, a personal connection, introduce you to somebody, and then you go through an application or interview process. With burnout, it was it was first time recently where I just applied and was invited to interview. And so in that way, it was, it was gratifying, just not that I, you know, not that there's anything wrong with, you know, having those connections, but, you know, it's It felt good to just apply and just on the nature of what they saw, have them give me a call and,   Michael Hingson  51:58 and asked me to, to interview. And the rest is sort of history.   Nick Bayard  52:05 That's right. That's right, as coming up on one year and November.   Michael Hingson  52:08 So tell us a little about bird note, I'd appreciate knowing more about what exactly the organization is, what it does, and so on.   Nick Bayard  52:17 Sure, we're an independent public media nonprofit organization that's been around since 2005. And it it started really, as a as a radio program under the auspices of Seattle Audubon. And eventually, after a few years it, it became its own nonprofit. And it started really with this vision that the founders vision was to produce a short, sound rich audio experience for radio listeners about birds. And it's just become a really beloved institution in the areas where it's broadcast. And it it's now we've got the flagship show is the minute 45 second show, copper note daily that broadcasts in about 250 public radio stations across the US. We've got long form podcasts, those are called threatened and bring birds back. And we do virtual events and things that most listeners know us for burning out daily. Because that's our biggest audience. We've got, we think around 5 million daily listeners to that show. And so what's really powerful about that, is that we're able to, I believe, create a mindset shift for all of those folks, in terms of inviting them to slow down, pay attention to nature, learn something amazing about birds, and hopefully get inspired to spend more time with nature, with birds, and to the point where we hope we inspire action. For conservation, whether that's something simple, like the way that you live your life, the way that you set up your bird feeders, the way that you turn off your lights during migration season, those kinds of things, all the way up to advocating for more federal legislation for conservation. You know, we hear from listeners that we we have changed their lives, which is really amazing to hear that we've inspired people to to pursue careers in ornithology bird science, that we have helped people with mental health. People say that the show calms them down. It's something that they look forward to every day. And I think the really, really big opportunity we have is to continue showcasing and diversifying people from every background on the show and stories that reflects different kinds of knowledge. folks that aren't, you know, this the the typical profile of somebody who's been centered a conservation over the last 100 years. white male, able bodied person recognize that every group is connected to burns and has a love of, of burning in the outdoors. And we have an opportunity to elevate those stories that haven't been elevated, you know, over over our country's history, which is, I think, very powerful.   Michael Hingson  55:20 So what is the typical one minute 45 second show, like what happens?   Nick Bayard  55:27 Well, sometimes we we start with our theme song, which I'm not going to attempt to recreate with my voice here on burnout.org. And hear that it's a it's a very short, little, just very catchy, you know, couple of seconds thing and then you'll hear the narrator say, this is bird note. And then you'll hear the sound of birds usually, and the narrator will talk you through what you're hearing. And well explained something about the birds behavior, something that we you know, we're learning about the birds something that scientists have just figured out, that kind of thing, then we'll take you back to the sounds of the birds, and then maybe one or two more pieces of information. And then from time to time, well, well let folks know what they can do to to learn more or to connect or to you know, to to make a difference for birds. This morning show was about the white Bennett storm petrel, which is a seabird lives off the coast of Chile and Peru. And it lives most of its life just over the water. And it took scientists eight years to figure out that this storm petrol actually nests about 50 miles inland and the desert and part of the continent that people describe as looking like the surface of bars. So anytime we can, we can drop in some surprising fun tidbits of information for our listeners, we love to do that too. So is bird node, a standard 501 C three nonprofit it is. And if you've got a burden on.org, you can learn more about how to get our email list, which gives you a sneak preview of all of our daily or weekly shows. You can support bird note, we, we we rely on the generosity of listeners to do what we do. And so, you know, unlike a radio station public radio station, which does a fun to drive every couple of years, or sorry, a couple times a year, we we are asking listeners over social media and have our email list to support us with gifts. And we're fortunate to have a lot of generous listeners who donate monthly and who give annually. And one of the services that we've created is something called Bird note plus, where you can subscribe at a different level of monthly giving to get ad free podcasts and get access to special events and get early access to shows and so if there any podcast fans or bird lovers out there that want to check out bird note plus, I would encourage them to do that.   Michael Hingson  58:19 I would as well. It it sounds like a lot of fun. I have not I guess either been up at the right time or whatever have not heard bird no daily here so I'm going to have to go set up a reminder to go listen on the website, I guess every   Nick Bayard  58:34 day. Please do. Yes, you can subscribe anywhere you can podcasts, you can subscribe to the sempurna daily, something that's really exciting as we just launched burnout en Espanol. So it's our first dual language production. So there's a new podcast feed for burnout and Espanyol where it's it's the same experience of the English burden on daily but in Spanish and speaking with folks in and in it throughout the Americas that are doing conservation work. In conversation in Spanish, it's, I think a really great opportunity for us to broaden our audience throughout the Americas. And then our our long form podcasts you can also find anywhere you get podcasts or bring birds back is is I think there's just a really special program that's hosted by a woman named Tanisha Hamilton who models her entry into birding and you just feel the enthusiasm and excitement as she gets into this and talks about things like what it's like to be a black woman birder what it's like to find your own community and birding. You know, how do people with disabilities? What are some of the technologies that they can use to get out and look at birds there and then there are different sort of species specific Two episodes, one of the really popular ones is about the purple Martin, which, which has an amazing history of interplay with with Native American communities and, and carried forward today where people will become what they call purple Martin landlords and create houses for them and just it's just a great story. Great, great program. And then our we have a field based long form podcast called threatened, which is hosted by already Daniel who's on NPR science desk now, and that's about going to the place they're doing in depth work to understand the conservation challenges birds are facing. And so that that podcast is coming out with new episodes in January, focused on Puerto Rico and island habitats. We just wrapped up the season on Hawaii, which was, which was really fascinating.   Michael Hingson  1:00:57 Well, I, I'm gonna go listen, I It will be fun to go do that. Well, if people want to reach out and learn more about you and burden on I assume they can go to bird node.org. But how can they contact you and learn more?   Nick Bayard  1:01:11 Sure they can. They can email me directly at Nick B. At bird note dot org. Always happy to chat. If it's a general bird note inquiry, you can email info at bird note.org We get a lot of people writing in with bird questions. You know, how do we get burned out on our local radio station, that kind of thing. We love to hear those kinds of questions because it helps us connect with new audiences and new radio stations. And, you know, I'm hopeful that we can grow the broadcasts range of Berto because right now we brought about 250 radio stations. But if if we were to, you know, get broadcasts on some of the bigger stations, we could double or triple our audience overnight, which would be, which would be amazing. And it's just a minute 45 seconds. So it's not exactly like a huge investment. I understand that, that time is a finite resource on radio, but I just I don't think there's any good reason why every radio station shouldn't play Burnin Up   Michael Hingson  1:02:18 is short Is it is it makes perfect sense to do. Well, I, I find it fascinating and I hope everyone listening to us today will find it fascinating as well. And that they will reach out to you I think it will be beneficial. And as I said, I'm gonna go make it a habit, I think I can easily do that minute and 45 seconds is just not that long. It's not a big ask just and it's such a such a joyful   Nick Bayard  1:02:47 show. You know, I came into this job as a huge fan, and just have become an even bigger fan, just, you know, getting under the hood and understanding everything that goes into developing creating and producing these shows. So I just feel really lucky to be doing what I do and lucky to have the chance to try to share it with as many people as I can and lucky to ask people to write us check some of sign up to God because that's that's what, that's what keeps us producing the stories and what what allows us to keep growing?   Michael Hingson  1:03:27 Well, I'm gonna go check out bird note.org. And a little bit more detail. Do you know if the website designer paid any attention to or spend any time making sure that it's accessible and put an accessibility kinds of elements to the site? And or do you know if they've done that?   Nick Bayard  1:03:42 We've done a, we our web developer ran an accessibility audit. I need to dig into the details around which aspects are good and which are bad. They told us we got a 91% score.   Michael Hingson  1:03:58 That's pretty good.   Nick Bayard  1:03:59 I think yeah, I think it's pretty good. That's you know, there's always, always room for improvement. One of the things that we were early early adopters of is the the transcripts of every episode on how to be really descriptive in those but I know that we've got got work to do and would welcome any, any feedback you have for sure when you when you go and check it out.   Michael Hingson  1:04:26 We'll do it. And I will definitely communicate either way. Well, Nick, thanks again for being with us. This has been fun and fascinating. I hope you've enjoyed it and and we really appreciate you coming on and we hope you'll be back and update us as burnout progresses.   Nick Bayard  1:04:44 Well, thanks so much, Michael. And I just want to say I'm really inspired by you and your story and I was just thrilled to hear from you and get the invitation to talk. So it's been just a really wonderful Expo. grandson a great honor to be able to chat with you today.   Michael Hingson  1:05:03 Well, my pleasure as well. And for all of you out there listening, please reach out to Nick, please learn more about bird note. And we hope that you'll give us a five star rating wherever you're listening to the podcast. We really appreciate you doing that. I'd love to hear your comments, please feel free to email me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com A C C E S S I B E, or go to our podcast page, Michael hingson.com/podcast. But either way, I would appreciate your five star review would appreciate your comments. And Nick, for you and for everyone listening if you know of anyone else who you think ought to be a guest on unstoppable mindset. We'd love to hear from you about that as well. So thanks for listening. And Nick once more. Thank you very much for being a part of us today and our podcast. Thanks so much.   Michael Hingson  1:05:55 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Medicine Revived Podcast: Learn, Grow, and Thrive
Why Ali's Growth Mindset Was A Far Mightier Weapon Than His Fists

Medicine Revived Podcast: Learn, Grow, and Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 4:43


Muhammad Ali was a far cry from the perfect fighter. He wasn't naturally built for it, had little strength and none of the usual moves. Heck, he even boxed wrong! Pulling back his torso to avoid punches? But despite all that, he still managed to become one of history's greatest boxers ever. Unstoppable self-improvement starts with having a growth mindset - where you don't let challenging times stop your progress, but rather use them as fuel to move forward. Embrace the idea of always learning and growing; it's invaluable for taking control and reaching any goal! Want Medicine Revived Morning Rounds delivered to your inbox every weekday morning? Sign up for the FREE Medicine Revived Morning Rounds at https://courses.medicinerevived.com/morning-rounds

The Unstoppable Entrepreneur Show
From Foster Care To Multi-Million Dollar Real Estate Agent And Best Selling Author | feat. Krista Mashore

The Unstoppable Entrepreneur Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 18:46


Krista Mashore is a best-selling author and unstoppable real estate agent. Krista's new book” Stop, Snap & Switch: Train Your Brain to Unleash Your Limitless Life” dives deep into the science and research behind "mindset".  Krista shares her story of growing up in group homes and foster care and then changing her mindset by focusing on personal development.  As a result, she was able to craft and live the life she always dreamed of having. Also in this episode: How to stop negative thoughts There is no such thing as overnight success  Brain training to shift your mindset Wealth doesn't equal happiness  Stay Connected with Krista: Follow Krista on Instagram | LinkedIn | Facebook | Youtube | Kristamashore.com Purchase: Stop, Snap & Switch: Train Your Brain to Unleash Your Limitless Life Stay Connected With Kelly:  Follow Kelly on Instagram | LinkedIn | Facebook | Youtube | Kellyroachcoaching.com  Grab one of Kelly's bestselling books: Unstoppable: 9 Principles for Unlimited Success in Business and Life Conviction Marketing Bigger than You: The Entrepreneur's Guide to Building an Unstoppable Team The Live Launch Method  

Way of Life Church
Episode 713: An Unstoppable Blessing - Stewardship Lesson 3 | Pastor Kevin Shindoll | January 25, 2023

Way of Life Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 57:23


An Unstoppable Blessing - Stewardship Lesson 3 | Pastor Kevin Shindoll | January 25, 2023Love is our Why. Join Us Online at 11 AM on Sundays and 7:30 PM on Wednesdays. WAYOFLIFE.CHURCH

The Unstoppable Entrepreneur Show
How To Organize Your Day Like A C.E.O And Maximize Your Impact

The Unstoppable Entrepreneur Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 19:03


As the old saying goes, “we all have the same 24 hours.” In today's episode, I am sharing how you can organize your days to maximize your impact, have a work-life balance, and avoid burnout. Also in this episode: It's important to have your own discipline around self-care Carving out time to specifically focus on your CEO responsibilities The value of PR and visibility in your business How being optimally focused and optimized feeds into your performance Stay Connected With Kelly:  Purchase Your Planner Here Follow Kelly on Instagram | LinkedIn | Facebook | Youtube | Kellyroachcoaching.com  Grab one of Kelly's bestselling books: Unstoppable: 9 Principles for Unlimited Success in Business and Life Conviction Marketing Bigger than You: The Entrepreneur's Guide to Building an Unstoppable Team The Live Launch Method

Powerhouse Women
Powerhouse Q&A With Hannah: Cultivating An Unstoppable Mindset

Powerhouse Women

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 39:59


Powerhouse Women COO Hannah Wells and I are back for another Q&A episode! We're answering listener questions around the theme of breaking through limiting beliefs and stepping into your personal power.  We chat about what it looks like to live in alignment, share tips on how to reframe your fears, and talk about what to do when you don't feel like you have control over your outcomes. We also share how we push through those days when it feels like everything is going wrong and give ourselves grace when we're facing resistance.     In this episode we talk about: Journal prompts to get a clear idea of who you are and what lights you up  The first thing I do when I feel like I'm stuck in fear  Ideas for surrounding yourself with proof that your goals are within your reach  Understanding where you give your power away Habits that can help reinforce your confidence and belief in yourself    If you loved today's episode, please share your favorite takeaways or your own systems and processes by screenshotting this episode and tagging us on Instagram! Click HERE to text the word MENTOR to (602) 536-7829 for weekly business + mindset tips delivered straight to your phone! Not part of the Girl Gang Community yet? Join HERE: Girl Gang Membership   CONNECT WITH POWERHOUSE WOMEN Follow Powerhouse Women: @powerhouse_women Follow Lindsey: @llindseyschwartz Follow Hannah: @hannahmwells Visit the Powerhouse Women website: powerhousewomen.co Join the PW Community Facebook Group: facebook.com/groups/powerhousewomencommunity

Real English Conversations Podcast - Listen to English Conversation Lessons

Consistency is definitely a key element to make easy progress in any language. The problem is that it is hard to stay motivated and consistent for a long period of time.  In this episode, I'll share a trick that has helped us to stay consistent with our language learning even when life is super busy! To get the transcription for this podcast, click here.  Our famous New Year's Offer is happening now! Join the 90-Day Next Level English Challenge here (ends January 31st). Don't wait to long to grab your spot because we only have a limited number of spaces available. Once our schedules are full, we will need to close the doors to new students for a while. 

The Next Chapter with Charlie
#267 Jimn Kyles: Pt 2 Unstuck and Unstoppable

The Next Chapter with Charlie

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 57:20


Show Notes  A handful of times in the past we have so enjoyed our time with a guest that we have said, “We must do a follow up to this conversation.” Well today is the very first time we were able to schedule such a follow up in back-to-back weeks. Our guest from last week, Jim Kyles, author of the popular book, Unstuck and Unstoppable, has graciously agreed to be with us once again. Last week we focused so much or our podcast time to dealing with the first notion in his book which is all about how to become Unstuck in various situations in life. Today we want to tackle the second idea of Jimn's book which is How to Become Unstoppable. Jimn will articulate a process he has designed for what to do as Next Steps toward for entering the realm of Unstoppable. Let's welcome once again author, entrepreneur, and church pastor, Jimn Kyles. LINKS You can learn more about Jimn Kyles at www.jimnkyles.com Check out Jimn's latest book: Unstuck and Unstoppable  

The Influencer Podcast
These New Habits Made Me 7-Figures

The Influencer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 38:32


Today we are talking about habits, and how they can make you more money.   In this episode, I will be sharing the new habits I developed and cultivated, that helped increase my revenue.   If you want to change your life, you must believe and create action. Start creating the habits of the version of yourself you want to be, and start taking action to be her NOW.   READY FOR VISIBILITY GROWTH & SCALING? Step into your next level of visibility and thought leadership. A high-level mentorship experience focused on scaling your business, building a credible brand, and owning a new level of visibility and authority. CLICK HERE TO APPLY.   For those that don't want to choose - you want it all. Join The Vault and get access to every course I've ever created! Podcast listeners get SPECIAL SAVINGS by clicking here.   Order my new book, Get What You Want: How to Go From Unseen to Unstoppable.

DoubleCoverage.Media
Lakers Trade & Djoker Unstoppable! - 134

DoubleCoverage.Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 87:24


Tune in today as we go over the latest from sports around the globe. We cover EPL, NFL, UFC, NBA and any other sport topics that are hot in the week. In the second Half of the show we have Hobby Talk where we look at any relevant Hobby topics from the past week. Please like, subscribe and share! Checkout our website - www.doublecoverage.media Follow us on Socials: Double Coverage - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | Tik Tok | Linkedin 2nd Instagram account: Double Coverage.Media Instagram Join Saucey's Tips Telegram: https://t.me/sauceystips Follow SauceysTips on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sauceystips/ Join the Double Coverage Fam Discord Server >>>>JOIN DISCORD

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 95 – Unstoppable Story-Teller and Social Influencer with Sentari Minor

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 62:32


Our guest on this episode of Unstoppable Mindset is Sentari Minor. Mr. Minor, a Phoenix native grew up learning to be a storyteller and writer. As he explains, today he uses his ability to write to communicate and help CEOs to learn more about philanthropy, policy, and driving social impact in their spheres of influence.   Two years ago Mr. Minor joined EvolvedMD as its head of strategy. EvolvedMD works at the forefront of the healthcare industry, among other things, combining the work of practicing physicians and therapists to better help patients especially, where both a physical issue and a possible mental or emotional crisis may be contributing to the same illness. He will tell us some stories about his current work. Even in the time of Covid, his company's cadre of workers has grown from 10 to several hundred. Sentari's work recently earned him a place on Phoenix Business Journal's prestigious “40 Under 40” list for 2022.   As usual, our guest inspires both through his stories and his work. I trust that you will find Mr. Minor's time with us beneficial and informative. Most of all, I believe you will find his work shows that he legitimately is unstoppable and a good example for all of us.     About the Guest: Sentari Minor is most passionate about bringing the best out of individuals and entities. His love languages are strategy, storytelling, and social impact. As Head of Strategy for evolvedMD, Mr. Minor is at the forefront of healthcare innovation with a scope of work that includes strategy, growth, branding, culture, and coaching. His deft touch recently earned him a place on Phoenix Business Journal's prestigious “40 Under 40” list for 2022.   Prior to evolvedMD, he advised prominent and curious CEOs and entrepreneurs regarding philanthropy, policy, and driving social impact as the Regional Director of Alder (Phoenix, Dallas, San Francisco), and strengthened social enterprises as a director at venture philanthropy firm, Social Venture Partners. When he's not busy making change, Mr. Minor enjoys health and fitness, engaging issues on social media, exploratory writing, and spending time with the people who make him smile.   Ways to connect with Sentari:   Website – About Sentari Minor Medium – Sentari Minor on Medium LinkedIn – Sentari Minor on LinkedIn         About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.     Michael Hingson  01:20 Well, hi there, wherever you happen to be today. And I am Mike Hingson, host of unstoppable mindset. We're glad you're with us. And we have a guest today Sentari Minor, who will tell you that his passion is trying to be bring the best out of individuals and entities. And I'm gonna be very interested to hear about that and all the other things that that you have to talk about. So welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Sentari Minor  01:47 I'm excited to be here. Thanks for having me.   Michael Hingson  01:50 Well, what's our pleasure? Tell us a little bit about you kind of go back to the beginning. And you know, what your roots are and how you got a little bit of where you are today in schooling and anything else like that that you want to throw in,   Sentari Minor  02:02 man. So just back to the beginning. That takes the first hour, right? I'm trying to that is a that's a lot, but I'll try to I'll try to condense it into something that's five minutes or less. So I guess super excited to be here. So I am a Phoenix native. I grew up in Phoenix, Arizona, which has grown so much essence when I was a little kid out. So I grew up here in Arizona, and was always a very, very interesting kid. I did a I did a a storytelling session. There's this group called the whole story that got together kind of six to eight Black Storytellers and just had them come on stage and like talk about something. And what I talked about was being like the first Black Nerd, as I put it before, it was cool. And so I was always just like a very interesting kid that loves school loved reading was pretty introverted, even though I'm naturally an extroverted person. And so I was kind of like an always an oddball, but in like, in a way that I loved and it was very embraced. So grew up in Phoenix, went to an International Baccalaureate High School, so a very kind of competitive High School. And there, I really got the bug for academics, and was really successful in that in that realm. And for those who are listening, you'll know that Arizona, great state, great state universities, but very, very big universities. And so I knew for me that for me that to thrive, I needed to find a smaller school, so I looked elsewhere. So I went to I went to college in Indiana, so I went to Phoenix, Arizona, one of the largest cities in the country to Greencastle, Indiana, a small rural town of about 10,000, to a university that was smaller than my High School at DePaul University where I studied English with an emphasis in creative writing. So I thought I wanted to be a writer, a journalist. And turns out I do a lot of writing in my current career. So that background served me well. But after college, I've always worked a lot in the social impact nonprofit space is done everything from program management, to program development to a lot of marketing, communications, and fundraising. Actually, I think where I hit my stride was working for a firm called Social Venture Partners, where I worked with nonprofits, social impact organizations, and also donors to really build capacity in organization. So folks that are really passionate about their mission, but just need a little help on how to support that mission from an infrastructure standpoint. So I got to be the director of that firm, and we had a lot of wonderful people and help a lot of really impactful organizations. Following that, I joined a group called Gen X, which has now been rebranded to older and that the mission of that organization was to really take purposeful leaders so owners, entrepreneurs, CEOs, and provide them the education and kind of the space to work really figured out how they wanted to leverage their networks and their kind of expertise and influence to make a better world for the next generation. And so that looked like curating content on education, economic opportunity, national security, facilitating these really, really intense dinners on how Jeffersonian dinners on just topics of the day, doing a lot on policy during London philanthropies. So I had a cohort, a cadre of about 30, CEOs in each of the markets that I ran, which was Phoenix, Dallas and San Francisco and got to just see a lot of really impactful and powerful people that play. And I learned a lot from them on a lot of things. But out of that one of the CEOs that was part of that group is the CEO I work for now. And the company that I'm with as head of strategy at evolved and D, and we integrate behavioral health into primary care. So we put a therapist where you would, where you get your primary care. So where your doctor OBGYN, we embedded therapist right next to them, so they can work on your pair together to some great clinical outcomes. So I've been with this company for two years, and it's been amazing learning a lot about the healthcare world, learning a lot about building a strategy for a company that when I started was about 10 employees will be at 100 by the end of the year. So really privileged and honored to be part of an executive team that's growing very quickly, and part of a solution to a growing problem. And that's me. So that's from when I was a kid out to today.   Michael Hingson  06:33 How many years is that?   Sentari Minor  06:35 That is 30, I'll be 37 in less than a month, October?   Michael Hingson  06:41 Well, you, you summarized a lot in a fairly short amount of time. That's pretty cool. What made you decide to go to a small school as opposed to one of the bigger schools like Arizona, Arizona state and so on,   Sentari Minor  06:54 you know, I just liked I just knew that I wanted a little bit more kind of direct education or rather direct instruction. So you're there. You have a there's an estate great again, great schools, but a lecture hall with 400 kids was just never going to be my thing, right? I, I went to a kind of a school within a school. So we had a cohort of same kids from freshman through senior year of high school. And I wanted that kind of that kind of vibe. And I also knew that I wanted to just really have some time to understand what I really wanted to do. I went in to college as like an econ. Econ major, and then quickly pivoted that to English. And I don't know if I would have done that at a larger school, but I love the small. The small school, but my senior year of college, I had a history class with four students, which is great, right? Like you have deep, deep conversations about a lot of things. And so I enjoyed the smaller schools. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  07:55 Well, I know that I read a book. Well, you may have read it, you've may have heard about an David and Goliath by Malcolm Gladwell, you're not. And he talks about fitting into different places. And he talked about the very subject of a lot of people want to go to these big colleges like Harvard and so on, when really their disposition and maybe their talents would be better. By going to a smaller school, he put it in terms of being a fish, big fish in a small pond, rather than being a smaller fish in a huge pond, where you don't get the same level of what you need. And I know for me, personally, I very much enjoyed going to a smaller school, at least at the time, UC Irvine back in late 1960s, early 1970s. We had I think, 2700 students the year that I enrolled, that was the fourth year of the school, and it was so much better having a small amount of people.   Sentari Minor  08:52 Right now you see your friends a huge squat. Well, in my mind a huge school.   Michael Hingson  08:56 Yeah, well, now, I don't know, I think the population is about 28,000. So it has grown a little bit. Yes, quite a bit. But you, you've you've evolved into this, this person that loves to, as you said, bring the best out of people. What, what drove you to do that, as opposed to sticking with English and just writing or telling stories? Well, yeah, let me let's start with that. Yeah, that's   Sentari Minor  09:20 a good question. I think, um, I think for some reason, I think it's probably mostly around like, I the thing that bugs me the most is inequality and injustice. And so I've always been drawn to the social impact sector. So doing good has always been like a through line in my life. And so, for me, doing good looks like helping and I think most of my career, you'll see has been helping leaders. So people of influence, kind of figure out how they can help others and so I've been really good at the coaching the advising that being a thought leader in spaces and rooms where folks are looking to me to kind of guide them on what that looks like. And it's been really I think it's been so rewarding to see you know, a see Have a company or someone that helps a brand learn from me and say like, this is the strategy we're going to use, either in our corporation or in our person in my personal life to, to launch this, this platform of kind of just social good. And I just love, I love that. And I think I had a really good time, I think I've been successful and building a brand around me kind of thinking, I think people come to me to want to figure out how to better themselves from like, a social impact standpoint. And it's been really, it's been really, really wonderful to kind of create, create that ecosystem around me.   Michael Hingson  10:36 Well, have you? Have you been able to use your your English in your writing as you go? Because obviously, you're not writing books and writing stories all the time and doing that? Or are you   Sentari Minor  10:47 know, so that's really, I think, one? I think it goes back to your question that you just asked, I think a liberal arts education actually helps you become just a much more rounded, well rounded person. So I think for me, I was able to come out of my years at at DePaul just learning how to think and like how to think critically and understand like problems and and synthesize them. So whether it was English or econ, I think I would have had that kind of same mindset or me, I think, also, what is what is becoming? Well, there's a lot of research around it, what is becoming more abundantly clear is that the the ability to write, to communicate, to really have a compelling arguments, which comes from having a background in English, or journalism is so invaluable. So for me, English, has helped me become a phenomenal writer, right. And then in my day job, I oversee a team that does our comms and content, and showing constantly the power of storytelling, and how that can compel someone to do something that is socially good. So I don't write stories or novels. But I do write all the time and then do coaching with my team on how do you take, take some words into a compelling piece of copy that drives someone to do to make a decision that can ultimately do good. So I use English every day. And I'm very thankful for that, that kind of the instruction and background that I have in it, because I think it's served me quite well.   Michael Hingson  12:15 And I think that's the real key. My background is in physics. And although I don't do physics, and I haven't really spent time doing physics. At the same time, the skills that I learned and the attitudes and the philosophy, I think make such a huge difference. In the way I approach thing, one of the one of the things I learned in physics is you always pay attention to the details. And it isn't always the way the numbers work out. But if the units don't work out with the numbers, there's something wrong. So if you want to compute acceleration, if you don't get meters per second squared in your units, or, or feet per second squared, then you've got a problem. And it's always a matter of paying attention to the details as much as anything else.   Sentari Minor  13:00 Love that sector. I've just wrote that down into the details. I love that.   Michael Hingson  13:03 So one of the things that I learned a lot was paying attention to details. And recognizing that there are a lot of ways to expand. I also agree that telling stories is extremely important. I've been in sales most of my life. And one of the things that I learned early on. And I don't remember whether it was just something that I figured out, or someone said to me was that good salespeople can tell stories that relate and I think I didn't hear that from someone. But I am a firm believer in it that the best salespeople are the people who can really advise, can tell stories, and relate. It isn't just pushing your product, especially if your product might not be the best product for an individual. And so that gets to another story. Yep. I agree about that. So it's it's telling stories is a lot of fun. And I always enjoy hearing good well told stories or reading, well written story. So it works out well. So you are obviously trying to bring the best out of in people and all that. And in my experience, usually something happens to people that kind of shaped their their life plans or whatever, did you have an experience? Or Did something happened to you really that led you to just choose the career path that you have?   Sentari Minor  14:23 No, I wouldn't say it links you the career path that I have. Because I think my career path has kind of been by happenstance, like I'm just really opportunistic. So what I would I would have set out to be at 22 was not what I am now and I don't think I think it's I think that's how people are most successful and how it works out that way. But I do think I can point to I've been reflecting on this experience where that might have shaped my values. And that would be so I so I came out when I was 13 which is really which is really a you know, beautiful experience. I luckily had a very supportive family. And a great support system. So my coming out story is not like a lot of coming out stories which are unfortunately, riddled with sadness, and just a lot of terrible things that come out of that. But I was always embraced for my sexuality, and that was something that I know a lot of 13 year olds don't get. But it also instilled just a competence in me from a very young age that I think happened, and helped a lot of the way that I've looked at the world, which is like to be unabashedly authentic. And I believe that one of my, I believe, admirable traits is just how authentic I am and how I show up for for people for the brands that I represent for the things that I do. And it was because I was so supported at that young age. And it taught me that like, the world is gonna view you in a certain way, no matter what, but it's how you how you overcome that, and how you manage and shape yourself around that, that is truly important. Because of that, I think I am able to go into spaces, go into companies go into these conversations with folks at a high level and really show up as myself and someone that is obviously very much passionate, very much caring, and just wants to do good. And I have to do the good because I know there are people like me that don't have the same that didn't have the same reaction to something that should be so beautiful, that I did. And I just want to make sure that all those folks as well as folks who have experienced any other kind of hardship are well taken care of too, and, and get to have that platform, because of what I do.   Michael Hingson  16:27 That's cool. And being authentic. Being authentic is as important as it gets, no matter what you do. And it's all too often that we see in the world, people who just feel they can't be authentic, or they don't want to be authentic, or they want to hide and it's great when you get to understand that that's an important thing. And bring that forward in your life. Because anyone you deal with is going to certainly recognize that it was when you're authentic, people know it and people know when you're blowing smoke.   Sentari Minor  16:59 It was so true. Yeah. And it just being authentic leads so much credibility to things. And also I think being authentic also means not being perfect. And I think people really resonate with folks that say like, this isn't going well, or I failed at this or you know, I don't have the answer. And I think I've always showed up to spaces and say like, I'm the first one to say like, I have no idea. But we can work on it together. And that's a piece of puffins being authentic, that is so, so, so important.   Michael Hingson  17:27 Yeah, it's really important to be able to do that I when I was a student teacher, I had a math class that I was teaching. And one of the students asked a question, and I should have known the answer. But for whatever reason I didn't. But what I said to him into the class was, you know, I don't know, I probably shouldn't know it. It's not that magical. This is freshman algebra. And I'm getting a master's degree in physics, but I don't I wouldn't know this. But I'll tell you what I'm going to do. I'm going to have the answer by tomorrow. And after class, my master teacher who was the football coach, so a real tough guy comes up to me. And he said, You don't know how much you scored in the way of points and how much adoration admiration you got from those kids, because you were honest. And you know, that's always been the way I am. By the way, the next day, I did have the answer. But the the young man who asked the question also came in him before I got to say anything, he said, I figured it out. And so I said, Alright, Marty, come up and write your answer on the board. Because being blind, I'm not a great Blackboard writer. And so I always chose a different student every day to write on the board. When we needed to do Blackboard writing. I had him come up and I said write it on the board. And it was great. And I know that I had an impact on him. Because 10 years later, I was at a faire in Orange County, California, the Orange County Fair. And this guy with his very deep voice comes up to me and he says, Hey, Mr. hingson? Do you remember me? And no, who are you? Because as Marty was his very high pitched young voice anyway, he said, I'm Marty, I met you and I was in your class 10 years ago. I remember who he was. That's so cool. Which was really cool. Well, you know, the very fact that you had a good support system and so on, was really cool. And you didn't probably go through a lot of the traumas that, that people did. But, you know, if I were to ask this out of curiosity, what would you like to have known at 10? That you didn't know, at 10 years old?   Sentari Minor  19:29 Oh, about that, huh? When I was 10, I think that the God I probably I would say this now, but that there's just so much of the world ahead of you and that like the gravity and weight of the quote unquote problems just aren't there. And people tell you that like your whole world, you have your whole world and so much life ahead of you and your gender, like whatever. But I wish I could go back and like the lessons like you don't have to have it all figured out. Um, all this stuff that in flux is going to change. You know, pain, it's only temporary, like, I think that'd be heavy for a 10 year old to understand. But I think hearing that as a 10 year old, like, if I could see me talking to my 10 year old self, that would be what it is like, there's just so much more that's going to happen than what's happening right now.   Michael Hingson  20:19 How about when you're older? When you're 21? What do you wish that you had known that that you didn't learn till later,   Sentari Minor  20:25 kind of what we talked about before that, like what you, your journey is going to be very different than what you think it is. So don't be caught up on like, what's your job and be don't be caught up on who you're dating or who your friends are, who your friends are like, Your journey is going to change so much. And you're going to be introduced to so many people that are going to push you and pull you in different directions that there's no possible way that the track you have all mapped out because everyone does it through on the track, you have all map that is ever going to kind of come to fruition and be okay with that. Like, it's actually great that it's not going to I wish I knew that then because I wouldn't have put so much pressure on myself to do quote unquote, the right things, I would have just let it be, which would have been super helpful.   Michael Hingson  21:07 The other side of that is that even if your path and your track go exactly as you thought they would, if you're open to to change, and you're open to listening to people, then it's only going to enhance whatever you do anyway,   Sentari Minor  21:21 I think that's probably an even better way of putting it like just be open to feedback and be open to really coaching and guidance. And now in my life, I have an executive coach. So therapists like these things would have been much more probably impactful at 21 than now because it's like, I would have I wish I would have had someone to tell me to like listen to other people more. I think that's actually a great point. Just listen to other people more.   Michael Hingson  21:45 Of course, the other side of it is of course a 10 You You knew everything there was to know. And then by the time you were 21 or 25, you're surprised at how much your parents learned, right? That's so funny. Oh, yes, it always happens. But it is. Life is such an adventure. And I've always viewed it as an adventure and really love that. It's an adventure. And I think that whatever we do, it's important that we think about it that way. Because having an adventure for life, even if it's what other people would call just sort of humdrum. And it's not very exciting. But if you can see the excitement and bring out the adventure in life, that just makes you a better person, it seems to me   Sentari Minor  22:33 Yes, I completely agree. That's Yes, that's a beautiful way of putting it.   Michael Hingson  22:37 Well, even with that. So do you have any kinds of things in life that you wish hadn't happened? Maybe that you regret? Does anything impact you with with that sort of thing?   Sentari Minor  22:47 Oh, there too. I think the big? Oh, that's a good question. I wish I would have spent more time with my dad, he, he passed when I was a junior junior in college. And we were just kidding, my mom's split when I was younger. And so we just never, like, we just were never very close. And I wish that I would have spent more time getting close because it was also it was kind of a matter of like, not even inconvenience. It was more so apathy. Like he was around, he lived in the same city, but like we never really got together. And I wish that there was more time that I got to spend with him because I think there would be so much more about myself that I learned about me. And so like when you do a lot of therapy you have you talked about your family of origin, right, like your parents and what you why you show up, the way that you do is always because of like how you're raised and your parents, it's up. And I wish I had like that data points from my dad to understand. So I regret not knowing him more.   Michael Hingson  23:45 Yeah, my dad and I had a close relationship. But even so, I wish we had more time to spend talking with each other.   Sentari Minor  23:55 Yeah. And then going back to, you know, when you're 10 that I think the what I wish I knew there is that also, while there's so much life ahead of you. Life is finite, like there's a will, there will be things that do end, and I wish I because when you're 10 you're like well, I'll get to it later or like I'll spend time later, and it just never came. And so that would also been helpful like that. And I think that as I reflect on that, like that's a regret of mine that obviously I can't really do anything about now, but if I were to go back   Michael Hingson  24:26 other than passing that knowledge on some way to others and who are growing up and helping them maybe not make that same mistake.   Sentari Minor  24:36 Yeah, I think I think it's good to have that but I feel like so many people have that knowledge already like everyone's like you never know when your parents are gonna pass or like you always you never know what anyone that you love is going to kind of be out of your life and yet still, that doesn't. I don't think that advice like empowers people enough. Yeah, make the phone call and so maybe it's just repetition like keep saying it or like I went through it. You should know this like Go call your parents because you just never know.   Michael Hingson  25:01 Or go well, yeah, you, you can approach it from a sense fear like that of you never know when they're gonna pass. Or you can say, you know, they've had a lot more experienced than you and this is your time to take advantage of that.   Sentari Minor  25:14 I love the way you put that because it goes to what you just asked about the being 21. It's like you can learn from these people around you that you have great access to so do it.   Michael Hingson  25:22 Yeah, we we just don't always take advantage of a lot of things that we can we we all think we know too much. And as a as a person who happens to be blind. Of course, I hear it all the time about what I can't do, because I can't see. And I've learned along the way, that one of the ways to maybe make people think about that is well, how do you know, have we ever tried being blind? You know, the fact is that the concern the concepts and the attitudes and misconceptions that people have are what what drives us and what make us what we are. But by the same token, if we're not open to exploring new things, and recognizing this is the time to learn. Whenever it is, we don't we don't grow.   Sentari Minor  26:07 Yeah. And you know, wonder I love your take on it. Like, do you feel like most people have a growth mindset or like a cure? Maybe not even a growth mindset, but like a curious mindset, one of the values that I have, for me and then disappear. I surround myself as being like, intellectually curious, but I don't know if most people are so I don't know, like, if what we were talking about resonates with a lot of people, but I would hope it does. Yeah, I   Michael Hingson  26:30 agree with you. And I don't think that people always have as much of a curious mindset as we should. One of my favorite books is a book entitled, surely you're joking, Mr. Mr. Fineman adventures of a curious fellow and it's the autobiography of Richard Fineman, the physicist and he talks even in the first chapter about the fact that his father pushed him to be curious about everything. They were, I think, because I recall, him telling the story in a park one day, and his father said, why is that bird flying? How can that bird fly? You know, and he, he really encouraged Fineman to be a curious individual. And I wish more people would do that. Rather than making assumptions no matter how much they see, no matter how much they have experienced. That goes one way, it doesn't mean that it always will. Yeah. Yeah. And so there's, there's a lot to be said for being curious. And no, I really wish more people were more curious. And we generally tend to be I agree with that, and ask questions, whether it's about disabilities, whether it's about sexuality, or race or anything else. It I think is so important that we learn to be more curious than we are   Sentari Minor  27:50 curious. And the nice thing also on the other side of that on the third person that's being questioned, having some mercy and some grace for the for the question. So if someone's being vulnerable, vulnerable enough to be curious, with you and about you, you also have to be vulnerable enough to understand that, like, part of this conversation and curiosity, there might be some missteps, but they're coming from, from a place of genuine curiosity, and in that curiosity, kind of love for lack of a better term of you. And I think that's something that we've been missing a lot as a as a society. But I, this is a this inspired me to kind of say that too.   Michael Hingson  28:24 And it goes both ways. If somebody is curious and asking me questions, I feel I should answer, but I also want to understand more, more of why they're asking the   Sentari Minor  28:35 question, they're asking the question, yes, for sure. Absolutely. Yes.   Michael Hingson  28:38 Because that teaches me something. Right. And I think that that is just as important as being able to teach something to somebody else. I want to learn as well. I've always said on this podcast that if I'm not learning at least as much as everyone else who listens to it, then I'm not doing my job. When I go deliver a speech if I don't get to learn a lot from all the speakers around me or just being around the people who are attending the event, then I'm not doing my job well because I should learn from that as well. Love that. Love that. So it is it is kind of important to be able to do that. So I'm curious Alder, how did that name come about?   Sentari Minor  29:22 No, they actually it's interesting. They rebranded after me. So when I left the company, they rebranded to Alder Alder, which I think was like the burgeoning of a seed. So I don't know that the reason behind the the tweet because that happened, right, right after I left the company.   Michael Hingson  29:38 Hmm. Has it been successful for them? Do you think or,   Sentari Minor  29:42 you know, talking to my colleagues, it seems like it I haven't really done a deep dive into it. But I think from what I can understand from the conversations I've had with both members, staff, you know, my peers there and then just from general viewing on social media, it seems like it's a it's been a great rebrand and we roll out of I'm repositioning of the work. Okay.   Michael Hingson  30:04 Well, as long as it as long as it makes sense, and people can relate to it, of course, branding is all about trying to get people to relate to you or doing something that will help people remember you. So, absolutely. So what is the evolved MD? That's an interesting name.   Sentari Minor  30:22 Yeah, so it's exactly what it says sounds like, really, our tagline is like, we want to reimagine behavioral health. And so watching medicine evolve. We, again, we're our approach to mental health. It's not, it's not new, but it is novel. So what we do is actually a model called collaborative care that came out of the University of Washington, 18 center, but we was kind of the kind of at the forefront of really figuring out how to commercialize it, and then enhance it in a way that is both better for or better for both patients, the providers and all the other stakeholders. And so I think when I think of evolved, it's like, how do we kind of evolve this model, how we evolve medicine, and especially how we evolve behavior and   Michael Hingson  31:06 mental health. Right? So tell me a little more if you could about this whole concept of having a doctor and a therapist together?   Sentari Minor  31:14 Yes, won't do. So. collaborative care really is and it makes so much sense. And I was I was actually on a podcast yesterday with a one of the dogs that we work with in Utah, and he came from the military. And he said, he was very good about saying, you know, the military has always done this, the military has been integrated. So your physical and mental health are, are kind of done in this under the same roof. And so it's that model of you, Michael would go into your primary care physician, they would screen you for anxiety, depression, any other negative mental health symptoms and say, Hey, there's seems like there's some things that are a cause for concern, we have a therapist in the next room, I will do the warm handoff, introduce you, and then that therapist would go about your care. And then the cool part of the model is that that therapist then circles back with your doc and say, This is what I've learned from there. And then we're going to collaborate and it's been a collaborative care, we're going to collaborate on your care, and pull it any other resource that we need, so that Michael is healthy physically. So he's healthy mentally. And it comes to great clinical outcomes. And so the cool thing about the model was that we've learned that people really, really trust their primary care physician, so you can trust your doctor a lot. If your doctor says, Hey, I think you should see someone and I trust that person. And by the way, they're just in the office next door, you're definitely going to, you're definitely going to do that. And it's just such a beautiful model to see how it's reduced stigma, because you don't have to go to a special place or special clinic to go see mental health, it's just right where you see your doctor. It normalizes care. And so it's all in that same kind of care continuum that you you're already in by being in your PCP, and just increases access, it's really, it makes it easier for folks. It makes it financially viable. And so we're really excited about the work that we do, I'm really honored and proud of how we've grown the company. And just the two years I've been here, and then now you're seeing a lot of literature around behavioral health integration. In fact, the Biden administration just put out something in the last couple of months that saying like, this is the way of the future, and we're going to put money and incentivize and, and really implore a lot of people to integrate care, and we get to be at the forefront of that. So it's been, it's been a wonderful journey so far.   Michael Hingson  33:31 So what exactly does evolved do in the process evolved?   Sentari Minor  33:35 So what we do is, we are think of us, if you're a primary care group, we were kind of your, your, your partner, your white label, partner in behavioral health. So we recruit, hire, train, and embed the therapist. So all the therapy parts are our folks. And so they are our employees, they do look and feel like the wherever you see your position, which is really cool. So it's essentially a white level label approach. And we also provide a lot of we do the clinical supervision, the training, and then we get to be the thought partner in mental health. And so when I came on to the your question about English, when I came on, I said, we have to start telling the story not only about integrated health, but how do we normalize care. And that's and reduce stigma. And that's sharing stories, all of the executive team sharing their personal stories with mental health and making that very public conversations like this. And there's really this pushing out the forefront of like, this is this is normal, like these conversations should be normal. And by the way, we have an option where you get to go have this conversation with your doctor, they can also tie it to your physical health. And it's been it's been wonderful. It's been great.   Michael Hingson  34:42 Well, since you're a good storyteller, can you actually tell us a story about maybe a success where, and give us an example of how this has all worked and came brought about a successful conclusion. Obviously, not mentioning names or anything but yeah, stories are always great.   Sentari Minor  34:59 I think I can give you two and both, unfortunately around suicidal ideation. So our model has seen, I'm trying to kind of make us this as generic as possible. So one of our primary care physicians, when they first started the program, I had a patient artists panel that he's seen for a while. So just a regular gentleman that's been coming to the same doctor for years. Very successful man, very baffling part of town of affluent part of Phoenix. So we started seeing this person and then our, our therapist, started getting embedded in the, in the clinic, and started seeing this person to and came in by the work of having both of those two people, therapists and the physician in the same place, they were able to uncover that this man, this very ostensibly successful man had been sleeping with a gun under his pillow, and had been contemplating suicide for quite some time. The doc had no idea. Obviously, this man presents very well, I he's, he's healthy, presumably happy. But just having the therapist there to ask the right questions. And also, here's the other part, not only ask the right questions, but then be there as a resource complex, save that man's life. And I think the big thing to take away from that is that people who are having suicidal ideation and suicidal thoughts don't appear, how you might think they were, they could be the ones that are smiling, the ones that are happy that whatever super successful, but it takes someone to ask the right questions to make sure that they're okay before something happens. And that's one that I think is really, really, really powerful. And then one that happened. Recently, also around a suicide was having a patient in crisis in clinic. So if you're a physician, unfortunately, right now, if you're a physician, without our services, you're just not equipped to deal with a patient in crisis, someone's going through something in your finger, in your exam room, where you happen to be there on a day where there was a patient in crisis, and it was very clear that this person was going to hurt the heart of themselves. And very soon, so are our therapists. And this is why we love our model so much, our therapist that's on site that was right there was able to deescalate the situation, get them immediately into the care that they needed. And obviously, again, seems like they're so I think those are the stories that are kind of the big stories. But there's also come some small wins, where we've had patients say, like, You've helped me with my anxiety, and now I can actually, like leave my home. Or I realized that these are some things that I've been really scared of, and I haven't been able to articulate it. But just having these sessions with you has really helped me thrive and prosper. It's just like, we have countless mission moments, every week, where we have stories of just successes within the clinics that are super exciting and hearing how are our services are not only like transformational, but sometimes life saving, it's very rewarding to be part of you   Michael Hingson  37:58 telling the second story about the patient in crisis just reminds me of something that all of us hear about every day. And that is all the things that go on with police and encountering patients with some sort of mental health crisis. And they don't have the training to deal with that. To a large degree, and that creates problems. And oftentimes, a gun goes off, which isn't going to help. But we we do hear occasionally. And I've seen I think on 60 minutes and a few other places where there have been some police departments that are shifting some of what they do, recognizing what the real issues are over to more mental health professionals who are able to go in and deescalate and bring about a much more positive solution.   Sentari Minor  38:42 Yep. You know, I think there's a fine line, I have folks that are in law for law enforcement. And then obviously friends who do this work in social work. So I think there's there has to be the right balance and mix. But I do think there's an appropriate response from an on call response from a social worker, but also realizing that there's a realities of the world where a police officer just has to be there. So hopefully those two working collaboratively, we'll find some better solutions in the coming years around. How do we get ahead of that?   Michael Hingson  39:09 Yeah. And it's, and it's important to be able to do it. How about the docks, when you go when you go in and start to work in places? are the primary care physicians generally open? Or do you oftentimes, at least at first see a lot of resistance to changing the way in a sense they operate? Oh,   Sentari Minor  39:31 that's a great question. I think it really just depends on kind of the culture of the community and the and the practice already. Right. So there are some folks and some groups that we work with that are just naturally collaborative. So we go in and they're like, Oh, we understand. We understand. We're excited for you to be here. Some take a little bit of finessing and work but I say kudos to our team for on the front end having those conversations before our even before our therapists even start day one of like, these are the expectations this is why we're doing it and getting the buy in from the physicians on the front end, but at the end The day, it just takes a little bit of it just takes what hear one story about like the ones that I just told you. Yeah, all it's seeing it in action. We're like, whoa, and we hear from customers all the time. Like, we have no idea what we did before you were here. And so I think any resistance is assuaged once they actually see the programming, and motion. But I just doing this work for the last few years and hearing more about kind of the instruction curriculum and kind of the programs that MDS or do is go through, there's not a lot around integrated health, and so are integrated care. So sometimes people are just the concept of it doesn't make sense to them. So we get to be on the front end of the education. And then of course, you get the buy in once you have the patient stories and get to see the impact firsthand.   Michael Hingson  40:50 Because you've often the just something in Phoenix or is it nationwide? Or how large of an area do you care, we're   Sentari Minor  40:55 in Phoenix metro area, and then other parts of Arizona and then a big a big piece in Salt Lake and then our sales team is rapidly trying to figure out where we're going next. So I bet if you if we did this again in a year that that those two cities would be expanded quite a bit,   Michael Hingson  41:12 well, then we should plan on doing this in a year or two. Important? Well, so it's exciting that you've gone, as you said, in two years from 10 people to over 100. Early in the time,   Sentari Minor  41:27 we'll get 100. But God will be at 100 by the end of the year. Yeah. So we're   Michael Hingson  41:30 in a time of COVID, you're expanding? Yes.   Sentari Minor  41:34 You know, fortunately, unfortunately, COVID really exacerbated the need for mental health services. And so I think it actually, it actually kind of rocket ship and launched a lot of our sales funnel, because so many primary care groups, and large healthcare systems were like, Oh, my God, we we see in our clinics every day, the need for some behavioral health component. And so we were able to kind of go in and be the savior of the solution for a lot of folks. So we've grown exponentially during that time, because, as I said, at the beginning of this, the problem is just so harrowing.   Michael Hingson  42:05 Why do you think that the Biden administration in the government is now taking such an interest in collaborative care? And I guess the other part of that is, if the administration changes, will that go away? Or is it something that will stick? Oh, those are big. I know, I have not given a lot of thought. It's a really scary one to   Sentari Minor  42:28 see the first question, I think, integrated and collaborative care. Again, it's been something that's it's not new, but it's been novel. And I think they're now starting to really understand the commercial viability, and then the clinical efficacy, the AMA, American Medical Association, and then a number of other physician based groups came out and said, like, from the physician, the MD, the physical health side, we need this. And this has got to happen. And I think the administration also understands that it's probably the best way when there's this idea of like value based care where we're a essentially, healthcare entities will be paid based on the outcomes of patients. And understanding that integration is actually a cost savings mechanism, if I can work with you and your primary care office to have a conversation around suicidal ideation, or what you might need rather than you showing up in an ER, that saves the country's money. And so they're understanding like, from a holistic point of view, this is probably the best thing that we can do overall, for people's care. I don't know, I think with any piece of legislation or any, not even just legislation, because it hasn't been legislated yet, but any type of like a referendum or initiative that starts in an administration, there's always the, the, there's always the possibility that it could go away. But I think I'm confident that this, people will understand how impactful this is. And it will be kind of an evergreen thing. It's just like, I envision a world where people were like, This is just how care is done. Like this is just the standard in the United States. So regardless, if it's, if it's Biden, whoever, if it's a Republican, Democrat, doesn't matter. This is just how we do care. And I think we can kind of prove out that model, or at least I hope so.   Michael Hingson  44:08 Well, they're very fact that the AMA is a part of it, and is endorsing the concept has to help a lot.   Sentari Minor  44:14 Yes, yes, yes, yes.   Michael Hingson  44:15 I would think that, like with most professions, and so on a lot of doctors or the profession, generally tends to be pretty conservative. Although when you get down to the specifics of Physical Medicine, and so on, they're always looking for the next good thing. But this is a little bit of a departure from that. So if they're taking an interest in, in supporting it, that's got to help   Sentari Minor  44:39 you and I think it's mostly because they're seeing patients and they're, they're seeing patients in your clinic that you are not either equipped to handle or that you just don't have time to and I think that's the other big piece is even a physician physician wants to do the right thing and help that patient. They just don't have enough time to do it. Whereas we were there to help and work on I'm alongside them to say, hey, we're gonna take this review. This is stuff that we know how to do, by the way you get to go do the great things that you know how to do with physical care.   Michael Hingson  45:07 Yeah. And are able to move forward? Is collaborative care a concept that is being embraced outside the US as well?   Sentari Minor  45:19 That I do not know. That's a good question. I, um, we focus mostly around the United States. But I don't know. Be interesting to see, that is a good guy.   Michael Hingson  45:29 And again, it does have to start somewhere. And if it starts here, and expands, then so much the better. I love that. Yep. But you, you have a lot of tough challenges to, to deal with and helping to introduce these concepts and moving people forward, which is great. How do you how do you build and keep a sense of resiliency in your life and what you do? Oh,   Sentari Minor  45:53 that's a great question. I think building resiliency is, it's like, it's a mindset and framework of how do you position things and that happened to us? So for me, I think of everything. And I was doing my second podcast today, by the way. The first one, I was talking more   Michael Hingson  46:08 about resilience.   Sentari Minor  46:12 How do I approach failure, which is something that you learn from and so every time that there's a challenge or setback, I think about it from a gift of it occurs, but it's a gift of I get to learn from this. And so I think that builds resiliency, I think having a great community around me, I have a great group of friends, coworkers, loved ones, a great partner, a great therapist, a great coach. And so all of those things together helped me everyday build up a little something. And then also, just honestly, not taking life too seriously. I think. Yeah, it's, you know, at the end of the day, like, I lose my job, I get all these things can happen. But I know that like, I'll figure it out. And I think that's actually been one of the things that really saved me and my mental health, like, and anything I approach or anything I do, it's like, I'll figure it out. I will be okay. Like it, it may suck, it may be hard, but I'll get through it. And that's, that's, I approach everything like that. And each each day of my life that way. And so once you have that mindset, you're like, Yeah, I'll get through it. If not, I'll make it work. And so that's been a that's been very, very helpful in doing this work.   Michael Hingson  47:20 Cool. Well, at the same time, have you had major times where you've had adversity that really made life tough for you that helped them as a result, build resiliency Do you think   Sentari Minor  47:35 I wouldn't say like a specific example. But I do think that I've been reflecting on this a lot more, there was something that someone who's read Instagram, which I thought was like, so spot on, which was a black man talking about, you know, you can be very successful in corporate America and I have been, but unless you're a person of color, or someone from minoritized community, you don't understand the extra kind of work and baggage that goes into, I'm typically the only in every room, right, so there's just an extra piece of man, I walk into this room with an automatic like Target on my hand, not because of anyone's like not because anyone's doing anything pernicious or adversarial. It's more for that, like, I just physically show up different than everyone else, which means that I now have to make sure that I am doing all the right things. Keeping there's just like an extra piece of an extra piece of like, mental bandwidth that has to happen for me, that doesn't have to happen for my white male candidate counterparts. Right. And so I don't think it's really an adversity, it's more so like, it's just a little harder. And I think for me, that's also shaped and how I approach things, because I think of even think of like, how we do things in the company where, you know, a white CEO, how they approach problems, like, oh, that seems like a, like, that's an interesting mindset. I don't have that luxury, right? Like, I could never walk into a room and say that or think that because I am a black man, it just never happened for me. And so like, we just I just have a different mindset, not good or bad, right? It's just different. And I think the adversity is just, there's an extra step and an extra layer constantly. And I that's what that's probably what I would name there.   Michael Hingson  49:20 But you can embrace that and endorse it, recognize it and use it as an advantage. Or you can consider that a drawback. And those are two very different views. And clearly you take the former not the latter.   Sentari Minor  49:37 Yep, yep. Yeah. I think it's, it also is like it is what it is like, I can't I can't change my race. And so I kind of how do you build strategies and resilience, ease around it and also leverages as a good talking point, I think it's one of the things that I loved about the work that we do it evolved in D and kind of building our executive team because I was the first I was the first non clinical employee. It's like the conversations we have about like, race and how we show up. And it's like, Hey, I can't just, you know, I could never do that, or show up to something that way we say that to a person without me being like, oh, shoot, and you can have those conversations. And I think that's, that's the beautiful thing about something like that, that can be seen as adversity. But really, it can be leveraged as a great and beautiful like talking point and discussion that can that can help everyone.   Michael Hingson  50:23 Yeah. And it's all in the mindset, isn't it? All in the mindset, it's really important to, to, again, look at it from a positive, adventurous standpoint, I face the same thing. Of course, every single day, I look at least as different as you look different. And more important, have to physically do things in a much significantly more different way, then oftentimes you do, right. And you either can accept that. Think that's a very positive thing or not.   Sentari Minor  50:58 Right? Yeah. Yeah. Again, mindset goes back to mindset.   Michael Hingson  51:02 It all goes back to mindset. And the reality is that for me as a person who happens to be blind, and I will, and I like phrasing it that way, as as many others are learning to do, because blindness is a characteristic, it's not what really defines me. And your race. And or sexual orientation shouldn't be what defines you. It's what you do with it. Absolutely. Absolutely. And that makes for a more exciting life anyway.   Sentari Minor  51:30 Yeah, I agree. I agree.   Michael Hingson  51:32 So what do you so what do you do when you're not working?   Sentari Minor  51:36 What do I do when I'm not working? i   Michael Hingson  51:37 There must be some time when you're not working. Okay, that is working. Working at your day job.   Sentari Minor  51:42 I, let's see, I like to I like to fitness is a big part of my life. So I like to be at the gym, I like to read I go to I try to be in a movie theater at least once a week. Like just spending time with, like, friends, family, loved ones just like to hang out. Yeah, I do like to take long drives. But yeah, there's like a, I'd say if you're catching me on any given weekend, and I am probably reading a book or by the pool, or I am watching the movie. Good for   Michael Hingson  52:17 you. My wife and I have both embraced reading audiobooks. I've taught her how to listen to books, as opposed to just reading them. So we do a whole lot more sharing, because we now read books together. And it's a lot more fun than what's mostly on TV. So we we do that, and spend a lot of time doing it. And oftentimes, when she's doing what she does, she's a quilter. And so she's doing a lot of quilt projects, and so on and I'm doing the things I am will just pipe a book through the house. So we both have it to listen to and we keep up with it. And then we talk about it when we get back together for dinner or whenever we're done doing what we're doing. I like that idea. I like them a lot. Yeah, so we just have it all over the house, as opposed to carrying something and works out pretty well. That's great. And watching movies are always fun. We we do some of it. But we've been so much involved in reading lately that we just enjoy it a great deal.   Sentari Minor  53:20 I like that idea of like using reading as something that you can do together. That's that's, that's great.   Michael Hingson  53:24 Yeah, it's pretty cool. And, and have a lot of fun doing it. And as, as you said, and being fit. I don't go to the gym, and I don't walk around and get as much exercise as I should. But I have a guide dog and he keeps me pretty honest. And we we work together and wrestle and play. So that works out. Great. Yeah. So so he helps the process a lot too, which is which is pretty good. That's good. But you know, it's, it's all part of life and even working with a dog. I love telling people that I have learned more about trust and teamwork from working with now eight guide dogs over my life than I've ever learned from all the experts, the managers, the ken Blanchard's and so on of the world because it's fascinating learning how to interact with someone who doesn't think at all like you do. Who doesn't speak the same language, and whose overall behavior and loan and life experiences are totally different than what humans experience.   Sentari Minor  54:30 Yes. Wow. Yeah. I never thought about that. Yeah. I bet you'd have   Michael Hingson  54:36 well, and and, you know, we we have a lot of a lot of fun and I've I've enjoyed working with a number of Guide Dogs. I don't know how much you've investigated me, but you may know that we were in the World Trade Center on September 11 With my fifth guide, dog Roselle. And that really validated all of the whole concept of how we can communicate and work together no matter who we are. It's all about building trust, and establishing a relationship. And that's why I really enjoy hearing about the things that you do, especially when you're talking about the docks, and the therapists and so on all learning to work together, because they develop this trust. And this understanding that you just can't be   Sentari Minor  55:21 good. Thanks for those were actually some great questions about the model and how it works. So I appreciate those those questions.   Michael Hingson  55:28 Yeah, and thank you and I, I enjoy learning about it. It's fascinating. I, my wife, and I go to Kaiser. And we so we use a lot of services at Kaiser and I haven't seen the collaborative care model there. I don't know whether it's there or not. Or maybe we just haven't needed to use it.   Sentari Minor  55:47 Yeah, checking to see if they are doing anything integrated. But yeah, that would be like a perfect system. For us.   Michael Hingson  55:56 It would be a really a perfect system. There. There are challenges in Kaiser's communications in terms of dealing with one area from another like my my wife's physical medicine doctor, she's been in a chair her whole life wheelchair. He is in Corona, which is part of the Riverside district of Kaiser. But our primary care physician is up here in Victorville where we live, and as part of the Fontana area. And there just seems to be this incredible barrier that the two districts don't communicate at all, which is crazy for a large organization. Hard. That's fair. Yeah. And they've converted everything to being electronic. But when we moved, for example, from Northern to Southern California, the Southern California people couldn't see our Northern California records for years. That's crazy. Today, so I don't know what the logic and the thought processes of that but you know, over time, hopefully things will will communicate more, or for people? Well, you know, in talking about all this, what what are some other things that you'd like people to know about you or, or the model or the kinds of things that you're doing that they can look out for that might help them?   Sentari Minor  57:09 You know, um, nothing at the top of them? I think we've covered a lot of ground. And I again, thank you for the very thoughtful, very thoughtful questions, I think, for any of the listeners. And we'll probably put this in the show notes. But, you know, follow us on LinkedIn, I've often do on LinkedIn, because we put out a lot of really good content around mental health and normalizing and then, if you ever want to learn more about the work that we do about the.com, or the work that I'm doing just Suntory minor.com. But I think we talk a lot about I love the conversation around adversity and having a different mindset and then the intellectual curiosity piece. So I'm just excited to share this podcast with the world and I'm excited that you that you brought me on.   Michael Hingson  57:49 Well, we will do it spell Sentari Minor for me and everyone. Okay, so   Sentari Minor  57:53 it's S as in Sam, E N T A R I  Minor M I N O R. So Sentari Minor.com, check out my website. We're actually in the process of updating it right now. But yeah, I'm just excited to hear from folks. And if you have any questions, I'm always open for a conversation.   Michael Hingson  58:12 Well, of course, I can't resist asking what you're doing to make sure that it's inclusive and accessible for blind people and other persons with disabilities.   Sentari Minor  58:19 I will I'm working with our website developer, right. Like, he was really texting me before this. So that would be something I texted him back and say, make sure that this happens. So thank you, thank you, good on you for that.   Michael Hingson  58:29 And we can help with that. AccessiBe is a company that makes products that help make

Millionaire Mamas In the Making
Episode 97: The Unstoppable Entrepreneur

Millionaire Mamas In the Making

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 22:46


I have created something specifically for you. For the entrepreneur who is ready to have an unstoppable business by becoming unstoppable themselves. This program was created with the current economy in mind and to equip you with all of the nervous system and mindset work you could need to become your best self. Listen in this week and I will share all of the details on what you can expect and how you can get started by becoming what you are destined to become: truly unstoppable. Learn more about The Unstoppable Entrepreneur program here.   Work With Me:  Book a Discovery Call:  https://coachkorba.as.me/discoverycall   Where to Find Me: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/coachkorba/

Unstuck and Unstoppable
033: Discovering Biblical Masculinity with Josh Khachadourian

Unstuck and Unstoppable

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 28:40


Jimn Kyles and Josh Khachadourian talks about understanding real masculinity and what it means to be a man. Josh has spent 15 years in a Fortune 500 company focusing on building high performing teams and developing the best in class leaders. He is also the host of Raising the Standard podcast and the author of The Standard: Discovering Jesus as the Standard for Masculinity.   Jimn and Josh discuss why there is an attack on masculinity. Josh believes that the enemy of God is attacking men to take out God's plan for His people and His plan for family. He then defines what it means to be a man, saying that he could list a bunch of virtues that have been listed throughout history as the virtues of manhood.   The conversation concluded with a reminder that, when it comes to understanding real masculinity, the best place to start is the Bible and the teachings of Jesus.   Order your copy of "Unstuck and Unstoppable" here -www.jimnkyles.com Join our email newsletter and received the first three chapters of "Unstuck & Unstoppable" along with three eBooks here - https://pages.jimnkyles.com/newsletter   Website- www.jimnkyles.com Connect with Jimn: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/jimnkyles LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jimnkyles/ Facebook: https://web.facebook.com/jimn.kyles?_rdc=1&_rdr   Connect with Josh Khachadourian: Website - https://www.standard59.com/ Podcast - https://raising-the-standard.captivate.fm//         #unstuck #unstoppable #unstuckandunstoppable #unstuckandunstoppablepodcast #jimnkyles  #SelfCare #selfcarematters #SelfCareIsHealthcare #selfcarebook #selfcarefirst #getunstuck #getunstucknow #getunstuckbeunstoppable #leadwell #leadwellservewell#moveyourlifeforward #moveyourlifeforwardnow #moveyourlifeforwardonpurpose #moveforward #moveforwardtogether #moveforwardinfaith #leadership #leadershipdevelopment #leadershipskills

Marvel's Pull List
Astonishing X-Men: Unstoppable with Emily Kim

Marvel's Pull List

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 52:42


This week, Ryan and Jasmine bring you all the latest in new books hitting shelves this week including our picks this week AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #18, X-TERMINATORS #5, SINS OF SINISTER #1, and more!Plus, we hand out the ""Is Someone Going to Make a Spreadsheet award— our weekly award named after a phrase pulled directly from an issue in this week's pull list! Think you know which issue this name came from? Let us know by sending us an email at PullList@marvel.com or by tweeting at us using #MarvelsPullList! Just make sure to mark it “Okay to read”!And finally, for this week's reading club, Tiger Division and Silk writer, Emily Kim joins us to talk about Astonishing X-Men: Unstoppable!!  What we're reading with Emily Kim:Astonishing X-Men (2004 - 2013) #19-24Giant-Size Astonishing X-Men (2008) #1As always, shout out your local comic shop or send us your questions or comments by emailing us at pulllist@marvel.com or tweet using #MarvelsPullList. Make sure to mark it "Okay to read!"  Follow us at: @agentm, @jasmiest New comics this week: ALL-OUT AVENGERS #5AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #18DOCTOR STRANGE: FALL SUNRISE #3MIDNIGHT SUNS #5MURDERWORLD: WOLVERINE #1SABRETOOTH & THE EXILES #3SINS OF SINISTER #1STAR WARS: DOCTOR APHRA #28STAR WARS: THE HIGH REPUBLIC - THE BLADE #2STAR WARS: YODA #3THOR #30X-TERMINATORS #5 New Weekly Infinity Comics: 1/23/2023X-MEN UNLIMITED 71 (Green IV) 1/24/2023AVENGERS UNLIMITED #30SPIDER-VERSE UNLIMITED A Tale of Two Cities #341/25/2023MARVEL'S VOICES: Super Hero Adventures Reptil #37      AVENGERS: ELECTRIC RAIN INFINITY COMIC #13WHO IS…? KANG INFINITY COMIC #11/26/2023LOVE UNLIMITED: KARMA IN LOVE #34    1/27/2023DEVIL DINOSAUR INFINITY COMIC #1      New to MU:ALIEN 2 (WDC)AVENGERS 61 (DCP)CAPTAIN AMERICA: SYMBOL OF TRUTH 6 (WDC)CARNAGE 7 (DCP)CRYPT OF SHADOWS 1 (WDC)DEADLY NEIGHBORHOOD SPIDER-MAN 1 (WDC)DEFENDERS: BEYOND 4 (DCP)IRON MAN 24 (DCP)MIDNIGHT SUNS 2 (WDC)MOON KNIGHT 16 (WDC)PREDATOR 3 (WDC)SHANG-CHI AND THE TEN RINGS 4 (DCP)STAR WARS: DARTH VADER 28 (WDC)THOR 28 (WDC)X-FORCE 33 [AXE] (DCP)X-MEN 16 (WDC)

You're Gonna Make It With Daniel Fusco
Hope + Grit = Unstoppable: Daniel Fusco and Jason Ritchie on Surviving Struggles and Why the 'Story's Not Over Yet'

You're Gonna Make It With Daniel Fusco

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 37:33


Daniel Fusco and Jason Ritchie break down how to overcome difficulties and persist in faith, finding strength and hope amid the ashes. The two also tackle how to live lives that are flourishing in Christ. As Fusco always says, "Hope + Grit = Unstoppable." If you're struggling with something or know others who are in the midst of a trial, this episode is for YOU."If you're still here and there's breath in your lungs, you're in the middle chapters," Fusco proclaims. "That story's not over yet."Listen to this powerful episode of "You're Gonna Make It."CONNECT WITH DANIEL FUSCO:- Follow Daniel on Facebook- Follow Daniel on Instagram- Follow Daniel on Twitter

The Millionaire Mompreneur Project
EP 234: Why I Don't Do Discounts & Why I Still Make Bank

The Millionaire Mompreneur Project

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 22:33


This is a real BTS look into a little part of the 7-figure in part-time hours strategy we use here at the MMP where we DON'T DO DISCOUNTS! In this episode, you'll also learn:- Why clients get buyers remorse and how to prevent refunds and/or default payments- How to create a brand known for quality and service over cheapness - What will make client not just pay you a higher price but PAY IN FULL- How to serve more people with value ladder offers that create recurring customers- How not doing discounts increases your client success ratesand more of course.....Learn more about the Money Making Moves Membership here: https://www.millionairemompreneur.com/mmm Learn more about the Millionaire Mompreneur Accelerator Mastermind here: https://www.millionairemompreneur.com/applicationIf you enjoyed this episode, please LEAVE A REVIEW and share the podcast so we can inspire other motivated mamas! Alone we are strong but together, we are UNSTOPPABLE.Connect with Jessie on Instagram: @jessieharrisboutonAND/OR say hello in our Facebook Community!Want to learn how how to make $1Million with 1 program in 1 year working less than part-time hours?  Watch this free training showing you exactly how to create, sell and scale your signature high-ticket group coaching program on autopilot without sales calls or being pushy: www.millionairemompreneur.com/7figurecoachsecrets

The Unstoppable Entrepreneur Show
5 Things You Need To Let Go Before You Can Start Living Your Dream Life

The Unstoppable Entrepreneur Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 23:12


We continue our theme for this year on The Kelly Roach Show of helping you design and build your %1 life. In today's episode, I share five steps to leave behind bad habits preventing you from living your 1% life.  Also in this episode: The toxic vice(s) that's keeping you in your comfortable bubble Why you need to cut toxic people out of your life Don't allow others to take advantage of you Making and keeping promises to yourself To grab a free download of Unstoppable, DM the word Unstoppable to Kelly Roach Official on Instagram.  Stay Connected With Kelly:  Follow Kelly on Instagram | LinkedIn | Facebook | Youtube | Kellyroachcoaching.com  Grab one of Kelly's bestselling books: Unstoppable: 9 Principles for Unlimited Success in Business and Life Conviction Marketing Bigger than You: The Entrepreneur's Guide to Building an Unstoppable Team

Suze Orman's Women and Money
Suze School: Unstoppable

Suze Orman's Women and Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 24:59 Transcription Available


On today's episode, Suze introduces something new, announces a great new opportunity for us to secure our money and teaches a lesson in being unstoppable. Take advantage of the Ultimate Opportunity Savings Account with Alliant Credit Union at: https://bit.ly/3vEUTZW Get Suze's special offers for podcast listeners at suzeorman.com/offer Join Suze's Women & Money Community for FREE and ASK SUZE your questions which may just end up on her podcast! To ask Suze a question, download by following one of these links: CLICK HERE FOR APPLE: https://apple.co/2KcAHbH CLICK HERE FOR GOOGLE PLAY: https://bit.ly/3curfMISee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Darren Smith Show
Omar Ruiz- “When the Cowboys are playing well, they're as unstoppable as anybody”

The Darren Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 21:20


NFLN's Omar Ruiz discussed the unflappable Joe Burrow and the Bengals upset chances, how Giants match the Eagles, Shanahan Quinn chess match & if Cowboys have any chances of beating the 49ers.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 94 – Unstoppable Prolific Author with Lorna Schultz Nicholson

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 66:17


As you soon will discover when you listen to this week's episode, this episode with Lorna was recorded in September of 2022. As usual, we get to have a fun and inspiring conversation.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson to date has published 49 books with more on the way. As you will hear, she believes that everyone has stories to tell. She has published books on various subjects including disabilities.   A good portion of our episode discusses blindness, eyesight, and how the world views and/or should view people's whose eyesight is less than most persons. Lorna provides some fascinating and valuable observations about this.   Regular listeners to Unstoppable Mindset will hear some discussions touch on in previous episodes. However, Lorna's ways of discussing issues and her personal insights are relevant and come strictly from her own observations. You can't but be inspired and enthralled by all she has to say about writing and her life.     About the Guest: Lorna Schultz Nicholson has published over 46 books with three more coming out in September 2022. Her books include children's picture books, middle-grade fiction, YA fiction, and non-fiction. Although many of her books are about sports (not all mind you) they are also about family and friendships and include diverse casts of characters. Her books have been nominated for many different awards. Lorna loves traveling and presents about writing at libraries, schools, and conferences to inspire people to love reading and writing as much as she does.  Lorna lives in Edmonton, Alberta with her husband (Go Oilers Go) and a dog that she rescued from Mexico.    Ways to connect with Lorna:   Website: www.lornaschultznicholson.com  Facebook: Lorna Schultz Nicholson Instagram: Lornasn Twitter: Lornasn          About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.     Michael Hingson  01:20 Well, hi there, wherever you happen to be today. This is Mike Hingson and you are listening to unstoppable mindset. Really glad you're here. We are going to have fun again today as usual, and get inspired and do all those things that we do on unstoppable mindset. And again, I really appreciate you being here and hope you enjoy what we have to talk about today. We have Lorna on with us. And I'm going to let her introduce herself pretty much except to tell you that she is an author who has written a whole bunch of books when I met her she had written 46 books. And since we last talked she said she was going to be publishing three more by September so one of course the big questions of the day is did you get to do that but first, learn a welcome to unstoppable mindset. Thanks for being here.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  02:09 Thank you, Michael. Yes, it's Lorna Schultz Nicholson, and that is a long name three names and nobody ever spell Schultz. Right. That's okay.   Michael Hingson  02:18 Well, how do you spell it?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  02:20 S C H U L T Z,   Michael Hingson  02:23 that's, that's the way I've always spelled it.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  02:26 Good for you. Because you have no idea how many people either forget to see or they forget the the yell or the T at the end screen or?   Michael Hingson  02:35 Or they make it or they make it an S instead of a Z?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  02:38 Well, I think they get the Z right. Because of Charles Schultz. Right. They get that right. Because of the   Michael Hingson  02:44 parents. Schultz from Hogan's Heroes. Yes, but   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  02:48 that's spelled the same way as mine.   Michael Hingson  02:51 S C H U L T Z. Yeah,   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  02:53 exactly. Oh, yes. Zee, sir. In Canada, we say Zed   Michael Hingson  02:58 was said Yeah, yeah, S C H U L T Zed. Well, it is a it is a British oriented or whatever thing or, or some sort of an empire thing. Yeah. That's it.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  03:13 Coming to you from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. That's the that's the other thing. I guess I'll say when I introduce myself,   Michael Hingson  03:18 and of course, go Oilers. I know I saw that in your bio. Yes. And how and how did we do?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  03:27 Well, the season I did fine. I've got those three books coming out. So I'm now on my 49 published book. And I do have a spring book in the docket. So it says it's a picture book. So that will be my 50th book in the spring. But right now I'm sitting at 49. Wow. 49th. One was just released today.   Michael Hingson  03:49 And our hockey and how did our hockey season go?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  03:55 Season was great. Last year. It hasn't started this year, they'll be starting their training camp right now. Players and training camp they will be starting up mid October sort of beginning of October, mid October, the first games will happen. They'll go into some preseason games here. You know, we all have to watch baseball for a little while. Because, of course they're wrapping up the end of their season. So we all get excited about that too to watch the World Series.   Michael Hingson  04:24 And in addition to hockey and baseball, do you ever watch basketball?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  04:28 I do actually because I'm a Toronto Raptors fans. So there you go. Okay. Yep, Yep, absolutely. I like watching basketball to   Michael Hingson  04:37 football, and football. We love college football. And right now we're very happy because my wife Karen is a graduate of USC. Okay. And well, she did her graduate studies there and the team is doing really well this year. We have no major complaints. First time in a long time. So we're very pleased about that.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  04:58 That's exciting. That's it. I think very exciting. There   Michael Hingson  05:01 are three and oh, and all three games, they scored more than 40 points per game. Oh,   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  05:07 I have a brother in law who always fights with this USC and UCLA. There's always a big rivalry between those two, right? Oh, there is? Oh, yeah. Yeah, that happens in my family because they live down in California. So there's always this rivalry that goes on in the family between the two. And which one does he like? You know, that you knew you're gonna ask me that. And I think he's the UCLA.   Michael Hingson  05:32 Well, you know, we we understand that there are those people in the world who who are less fortunate than we, and that's okay. Well, let's see. See, my story is that on the day, we got married, our wedding was supposed to start at four o'clock. And it didn't start until a quarter after four because at four, the church was less than half full. And at 12, after four, suddenly the doors opened, and this whole throng of people came in. And so we finally were able to start when we asked somebody later, what the heck was the deal? Why was everybody late getting there? And they said, No, nobody was late. They were sitting out in their cars waiting for the end of the USC Notre Dame game. So one that tells you where we were in the priority of things, but but SC want Notre Dame, so we knew the marriage was gonna last?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  06:29 Oh, I love to hear that. That's a lovely story. That's a good story.   Michael Hingson  06:33 Well, tell us a little bit about you kind of where you came from your life, your life a little bit, and we'll go from there.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  06:40 Well, um, I actually grew up in Ontario, St. Catharines, Ontario, which is really, really close to Niagara Falls, and Niagara Falls, New York, Niagara Falls, Canada. And then I did a lot of moving around and all that, you know, that we all do, and going to university and that kind of thing. And I wasn't always a writer. I mean, you know, I should go back and say that that's not exactly true. But I didn't always think that I was going to be a writer, like, I never grew up thinking that I was going to be an author, like I have some friends off their friends who grew up saying, I knew I was going to be an author, I wanted to be a writer, I wanted to do that when I was little. And I didn't have that. I wanted to be an athlete. Like, if you had asked me when I was a child, they'd say what you want to be when you grew up, I'd say an athlete, my mom and dad would say, because in my era, of course, my parents said, that's not really a profession, you can relate to that. So you know, I went into other things that had to do with sports, like I got a science degree in kinesiology and, you know, worked in the fitness industry. And then when my children were little I came, I decided to take a writing course. And I, I discovered how much I loved writing. And then it brought me back to my childhood, of how much I love to read, and how I love to write stories when I was a kid, that I just never pursued the writing Avenue, but I did actually love writing stories. So it was a bit of a full circle for me, and it didn't happen. You know, in my 20s, I didn't get my first book published until I was in my 40s. And I worked really hard in those late 30s. After that course, I sort of got like, jazzed up. And I, I wanted to write and I wanted to be a writer, and I wanted to be published. And of course, that takes years to happen, you know, you have to keep trying and trying and trying, and keep submitting and keep writing another story. And then finally, I got a book published in 2004. So I mean, I was in my early 40s, when that actually happened. And so for anybody who's listening out there, who wants to write and you think, Well, I didn't do this in my 20s, and I didn't go to university for it, and I didn't get an English degree. You know, you can keep trying, just keep trying.   Michael Hingson  09:02 Well, it's always about trying and I and I take the tact also that if you don't happen to want to write a book or whatever, you do, at least have stories to tell.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  09:13 Everybody has a story to tell everybody who and I and I do a lot of writing classes as well. I teach a lot of writing classes I teach a lot to kids, like because I I write mostly children's I do write some adult but I write a lot of children's literature. And so I'm often in schools, you know, or workshops, writing workshops for children and, and you know, they're keen keen writers or they're not But and if they're not, I like to tell everybody you have a story to tell everybody has a story to tell. And out in the world. There are lots of stories. So I think that that's the most important part about writing is the story part of it.   Michael Hingson  09:53 One of the things that I find and I love to tell people is if you Don't think that you would be a good guest on the podcast because you don't necessarily talk about whatever our mission is. What I tell people as well, our mission is to inspire people more than anything else. We do talk about disabilities, we do talk about inclusion, and of course, being blind and wanting to get people to have a little bit different view of what blindness and disabilities are all about. I'm always glad to do that. But at the same time, the general purpose of this podcast is really to show people that can be more unstoppable than they think. And so as I go out, and I look for guests, and we searched in a number of different ways, but people often say, Well, I don't know that I would really be good for your mission. And then I say, well, but our mission is to inspire. But I don't really know what to talk about. And I say the same thing that you just said, everyone has a story to tell. And so my job is to help people really find or remember what their story is, and talk about it. And there's no formal way or anything else to do that. It's more an issue of you have a story and we want to hear it. Yeah, I   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  11:09 agree with you. I do think that people, everybody has a story. And I mean, Michael, you have a story, because were you blind at birth? Yes. Yes. Okay, so you have a story. And, and you're doing a great job with this podcast by getting people you know, to tell their unstoppable story, but also to inspire people to do other things. And, and I do write a lot about different disabilities I, I am I have a series that I've written that's called the One to One series, a book has just been published in the series, it's called behind the label. And in that series, I've looked at first book had a character with autism, high functioning autism, the second book was a character that was born with Down syndrome, I have featured fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in it. And I think it's really important that, you know, I'm going to say, behind the label is the latest book that came out, but that we do look behind that label too. So we look behind your label of your disability of being blind. And then we find your your true story and, and how you can help others as well. You know, maybe maybe go through what they're going through.   Michael Hingson  12:28 Of course, one of the things that I have pointed out a number of times on this podcast, and I love to tell people is if we're going to really talk about people with disabilities, then we really have to recognize that everyone has a disability specifically for most of you, your disability is that you are light dependent, you don't do well if the lights aren't on. And electric lighting is a relatively new invention, it came around in the mid 1800s. But the reality is, you guys don't do well, without lights. And in the workplace. Companies and builders provide lights and the ceilings and all sorts of lights so people can see to get around and so on. But that's your problem. And not mine. I don't happen to have that disability. And we need to recognize that everyone does have a challenge people take it for granted. Well, I'm not really disabled, because I can get around. Yeah, let's see how you do in a dark room. And let's see how well you read in a dark room. Or let's see how well you function in other ways when lighting conditions aren't great, because we're always looking for the best lighting conditions. So the reality is we all have disabilities. And we should recognize that. So we don't try to say that we're better because we're not of the of the scope where our disability if you want to call it that is really less than yours, because it's not there. We all have them. And it's an equalizing thing, I think among all of us in society in general.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  13:59 I totally agree with that. And that's a very, very interesting concept. I never, you know, thank you for saying that, because I never really thought of it that way. Like, I'm thinking now of course, when I turned my computer on the first thing I thought of was, oh, no, I forgot my, my ring light in. in Penticton. I have I have a summer place that I go to by the lake. And so I was coming back yesterday, I drove back yesterday and I forgot my ring light. My ring light is there. I'm thinking I don't have my ring light. Oh my goodness. So that's not something that you even thought of before this podcast, you didn't think to yourself, oh, gosh, I don't have my ring light. You didn't think of that. And that's that's very, very interesting for you to say that. And I thank you for that. Because I think that that's that's something that you know, we people who have our vision, we don't even think about and it's true. We don't know how to walk in the dark. We don't know how to turn off our Lights and feel around and try to find our way to our bed. Like, you know, we keep our little nightlight on so that we can get there. So that's a really interesting, a really interesting comment. And I do agree with that, that I think that the more that we we look at the world as a whole, and look at all the individuals who are in our world, and look at the fact that we are each and every one of us different. And I'm not sure why, why we have to put everybody into into sort of so many boxes, like why can't we all just live together and sort of understand that we're all different. And we all have a different makeup, like even identical twins are different. Sure, they have small differences. And they, you know, they're not, they're not exactly the same in their personalities.   Michael Hingson  15:57 So maybe we should work together and write a book, or you write a book, and I'm glad to help on blindness. And we bring out some of these concepts that might be kind of fun to explore.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  16:09 Very fun to explore. I mean, a friend of mine actually did write one where she had a visually impaired runner, and you know how they're then they tether them together. And I was just watching that running race the other day with this gal who was just running like the wind. And she was she had a runner beside her. And she was visually impaired. And it was really incredible. I was just like, wow, that's that's impressive. That's good, really good.   Michael Hingson  16:37 But of course, the question is, why should it be viewed as being so incredible? And the answer is, of course, most people can't imagine doing it without eyesight. And the reality is eyesight has not a lot to do with it. If you look at it a different way. It's all about information gathering and having the information that you need. And certainly eyesight is one way to get information. But it's by no means the only way that we get data. And nor should it be the only way we get data. And the difficulty is that so often, people who can see really think is the only real game in town. And oh, for a number of years, the Gallup polling organization, classified blindness specifically, is one of the top five fears that people felt they faced. And it shouldn't be that way. But we really don't look at the reality that blindness isn't the problem. It's our perceptions. And there are a lot of ways to get information, far and away, even in some sense of superior to eyesight, but we just don't look at it that way. Because we're used to seeing and we think that's the only way to do it.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  17:55 Do you think that your other senses have been heightened? That perhaps I mean, we are very people that have eyesight are very visual, like visual, the won't be the word for it. That's probably their top choice.   Michael Hingson  18:14 Because that's what they're used to. I do not think that senses are heightened simply because we don't see, I think they're heightened if we use them. That's why some of the examples that I use are military teams like SEAL Team Six, or any of the high functioning very specialized military teams that have learned to use their eyesight they see better than anyone else, because they've learned to use that sight. They've learned to process the information more effectively, because of what they see. But they've also learned to use their other senses. And so those senses are also heightened because they've learned to use them. And so the result is that they're not heightened simply because you lose one or not. They're heightened because you make use of them. And you recognize that they are as valuable, as eyesight, for getting as much information about your environment or whatever it is that you need to deal with.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  19:22 So it's kind of like, in a way, people that have vision are a bit lazy with their other senses. We could You could say that we allow our vision to be our strong strong sense. It's like you know, in your body like if you work out your you know, your your hamstrings and your glutes, you always use your quads you don't necessarily you know, there's certain muscle groups that take over so maybe we just let our vision take over and we become a bit lazy and we don't use all our senses and you know, getting Back To Me teaching classes. This is one of the things that I try to teach students is that use all your senses when you're writing, because it's very, very easy as a writer to just write with the visual. And so you write what somebody looks like you write that they were this, they were that they did this, they, you know, it's all visual. And I try to tell students and I try to do it with my own writing, sometimes I'll write something and then I'll take a look at it. And I'll say, well, Lorna, you didn't use your senses in this. Now, how can you add this in? What did the person smell when they walked in? Did a feather you know, did they walk into a barn and a feather hit their nose, and then they sneezed. So what was the sense of touch? So, and hearing, I mean, it's all really important to put those senses in, in writing, it's super important. And it is very, very easy just to write with the visual, and a lot of kids will do that. So then it's up to me to say, You know what, let's look at everything else here. Let's look at all your other senses when you're writing this. So that's something that's interesting, too, is that I think that it's even more important. Now that I've chatted with you. I'm thinking wow, like, this is really interesting. I mean, this is, this is something that, you know, I, you know, I can talk to kids about that we need to do this more.   Michael Hingson  21:28 Well, the issue is that, of course, your expertise is in eyesight. And that's why I suggested we ought to explore doing a book. And that's something that we can talk about, but but the reality is your expertise is in eyesight, you can gain more expertise in other senses. But the odds are because the world has been shaped around eyesight, that's what you're going to use. And I appreciate that, and understand that. And we love you anyway. But thank you, but but the bottom line is, it is the way the world is shaped. And and so as a result, we don't really look at our other senses in the way that we can. Which isn't to say that if you're writing a book about a blind person that you so emphasize the other senses that you don't talk in the vernacular that people are used to. So for example, I watch TV, I go to watch and see movies. And the reason that I say that is not because of an eyesight issue, but rather, the Webster's Dictionary defined, see in one of his definitions as to perceive. So why shouldn't I use See, as well as anyone else does, we've got to get away from the concept that that's the only game in town that is eyesight, which and I don't know whether you've read my book, Thunder dog, which is a book that we wrote about not only me growing up as a blind person, but my story of being involved in the World Trade Center on September 11 2001. But in center dog, one of the things that I say is don't let your sight get in the way of your vision. And it's absolutely important that people start to realize that because we talk about vision, I think I've got tons of vision, I just don't see so good as I love to say to people, but vision is there. And I don't object to people using the word vision relating to eyesight, but it is not the only way and not the only definition of the word.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  23:32 I really liked that comment. Don't let it don't let your sight get in the way of your vision.   Michael Hingson  23:38 Don't let your sight get in the way of your vision.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  23:42 That's it. That's a very, very good comment. That's, that's a good line. That's a very good one. Um, no, I haven't read your book. But now I'm going to I hope you will. Yeah, for sure. Like   Michael Hingson  23:51 it sounds really interesting. And it was a it was a number one New York Times bestseller. He brags and, you know, but it it is intended to teach people more about blindness of blind people, and I hope you and others who haven't read it will read it. Also being a poor, starving author, you know, we need people to buy books anyway. So it's important, but But here's another one. And then we I've got lots of questions for you. But here's another one. People say that I and other people who happen to be blind or visually impaired, look at the wording visually impaired. Now the last time I checked when you talk about something visual, and you talk about something that's visually oriented, it's about how it looks. And I don't think that I'm impaired simply because I'm blind from a visual standpoint. I don't even like low vision, because then you're still making it all about degrees of eyesight. I think that the fact is that low vision is probably better than certainly a lot better than visually impaired or Vision Impaired because again, I think I've got lots of vision and to say that we're impaired with our vision or our eyesight is really a serious problem because you're still then promulgating the class difference between people who happen to be blind or who don't see, as well as most people, and people who have better eyesight. So blind and low vision is probably at this point, the best that we can do. It's sort of like deaf and hard of hearing. If you say to most Deaf people, you are hearing impaired, you're apt to be executed on the spot because they recognize the value of words.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  25:38 Right. So what what are the words that we should use?   Michael Hingson  25:42 I would say right now the best words that I can give you are blind and visit low, low vision.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  25:48 Okay. Okay. I mean, because you know, what, sometimes we don't know sometimes. I don't know what I'm supposed to say. And, and the last thing that I want to do is say the wrong thing. But but you know, I mean, things go out there. And, and we're told, you know, you can't say that. So it is nice to hear it from you, that this is what, you know, what we what we should say, and well, vision. And   Michael Hingson  26:19 the other part about it is, of course, what you're welcome. But the other part about it is you can't say that, you know, that concept and that comment is a problem. The fact that we worry so much about political correctness is is a problem. I think that, that if somebody says that I'm visually impaired, I'm not going to get too offended by that. But I am going to try to correct the concepts that No, I don't think I'm visually impaired, don't I look the same as most anyone else. You go back and look at what visually means. And I don't think that I'm more any more visually impaired than you are. But I happen to be blind or I can be considered low vision. But even most low vision, people really ought to look at themselves as blind. And what do I mean by that? I subscribe to a different definition of blindness that Kenneth's Jernigan, a past president of the National Federation of the Blind created. And his definition was you are blind if your eyesight has decreased to the point where you have to use alternatives to full eyesight in order to accomplish tasks. So if you've got to use large print, or a closed circuit television or a magnifier, the odds are you will probably lose more, if not all of your eyesight at some point in your life. So now is the time to start to learn blindness techniques and to accept the fact that blindness isn't the problem. And that you can function as a blind person, in a world where most people don't happen to be blind. And if we would start to do that, we would learn that blindness, again, isn't really the issue that we face. It's more of the misconceptions that people have   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  28:04 very interesting. And I mean, I think there are a lot of misconceptions with everything. I mean, you know, every single difference in somebody, often there are misconceptions about it. And and I think that, you know, sometimes when I was writing, I remember writing the book about autism, that I had a character that had autism and high functioning autism, and I, I remember being in a lineup in the grocery store, and all of a sudden, I thought somebody was in front of me. And then I thought, you know, what, maybe, you know, I don't want to be impatient here. Because it's that person may be, you know, their name may have maybe they do have autism, or maybe they do have something that is just creating them to be a little slower is that my, that's not my deal. That's who they are. And I should respect who they are. And I think that that's really important in our world is that we just respect who everybody is, and what everybody is all about. And look for the insight of the person instead of that sort of outside that we're always looking at which I use the word looking,   Michael Hingson  29:13 which is fine. That's the word right? Sure. And it's fine to use that word.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  29:19 We're looking like because we, we do look like you know, we do look and but you look in a different way.   Michael Hingson  29:26 But look doesn't necessarily need to be defined as with your eyes. And that's the real issue, right? We're so oriented in our mindset, overall, are thinking about looking, you have to do it with your eyes. And that's where the breakdown comes, rather than recognizing that look, means really to examine or explore in a number of different ways and it doesn't necessarily need to be with eyesight.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  29:56 And that's an that's a very interesting concept, right? We can look I guess we can look with our ears or we can look with our senses, other senses, correct?   Michael Hingson  30:06 Well look as a general sort of a thing. You know, we listen with our ears, but it's part of looking around.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  30:14 Right? Yeah. Interesting. Very, very interesting. I like to use of your words, I like the use of how you're taking certain words that I may think are only visually, I'm 50. Courts. I love words, right? I'm a writer. I love words. So you're taking words, and you're you're spinning them a little bit for me?   Michael Hingson  30:36 I'm taking. I'm taking site orientation out of it. Right. Yeah. Which, which is important. And so you see why our podcast unstoppable mindset can go off in all sorts of different directions that we never thought about when we started this.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  30:54 Yeah, we're going off in a totally different direction. But, you know, it's fun, really enlightening. It's really enlightening to me, I'm really actually learning a lot today. So this is really   Michael Hingson  31:04 good. Well, you know, it's, it's part of what makes life fun going off and having adventures and adventures and words are always important to have and learning new concepts. And and every time I have these conversations, I get to learn things and sort of even more effectively, and hopefully, efficiently define what I do and say, and so, yeah, I love it. It's it's enjoyable to do this, but I do have a question for you. You have written a lot of books now, relating to sports and how come?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  31:38 Because I love sports. And I love sports as a child, as I said, when my parents would ask me what I wanted to be when I, you know, people would ask what I wanted to be when I grew up, I always said, I want to be an athlete. Everybody looked at me like, Okay, well, that's not really a profession. What are you talking about? I love sports. As a child, I played everything you can possibly imagine everything I possibly, you know, was was there for me. And it was something that was really big in my life. So sometimes there's that old saying that write what you know, and especially when you're starting off writing it makes makes it a little bit easier. I mean, you know, blindness, you could write about blindness. So it's like, write what you know, and I and I knew about sports. So I wrote a tremendous amount about sports. And really interesting. Just a little side note here. I wrote a book called when you least expect it, and it's about a rower. And I was a rower in high school, I grew up in St. Catharines, Ontario, which is, as I said, close to negra falls, was a really big growing community. And I got into a boat and I rode and I, you know, went on and was on the national team and you know, won the Canadian championship and I was down, we went down to Philadelphia, we went down to Princeton, we went down to all kinds of places to row. And I really, really loved it. And the book ended up winning an award this year, it won the R rasa network for the Writers Guild of Alberta. And so I want some money for that. And I decided that I would give back and I would give a little scholarship, you know, give half of the money away to somebody who was finishing rowing at the St. Catharines rowing club where I grew up, and they were going to go into university. I ended up giving it to an I don't want to say visually impaired   Michael Hingson  33:26 A Low vision person.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  33:30 Yeah, because she sent me this letter. So I asked the, for the criteria, they had to send me their admission letter and tell me that they were going to continue on with the sport. And then they had to write a letter to me about, you know, something to do with my main protagonist and how, you know, they related and she just, she sent me this lovely letter about how, you know, she really wanted to be in sports, but she found it hard, difficult for some of the sports but then she found rowing. And as somebody with low vision, this was something that she could be very successful at. And she actually went in a single and in the Paralympic race at the Henley and she won the gold medal. So very interesting. And she wrote it a four but I think to get her bearings, she was able to sit on the floor, and then you know, a Coxy would, you know, steer the boat down and all she just had to hear for the sounds of the water to put the to put the orange in the water. So I just I just thought I'd share that thing as I'm talking to you today. So that was the letter that inspired me. I was like, this is this is this is good. This is inspirational and that's what this show is about. Because she was unstoppable she she wasn't going to say no like no I can't do this. She just went out and found some somewhere where she could be an athlete and, and be successful and go on to university and follow her dream and follow her passion.   Michael Hingson  34:59 A friend of mine, Ariel Gilbert, who I've known for a long time I met her when I was working at Guide Dogs for the Blind. And she was working there as well is an inner is an international rower, and also was involved in the Paralympics. And actually when the Olympics were held. Last, I think in California, she was one of the people who carried the torch for a mile. And so has been very involved in the Olympics and very, very heavily involved in rowing and has done it for a number of years. She had to stop for a while because of some kidney issues. But that all got straightened out. And she's started again. Oh, so she's been rowing for for quite a while. And the reality is, it's a very doable sport. And she tells the story about how people didn't think that she could do it. And she said, Of course I can. Let me at least have a shot at it. And it didn't take very long during the shot at it for people to recognize that she was going to be as good as anyone else. Which makes perfect sense.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  36:05 Yeah, I was so impressed with the letter to be really, and she was the one who got the scholarship or the bursary. She got the bursary. I emailed her and I said, you know your letter, I loved your letter, I thought that, you know, you explained everything to me quite well. And, you know, here's your money and go forth, and go to university and, and join your crew and keep going at it. And, you know, she just said it was a place where she felt that she could make some friends. And, you know, she just found success, and it is doable. It's a very, very doable sport for that. So, I mean, when I wrote the book, when do we expect it, it's not what I expected. So I mean, you know, it was when he least expected that I would, you know, donate the money back, and then get these letters in, and then all of a sudden end up on your show, to tie all of this together. And I kind of liked when things like that do happen, because as I said, everybody has a story to tell. And it was a really, really interesting story. So thank you for sharing with me about that other woman who? What was her name again?   Michael Hingson  37:13 Ariel Gilbert, she lives up in the Bay Area in California.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  37:17 I'll look that up. Because very interesting. I mean, she this other gal said, yeah, it was a very doable, doable sport for her.   Michael Hingson  37:24 As with, as with a lot of things, the biggest problem is again, people's perceptions. Well, the belief is you've got to see to do it. And the question is why? Even even driving a car today technologically can be done. Although the technology isn't in wide use and isn't really in ready for primetime use. But and I'm not talking about an autonomous vehicle, but rather, a person truly being able to drive. Why should we view that is only something that a person with full eyesight can do with the amount of information that is truly available to us with technology today. And there has been demonstrations of a blind person truly driving a car, getting information from the vehicle that allows them to be on the road, or the one thing I'm thinking of, and I've talked about it here before, is the now president of the National Federation of the Blind Mark Riccobono drove a Ford Escape around the Daytona Speedway right before the 2011 Rolex 24 race, driving through an obstacle course passing a vehicle, and a number of other things because the car was transmitting through some additional instrumentation on the car information to mark that allowed him to safely be on that course, and drive around the course successfully. Again, eyesight is not the only game in town. And yeah, will that technology be something that gets built into cars, so more blind people can use it, hopefully in some way, at least, if nothing else, when we start to deal more with autonomous vehicles. And until we get to the point where there are 100% foolproof, which is going to be a ways away. It's going to be probably mandated that someone needs to be behind the steering wheel and be able to take control of the vehicle if something breaks down or drops out during the autonomous vehicles driving of technology driving the vehicle. I want to have the same opportunity to do that. Does anyone else at least to be able to safely pull the car to the side of the road? And the fact is the technology exists to do that?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  39:42 Mm hmm. You know, it's typical sports to a friend of mine wrote a book with a it was a children's book, but it was a hockey book. Right? A lot of hockey books because I live in Canada. But they had a puck that had a puck that has like, like a rock or something in it. And the puck, you know, so when they stick handle down the ice, they could hear the puck. Yeah, yeah, it's it's, it's something that's used with people that are blind can play hockey, because they can actually hear the puck. And so then they can pass it over and they can hear it.   Michael Hingson  40:22 And then they, there are some interesting and extremely active sports that blind people are are involved with. And of course, the whole concept of physical fitness is becoming more of an issue that a lot of us are paying attention to. And again, even exercise programs can be very accessible, if we verbalize rather than just showing things on a screen or through a camera lens, or whatever. And the fact is that there are a lot of ways to make it possible for more people to be included in what people think are otherwise not accessible or not any kind of activities that people without eyesight can do. Because eyesight is not the only game in town. There are many blind scientists and blind people who have participated in other things. For many years, it was assumed that no blind person could teach. And that eventually was addressed. And now it's fairly commonplace, although there are many school districts that still won't hire a person. Because the belief is that you have to see to be able to do it. And you don't. And so it's it is a it is a constant thing to explore and to hopefully do more to educate people about which is really what it is. It's an educational process.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  41:44 Oh, 100% it 100% I think that it's all the more that someone like you, you know, with your podcast, you're today you're educating people, you've educated me even a little bit like hear like a lot, actually. And, you know, I think that that's that's important as well. And I think that technology has probably, perhaps helped the blind out tremendously.   Michael Hingson  42:11 Well, it's helped all of us I mean, I we talked about the electric light bulb, right? That made it possible for us to do so many things after dark. Because before the light bulb, we had to go have used candles are light torches, technology is is helping all of us. And it has only in a relatively shorter time been recognized that we can use technology to further advance the inclusion that we all want. But you know, things like insulin pumps for people who have diabetes who happen to be blind, those insulin pumps use touchscreens and other things. And only recently, I believe in the US, at least as the FDA finally approved one that uses an app on a phone that is accessible so that a blind person can actually as a diabetic use an insulin pump. And the fact is that we've so got ourselves locked into touchscreens now that we find that more and more things are becoming inaccessible to us who happen to be blind or low vision, especially blind because we can't see the icons on the screen. And it's ironic that there's no need for that. Because today, we know that there are ways to make touchscreens accessible. Apple was very clever about doing that when they finally made the iPhone accessible. They had to do that because they would have been sued if they hadn't. But they got creative and they did it. So now every iPhone and Android phones, although that's still not quite progressed to the same level, but every iPhone and Android phones have built in to the software, the things to make them more usable for people who don't happen to see or see well. Right.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  44:01 What about books in braille? Do you find that there's still not enough books in braille?   Michael Hingson  44:07 Oh, I think there's still not enough books in braille. But ironically, again, the issue is that many books are being published electronically, but what they are, are photos saved in some sort of format of printed pages of books. And so those are not accessible. And so when books are made electronically, it's important that there be some sort of text version of the book so that they can be made available for people who happen to be blind again, or who could listen to them. Braille. Braille is still the means of reading and writing that I have available to me and a lot of teachers talk about Braille as being something that we we really don't need anymore because blind people can listen to books and so on. Well, if that's the case of why to be allow, why don't we allow sighted kids to just watch cartoons when Why do we want to teach them print? You know, the concept is still the same. We haven't progressed to really understand that there are true alternatives to eyesight. So a lot of people think a blind person can't right. Now I happen to collaborate with people when I write my find that helpful for me. But by the same token, the the issue is that the technology exists for me to be able to write I use a standard keyboard, you have a process that you use to write, you use a computer and a keyboard, but what's your what's your whole writing process? You written a lot of books, you have to have a process for that.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  45:41 Yeah, I have a process. I generally start with an outline like I mean, there's a lot of thinking that goes on before a book gets published, right, or before you even start a book, start writing a book, not even before it gets published, you think a lot about what you're going to write, you think about how the story should start where the story should end. I mean, there's a lot of that that goes on, before you even start. Sometimes you can think about a book for a year. And then, and then you finally start it. And I often do an outline before I start, not everybody does, I'm not somebody who says Oh, you have to do this, you have to do that everybody has to follow their own process. And my process, it tends to be a bit of an outline, because I'd like to know the ending before we start, just because it saves me time, once I do begin. And then once I begin, I just I go at it, I go at it until I finish the first draft. And then once I finished the first draft, then I can sit back because the first draft is the bones, it's never very good. It's always not very good. And I have to edit it. And I have to revise it and work on it and mold it and make it make it what it's going to be even before I send it to like my agent, even before it gets out. I mean, and she'll give me notes, or I'll give it to friends even to take a look at to give me notes to tell me stuff that's not right with it. And then of course, when it goes to an editor, so yeah, I'm a sort of beginning to end finish. And then, you know, then I go back, and I revise. And I revise. And I revise. That's sort of my process. I have a novel that I have to work on here soon. And I've got the outline done. And I need to I thought a lot about it. And I did write the first chapter. And now I need to just dive back in and, and get the book, you know, get the book finished. But I do have an ending insight and an outline for it. So that's generally my process. Have you have you ever   Michael Hingson  47:39 had a book that has really taken on a life of its own? And maybe even though you wrote an ending, that by the time it was done the whole ending? And everything changed about the book?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  47:50 Oh, yeah, I mean, that does happen. And sometimes, you know, for instance, with this series that I was telling you about, one to one, yeah, the one to one series. I was in I think the third book, and Harrison was my autistic character in the first book, and I'm in the third book, and I'm riding away and I've got Madeline, and she has this brain injury. And I have a really good girlfriend who has a brain injury. So I kind of took a lot of and I spent a lot of time with her over the years and and so I'm riding away and all of a sudden, Harrison sort of comes back into the story because the kids sort of the teens sort of come in and out of the stories. And they all go the same high school together. And this character came back in and I was like really excited to see him. I was like, Oh, he's back I spoke. So like, and I had not planned that at all that that was simply came out of the blue. And his voice just came right back to me. And I was right back into writing about him. And, you know, he wanted to ask Madeline to dance was really fun. I was like, This is so fun. So yes, it does happen that sometimes it just goes off on a tangent and something appears and then you just think you just go with it. I just went with it. And I was you know, thrilled to have him back in my story. So it was really, really fun. And I you know, that was one of those days where I pushed my chair back at the end of my writing session and went oh, gosh, that was so incredibly fun to do so. Yeah. I mean, that does happen for sure. Yeah. So   Michael Hingson  49:24 did Harrison and Madeline hit it off?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  49:26 Well, they did. Thank you for asking. I love their interaction. I was like, This is so good.   Michael Hingson  49:35 Well, maybe they will become a thing, or did they become a thing?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  49:39 Maybe they'll become a high school thing. Who knows? Yeah, it's not up to them.   Michael Hingson  49:44 There's nothing wrong with that.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  49:46 Oh, gosh, no, that's okay. That's good. Anyway, yeah. So that does happen for sure. And that makes it really fun. When it does. That's cool. I allow that to happen. I do allow the book to go off Want to attention to and maybe finish somewhere else that it's never finished before? So   Michael Hingson  50:04 well your characters are part of you, and then in a lot of different ways, and so it's interesting that they can come back and say, No, we think we should go this way.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  50:13 Exactly, exactly. And that's okay. And that's cool, because that's who they are. And they're just telling me something. So, and I enjoy that process. And I enjoy that part of it, for sure.   Michael Hingson  50:25 Do you have yet a favorite book from all the ones that you've written? That that you would identify as kind of your favorite so far?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  50:33 Oh, no, I gotta say no to that. I think every book is a different process. It's a different book. Some books write themselves, some books, you know, are harder. Sometimes it's harder to, you know, I have to figure out the character. I mean, of course, the rolling book was, you know, based a little bit on me as a teenager. So that has a really special place in my heart, but it doesn't mean it's my favorites. I mean, I know I'm going to say no. Well, that's,   Michael Hingson  51:09 um, that's, that's fine. You just have a lot of fun with all of them, which is, which is great. So what does your husband   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  51:16 do? Oh, my husband works for the Edmonton Oilers.   Michael Hingson  51:20 He works for the Oilers. That's why you said go wireless. I got it. What does he do?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  51:27 I gotta wear the jersey. I gotta wear the gear. No,   Michael Hingson  51:30 you're not gonna go off and root for the flames and then embarrass him.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  51:36 Never happened? No, no, no, no, no, no. No, he works with me to do either so yeah, I'm an oiler span through what does he do? Pretty good job with them. He's like their vice president. I think they   Michael Hingson  51:49 are cool. I, I tried ice skating once. And it was a challenge for me. And I eventually, as we were actually going off the ice, I finally fell and sprained my ankle. But so I've not ice skated since. But it's one of those those kinds of things that I never really caught on to. And I admire so much people who are able to do it much less the figure skaters and so on, and all the things that they can do.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  52:17 Well, it's amazing. It's, you know, sometimes I look at photos of like, a figure skater or hockey player. And you can see them over on their edge on that one like line. It's a really, really fine line. And it's pretty incredible that they can actually balance on that.   Michael Hingson  52:36 Yeah. And, and the hockey players who can just do that for so long, so fast, and so well. And   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  52:44 so Well, absolutely, yeah, it's, it's actually, you know, it's a really fun sport to write. And I've got I've written a lot of hockey novels because of the speed that I can I and you know, the speed the sounds the throwing off the board's the scraping of the ice. So there's a lot there that I'm allowed to use my words. And so it's fun because it's fast. So I get I can get going into like a scene where it's fast and furious. And they're, they're moving and scraping and doing all kinds of fun things. So yeah, it's it's like,   Michael Hingson  53:22 I think for my part, I could probably learn to drive a Zamboni.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  53:25 Oh everybody, that's it.   Michael Hingson  53:34 But that's a that's a lot of fun to, to be able to do the things that they do. And I admire not only hockey, but all all sports people because they hone some skills so well and so much that it makes it a lot of fun. And the reason we really love college football is although is still becoming more of a money thing. Still, college sports tend to be a lot more fun and still somewhat less commercial than professional sports, which makes them a lot more enjoyable. Oh, for   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  54:07 sure. Yeah, for sure. I think it's very fun, especially down in the states to be my son went to the University of Arizona and that was one of the biggest things that he really wanted to participate in was going to the football games. I mean, for him. That was just such an experience to participate in, in college football and be like a fan. He really enjoyed that. That was kind of a i something he'll never forget.   Michael Hingson  54:35 It's a whole different culture being I think a college sports fan than a professional sports fan. Just it's a it's a whole different environment.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  54:44 He really enjoyed it. And he did mentor the basketball games. He really really enjoyed that part of his college experience. So   Michael Hingson  54:50 yeah, even though as I said, we love USC and we enjoy that, you know, just watching the games are a lot more fun. So of course this Here we'll get to see our two major rivalries, it'll be SC against UCLA. And then we'll also be SC against Notre Dame. And, and those are the two big ones that we tend to, to watch. But we're really enjoying college football. And one of the things that we've really seen an eye I've become much more convinced of over time is how much the coach really does impact the team. I mean, look at what's happening at SC this year, they're three in Oh, and they've been playing so poorly in previous years. And I think their coach in the past, just wasn't really ready to be in the same kind of environment that a USC team is, because he's a winning coach. He's gone off elsewhere now, and he's winning. So I think he's found a better niche. And the person who came in to coach, the USC team is doing really well.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  55:57 Well, the gel to the gel of the people with the coach and all that sort of stuff. I mean, there's so much that goes into a team that actually ends up winning and so much, so much of it is more than just the skill. It's the psychological and the mental game that the team has. Yeah, it's huge.   Michael Hingson  56:20 And it's interesting listening to the announcers, talk about what's happening again, at SC this year, how Lincoln Riley the coach is getting all the people on the team to really interact outside the games and, and feel like more of a team. And that's pretty impressive. And in there's a lot to be learned there about teamwork, and the value of what, in a sense, the coach does, and people talk about the quarterback and football being the leader. But in some ways, the coach brings a different dimension to it. And if the coach is doing a good job, then that's going to help the rest of the team, by any definition. For sure, do you get a lot of coaching from people when you write?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  57:03 Oh 100% I always I always attribute because I was an athlete, I always attribute my editors as my coaches, editors are so valuable, like in a good editor is huge. And and I look forward to their comments. And they're, you know, this didn't work for this character isn't quite resonating with me, I think you need to go a little deeper into this or you need to, you need to look at the depth of the emotions with this. I didn't quite get it. And I think oh, okay, I thought that I'd done it. But maybe I haven't, when the reader actually takes the book over when the editor takes the book over. So a good editor is worth an author is so worth it to an author. And it's because, oh, it's huge, huge.   Michael Hingson  57:48 A good editor isn't going to change the book unless it just is horrible. What's the purpose of a good editor is is to help you flesh out the book.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  57:56 Yes. And a good editor. I mean, by the time you get the publication, though, I mean, it's been accepted because it is a book that's got something right or else rejected. So you finally get there. And then you know, but then you still have to work with that editor. And that editor will have some thoughts, but you're 100% correct in saying that a good editor doesn't want to change the book. They just want to make it better.   Michael Hingson  58:24 Yeah. And they've learned how to do that. 100 Yeah, yes. So what kind of tips I love to ask this question, what kind of tips do you have for people who want to write or for other writers?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  58:36 A couple of tips. I would say number one be reader. I think that it's huge. If you know, I've taught lots of courses, and if I get somebody who says oh, I don't like to read, I think how are you going to be a writer like reading is super important. I also think, just write, don't, don't try to edit yourself as you begin to write like, think of your story. You remember what the very, very beginning we talked about story and story is hugely important. So just think about what your story is what it is you want to tell, and how you want to tell it, and who do you want to tell it. And that's that's important too, because the voice of the story is really important. So if you look at it that way, and then you think of story first, and then think of the writing you know, as your as you get the story down, then you can write and then don't be afraid to edit. Don't be afraid to go back over and over and over it and just make it better. Don't think it's done after the first draft. And persistence and perseverance is really important.   Michael Hingson  59:42 Do you when you're writing or once you've written a draft? Do you share it with a cadre of people to get their thoughts and reviews?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  59:52 Yeah, I have depending on what I'm doing, like, if it's a book that I have signed a contract before I've written the book which I I do have some publishers that I work that way with. But recently, I just wrote a thriller novel, which is an adult novel, which hasn't been published yet, was just a COVID experience because I was bored. You know, I was tired of watching Tiger King. All those shows. So I wrote this book, and I needed some guidance with it. So I asked some friends to read it like, you know, and then we would have a zoom call, and I would get their their take on it. You know, did you get this? Did you get that? Did you understand this? Maybe it needed more. So yeah, I will. I will, it depends on the book. Yeah. And what I'm doing? Yeah. So for sure. I think it's a good, I think it's really good advice for new authors is to is to help flush the story 100%. But make sure you're going with people that you trust. Because you don't want to get it. Like if you get bombarded with feedback. And it's conflicting feedback, then that can be really difficult to so you want to get the feed, but you want to go to people you trust. So maybe people that are in a writers group, if they're in like three or four or five people that can work really well.   Michael Hingson  1:01:14 For sure. Yeah, it's important to be able to get input, but be able to sift through it. Because you're right, it can be very overwhelming. And you have to develop a little bit of a thick skin, not because you shouldn't be afraid of criticism, if you will, although people get worried about that. But rather, it's a thicker skin that helps you be able to sift through it and look for the nuggets that each person brings to suggestions that may be valuable for you.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  1:01:47 Yeah, thick skin is super important in this business.   Michael Hingson  1:01:50 Yeah. Always. Always is.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  1:01:53 Yeah. It's a very important part of the business.   Michael Hingson  1:01:56 Well, this has been really fun. We've been doing this now for a little over an hour, and I really appreciate   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  1:02:02 it take my dog to the vet.   Michael Hingson  1:02:03 Oh my gosh. Or is the horse the dog taking you?   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  1:02:08 Well, probably the dog take you home. There   Michael Hingson  1:02:10 you go. What kind of dog? Oh,   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  1:02:12 I brought him home from Mexico. He's a rescue dog. I picked him up as a little puppy off the street. And I brought him home. Oh, nine and a half now though. He's older now. So I've had him for a lot of years. See doing okay. Oh, he's great. He just has to go for his checkup and get his shots and whatever. You know,   Michael Hingson  1:02:27 Alamo my guide dog goes tomorrow we're taking dog and cat to the vet. Alaba is just going to get his shots and a physical and stitch the cat goes in for a pedicure to trim toenails, and so on because they're getting way too long. And it hurts when she grabs a hold of you now, so we're gonna do that. I'm gonna go   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  1:02:47 get their shots, too. So. So anyway, it's been great. This,   Michael Hingson  1:02:51 this has been fun.   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  1:02:53 Yeah, really fun.   Michael Hingson  1:02:54 Well, we should do it some more. And definitely, we could talk about that book if you'd like. But I want to think I want to thank you again for being here. We'll connect by email. Well, we have to do that. And I want to thank everyone. I want to thank you all for listening. We really appreciate you being here. We'd love to hear your comments. Send an email to me. I would love to hear from you, Michaelhi at accessibe A C C E S S I B E.com. Or go to Michael hingson.com/podcast. And you can find contact information there. But also learn a how can people reach out to you they'd like to talk with you or learn more about you. Oh, my   Lorna Schultz Nicholson  1:03:33 email is Lornasn L O R N A S N at TELUS te l u s.net. That one's pretty easy. Yeah,   Michael Hingson  1:03:44 that one is Lorenasn@telus.net.net. Yeah, that's so there you go. If you want to talk to learn a please hit if you don't want to talk to Lorna, email her and tell her you love the podcast anyway. And of course. And of course, we would appreciate you giving us a five star review whoever you are, wherev

The Volume
Hoops Tonight - Jokic unstoppable vs. Blazers, Joel Embiid drops 41, Nets struggle without Durant

The Volume

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 38:46


Jason Timpf reacts to the Denver Nuggets' 122-113 win over Damian Lillard and the Portland Trail Blazers and breaks down how Nikola Jokic so effortlessly had a 36-point triple double. He later discusses Joel Embiid and the Philadelphia 76ers' 120-110 win over Kawhi Leonard and the Los Angeles Clippers. Is Philly a legitimate NBA Finals threat? And what is holding back the Clippers from being one of the NBA's best teams? Lastly, Jason reacts to the Nets' struggles without Kevin Durant. #volume #herdSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Unstoppable Entrepreneur Show
How Damon West Went From Ex-Convict To Living His 1% Life

The Unstoppable Entrepreneur Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 25:08


In today's episode, I invite Damon West on the show to share his story of how he went from being a promising quarterback to becoming dependent on methamphetamines, being sent to jail, and then transforming his life to become a college professor and best-selling author.  On May 18th, 2009, a judge sentenced Damon West to 65 years in a Texas prison. Back then, Damon was known as the Uptown Burglar: the ring leader of a group of addicts responsible for the uptown burglaries. Now he has evolved from being behind bars to being a global inspiration. Also in this episode:  There is no such thing as overnight success Getting up every day and becoming a servant leader The story of the coffee The power of sharing your story and the opportunities to which it can lead Stay Connected With Damon: Facebook | Twitter | Youtube | Instagram | LinkedIn Stay Connected With Kelly:  Follow Kelly on Instagram | LinkedIn | Facebook | Youtube | Kellyroachcoaching.com  Grab one of Kelly's bestselling books: Unstoppable: 9 Principles for Unlimited Success in Business and Life Conviction Marketing Bigger than You: The Entrepreneur's Guide to Building an Unstoppable Team The Live Launch Method

The Next Chapter with Charlie
#266 Jimn Kyles: Unstuck and Unstoppable Pt 1

The Next Chapter with Charlie

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 54:42


Show Notes  You know there are times that all of us just feel “stuck.” Doing the same things over and over again and finding ourselves unable to move forward toward to the life we really want. Our guest today, Jimn Kyles, has written a book intended to give us hope for a new life as well as a very doable strategy to get there. Jimn Kyles is the lead pastor of Anchor Bend Church and author of Unstuck & Unstoppable: Shake Off The Past, Find Your Purpose, Get On With Your Life. The book reached No. 1 status on Amazon's list of new releases. Jimn is also an entrepreneur and real estate investor and has worked with, trained, and coached thousands of leaders across the nation to get unstuck and reach their full potential. LINKS You can learn more about Jimn Kyles at www.jimnkyles.com Check out Jimn's latest book: Unstuck and Unstoppable

More Than A Mother: Personal Growth, Productivity, Trauma Healing, & Self-Care Strategies for Working Moms
Unstoppable: Harnessing Your Inner Power and Becoming Your Best Self in 2023

More Than A Mother: Personal Growth, Productivity, Trauma Healing, & Self-Care Strategies for Working Moms

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 20:52


You've been asking about my theme for 2023 and now I am sharing it and all the details in this video. 2023= 20-20 ME. This is a great time to focus on your dreams and goals and make them a reality. In this video, I'll discuss the steps I'm taking to become the best version of myself possible and how you can do the same. I also share how I am staying motivated and the shift I making to stay on track. This is the year to take control of your life and make it the best it can be. With the right planning and dedication, you can set yourself up for success and make this the year of YOU. The year of me is sounding A LOT like the year of you, so let's do this! Take a listen as I share what I'm doing, and how I'm doing, and inspire you to create a plan and become unstoppable in 2023

Unstuck and Unstoppable
032: David Winston: The Confidence To Be Yourself

Unstuck and Unstoppable

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 28:05


Jim Kyles and David Winston discuss the topic of living an authentic life and the courage needed to reach one's full potential. David is the founder and creator of the Winston Leadership Institute and author of “Authentic: The Confidence to be Yourself, the Courage to Release Your Greatness.” David serves as a pastor at Living Word Christians Center and the international director of Bill Winston Ministries. He explains that it's important to ask who have you been created to be as a means to finding one's purpose in life. He believes that uniqueness is the key to discovering that purpose and that everyone has been created unique. He encourages listeners to have the confidence and courage to be themselves and reach their full potential.   Order your copy of "Unstuck and Unstoppable" here -www.jimnkyles.com Join our email newsletter and received the first three chapters of "Unstuck & Unstoppable" along with three eBooks here - https://pages.jimnkyles.com/newsletter Website- www.jimnkyles.com   Connect with Jimn: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/jimnkyles LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jimnkyles/ Facebook: https://web.facebook.com/jimn.kyles?_rdc=1&_rdr   Connect with David: Website: davidswinston.com winstonleadershipinstitute.com  Twitter: https://twitter.com/davidswinston Facebook: https://web.facebook.com/davidswinston/?_rdc=1&_rdr Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/davidswinston/?hl=en LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/davidswinston Email: booking@davidswinston.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidSWinston         #unstuck #unstoppable #unstuckandunstoppable #unstuckandunstoppablepodcast #jimnkyles  #SelfCare #selfcarematters #SelfCareIsHealthcare #selfcarebook #selfcarefirst #getunstuck #getunstucknow #getunstuckbeunstoppable #leadwell #leadwellservewell#moveyourlifeforward #moveyourlifeforwardnow #moveyourlifeforwardonpurpose #moveforward #moveforwardtogether #moveforwardinfaith #leadership #leadershipdevelopment #leadershipskills

State Of The Lakers
Hoops Tonight - Jokic unstoppable vs. Blazers, Joel Embiid drops 41, Nets struggle without Durant

State Of The Lakers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 38:46


Jason Timpf reacts to the Denver Nuggets' 122-113 win over Damian Lillard and the Portland Trail Blazers and breaks down how Nikola Jokic so effortlessly had a 36-point triple double. He later discusses Joel Embiid and the Philadelphia 76ers' 120-110 win over Kawhi Leonard and the Los Angeles Clippers. Is Philly a legitimate NBA Finals threat? And what is holding back the Clippers from being one of the NBA's best teams? Lastly, Jason reacts to the Nets' struggles without Kevin Durant. #volume #herdSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

In The Den
Tap Into the Power of Your Unstoppable Mindset | In The Den Podcast

In The Den

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 51:19


This week In The Den we have the incredible Sean Michael Crane joining us, and he's sure to rock our world with his inspiring words of growth, leadership, and development. His message is clear: unlock the power of your unstoppable mindset!Be unstoppable in your life. Be unstoppable in your business. Start growing. Start winning. He brings a wealth of mental health and wellness knowledge that will help you break through barriers and make changes now—so you can become better than ever before.Sean Michael Crane is an absolute legend—his story is one of perseverance, strength and resilience. He's seen it all—the ups and downs of life and he knows what it feels like to be on a rollercoaster of emotions. With Sean, you're getting a real deal life coach full of immense experience who can totally relate to what you're going through. Stop settling for superficial influencers, Sean has been tested in real life scenarios and his goal is to help you make your way from the bottom to the top just like he did. You won't want to miss out on this chance to take advantage of Sean Michael Crane's hype-filled motivation and learn how to tap into your inner strength, grow your business, or start the business you always wish you had. Get ready to reach new heights in your life!#lifecoach #leadership #goalsetting #businesscoach #mindset #seanmichaelcrane #prisonofyourown #beunstoppable Learn more about Sean Michael Crane:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sean_michael_crane/?hl=enFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/seanmichaelcranecoaching/Prison Of Your Own: https://a.co/d/6snDOkYKeep up with Bill Rossell: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bill.rossell.3 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/billrossell/ 

The Herd with Colin Cowherd
Hoops Tonight - Jokic unstoppable vs. Blazers, Joel Embiid drops 41, Nets struggle without Durant

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 38:46


Jason Timpf reacts to the Denver Nuggets' 122-113 win over Damian Lillard and the Portland Trail Blazers and breaks down how Nikola Jokic so effortlessly had a 36-point triple double. He later discusses Joel Embiid and the Philadelphia 76ers' 120-110 win over Kawhi Leonard and the Los Angeles Clippers. Is Philly a legitimate NBA Finals threat? And what is holding back the Clippers from being one of the NBA's best teams? Lastly, Jason reacts to the Nets' struggles without Kevin Durant. #volume #herdSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

HerCsuite™ Radio - For Women Leaders On The Move
Building a More Inclusive Culture with Victoria Pelletier, Managing Director, Accenture

HerCsuite™ Radio - For Women Leaders On The Move

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 25:48


How does an authentic leader create an inclusive culture? Find out from featured guest Victoria Pelletier, Managing Director at Accenture. Take a listen to HerCsuite™ Founder and Host Natalie Benamou, MBA (she/hers) and Victoria Pelletier, (she/hers) as they discuss how organizations can Build a More Inclusive Culture. "If we want to build a more inclusive culture where people feel like they belong, are more engaged, and therefore performing at higher levels, then a big part of that is the time we invest around the people in the business. What do we need to do to make that an element that we measure?  What are we doing to create a more inclusive culture? That should absolutely be a measure of performance beyond the widgets or productivity metrics that need to be produced each year."- Victoria Pelletier  3 Ways to Create Flexibility in the Workplace: "There are no schedules only deliverables" Focus on the end result. Communicate commitments and meet client needs. Trust your team to deliver. ERG Best Practices: "Where there is conviction there is capacity." Encourage employees to get involved in things they care about. Volunteers are more likely to help when they are aligned with the mission. Make sure there are enough volunteers to help support the ERG. Victoria Pelletier is a prolific speaker including her program for HerCsuite™ DEI Cross Organization Council.  She shares her personal story and carries so much impact that she leaves her audience breathless and wanting more. By the time Victoria was 24 years old, she was the COO of a multinational corporation. With now 20 plus years in corporate leadership, Victoria's held senior roles in companies such as Accenture, IBM, and American Express. Victoria is a wife, mom, and corporate executive.  Victoria believes: “We can have it all, as long as we have a life of no excuses.” Victoria proves that it is possible to have a life in which women can succeed as a mom, as a corporate executive, as a spouse, and much more. Thank you, Victoria, for this interview, for being a member of HerCsuite™ community and special thanks to HerCsuite™ Alliance Partner Bobbie Carlton from Innovation Women. HerCsuite™ Radio is sponsored by our Turnkey Speaker Programs. Schedule a call to learn more. Find Victoria Pelletier on LinkedIn | Website | Resilient and Unstoppable in 2023 Natalie Benamou can be found LinkedIn | HerCsuite™ LinkedIn | HerPower2 LinkedIn Natalie Benamou MBA, (she, hers) CEO, HerPower2, Inc. , Founder, Chief Growth Officer, HerCsuite™  and  Podcast Host Natalie has accelerated her career to leadership positions in both the marketing industry and non-profits.  She is a rainmaker, achieving a high level of client success generating over $110 million in sales revenues.   Natalie is a leadership expert and sought-out speaker for events and conferences including the Healthcare Businesswomen's Association (HBA) National Conference, HCEA Connect and podcasts like Conscious Millionaire, Brave Women at Work, Go Find Out, What's Your Ask, and Lioness Magazine featured article.  Thank you for listening to the show and shining your light out in the world!  We would be so honored if you subscribe and share this episode with a friend or colleague today.  

The Influencer Podcast
How to Change Your Beliefs and Manage Your Mind with Denise Duffield-Thomas

The Influencer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 50:39


Want to make twice as much money with half the work? If so, today's conversation is for you.   When I first was introduced to Denise, it was through her book "Get Rich, Lucky Bitch!" and it has been a favorite of mine ever since.   Denise is the money mentor for the new wave of online entrepreneurs who want to make money and change the world. She helps women charge premium prices, release the fear of money and create First Class lives.   Today we talk about easy ways to shift your beliefs, and her new book Chill and Prosper: The New Way to Grow Your Business, Make Millions, and Change the World. It's an honor to have Denise on the podcast, and you'll quickly hear why!   READY FOR VISIBILITY GROWTH & SCALING? Step into your next level of visibility and thought leadership. A high-level mentorship experience focused on scaling your business, building a credible brand, and owning a new level of visibility and authority. Apply HERE: https://forms.gle/MjyHAjZUe5WpXiFe6   To order my new best-selling book, Get What You Want: How to Go From Unseen to Unstoppable go to:www.juliesolomon.net/getwhatyouwant  

The Millionaire Mompreneur Project
EP 233: Part 1 - How To Be So Good At What You Do So People NOTICE YOU on Social Media

The Millionaire Mompreneur Project

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 37:31


This one social media growth strategy is something I wished to understand for so long. so I could make more sales.  I invested in so many coaches, and courses, and programs and still never learned this.  If you're ready to level up and not just look the part of an expert in your field but become the expert, you'll love this episode!Learn more about the Money Making Moves Membership: https://www.millionairemompreneur.com/mmm If you enjoyed this episode, please LEAVE A REVIEW and share the podcast so we can inspire other motivated mamas! Alone we are strong but together, we are UNSTOPPABLE.Connect with Jessie on Instagram: @jessieharrisboutonAND/OR say hello in our Facebook Community!Want to learn how how to make $1Million with 1 program in 1 year working less than part-time hours?  Watch this free training showing you exactly how to create, sell and scale your signature high-ticket group coaching program on autopilot without sales calls or being pushy: www.millionairemompreneur.com/7figurecoachsecrets

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 93 – Unstoppable Unexpected Loss

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 61:22


On this special episode today, I am being interviewed by Braden Ricketts to discuss the unexpected loss of my wife Karen. After a long battle with a sore on her back, Karen passed away on November 12, 2022. I wanted to put out an episode dedicated to her memory and all the adventures we had in life together.   As I navigate life without Karen by my side, I am grateful to get to look back on all the lessons we learned from each other and all the amazing accomplishments she had in her life. Karen truly embodied the Unstoppable Mindset, and I am going to continue moving forward with her in my thoughts.   Many of you came to know Karen through our book “Thunder Dog” and saw just how important she was to me. Karen wanted a small celebration of life, but for those of you who would like to pay your respects, I will be holding a zoom call on January 28th, 2023 at 11 am (PST).   I share with Braden how Karen and I first met and fell in love, how I am processing the grief of her loss and the fear that comes along with it, and my final words to Karen. I appreciate Braden being there to support me through this conversation.   Zoom link for Karen's service: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/4158274084?pwd=SHFuSDFaamZtdjZVbEZBNEtjWUk3QT09       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Well, hi there welcome once again to unstoppable mindset where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet and today we are absolutely dealing with unexpected. I'm your host, Mike Hingson. But I'm not doing the interview today. I get to be interviewed, and you'll find out why all that is in just a moment. Our guest interviewer is Braden Ricketts, who is part of the team that helps me in the back deal with podcast editing, and so on. He doesn't mostly do ours, but he's involved with what we do. And I even got him to commit once. And he still hasn't done it yet. But I got him to c