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TMS at the Cricket World Cup
Should the Championship become a franchise competition?

TMS at the Cricket World Cup

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 40:30


Former England captain Kevin Pietersen has caused a stir by suggesting the County Championship is replaced by a red ball franchise competition. Kevin Howells gets reaction from the ECB managing director of County Cricket Neil Snowball. They also discuss whether the T20 Blast is getting the attention it deserves with the emphasis on the Hundred and what lessons are being learnt following the Azeem Rafiq racism revelations.

ESV: Straight through the Bible
May 24: Nehemiah 1–3

ESV: Straight through the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 9:56


Nehemiah 1–3 Nehemiah 1–3 (Listen) Report from Jerusalem 1 The words of Nehemiah the son of Hacaliah. Now it happened in the month of Chislev, in the twentieth year, as I was in Susa the citadel, 2 that Hanani, one of my brothers, came with certain men from Judah. And I asked them concerning the Jews who escaped, who had survived the exile, and concerning Jerusalem. 3 And they said to me, “The remnant there in the province who had survived the exile is in great trouble and shame. The wall of Jerusalem is broken down, and its gates are destroyed by fire.” Nehemiah's Prayer 4 As soon as I heard these words I sat down and wept and mourned for days, and I continued fasting and praying before the God of heaven. 5 And I said, “O LORD God of heaven, the great and awesome God who keeps covenant and steadfast love with those who love him and keep his commandments, 6 let your ear be attentive and your eyes open, to hear the prayer of your servant that I now pray before you day and night for the people of Israel your servants, confessing the sins of the people of Israel, which we have sinned against you. Even I and my father's house have sinned. 7 We have acted very corruptly against you and have not kept the commandments, the statutes, and the rules that you commanded your servant Moses. 8 Remember the word that you commanded your servant Moses, saying, ‘If you are unfaithful, I will scatter you among the peoples, 9 but if you return to me and keep my commandments and do them, though your outcasts are in the uttermost parts of heaven, from there I will gather them and bring them to the place that I have chosen, to make my name dwell there.' 10 They are your servants and your people, whom you have redeemed by your great power and by your strong hand. 11 O Lord, let your ear be attentive to the prayer of your servant, and to the prayer of your servants who delight to fear your name, and give success to your servant today, and grant him mercy in the sight of this man.” Now I was cupbearer to the king. Nehemiah Sent to Judah 2 In the month of Nisan, in the twentieth year of King Artaxerxes, when wine was before him, I took up the wine and gave it to the king. Now I had not been sad in his presence. 2 And the king said to me, “Why is your face sad, seeing you are not sick? This is nothing but sadness of the heart.” Then I was very much afraid. 3 I said to the king, “Let the king live forever! Why should not my face be sad, when the city, the place of my fathers' graves, lies in ruins, and its gates have been destroyed by fire?” 4 Then the king said to me, “What are you requesting?” So I prayed to the God of heaven. 5 And I said to the king, “If it pleases the king, and if your servant has found favor in your sight, that you send me to Judah, to the city of my fathers' graves, that I may rebuild it.” 6 And the king said to me (the queen sitting beside him), “How long will you be gone, and when will you return?” So it pleased the king to send me when I had given him a time. 7 And I said to the king, “If it pleases the king, let letters be given me to the governors of the province Beyond the River, that they may let me pass through until I come to Judah, 8 and a letter to Asaph, the keeper of the king's forest, that he may give me timber to make beams for the gates of the fortress of the temple, and for the wall of the city, and for the house that I shall occupy.” And the king granted me what I asked, for the good hand of my God was upon me. Nehemiah Inspects Jerusalem's Walls 9 Then I came to the governors of the province Beyond the River and gave them the king's letters. Now the king had sent with me officers of the army and horsemen. 10 But when Sanballat the Horonite and Tobiah the Ammonite servant heard this, it displeased them greatly that someone had come to seek the welfare of the people of Israel. 11 So I went to Jerusalem and was there three days. 12 Then I arose in the night, I and a few men with me. And I told no one what my God had put into my heart to do for Jerusalem. There was no animal with me but the one on which I rode. 13 I went out by night by the Valley Gate to the Dragon Spring and to the Dung Gate, and I inspected the walls of Jerusalem that were broken down and its gates that had been destroyed by fire. 14 Then I went on to the Fountain Gate and to the King's Pool, but there was no room for the animal that was under me to pass. 15 Then I went up in the night by the valley and inspected the wall, and I turned back and entered by the Valley Gate, and so returned. 16 And the officials did not know where I had gone or what I was doing, and I had not yet told the Jews, the priests, the nobles, the officials, and the rest who were to do the work. 17 Then I said to them, “You see the trouble we are in, how Jerusalem lies in ruins with its gates burned. Come, let us build the wall of Jerusalem, that we may no longer suffer derision.” 18 And I told them of the hand of my God that had been upon me for good, and also of the words that the king had spoken to me. And they said, “Let us rise up and build.” So they strengthened their hands for the good work. 19 But when Sanballat the Horonite and Tobiah the Ammonite servant and Geshem the Arab heard of it, they jeered at us and despised us and said, “What is this thing that you are doing? Are you rebelling against the king?” 20 Then I replied to them, “The God of heaven will make us prosper, and we his servants will arise and build, but you have no portion or right or claim1 in Jerusalem.” Rebuilding the Wall 3 Then Eliashib the high priest rose up with his brothers the priests, and they built the Sheep Gate. They consecrated it and set its doors. They consecrated it as far as the Tower of the Hundred, as far as the Tower of Hananel. 2 And next to him the men of Jericho built. And next to them2 Zaccur the son of Imri built. 3 The sons of Hassenaah built the Fish Gate. They laid its beams and set its doors, its bolts, and its bars. 4 And next to them Meremoth the son of Uriah, son of Hakkoz repaired. And next to them Meshullam the son of Berechiah, son of Meshezabel repaired. And next to them Zadok the son of Baana repaired. 5 And next to them the Tekoites repaired, but their nobles would not stoop to serve their Lord.3 6 Joiada the son of Paseah and Meshullam the son of Besodeiah repaired the Gate of Yeshanah.4 They laid its beams and set its doors, its bolts, and its bars. 7 And next to them repaired Melatiah the Gibeonite and Jadon the Meronothite, the men of Gibeon and of Mizpah, the seat of the governor of the province Beyond the River. 8 Next to them Uzziel the son of Harhaiah, goldsmiths, repaired. Next to him Hananiah, one of the perfumers, repaired, and they restored Jerusalem as far as the Broad Wall. 9 Next to them Rephaiah the son of Hur, ruler of half the district of5 Jerusalem, repaired. 10 Next to them Jedaiah the son of Harumaph repaired opposite his house. And next to him Hattush the son of Hashabneiah repaired. 11 Malchijah the son of Harim and Hasshub the son of Pahath-moab repaired another section and the Tower of the Ovens. 12 Next to him Shallum the son of Hallohesh, ruler of half the district of Jerusalem, repaired, he and his daughters. 13 Hanun and the inhabitants of Zanoah repaired the Valley Gate. They rebuilt it and set its doors, its bolts, and its bars, and repaired a thousand cubits6 of the wall, as far as the Dung Gate. 14 Malchijah the son of Rechab, ruler of the district of Beth-haccherem, repaired the Dung Gate. He rebuilt it and set its doors, its bolts, and its bars. 15 And Shallum the son of Col-hozeh, ruler of the district of Mizpah, repaired the Fountain Gate. He rebuilt it and covered it and set its doors, its bolts, and its bars. And he built the wall of the Pool of Shelah of the king's garden, as far as the stairs that go down from the city of David. 16 After him Nehemiah the son of Azbuk, ruler of half the district of Beth-zur, repaired to a point opposite the tombs of David, as far as the artificial pool, and as far as the house of the mighty men. 17 After him the Levites repaired: Rehum the son of Bani. Next to him Hashabiah, ruler of half the district of Keilah, repaired for his district. 18 After him their brothers repaired: Bavvai the son of Henadad, ruler of half the district of Keilah. 19 Next to him Ezer the son of Jeshua, ruler of Mizpah, repaired another section opposite the ascent to the armory at the buttress.7 20 After him Baruch the son of Zabbai repaired8 another section from the buttress to the door of the house of Eliashib the high priest. 21 After him Meremoth the son of Uriah, son of Hakkoz repaired another section from the door of the house of Eliashib to the end of the house of Eliashib. 22 After him the priests, the men of the surrounding area, repaired. 23 After them Benjamin and Hasshub repaired opposite their house. After them Azariah the son of Maaseiah, son of Ananiah repaired beside his own house. 24 After him Binnui the son of Henadad repaired another section, from the house of Azariah to the buttress and to the corner. 25 Palal the son of Uzai repaired opposite the buttress and the tower projecting from the upper house of the king at the court of the guard. After him Pedaiah the son of Parosh 26 and the temple servants living on Ophel repaired to a point opposite the Water Gate on the east and the projecting tower. 27 After him the Tekoites repaired another section opposite the great projecting tower as far as the wall of Ophel. 28 Above the Horse Gate the priests repaired, each one opposite his own house. 29 After them Zadok the son of Immer repaired opposite his own house. After him Shemaiah the son of Shecaniah, the keeper of the East Gate, repaired. 30 After him Hananiah the son of Shelemiah and Hanun the sixth son of Zalaph repaired another section. After him Meshullam the son of Berechiah repaired opposite his chamber. 31 After him Malchijah, one of the goldsmiths, repaired as far as the house of the temple servants and of the merchants, opposite the Muster Gate,9 and to the upper chamber of the corner. 32 And between the upper chamber of the corner and the Sheep Gate the goldsmiths and the merchants repaired. Footnotes [1] 2:20 Or memorial [2] 3:2 Hebrew him [3] 3:5 Or lords [4] 3:6 Or of the old city [5] 3:9 Or foreman of half the portion assigned to; also verses 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 [6] 3:13 A cubit was about 18 inches or 45 centimeters [7] 3:19 Or corner; also verses 20, 24, 25 [8] 3:20 Some manuscripts vigorously repaired [9] 3:31 Or Hammiphkad Gate (ESV)

Lehto's Law
Men Busted for Rolling More than a Hundred Odometers

Lehto's Law

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 13:03


Yes, it's still against the law to do that. www.patreon.com/stevelehto

OMG Julia!
C. S. E. Cooney Talks Saint Death's Daughter (Part 2)

OMG Julia!

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 43:37


This is part two of my interview with C. S. E. Cooney about her publishing journey for Saint Death’s Daughter, featuring questions from my patrons. You can listen, or read the transcript below, and in case you missed it, part 1 of this interview is here! If you have not already devoured Saint Death’s Daughter in one day, like I did, I encourage you to check it out! It’s available as a printed book, an ebook, and an audiobook, and Claire does her own narration for the audio version!JuliaWelcome to the OMG Julia Podcast, where we talk about creative lives and processes. This is part 2 of my interview with C. S. E. Cooney about her journey to publication with Saint Death’s Daughter. We’re picking up this conversation after Claire told us about how she loves to read her first drafts aloud. JuliaI love that about you! I love working with you, because I've done work at the same time and place as you, and even if I'm not super productive during those times, I always love hearing what you've come up with. Because I feel like I've gotten a lot out of just talking through plots with you, even if I haven't been writing. ClaireI Do. I Love that part. Yeah.JuliaBecause I think that writing is a lot of different things, and some of that is getting the words actually down on the page, but some of it is actually just being in a place where you can think through story structure, and what is actually happening. And one thing that I've learned about myself over years and years and years of basically feeling like I must be broken because I don't write x words every day… Which, there is so much advice out there that's like, “You're not a writer if you don't write every single day.” And I don't. I don't write every single day. ClaireYeah, it's so harmful. Oh my gosh.JuliaI have to have a long period of time usually before any project where I just kind of like think about it. And now that I've learned that this is how I work, it really has made a huge difference for me. Because I know that if someone has asked me to write a story for an anthology or something, I can tell myself very clearly, “You know we have to write a story for this anthology. So, let's start thinking about that.” And then I go about my business doing other things, but I'll be working through the problem in the back of my mind. And I will do research and I'll do other things, but the whole time, what I'm really doing is the hard brain work of invisibly creating something inside my head that I don't even necessarily really fully understand until I actually start writing. And I won't be ready to start writing until it's ready.ClaireI feel like I do that process, but I do it in drafts rather than in my brain first. But I draft a lot, like 4 to 8 drafts sometimes, so it's like I write before I even know what I want to write, before sometimes I have an idea. And that makes a whole draft before my draft starts, but sometimes it's just like this vague, you know, itch. Or a character, or even like a feeling between two characters. Like, what is that? How do you make that? Like, I wanted to write a theater story and I knew what the theater troupe did. And I kind of knew the world they did it in but I didn't have characters you know like the troupe was almost like an entity but somebody still has to tell the story. There has to actually be a plot. And these elements of this theater troupe that does this thing in a world that does this thing… those were like the tensions grinding against each other. So I had the 2 major tensions, but what are the pieces at play within those tensions? And I didn't know that until I started, you know, wrote the first line, which came out of nowhere.JuliaRight? yeah.ClaireAnd then I figured my way through from there. But it's funny how much you can do with 2 grinding tensions. JuliaI mean, yes, as the actress said to the bishop. You can count on me for that 12-year-old humor. ClaireLOL. Anytime, Julia Rios.JuliaNo, but I find that for me, I used to be the kind of person who writes a zero draft that's not a first draft. It's the draft where I try to tell myself what I'm even writing, and it's a giant mess and completely often unsalvageable. So I have many, many old stories languishing on hard drives that are just like a complete mess. It doesn't do anything for me, and many of them are such a mess that I've never come back to them. It's like, it's not worth it. Now that I know that I kind of have to do this percolating thing, my drafts come out a lot cleaner. Which isn't to say that I don't end up having to change them and edit them. I do! It's just that my rate of unsalvageable muck is lower.ClaireThat's cool. You can actually work on it because you're not shuddering away from it.JuliaAnd because there's something to work on. I literally, because I tried to do NaNoWriMo many years, and I had so many attempts at it that just came out as just a mess. Not a mess that you're like, “Oh, this could turn into a good story!” Just like, what is even happening here? No one knows.ClaireHave you over have you ever tried to do a NaNoWriMo where you've spent all year thinking and prepping for it the way you do for a short story for an anthology?JuliaI think, yes, I have, and that's probably the one that came the closest to actually being decent. This was many years ago, though, and I say close to being decent, by which I mean, like, had a full story arc. And I don't think I finished the word count during NaNoWriMo. I definitely didn't finish the novel during NaNoWriMo, but I had been thinking about it a lot before I started it, and I did do a big chunk of it during NaNoWriMo. I don't remember if I did 50,000 words or if those 50,000 words ended up staying. I think I still have that saved somewhere, possibly in a Google drive. But it's the kind of thing that also it was so long ago. I haven't attempted NaNoWriMo in many years because I finally figured out that like, hey, you know what? Trying to push myself in that particular way isn't actually productive for me. ClaireYeah, that's what Ellen Kushner once called the cult of word count, which, I have to say, I mean, all these years later: Saint Death's Daughter! But it is not really the story I wrote in NaNoWriMo, though there are many elements… Like, you could see the origins there. JuliaI don't think it's a cult of word count. I think that it's a really useful tool for some people. I think it depends a lot on what kind of writer you are. ClaireYeah, I always wanted to do it again.JuliaI know people for whom they have a great time and they come out of it with something that they enjoy. And I know several self publishers who, like, a lot of the people who really are successful in self publishing can just crank out stuff and they are very prolific. They have an idea of what they want to do and they just sit down and do it, and they do that over and over again. And if you're really fast, doing something with a bunch of other people and knowing that everybody's doing it at the same time can be a very powerful tool.ClaireI've always wanted to do it again, and I never have, and I wonder why. It was like that 1 year in Chicago, and, I mean, I was commuting an hour both ways to the bookstore that I worked at. I'd come home and I remember that I would read a chapter of Jane Eyre (which I've read an umpteenth billion times) right before writing, because I couldn't get started without having read something, but I couldn't read something that I would get into too much, because I didn't want to lose all my time to reading something that I found super fascinating, but it had to be really good. Because it had to feed the writing itself. So Jane Eyre was the book of choice, and I would set a timer. I'd read for a half hour, and then I would try to do 2,000 words, and it was really interesting, and it created a lot of cool things. And I feel like I was like, “This is cool. This works.” If I did that every month, oh boy. What a writer I would be! And it made it feel possible to to be that kind of writer, and yet I've never been able to duplicate it.JuliaWell, the other thing I wonder is, for you, if that isn't the kind of thing that you can sometimes do in a sprint, but can't do in a marathon setting. And often when you're writing as a career, you're doing a writing marathon. You're not doing a writing sprint.ClaireYeah. Yeah, maybe I'll do it this year, though who knows? It would be cool. You know, it'd be cool if I wrote the next two drafts of Miscellaneous Stones —sorry, of Saint Death's Daughter. I still do call it by its old title, or just by her name, really— if I did both drafts as NaNoWriMo to start with, to give myself, like, starting time motivation. You know, like, here's the seed… and maybe if I start out with 50,000 words and I don't give myself 12 years, it won't turn into almost. 200,000 words. Maybe I could just kind of keep it in… But, you know, usually a second draft doubles. So like 100,000 words is not bad for a novel, you know. We could maybe keep it at that that.JuliaSo you mentioned NaNoWriMo, and you said that this is what came out of it. Was this actually your NaNoWriMo novel?ClaireIt was, but it wasn't the beginning. The beginning is further back than that, though I often count the first draft of Saint Death's Daughter as the NaNoWriMo. I think it was 2006. But, before that, was a short story in Phyllis Eisenstein's science fiction class at Columbia College, where there was the idea of a girl raised in a family of assassins. But it was a sci-fi story, and the butler was not a housekeeper, and it was not undead. It was a robot, a robot butler named Graves. So, before that, though… Several years before that, either I was just in college or just before college, my friend Kiri took me out shooting in the Arizona desert. We were both raised in Arizona. She said, “You're going to be a writer. At some point you probably will have to write about guns, so you should definitely shoot a gun sometime during your life, and I want to be the one to take you to shoot a gun.” So we went out to the desert to shoot guns, and we had noise canceling headphones and everything, but either mine weren't working or my ears are very sensitive or bullets are just that loud, but it was so loud that after the first shot I was getting heart palpitations and my hands were sweaty because I didn't want to hear that sound again. I was like, “Oh gosh, if this had a silencer on it I'd be a badass assassin, but it doesn't and I'm afraid of the sound. Wouldn't it be interesting if there was a character who was supposed to be an assassin, but was allergic to violence?”That was the idea, and I remember when it happened, and it didn't show up in a short story for several years, and it didn't turn into a NaNoWrio novel. But the idea has always been appealing, especially throughout all the media and books I've read, and still am reading, where violence is such a problem solving tool on a micro and macro scale. There are so many TV shows where, if you don't agree with someone, you punch them in the face, which is not how my life works at all. And then like on an epic fantasy scale, if you don't agree with someone, you invade their country and you kill all of their orcs or whatever, you know? And I just thought like what if she doesn't have that option? What else can we do if you don't have that option? How many workarounds does somebody have to figure out in their life? In a world like ours that's full of violence, but you're incapable of it? Not that you don't want to sometimes, but that even wanting punishes you?I mean, I still think it's an interesting idea. Thank goodness, because it's still enough of an idea to create two more books out of, I think. And then trying to turn it and look at it from a different point of view. What does violence mean? What does history mean? What is, like, not only the violence of a physical violence, but the violence of your own history? The lies and the biases and the prejudices you've been told? The violence of your own education? How seeing the world and growing a little older and thinking about things differently, and learning another language changes your mind, you know? So, I mean, I still think that's interesting. JuliaYeah, I mean I think it's very interesting. I think that you really do dive into a lot of those questions, and it's very cool to see Miscellaneous Stones exploring them.Yeah, I think this leads into… This is a good place to dig into a question from Francesca Forrest.ClaireOh, I Love her!JuliaThat's because she's delightful! So, she says, “I know Claire's journey with this novel is very long. I'd love to hear what the most important differences are between the novel now and the novel she started so long ago, and which things have remained the same or very similar over all the years.”ClaireThe first novel, that was 50,000 words almost exactly, was very cheeky. It's very lighthearted, and the violence is cartoonish, and the consequences are surface. It's as funny as I could have made it at the time, which isn't very. But what has happened since then? Well, many things. Many drafts, many years, and also Carlos. And one of the wonderful things about Carlos—so he caught me at about draft four, so he's been with it for more than half the book, more than half of the drafts. It was about eight full drafts till it hit the agent and went on submission, and then a couple more drafts from the editor. So, Carlos did many, many things for me, but the three things that stand out are:The child, DatuThe father, Mac The Scratches, the Scratch family So, in the original, the child, Datu, is like one of those anime 6-year-old genius serial killers. Do you know what I mean? Like, cold stone killer, acrobatics, dance on the edge of a leaf. Really funny and witty, but also six years old. And he was like, “She's a child. She's six years old. She may have been trained. You know, like, you see children gymnasts who are capable of amazing things, or children Broadway performers, or child actors who've won the Academy Award, and they are amazing. They're still children, and that level of savant genius has a toll, generally.” He kept being dissatisfied. He's like, “We've seen cartoon death child already. Like, what else have you got?” So, I think Datu’s really different.Mac, the father, really different. Because he's one of the only nurturing, moral male characters in the in the novel. And I think Carlos was just like, You know, give me more than brooding male / potential love interest.” Earlier drafts, he definitely was Lanie's love interest, and I've moved far away from that. Because it is more interesting. Satisfying romantically is one thing, and what I kind of like to read and am inclined to write. But what is more intellectually and emotionally interesting now is different. And he's like, “I don't think if one's sister has enslaved a man, got her child upon him, abused him in many ways, that it's very likely that that man will end up falling in love with you, unless it's super traumatic and ugly, you know?” Like, he was just so repulsed by it in a way that was so different from every romance novel ever that takes a damaged man and puts it with your protagonist and by the end he's not as damaged because love has saved him, or whatever. Like all of those tropes that I grew up with. So he kept saying that. He kept being dissatisfied. And, you know, his best friend Maggie once told me, “You have too high of an opinion of his high opinion.” But the truth is I do want his high opinion so badly, and it tells me something when I can make him cry or laugh. Like, it's working. That's what I want. And when I make him make a certain face like, this just isn't right! This doesn't feel good. “Give me something. Mac has to be better than that. You have to make him better.”So he really turned into, in many ways, a moral center. He's wrong sometimes. But he thinks about it, comes back, and says, “I was wrong about that.” You know, he's actually capable of growth. He has such an interesting internal life. And he and Lanie become like brother and sister, true brother and sister almost in spite of everything that happened to them. Consciously, to make this decision to be family, that’s something that is a huge difference from brooding man who turns into a falcon, totally damaged, awesome, scarred, so hot, ends up being the love interest that lightheartedly, coyly flirts with you at the end sort of thing. I still have that Mac inside of me, but he doesn't fit anywhere in the future of Lanie Stones. What does fit in is an increasingly interesting intimate. Not sibling the way she and her sister are siblings, but like, will be there for you if you need me. Always, and in both physical and spiritual ways. And then, the Scratches… There's like the huge major villain, which is the Blackbird Bride, which, I actually am a little in love with her, and I feel deep pity for her. But she's also, like, she just needs to be shaken some sense into, and she's not capable of being shaken sense into. She was not born that way. But the Scratches are the villains on the ground, or at least the antagonists. They are definitely working against the Stoneses, for reasons that are both apparent and mysterious. There's the front reason, like, you owe us money. And then there's the deep-seated, like, your family versus my family a hundred years ago, feudal reasons.But the nature of the scratches… They were very much like cartoon villains, and in the first draft, by the end, Lanie had turned them into like neon colored bunny rabbits. That was what her magic did. They ended up being a bunch of neon bunny rabbits that she sold to a circus or something like that. That was that story. It is not that story anymore. There's no magic that turns anybody into neon colored bunny rabbits, and there are severe consequences to the Scratches doing things the way they do. Which is, you know, sometimes with violence, and sometimes with arrogance, or with coldness, or with an uncompromising vision. And not everybody survives that.And the Scratches, once they have enough power to do so, change their name back to their true name, and they start to live by their own standards. They'd been sort of subsuming themselves for so many years, but like the nature of of culture and language again like they kind of represent a lot of that and they are very reasonable and and yet have been part of a people who have been very oppressed and downtrodden for. Hundred years so like there's a there's like they occupy a whole different space. So I would say those are the 3 and I blame Carlos for all of them but also just like living in the world a little longer than 27 years Ah also helped.JuliaYeah, I mean, I'll say one thing that I noticed a lot, reading the final version versus the the draft that I read so many years ago… because I think it was probably ten years ago that I read a draft of this. ClaireYeah.JuliaFor me, some of the things that stood out were just how much more real a lot of the world felt. And I don't mean like I could imagine being there, because I feel like you always have drawn worlds that I could imagine being in. They're very vivid. And your writing voice tends to draw people in that way. So it's normal to think, “Oh, I'm reading something by C. S. E. Cooney and I feel like I could just walk into this world.”But the realness was more of this sort of like… The sense that all of this frivolity was happening in the harmony and contrast with oppression and suffering and what those things specifically meant and how they tied into each other and fed each other on multiple axes. And I don't know if part of that is just your deepening life experience or part of that is having feedback from different people. But I think, like, you were talking about the character of Mac, and how he changed from being just like a hot scarred hawk guy and into someone who has become in a lot of ways a moral center, and I think that I noticed that with Goody Graves as well. ClaireYeah.JuliaIn the draft that I remember first reading, Goody Graves was just sort of like a loyal retainer who was always there and liked Lanie. And that's great and cool, and it's also you know, unexpected that your loyal retainer is going to be an undead, stone, statue person. But in this draft you you learn a lot more about who she is and her backstory and what she is capable of doing or not doing, and it makes it feel that much more real and rich because you have a lot more — there's a lot more to chew on, I guess.ClaireYeah, Amal said when she read it —this will always stay with me, “It’s like I can see your stretch marks.” You know like she's read so much, like you, I feel like she can see all the layers. I don't think she ever read an earlier draft. And I'm very aware of the draft you read, because you were the one who gave me the language of the many gendered god of fire, and I remember changing that because of how you were very gently like, “I don't think we use those words anymore.” And then I started thinking about gender in a different way, because, at some point in our lives, we have to start. You know like if you don't know something, there's a point where you learn it, and that was the point where I learned like, oh, a fire god, a many-gendered god of fire makes it much more interesting and open and like less like, “Oh, I don't want to touch that…” You know, like, you gave me my god of fire, Julia.JuliaOh, that's so nice! I love the way that worked out, by the way. And I really love that the inn that she sort of ends up working at has a history of having been a brothel at one point, and it's still actually there and informs the present of it today. And I love the character that's clearly Patty Templeton.ClaireDread! Yes, I want to write the novella that's mentioned in the footnote about Havoc Dreadnought. Havoc: the life and times of Havoc Dreadnoought, and how she… like there's a huge footnote about it, and yeah, I want that to be the title of a novella someday. JuliaI guarantee you you will have a built-in readership for that.ClaireYeah, I love the school. So there's an inn, and on top of the inn is a bakery, and on top of the bakery is a school, and the the school part had been a brothel, but they leave a lot of the brothel trappings to sort of, the footnote says, to lure people into higher education. To lure the unsuspecting into higher education. I feel like some of the cheekiness of the first draft, when I really just wanted to be Terry Pratchett and failed constantly. I'd lost a lot of the humor in many of the drafts to come, and then I just missed it so much that, very late in the drafting process… There was so much world-building and backstory that I wanted that didn't fit into the narrative flow, and so many jokes that I wanted to make that delighted me, so that's when the footnotes happened.I was like, I have to cut all this, ooh, but I could put it in a footnote and then make it even funnier! So that's what I did and I feel like Jasper Fforde, Terry Pratchett Susannah Clarke, you know, I think they sort of give you permission to do footnotes.And when I was younger, if a story had footnotes in it, I would actually not read them. It just didn't occur to me to do so. And I feel like if a younger person, or somebody who hates footnotes, read Saint Death’s Daughter through, they'd still get it without having to read the footnotes, but the footnotes are the parts that made me laugh out loud. And I don't easily respond to my own writing like that. But some of the footnotes still make me laugh.And I have to say that's what Carlos says. When he's writing, if he can make himself laugh out loud, he knows it's working, because it's like tickling yourself. It's a lot harder to do.JuliaYeah, I 100% agree with that. Okay, so last Patron question is, “I would love to find out what it was like finding an agent and how your agent helps you in your career.”ClaireOkay, yeah, it's so hard. I thought when I was first setting out to find an agent, I'm like, “I'm going to submit to an agent a day. No, five agents a day!” It's a numbers game —everybody says it's a numbers game— if you can get to a hundred submissions, your chances are so much higher than if you do ten submissions, but so is dating, they say. I don't know how similar or dissimilar they are, but what I found when I was submitting….First of all, it's sort of like the cover letter and the synopsis takes a lot of eyes and brains. You definitely want to get some friends on it, especially friends who've already gone through the process. For doing the synopsis, if you have three friends who've read your book, basically what I ask them is, “Could each of you write your version of a synopsis of my book and send it to me?” My friend Caitlyn is really good at that. So I think Carlos maybe did, and Caitlyn did, and I had my synopsis. And Caitlyn's really good at making my book sound like something somebody would want to read. I wrote a very stilted like, “And then, she very formally did this thing in an elucidating sort of way, and you know there was a villain…” or whatever. It just was very stiff, and she'd be like, “Kapow! Kablam! Exclamation point!” I mean it all felt like an exclamation point. It felt like an actual back of a book, and by reading her synopsis, I saw what was important or what stood out, or like, “Oh that's what it feels like to write a compelling synopsis. I think she left a few important things out which I will slip in and try to do it more in her style…” And then again if you have a third view, it's even better because then you can have a pretty hefty, true to the story synopsis in a way that you, as a writer, may be too close to write initially. So I say cover letter, synopsis… And cover letter is much like a cover letter for a submission for a short story, where you give your credits. So you have to make yourself look like you're worth reading the first chapter of, I guess. Which doesn't necessarily mean that you have to have a bunch of credits to your name, but you just have to, I guess, be confident, or know who you are, or at least be polite and professional. So anyway. All of that to say that I set out with this very what Caitlyn calls Big Book Energy. You know, I'm going to do all of this because it's a numbers game! And I found that like after submitting one, I had this terrible headache. My stomach was a mess. I had to go lay down, and the whole day was shot, and I was like damn it this is not how you win a numbers game! But I couldn't, emotionally, make myself do more than one a day, very rarely more than one a week, so it was a very, for me, slow process. I Still don't know, if I have to do it again, how would I do it. Because it would just… I'd hope I'd be tougher now. And I'd hope I'd make better lists and do things better, but actually I think it will always be hard, and it's what mood people are in how overwhelmed they are, how much they might like the thing that you're writing. And, boy, like books are so personal and so intimate. So I would say that I sent it out to a lot of people. I got very few responses. Some of the responses I got quick were just, “This is not for me. Didn't catch my interest.” And you try to think, “Ah, I didn't catch their interest. I am boring. Nobody loves me.” Eventually, I got a great response from one of the submission editors at New Leaf, I think they're called. I loved every single agent bio that I read, I loved their mission statement, I was like, “Oh, these people! I want these people to read my book and love me!” And it got to the submissions editor or agent, the one who reads things before they send it up to the main agent, like kind of to get you past the slush pile, and she just wrote back with such enthusiasm! And she's like, “I'm going to set it up to my boss right away!”Even just that stage, even to get any kind of feedback of that tone of voice that I'd been waiting for… I want the people who represent me to have that tone of voice! And it did get passed up to her agent, and I think she even was reading it, but I think she had a baby and a lot of things.And in that interim, when she was reading it and having a baby and life was happening, Markus Hoffmann at Regal Hoffmann & Associates also read it. And he was a suggestion of a writing friend, who said, “This is my agent. I really like him. just tell him I sent you.” So that was a kind of a Who You Know moment. It was Audrey Niffenegger, who I had met once at Columbia College Chicago. We were on a panel together. She had been a teacher there and I had been a student. She wrote The Time Traveler's Wife. So we were Facebook friends, but we had had literally no interaction since that one panel we were on, where we were on a panel but didn't really talk to each other, we just talked with each other. And she saw on Facebook when I was like, “Oh, this agent quest, it's such a slog.” You know, how one does when one's on an agent quest. She private messaged me and she said, “Try Regal Hoffman. I didn't know you didn't have an agent.” You know, like, tell him I sent you… So Marcus got back to me and he wrote an email. He said, “I quite like the first 50 pages. May I see the rest?” And then he wrote an email saying, “I would love to talk to you to tell you about this agency.” When I talked to him, I just loved him immediately. He said all the right things, and in such a tone of voice, very European. He's German, and just gentle and warm and really incisive, and had great questions, and… It's like that kind of person you want on your team, that he'll be the editor before your editor gets to you. He'll be the editor who makes the draft that makes the the publication happen. So just on all of those levels, I really clicked. So I wrote to the people at New Leaf, who still had my manuscript. I was like, “I'm sorry, I'm going with another agency.” And that agent had just read it and said, “Oh, I just finished it! I was about to write to you.” So I feel this very warm radiant feeling toward New Leaf, and I think I feel like if I had gone a little further in the process, maybe would have not been so emotionally wrecked by it, I would have gotten better at it. I would have gotten a tighter and tighter synopsis and cover letter. You know, it might have taken 50 or 100 more, but I think eventually it would have happened. That it happened this fast, I think, was due to the shortcuts of going to conventions, being on panels, that whole networking web that happens that you think will never happen that it's really hard to make happen on purpose. But Gene Wolfe once told me, “You know, all networking means is making friends.” And you don't really make friends with this cold eye of calculation of what your friends will do for you someday, you just sort of make friends who all love the things you love writing and reading, you know, and then sometimes somebody knows somebody who knows somebody, and that's one way to do it. But I think the other way also works. It just takes longer and has a toll. So I would say, working with my agent is amazing. I sometimes like think of him as like a ninja elven prince. Yeah, that's the space in my brain he occupies. He's sly, he likes things like talking up my book, and making deals, and like, going to parties. Things that I don't really know how to do, and don't really want to know how to do. he has people who do the contracts like, “Markus, can you look at this contract because it's scary?” And then he'll look at it, and he does things that I can't. I don't have the tool set, and I'm so, so grateful. And as Carlos and I have done some collaborative projects, It's been really fun, because Carlos's agent is DongWon Song and mine is Markus Hoffmann, but they used to almost work together at one point. They knew each other! And they met at a house party at our house, and they're like, “What are you doing here?” So they get to work together sometimes on mutual contracts and it's really nice that they already had a kind of warm, friendly relationship.JuliaOh, that is nice. So how long would you say it took from the time you started sending queries out until the time you ended up with an agent?ClaireIt's it's really hard to say because, like at one point I had sent it to an agent and he suggested these edits, so that took me six months to make the edits and turn it back in. He suggested more edits, and at that point, I thought, “Ooh. I liked the first round of edits a lot, but the second set of edits sounds like the book he wants is not the book I want to write.” And so I gently backed away very amicably and then started submitting again.And then there maybe comes a time where it's like, “Oh, I can't believe I ever thought that draft was worth submitting. I think I need to just sit down and rework it.” You know? So it was a lot of stops and starts, and it was years. I think I started submitting it at the fourth draft and it wasn't until like draft eight that it got an agent. That's at least a draft a year, so I would say maybe four years for that one. Some people don't ever start submitting until they are totally sure they're done. Me, I'm like totally sure I'm done after my first draft, and then two weeks later I'm like, “What was I thinking?” And you know then twelve years later it's ready…JuliaOkay, well thank you so much for talking to me about this. We didn't talk about your career as an Audiobook narrator at all, which is a sort of a separate thing from your writing career. Except for when you narrate your own books. ClaireYes, thank goodness.JuliaAnd so I want to close this out by asking how was the experience of narrating this novel as a narrator who is also the writer of the book? Did you always know it was going to be you? Did you really want it to be you? And what was the whole experience like?ClaireThat's a great question, and it has a complicated answer, so forgive me beforehand. So, if I could have gotten a world class, phenomenal, powerful narrator like one of the ones I listen to all the time, like Kate Reading, for example. Or who's the really famous one? Simon Vance. You know, somebody of that caliber. Then I would totally have wanted somebody else to narrate my audiobook. But most narrators are like me, where we're pretty good. We make a living, or we would make a living if we lived in a small town and had two roommates. But since I'm married to Carlos, you know, I make a living as far as I'm concerned, but not like a New York City living. Anyway, so if somebody is just going to be very good, and I know I'm pretty good, and I know how to pronounce all my made up words. So that part of my narrating writing brain is like, “I should probably do it unless they get somebody extraordinary.” Which sounds… I don't know how it sounds, but that's how my brain works. Now, Carlos, and my mother, and a couple people who love me very much have agitated strongly from the beginning that no matter if they got Kate Reading or Simon Vance, I should still be the one to narrate it, which I fight against because there's a part of me that is not arrogant enough to think that that my text couldn't be improved upon by somebody else. I would be eager to listen to a different interpretation. It's easier to listen to somebody else's voice than my own, even though I like my voice just fine. All of that to say, when we made this deal, Rebellion seemed very excited. They like having authors narrate their own work and that had been kind of a handshake agreement. And earlier this year, as we're getting closer to publication, it ran into some snags. Like, it's pretty expensive to hire a US narrator. They have people in-house. They have deals going on. So it was almost that I couldn't narrate it and they had some pretty good narrators lined up, and I was like, “Okay, well just make sure that they call me so I can give them the pronunciations of the words I made up.”But I was unhappy, I think, in that moment because I had been looking forward to it. for two years I'd sort of had it in my head I was going to do it. I'd been prepping for it, and so that felt like a little like, “Oh it's not going to happen. Okay.” And I had to readjust my thinking.But over the pandemic, instead of commuting to Connecticut to do my studio recording for Tantor Audio, they have a working relationship with a small studio that's just three miles from me, which I can walk to. Three miles is a big difference from a three hour commute to Connecticut and staying overnight for three or four days, which is what I'd been doing for the two or three years since I'd moved here before the pandemic. So I told my agent and Rebellion. I was like, “Well, there's this little studio I work with. They do all this amazing professional production work for all of these different companies. Here are their rates. Here's their email. Maybe we could work something out.”And the next thing I knew, they're like, “Okay, you're recording next week.”So whatever they worked out, whatever my agent did, and whatever all of the powers that be… Because of the pandemic, and because of this relationship, and maybe because I wrote the right email at the right time, all of this worked out so that I could I could actually record my audiobook. So it was a bit of a roller coaster right at the end, and it was right up at the edge of time of when we could record it to have it out concurrently with the book. All of which to say that I didn't have as much prep time as I had wanted, and yet I have been prepping for twelve years at this point.I wanted to make every day in the studio more than usually special. I really wanted to say this is the end of a very long journey of many drafts and many despairs and a lot of leveling up. And yet it felt like another day. If I didn't pay super close attention, it would just be another grinding week at the studio, and I didn't want that. So every day I dressed up to match the section of the book that I was going to be recording. I wore like a different little perfume that had a note of citrus in it because citrus is the smell of necromancy in my book, and I wore a piece of jewelry that usually a friend or a loved one had given me that had to do with the book. I really tried to make it not just a recording, but a celebration of a decade and a half of work. And it was a blessing, in that sense, to record my work, and to look at it in its final form, and to say, “Ah, well, this was a thing, and this is what that thing looks like, and now it's in my mouth, and it's for you in your ears for all of posterity.” And that's something, because you know we still listen to W. B. Yeats at the beginning of the twentieth century reading his work in his own voice. There are probably better actors to read his work, but it is something to have his poems and his own voice. And so now we have this work in my voice, and I feel that in this human pageant, it's something that is super special. Very pleased.JuliaI think it's great. I loved it, and I think you're a wonderful narrator. I think you're not giving yourself enough credit.ClaireOh, but not British, Julia!JuliaWell, no, you're not British, but you are someone with a huge background in theater, and training, and also a large amount of experience at this point in narration, and you know your stories better than anyone, because you did spend all of your twelve years refining this particular book.ClaireThat's what Carlos says, so you and Carlos… if you and Carlos say it, I know that you're both more right than I am because I trust your brains.JuliaI thought it was a wonderful experience listening to you read it, and if you're listening to this podcast and you like listening to things, go ahead and pick up the audiobook of Saint Death's Daughter, because it is really wonderful. If you like to read things on the page, the text is also there for you, and that is also wonderful. But if you like listening to Claire's voice, get that audiobook. Thank you Claire and, thank you so much for taking all of this time to talk to us and answer all of our questions.ClaireThank you so much. Julia.JuliaI hope everybody goes out and reads your wonderful book, which is full of horrifying things, and also great bits of humor, and wonderful humanity. ClaireThank you.JuliaThanks so much for listening. If you want to have the chance to ask your own questions, or request specific kinds of posts from me, consider joining my patreon which is at patreon.com/juliarios, or my substack, which is at omgjulia.substack.com All patrons and subscribers get early access to every piece of creative work I commission from other creators in my Worlds of Possibility project, and your pledges and subscriber fees go directly to help pay for those stories and poems, and for the cost of my equipment and my labor, because recording these interviews, and then editing the transcripts and editing the recordings and making them podcast-ready for you takes a lot of time and effort! I am a little later on this one than I had intended to be because I got COVID again! Oops! So that’s why my voice sounds a little hoarse right now. Luckily, I was able to get antivirals, so that is fine, and I am doing better, but it kind of threw a wrench in things and it really made me realize how much time and effort this kind of thing takes. It takes a lot! So, if you have been enjoying this, please do subscribe. Please, any amount that you feel like contributing will absolutely help keep things going for me. And I’m in the middle of accepting all the pieces I am going to accept for this wave of Worlds of Possibility, and I have some GREAT stories to share with you, so I can’t wait to get into that, too. Thank you for listening, and I’ll catch you next time!Thanks for listening, and I’ll catch you next time. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit omgjulia.substack.com/subscribe

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
$40 Million in Real Estate And the Benefits of Social Media with Sam Primm | EP104

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 37:52


Sam Primm is a Real Estate Investor, Educator with over 40 million dollar Real Estate using people's money  He started a successful Rental Real Estate company, Wholesale company and he does Flips as well.  In this episode we talked about: * Sam's  Bio & Background * The First Investment in Real Estate * Using Other People's Money to Buy Real Estate * Network Building * Private & Institutional Lenders  * Capital Structure * Interest Rate Risks * Journey on Social Media * The Process of Property Acquisition  * Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned Useful links: Book “Pitch Anything” by Oren Klaff Book “Eat that frog” by Brian Tracy https://www.instagram.com/samfasterfreedom/?hl=en https://fasterfreedom.com Transciption: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Ladies and gentlemen, my name is Jennifer gala and you're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. My guest today is Sam prim. Sam is a real estate investor educator with over $40 million worth of real estate using other people's money.   He started a successful rental real estate company, a wholesale company, and he does flips as well. We just kind of went over a little bit about his portfolio right now, Sam, how's it going?   Sam (45s): It's going well, man, it's going well, appreciate you having me on.   Jesse (47s): Yeah, thanks so much for coming on. I think one thing we miss here in the intro is just the fact that your social media presence with real estate is pretty pronounced. It's part of the reason that we connected, I saw what you were doing online. And I said, you know, I think that listeners would get a lot of value about you coming on, telling your story, and also talking a little bit about that presence online. So thanks for coming on. Really appreciate it. Why don't we take a couple of steps back as we normally do here and talk a little bit about your background and how you got into real estate, you know, from, you know, where you started and where you're at today.   Sam (1m 23s): Yeah, for sure. So I don't have the most exciting story, like, you know, some guests and some people I know that, you know, came over here or grew up super, super poor and didn't have, you know, much of an upbringing. I had a normal upbringing, you know, my parents were middle-class. My dad was an engineer. My mom was a teacher. My dad worked for the same company for 40 years and retired. That was kinda what I was grown up in. That was kind of how I was raised, you know, save money, save money, save money, invest, and went to college and was kind of planning that path.   But kinda during college, I started a, a house, you know, painting company with my buddy. We started to kind of paint in the summers, painted exteriors of houses and fences and decks, kinda got some entrepreneurial itches and then went to school and finished school and then, you know, graduated and got a job out of school. And he got an engineering degree and we were just doing our own thing. And then we started to connect and talk real estate and we decided to go in and buy one house a year for 10 years was our goal. And just kind of start to just see what real estate can do for us on the side.   And that kind of ballooned into what I'm doing today. I kind of really kind of ventured away from that traditional mindset of work for somebody else, your whole life. I was able to quit my full-time job and go full-time in real estate a few years later and really enjoying now showing other people that you do have an option. You can do the traditional path, but if that's not for you or you can't do that, or whatever, whatever the reason may be, you do not have to work for someone else, your whole life. You can do what you want when you want and real estate's the best, you know, kind of bridge to help you get to that life.   Jesse (2m 53s): So, Sam, what was the first investment in real estate that you, that you ever did? What did that look like?   Sam (2m 60s): It was a single family rental. I actually bought it in 2014 into 2014, bought it with the thought that you got to, I was going to fix it up and sell it and take that profit and put 20% down on a rental. So back then, even when I started, you know, investing in real estate, I thought 20% down on rental property. So, all right, I don't have 20% to put down, so I'm going to flip a house, take that profit and then put 20% down. So I thought for every, you know, one rental I wanted to buy, I had to flip one, so two houses to get one rental.   But during that process, I learned a, about the cash out refinance and kind of leveraging money and leveraging bank funds and all that, all that stuff that I'm sure a lot of your viewers know about, but I didn't know about it. And I ended up actually turning that one into a rental that worked out pretty well. So just, you know, jumped in and was figuring it out and then found out about refinancing and, and all that cash out stuff. And you haven't looked back since, and haven't had to put 20% down of my own money on anything since. So   Jesse (3m 55s): That's great. So in terms of the actual debt side of the equation, when you are looking for properties and over your career, when you've been looking for properties using other people's money, I mean, people hear that and they, you know, intuitively understand what that means. You know, you understand what the words mean, but in terms of actually executing that and doing it in a way that doesn't put you in a unreasonable amount of risk, how do you approach that? And what does that look like for you when you're saying you're using other people's money to buy real estate?   Sam (4m 26s): Yeah, for sure. Cause if you're, if you're not using your own money, you're putting 20% down, you know, you could be overleveraging yourself, like you said, and putting yourself at unnecessary risk, you know, shift in the market could sink you. And, and that did a lot in oh eight, it's sunk a lot of people. So the key to using other people's money in your own money honestly, is making sure there's equity in the property. Everybody thinks that banks care about that 20% down when you're buying rentals, they don't, they care about that 80%. They want to just make sure that they are not over leveraged themselves and that there's 80% equity in the deal.   So if you can creatively use somebody else's money to find distressed properties, you know, fix them up, manage them well, whether we're talking, you know, single families, commercial multi-families, whatever it is, if you can just find the deals out there and use other people's money and, you know, find a good enough deal and increase the value enough that there is at least 20% equity at the end, then you're not over leveraged. If, if you bought a million dollar apartment complex and put $200,000 down, there's 80% equity. If I've, you know, did the same thing and use somebody else's money and have $800,000 of somebody else's money in the deal, and it's still worth a million, why it's the same position?   There's, you know, there's, there's not any risk there. As long as that equity is built in, obviously there's some more intricacies that go into it and there's a ton different ways to do it. But I think the key concept that you brought up and kind of wanted me to drive home is as long as you're buying at a discount and managing it properly, you shouldn't over leverage yourself. If you do it the right way, it's not buying things at market value, you know, a hundred percent of costs, a hundred percent of value, a hundred percent of loan. It's, you know, we're, we're deep, we're much less than that. There's a lot of equity built in at the end of these deals that just grows over time.   Jesse (6m 5s): So during that time 2014, and I guess the, the few years after that, that got you to where you're at today, the actual network that you had, the people that you went to to actually raise money from, how did that evolve? You know, did you have somebody in the beginning that you were doing this with, that kind of showed you who the ideal people would be that would invest with you? What did that look like?   Sam (6m 25s): Yeah, kind of. So I knew that you could use other people's money to buy and fix up a property. I think, I don't remember. I think that flip or flop the torque and Christina moose or whatever, the ones that was on HTV. I remember seeing them go to like their lawyer's somebody's house and they would get the money and then they would fix up the house and they would split the profit with them. So I knew you could do that. So I knew that you could borrow money to buy and fix up a house. I just didn't know about the 20% down. And that's what I did on my first property. I borrowed the money to buy it and fix it up. It was from like a kind of a friend of a friend kind of thing. It was one of my dad's friends that owned a business.   I'd known him growing up a little bit and he'd always talked about, you know, if we ever get into business, you know, he'd like to help me out kind of like a, a mentor type thing, but he wasn't a real estate investor more just on the business and mindset side of things. And we talked and, you know, met a few times and, and showed them the plans and show them what we wanted to do. And he said that he would be willing to give us, you know, you know, a hundred thousand dollars to buy and fix up a house. If we found something that worked and showed him the deal and ran through the numbers and we did that. And then we did it again. And I continued to use that same private lender for, for a long time.   My first, first three or four years in investing in real estate, I had a full-time job. So it probably maybe a 20, 20 rentals or so. So it was good, but it wasn't anything crazy. But then after that, you just make connections and know the right people and that lender talks to other people. And then eventually we, you know, got more money than we know what to do with now, just as far as, you know, sourcing deals for private lenders, it's, it's just, it can be tough to find private lenders. So I was pretty lucky, but I always tell people whether it takes you two months or two years to find a private lender, always be looking one private lender can change your life.   There's other, there's other options. In the meantime, you can wholesale, you can use hard money, you can use lines of credit, you can do a ton of different things. Self-directed IRAs, all those are great. But, you know, using a, having a private lender that has flexible terms that will lend you a hundred percent of purchase and rehab on, you know, whatever the property may be is life-changing so be looking for one, you may stumble across when, right away, you may not, but don't give up because one can change your life. For sure.   Jesse (8m 27s): And what was the, I mean, flexibility, you mentioned that there w what are the other appeals that you have with private lenders, as opposed to institutional institutional lenders for what you're trying to do?   Sam (8m 38s): Yeah. So private lenders are, you know, their flexibilities by far the biggest one. So, you know, if I'm buying an apartment complex, I'll go to private lenders and they'll put 20% down. And then the other 80% is institutional. Whether it be, you know, government money, Fannie, or Freddie, or whether it be, you know, bank money, but they're, they're going to be in second position. Then the private lender is okay with that. It's, you know, most hard money lenders or other institutions won't want to be in second position. They're going to want to be in first position to be most secured. So they're flexible because you have a relationship with them.   There are people that, you know, or people that, you know, know that understand real estate that don't usually, they don't have millions. It's usually it's, you know, I just had a student the other day that was like, I can't find a private lender. And then all, you know, all of a sudden he was talking with a real estate agent that he was trying to buy houses from. And that agent said they always want to do invest, but they don't have the time or knowledge. And they had an extra 150 green, you know, they didn't have millions, but they took some out of the stock market and they had that and they're willing to invest with them because they knew them. So it just comes from different sources. It usually doesn't come from a rich uncle or even a rich friend of your dad like minded, but, you know, there's a ton of different places.   You can find them. And they're just flexible. They're understanding. I think a couple of the second deal I did, we couldn't pay back. The private lender has full amount plus interest. So he let us roll that into the next deal. And just things like that. There's flexibility being second position on terms, and I'm on lengths of things. And, you know, when you're dealing with somebody that they have relationship with built with, you can talk about that when you're dealing with these bigger institutions, they're just a number on a spreadsheet to them. They don't give a, they don't give a crap if you had an issue or not.   Jesse (10m 10s): Yeah. I feel like when you're dealing with private lenders, if the deal goes sideways, God forbid there, you know, you want to work with the person, the person typically wants to work with you where it's the bank. Like you said, if you're just a number on a spreadsheet there, you know, they can be a little bit more aggressive and saying, yeah, sorry, like this, we're going to take this action X. That might be pretty detrimental to your investment in terms of the, the, what you described there. So the 20% down from a private lender and then the balance from say an institutional lenders. So that to me is a very similar or very common for a short-term kind of, you're basically trying to stabilize an asset or you could potentially be flipping it.   How do you look at the capital structure when you're dealing with more of a longer term, hold on your real estate.   Sam (10m 54s): So everything, and we've done this a few times now, so I own six, six apartment complexes, and I've done this on three of them and three of them in the process of doing this. So like, what I've done in the past is for one of my second apartment complex, I bought it. No, nothing big. I haven't done any huge deals yet. This was a 32 unit. So what we ended up doing was we bought it for 1.1 million. So we've got 20% down from our private lender. So he lend us 20% down, which I guess is 220 grand. We got an $880,000 mortgage from the bank.   So it was worth a little bit more than that when he bought it. So there's equity built in, but we improve the building over the next couple of years. You know, we increased cashflow by raising rent. We use some of that to fix up the property and we, you know, got efficient with the expenses and managing and just took care of everything and just kind of turn the building. Wasn't a nightmare, but we turned it around relatively quickly and just two years. And we were paying the private lender a little bit out of cashflow. And then two years later, it appraised for 1.5 million. So we took some equity out.   We refinanced at 80% and paid him back as two 20 plus interest. And now we own it and we own it. Long-term and, you know, we have a one point had a one point, you know, one, something million dollar note on it. It was worth 1.5. And then two years later, which was last year, just the price for 2 million. So it just kind of shows you that you, you get one of these assets and you can force the value in force appreciation by being efficient and raising rents. You can create so much equity so fast that you can do these short term. I call them short term burst deals in two or three years.   You can, you can reposition an asset and create enough equity and value by you controlling the asset properly to get enough to pay him back plus interest and move on to the next one. It's just kind of a rinse and repeat thing. I haven't, you know, done the syndication route where you're raising 20% from, you know, lenders that you're going to pay back over the next, however many years or, or anything like that. But mine's a little bit more of that, you know, smaller scale. But if you do it enough, you know, like I said, I got 40 million that I own a hundred percent of you can, you can scale pretty quickly.   Jesse (12m 57s): Yeah, for sure. I mean, there's good money to be made. And both strategies might find the, like you said, almost a, like a, a variation of the burst strategy where you are buying, holding, or refinancing, renting all the RS. But if you do the syndication route, it's basically the same thing. I, the only difference would be an equity portion coming from LPs. So we, we did something very similar recently, and it is just a larger version of buying that single family house and, and doing a, doing a burst strategy with, so in terms of the, where you kind of see the market right now, obviously we're in a time right now, it's Q2 20, 22 interest rates have continued to go up.   How do you look at the risk of your deals in terms of interest rate, what you typically keep in reserve? Like how, w from a risk standpoint, how do you, how do you view your, your real estate acquisitions?   Sam (13m 51s): Yeah. Interest rates have gone up way more than I thought they would way quicker, but even, even with that, I'm not, not overly concerned. A majority of my portfolio, we have tied up at, at 10 year arms, you know, tenure. So the rate's not going to just, I guess for eight more years now, we locked them in a couple of years ago. So majority of it is eight is eight more years of our current rates. Modem is non-recourse with some government and funding, but as far as going forward with the current purchase, I'm just keeping that into account interest rates are going to be a little bit higher.   If we do a deal now, or we have a three-year arm or something that probably going to be a little bit higher, but I don't think they're going to be substantially higher. And now that my portfolio has got to a point where I'm just trying to add good assets to it, I'm not worried about, you know, they're all good deals. They all cashflow on their own, but I'm just looking at it as more of a portfolio that I'm going to have for 20 years. So a little bit of interest rates, a little bit higher on the portion of the portfolio right now, isn't extremely concerning to me. I don't love it, but also going with higher interest rates, rents more rents going up every, I think I heard the other day or read something rent's going up every year in the past, like 90 years, except 2008 or 2009, like one is the only year rent's ever not gone up.   So with increase interest rates, you also have increased expenses. We're getting more efficient in management with property, with software, with things like that. So you can offset some of that extra interest on that. You'll be paying with a higher, with a little bit higher interest rate, but you can offset that with just being smart and efficient and just scaling and not worrying about, you know, having to spend a little bit more. I feel like if your deal hinges on 50 basis points, you'd probably buy in too deep. Anyway, I understand this gone up more than that recently, but in the, in the commercial game with a small local banks who I deal with, it's it hasn't gone up.   It hasn't gone up near what the residential has. That's right. Not to get too into a, you probably know this better than I do, but the, the residential, the mortgage that people hear about this going up like crazy is based on the ten-year treasury, what, what we borrow at the small local banks that I deal with. And part of the reason it's based on the fed funds rate, and that's barely gone up. So they're kind of based on two different things. And, you know, you can take advantage of one while the other one's, you know, doing something. And so there, there's always some way to be flexible and get around it. I, I'm not thinking that you're not going to be able to invest in real estate because interest rates are too high, but that's kind of how I look at it.   W what do you think about that?   Jesse (16m 10s): Yeah, I have very similar view. I think the 50 basis points comment, I think it actually is accurate because even though rates have gone up higher, if you're doing an analysis and underwriting a deal and say, you're playing Monday morning quarterback, and you're in the deal now, and rates have gone up. If you didn't, if you didn't have some sort of sensitivity analysis that gave you a bit of a range, you don't underwrite a deal and go, okay, I can't go higher than this. You give yourself a little bit of padding. So you, yeah. Even with the padding, you might be, you might be within 75 bips or 50 BEPS.   And it, like you said, if that's going to kill your deal, then you've got bigger problems to worry about. I think the, the different approach that we're taking is just looking at things banks, when we're doing refinances or bef before LTV loan to value was a lot bigger piece of the pie. Now, debt service coverage ratio is which makes sense, right there. They're being cognizant about how much you have in cashflow. And it kind of, I think every once in a while, every five, 10 years, we need a little bit of a jolt in the real estate industry because we start getting away from the fundamentals and then we kind of need to be brought back that cashflow is, is a key aspect of what we do.   So I think, you know, provided that we don't go into a global pandemic again, which is kind of, I only laugh. It's, you know, it's not funny, but only ironic in the sense that we always say, like, you know, caveat this, as long as this doesn't happen, it will be okay. Now that we have seen something very intense, like the last two years, I think investors will be a little bit more prudent, but provided that we don't have anything crazy geopolitically going forward. I think that it's not unhealthy to have interest rates go up a little bit and values of cool off, especially in some of the major markets, you know what I didn't even ask.   What a, which market are you currently investing in right now? We're   Sam (17m 58s): St. Louis, Missouri, everything. Everything's here within an hour, hour and a half of a, of St. Louis on the Missouri side. So yeah, everything's here local in the Midwest, not the most exciting city, but it's a great city to own rental properties in and invest in is, is pretty stable. You don't get the swings. So it's, it's a good place to be.   Jesse (18m 16s): Yeah, for sure. What, switch gears a little bit here and talk about this presence on social media. It's pretty fascinating to me, especially in our space because, well, I guess any space you get all these quotation gurus online and posting random stuff, and just kind of filtering through a lot of that. I saw the content you were posting really interesting, engaging educational. You kind of go through some of the deals. We'll put a link up for listeners to check you out on Instagram. And I assume you, you know, you have a link for YouTube, but talk a little bit about that, that journey on social media as it relates to real estate.   Sam (18m 52s): Yeah. So I just started posting a little bit on Facebook about what I was doing, you know, and drummed up a pretty good amount of, you know, interest from just friends and family and people that didn't know that I was investing in real estate. They just thought I had that full, you know, my full-time job. And so that kind of started to get some traction and, you know, it didn't really think a ton of it. Then I went full-time in real estate in 2018 and was focused on growing my rental portfolio and growing, you know, the flipping company and doing all that for a good year and a half, two years and occasionally posting on social media.   And then we got those businesses to a pretty stable place being my business partner, Lucas, and kind of had the idea of you run those, keep those going. I'm going to try to, you know, get into this education space and try to educate people what you're doing, because the minimal exposure I had was just inundated with people. How did you do it? Can you teach me how to do it? How do you do it? You know, so I thought, well, let's, let's try to, you know, make a social media about it and try to maybe create some type of course or mentorship. So I just started by just giving away as much as I could for free on YouTube and then Instagram and slowly getting some traction.   And then Pope did Tik TOK and got made fun of for a while. But I posted on Tik TOK once a day for 30 days and said, I'm just going to give it a shot. And this was back in 2020 middle to end of 2020, and then that blew up and then everything else kind of just followed from there. You know, ticktack saying is it all starts on Tik TOK? And for me, it kind of did that kind of gave me the credibility to grow the other platforms. And like, what you said is what I do. I just try to post informational stuff. I don't overreact. I could have a bigger following if I was a, fearmonger not going to name any names, but the people that have had that YouTube thumbnails for five years in a row saying the world's ending and the market's going to crash, eventually they're going to be right.   But you know, those people that do that negativity and that just kind of drove me crazy. And also I knew somebody that had done three bird deals and wrote a bird book. So I was just like, come on. So anyway, so I decided to, to teach and go in a little bit more and go full-time into it. And the last I've been doing social media for about years. And as you alluded to, you've got a decent following on tic-tac YouTube and Instagram, and just trying to provide as much education as I can. It's fun. Obviously I can make money from it if people want, want me to educate them further, but regardless, it's just a good place to, you know, be creative and have fun and teach people and show them that there is another path out there that real estate can be fun.   And it's a, it's a good thing to invest in and so great way to get free eyeballs.   Jesse (21m 13s): So I don't think I connected with you on Tik TOK, but what was that 30 days like, was that just I'm going to post some deals, some, some tip, but what did that 30 days look like?   Sam (21m 22s): I just, I just was posting and at the time my Instagram was probably like 500. My YouTube was probably like a thousand, I don't know. And I just wasn't getting as much traction on them. So I thought let's hop on Tik TOK. I had somebody told me that people were talking about real estate. I thought it was just a place for people to dance and you know, what it's turned into now, craziness. But so I got on not early, but kind of early. And then I just posted once a day for 30 days. And I think my fourth video got a hundred thousand views and I was like, holy cow, it was like a 15, 22nd video. You know, it makes sense now that people can scroll and see, you know, five different people in one minute, the only platform that really allows for that.   But yeah, and then just kind of got some traction there and then other social media started to grow and then it's kind of the staple. I, I don't even, it's insane. I have 1.5 million followers on Tik TOK, and it's just like, that is like a city. And then when it does bleed over to the other platforms and now, yeah, and now that tic-tacs allowing for longer videos and things like that, I'm trying to leverage it to, to, to push people towards the other social media platforms. Cause tic Tacs fine and all, but you know, in five minutes, someone probably sees 50 different people on Tik TOK in five minutes.   They've see probably 10 people on Instagram in five minutes. You just, usually one people on YouTube and same with podcasts. So the goal is to push people to the longer form content, to warm them up and teach them more. But just taking advantage of what's out there. And it's a lot easier to make a 32nd video than an engaging 30 minute podcast. So that's, that's what I was doing for a while and still do.   Jesse (22m 53s): Yeah. And it's, you know, like we're talking right now, if we probably end up putting this on YouTube, you know, it's one thing to have this story. Some people, you know, you, I find a lot of people just like people are visual learners. I find we, we remember stories better. You have this long form aspect of, of Sam prim they'll remember certain aspects, but you know, like at some point in this conversation, we said, DSCR, you know, that's a 32nd video for tech doc or for Instagram. Right. But you can't get the, well, you can only get so much information out there in the short form. So that makes sense that you kind of capture them there, bring them over to longer form content.   So in terms of the educational stuff, what type of, what type of stuff are you putting out there? You mentioned the course that you had.   Sam (23m 34s): Yeah. So Joe, I have a, I have a mentorship currently, you know, it's a lot of different things that go and it, but basically it's everything or, you know, everything I can put into that content about creating a rental portfolio using other people's money. There's 250 videos I put in there because no one likes to sit down. No one has an hour free time, or usually they don't. So I spent about eight months making five to 10 minute clips of every single step of the way. So someone, if they got a free 10 minutes can just watch to my videos and learn a little bit or poke around and see.   So there's that, there's a closed Facebook group. There's weekly mentorship calls, group mentorship calls, and then all the resources you'll need. So it's pretty in depth and it's pretty comprehensive. You know, we just launched it about six months ago, had a little over 500 people sign up. So it's, it's not, it's it's for people that are willing to take action. We'd one of the questions is making sure that they're willing to take action. We just don't want to take people's money just to take their money. If they're willing to take action and it's a good fit for you, but it's been fun. And it's just kind of one of the trickle down effects of getting a lot of eyeballs, a certain amount of those people will want we'll happily give you money to teach them further.   You know, we're not holding a gun for anybody's dad to sign up. So it's, it's been, it's been a fun thing that I don't really push a ton. A lot of people don't even know I have it that follow me on social media. So I kind of like it that way.   Jesse (24m 50s): Yeah. I mean, it's also too, it's a reflection of, of yourself. So this idea of just, you know, signing up a million people in the short term is, you know, a lot of people do it, but if it's something that you you're trying to build and you want it to be quality, it makes sense that you want people to actually be in there engaged because unfortunately, a lot of people, you know, we've all been guilty of it, but there are a lot of people that consume a lot of great content, but never take any action with it. Whether it's a finance real estate need, it could be anything. So it's, it's definitely one of those things you want to have that action piece connected to the actual consumption of, of information.   Want to just hop back to the real estate side of things. So, one thing that we talk about with a lot of guesses, their process for acquisition now more than ever off-market deals are, seem to be the route that a lot of people are going in terms of finding properties. We'll see if that changes with the changing environment out there. What's your process when you're looking to acquire properties. And maybe you could talk about if, if it has evolved when, since you started out.   Sam (25m 54s): Yeah, it has. For sure. So at first, when I was, you know, just doing this on the side, I was, you know, buying things, certain things were on market, you know, back in 2015, 16, it was a little more common to find some of these on market deals. So that's what I did at first. And then through some local wholesalers, you know, people that were out there doing the work themselves and, and drumming up the deals and bringing them to me. And then we, you know, went full-time and have our house flipping company now. So we have five full-time buyers. That's all they do every day. They buy between 30 and 60 houses a year and they go and find the deals and drum up and talk to other wholesalers and connectors and real estate agents and lawyers and senior care facilities and all those kinds of things we buy.   We bought 252 houses last year. And I think like 165 of them were through no marketing spend all just through networking and our, and you know, going to find people. And then we also do the, do the advertising. You know, we got Facebook and AdWords and SEO and all those. So we do a mixture of, you know, you know, actual ads and then a mixture of networking for the sort of the houses. But for the apartments, that's a little bit different, you know, we've done some mailers specifically to owners, but we're, we got most of our deals. I've just been dealing with local brokers and, you know, local people that are wholesale on those deals.   And, you know, people that come across these cause you know, the commercial space is a little bit different. An agent can get something and you kind of have a pocket listing and put shell it out. They don't have to blast it to everybody like they do on the residential side. So yeah, just getting to know people and networking our last three apartments we bought from the same broker that he brought to us first because we were able to perform on one. So relationship-based, I guess is the key to what we've done. It takes time, but it takes time upfront. You'd be friendly and get to know them, offer value. Then you get a gravy train of deals coming. And yet it takes a little bit of time, but our last three deals I've been through one guy.   I mean, we'll probably buy 20 apartments from him in the next 10 years. So that's well worth it. I'm spending some time, you know, you can flood the market with advertising. That's an option, but not everybody has the money or knowledge to do that. So anybody can go network and market with people and, and, you know, come across deals that way.   Jesse (27m 56s): Yeah. And it's beneficial for him as well. Right. You have a qualified buyer and he knows that when he has that pocket listing, that you're going to be one he shows. I think it's, it's just, it's interesting to see the different approaches people take. Like for, you know, a lot of people come in with mailers. I found with our market it's, hasn't been, as we haven't had seen that much advantage or that much output from mailers, but I still call direct. I'm a broker by trade. So it's a little different in the sense that, you know, I get the free quote freebies of CoStar Altice, a bunch of different software pieces that when I need to find a corporate search for a numbered company, it's something fairly easy for me to do.   Whereas I know, you know, for a private investor to do that, they have to scale their business fairly, fairly big, but a lot of this stuff, depending on which state or province, if you're in Canada, in terms of, you know, where you're finding information, it's a lot of this is publicly available for on the apartment side as well. So you can usually enough elbow grease and you can find a name for a person, but you're absolutely right. It's a different animal on the commercial side, but in terms of making those relationships, I think, you know, just going back to your educational aspect, I think stuff like that is, what's so valuable in education.   And one thing is, okay, you can say connect with a good broker, but there are aspects of, you know, making sure that you sound like, you know, what you're talking about and you know, do's, and don'ts when you're trying to connect with the brokerage community. And not that they're, you know, we're this, you know, just geniuses, it's just the fact that you want to be speaking our language. And there's a couple of red flags that just jump out right away. When brokers hear somebody talk that, you know, you can, you lose credibility fairly quickly, but if you do the opposite, you know, it's a, it's a list an off-market listing then I'll definitely want to get out and, you know, give to somebody that if they sound like they know what they're talking about.   Sam (29m 40s): Yeah. I agree. Hundred percent like that. The education is, is just huge. And it's obviously something I believe in it's something I practice and I pay a lot of money every single year to be in a couple of masterminds and some subscription services. But it's, you know, they say you can't buy time, but you can like time, you can buy time by being more efficient and effective. If, if you know, you took 10 years to learn how to do what you do. And you know, we're putting a lot of that in this pocket. Someone keynote can spend listened to, you know, 10 hours of your podcast and get two years worth of knowledge and information.   So they can be more efficient and effective. So whether it's free or paid. And I take part in this, in all my businesses and every aspect, I'm writing a book right now, and I got a ghost writer helping me write it, like taking other people's information. So you can be, and their knowledge and experience. So you can be more efficient and effective and kind of take that group path and have less headaches and, you know, do more in less time you are buying time. So yeah, that's huge. That goes along with the lingo that you're talking about and just general, you know, just having somebody keep you in the lanes and keep you out of the gutters is huge, hugely important.   So yeah, I fully believe in it and sell it obviously, but also take part in it. And pretty much every business I have.   Jesse (30m 51s): Yeah. Well, it's a great community be in. I find that there's a lot of like-minded people. And generally speaking for the most part, everybody is pretty encouraging when you get into this business. And I, you know, I assume it's similar for other industries, but one thing I've always loved with the real estate industry is that if you are hustling and, and you are outwardly showing that you're interested, older individuals in our industry do want to do nothing but help you. I've found that through my career is because they see a little bit of themselves in you. I want, you know, when they're 50, 60 plus, and they see a younger version of themselves kind of doing their thing.   So reaching out to those people is, is something that, you know, if you can add value, it's something that I always encourage for people to do.   Sam (31m 31s): Yeah. Don't, don't underestimate vanity. I see it all the time. They're, they're willing to help. They really are those older people, they a hundred percent want to help. They see themselves in you, but they're also like, Hey, this is what I did. Look at how cool I am and look, here's the secrets that I did. And I figured out, and look at me, I did this, you know, look up to me and it's, it's everybody has it as natural. I'm not trying to dog on anybody. I have it, you have it everybody. But if, you know, people will, some people have a little bit more banning than others, but having, you know, people, you know, be able to say, look what I did and have you be like, wow, that that's something and that's real.   And that, that goes along with people wanting to help you're right. Real estate investors are surprisingly helpful in my opinion, compared a lot of other industries.   Jesse (32m 10s): Yeah, for sure. And you're absolutely right on the vanity side, I've found that even on the podcast and it's, and again, it's not to say that in a negative way, but I get a lot more honey from people I reach out to, especially on the commercial real estate side and, and the academic side, when I said, Hey, I just read your last paper, you know, that you wrote on, you know, commercial real estate prices and their effect on X. And all of a sudden you're like, oh, read my work. Okay. Like, you know, I would test it. So yeah, definitely. That's a good aspect.   I think any, any time in life, you can kind of a tickle or a, you know, a warmup through the vanities angle or a little bit of the stroke in the ego. I think it, you know, it helps Sam. We're coming up to the end here. We've got a few questions at the end. We ask every guest. So if you're cool with that, I'll, I'll send them your way. All right. All right, Sam, what you know, talking about mentorship, what is something that you would recommend or encourage for a young person getting into our industry, whether that's, you know, investing or commercial real estate as a, as a profession, you know, even on the institutional side,   Sam (33m 19s): Just take advantage of all the free resources out there, your podcasts. Those is a ton of social media stuff. I'm on YouTube and Instagram and even Tik TOK. Now, like we kind of alluded to, but just take advantage of all the free stuff out there. You can learn so much for free if you're willing to spend a little bit of time and energy on it. So take advantage of the free stuff out there, and then that'll guide you to pay stuff if you want. But also get out and network, go to these meetups, go to meet people, go grab lunch with someone it's so much different commenting on somebody's Instagram or joining a Facebook group and chatting then getting in your car, driving, going to a meetup, meeting, other people that got in their car and drove and went to that meetup.   Those people are so much more valuable to connect with than somebody you just met online. So do the online research, but go meet people, talk to people because those people are the people that you want to know. And you, one connection probably will eventually change your life. You just gotta meet that connection. So go connect with people in person. And if you're young, like you said, man, people like to take you under their wing, especially if you're super young and just wanting to get into it in green, you don't even have to act like, you know what you're talking about. As long as they know that you're green and you don't act like, you know what you're talking about, you'd be shocked at how many people will help you.   Jesse (34m 31s): Yeah. It's almost an advantage if you act like you don't really know what you're talking about, they want to, they want to help you out. So speaking of resources, what's something, a podcast or book that you're reading right now that you could share with listeners.   Sam (34m 44s): Yeah. I just talk on that. I love listening to podcasts and listened into books and kind of getting, I usually get my active information and active knowledge and, you know, from, you know, masterminds or podcasts or YouTube like this, but my overall like mindset stuff comes from more books and things like that. A book that I just read again for the second time that I, I really, really like is a pitch. Anything, if anybody's ever read a pitch, anything's a good one. And then eat that frog,   Jesse (35m 13s): Oren Klaff right. Pitch anything,   Sam (35m 15s): And then eat it just about, you know, conversations and how you can kind of not control the other person, but you can kind of lead the conversation to where you want and lead the relationship to, to, you know, something that's beneficial for everybody. And then also eat that. Frog's a really good, simple one that I kind of liked. It's just about, if you get the, you get the hardest thing over at the beginning of the day and everything else, it's not just like, you're done with the hard thing. It's like, you got momentum, you got the energy from it. And then everything else seems easy. You get, if you wait until the end of the day, do the hard thing, you won't do it. Or you do at the end of the day.   If you do the hard thing at the beginning of the day, you get literally twice as much done. So just suck it up and do it. So that's that's I really liked that book.   Jesse (35m 52s): Yeah. We'll put links to both of those. I've, you know, I can't even, it was probably three, four years ago. I read, eat that frog and I was so confused. Cause a buddy sent it to me and I was like, what is this? I don't get the, you read the book. And you're like, yeah, it makes a lot of sense. No, I mean the, the, the title, when I first saw it, I was like, what am I getting into? But yeah, it's basically getting, getting that, you know, that toughest thing out of your day and then setting yourself up for, you know, for the rest of the day, week a year. That's awesome. We'll put a couple links to those last question. We'd like to ask all of our guests just cause I'm a bit of a petrol head.   First car make and model   Sam (36m 26s): First car make a T at 1993. Stick-shift Toyota Corolla.   Jesse (36m 31s): I like how you say stick, stick, shift. I listened to this econ talk one of my favorite podcasts and they call it a, a millennial security device.   Sam (36m 39s): Yeah. I've heard that too. That that's true. That's true. That a lot of, not a lot of people can, can find those these days.   Jesse (36m 46s): Awesome. We'll say for those that want to reach out, we alluded to it throughout the whole podcast, but working the working, they get to you. What's your handle for Instagram? Tik TOK or YouTube.   Sam (36m 57s): Yeah, they're all. It's all the same. It's same faster freedom. So my name and then faster freedom is my brand. So same fastest freedom on Tik TOK, YouTube, Instagram, check out the stuff. If you like it, shoot me a follower and shoot me a message on Instagram. I, I try to get to as many as I can and I'll usually get to them within a day or two if I don't get them right away. So shoot me a message. If you have any questions, I'd love to help you out.   Jesse (37m 17s): My guest today has been Sam prim Sam, thanks for being part of working capital.   Sam (37m 21s): Thank you. I appreciate being on.   Jesse (37m 30s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.  

Go Float Yourself
Season 5 Episode 4: Pandora's Box

Go Float Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 69:10


Oh they done did it again! They opened pandora's box... err bunker. Wonkru is free, Diyoza takes abby prisoner and chess board is reset! Support the Show! Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Gofloatpod Insta: https://bit.ly/2IHgNIt Twitter: https://bit.ly/2H337qu Theme song: Severe Tire Damage by Kevin MacLeod: https://bit.ly/2ICU0h2  Logo Design by Tori Russell: https://torirussell.com/

Free Library Podcast
Matthew Continetti | The Right: The Hundred-Year War for American Conservatism

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 60:07


In conversation with Ramesh Ponnuru, editor of National Review A senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, Matthew Continetti works in the field of American political thought and history, with an emphasis on the Republican Party and the history of 20th-century conservatism. His books include The Persecution of Sarah Palin: How the Media Elite Tried to Bring Down a Rising Star and The K Street Gang: The Rise and Fall of the Republican Machine. The founding editor of The Washington Free Beacon, the former opinion editor at The Weekly Standard, and currently a contributing editor at National Review and a columnist for Commentary Magazine, his writing has been published in The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times, among other places. In The Right, Continetti provides a survey of the U.S. conservative movement's evolution and intellectual history. Ramesh Ponnuru is the editor of National Review, a columnist for Bloomberg View, and a contributing editor to National Affairs. A visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute since 2012, he has been a commentator on a wide array of media outlets, including Meet the Press, Face the Nation, and PBS NewsHour, among many others. He is the author of The Party of Death and his articles have been published in numerous newspapers and magazines.  (recorded 5/17/2022)

Versus History Podcast
Episode 143: Red Ball Radical - Cricket Past, Present & Future

Versus History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 24:44


In this episode, cricket expert and the Head of History at Felsted School, Rakesh Pathak, returns to the Versus History Podcast. Having been our guest in episode #111, Rakesh is back to discuss a range of cricketing questions and themes, including how historians should view Joe Root's captaincy of the England team, the future of red-ball cricket, the IPL, women's cricket, The Hundred and the streaming of the LV County Championship on Youtube. For more from Rakesh, please check out his excellent cricketing blog 'Red Ball Radical' here. Rakesh has also written a short book about cricket, entitled Nudges, Nicks and Nonconformists, which is here.

Not Actually Film Critics
The Hundred-Foot Journey - CardaMom's On the Grill

Not Actually Film Critics

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 65:32


The crew recovers from last week's theatrical trauma, including a sick and deeeeep Gibbs, to review recently played games of Yakuza: Like A Dragon and Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order. Blizzard's diversity tool gets some discussion before a review of the French-Indian fusion food film The Hundred Foot Journey, produced by Steven Spielberg and Oprah. If you like food porn and feel-good family movies, this is the ticket for you. If you like Foodfight porn though, then Zea's Porn Corner is the dirty, shameful ticket for you.

Pet Resource Radio
Puppy Mills and the Horrible Hundred with Cody Atkinson, HSUS State Director for Missouri

Pet Resource Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 27:53


The 2022 annual Horrible Hundred report has been released, and we've got HSUS State Director for Missouri, Cody Atkinson, on to talk about puppy mills, why Missouri is consistenly topping the list, and what you can do to help stop the suffering of these animals. 2022 Horrible Hundred Report The Humane Society of the United States An Advocate's Guide to Stopping Puppy Mills (HSUS) Maryland Becomes 2nd U.S. State To Ban Declawing Cats Cortisol in shelter dog hair shows signs of stress Help us keep pets and people together!

The John Batchelor Show
#PacificWatch: The Hundred Billion Dollar Governor. @JCBliss

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 10:41


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #PacificWatch: The Hundred Billion Dollar Governor. @JCBliss https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/Gov-Gavin-Newsom-unveils-plan-to-use-California-17169445.php

God Stories Radio Podcasts
Celebrating The GSR Family - EP300

God Stories Radio Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 42:51


Come join us for a big trip down memory lane, and gratitude for the last 9 years of ministry. Thank you to the GSR Family for helping us to keep going. We truly love you all. godstoriesradio@gmail.com Produced By Fritz @ GSR Podcast Productions gsrpodcastproductions@gmail.com Paypal.me/godstoriesradio 

Six O'Clock News
12/05/2022 The number of fines for breaking covid rules in Downing Street and Whitehall has now topped a-hundred.

Six O'Clock News

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 30:20


The Metropolitan Police has handed out another fifty fixed penalty notices for breaches of Covid restrictions in Downing Street and other Government buildings.

Story Time Tamil
பாட்டில் பேய் | HUNDRED WORK

Story Time Tamil

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 16:48


Why were the people of the town afraid of Rangam? Why Thangapandi couldn't find a bride locally? Why was Vimala upset? Where did she go one early morning? What Meiyappan gave her? How many jobs the ghost will do to go free? What happened when Rangam overheard the talk between Vimala and the ghost? ரங்கத்திடம் அந்த ஊர் மக்களுக்கு ஏன் பயம் இருந்தது? தங்கபாண்டிக்கு உள்ளூரில் ஏன் பெண் கிடைக்கவில்லை? விமலாவுக்கு என்ன வருத்தம் இருந்தது? ஒரு நாள் விடிகாலை பொழுதில் அவள் எங்கே சென்றாள்? மெய்யப்பன் அவளுக்கு என்ன கொடுத்தார்? விடுதலை பெற பாட்டில் பேய் எவ்வளவு வேலை செய்ய வேண்டும்? விமலாவும் பேயும் பேசியதை கேட்ட ரங்கம் என்ன செய்தார்?Youtube Story Link: https://youtu.be/1n4yxVaSPJI You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcast App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/iosYou can check out our website at http://www.ivmpodcasts.com

The Daily Gardener
May 11, 2022 Salvador Dalí, Nathaniel Lord Britton, Katharine Stewart, Margaret Visser, The Little Library Cookbook by Kate Young, and Turtle Hail

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 12:23


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1904 Birth of Salvador Dalí, Spanish surrealist artist. Educated in Madrid, Salvador was a son of Catalonia, and he never lost his love for the beauty of his homeland. Early in his career, Salvador gravitated toward surrealism. By 1929, Salvador Dali was regarded as a leading figure in the art form.  Like Sigmund Freud, Salvador Dalí used the landscape to metaphor the human mind. He once said about the coastline of his beloved Catalonia, I personify the living core of this landscape. Today, two museums are devoted to Salvador Dalí's work: the Dalí Theatre-Museum in Figueres, Spain, and the Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. And in 2020, the Marie Selby Botanical Gardens in Sarasota, Florida, presented Salvador Dalí: Gardens of the Mind. The exhibit's centerpiece was Flordalí, a fantastically-colored series of flower lithographs from 1968. In Flordali, Salvador created imaginary surrealist enhancements to favorite blossoms. He made Dahlia unicorns, which feature a twisted horn in the middle of the bloom.  Lilium musicum has vinyl records and sheet music for petals. Pisum sensuale is a sensory plant with fingers with painted nails and voluptuous lips. Panseé (Viola cogitans) is a self-portrait with pansies for the eyes and mouth.    1907 On this day, the American botanist Nathaniel Lord Britton was in Nantucket preparing for a lecture on plant protection. Nathaniel had brought along fifty colored lantern slides from the Van Brunt collection to use in his presentation. Nathaniel and his wife co-founded the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, New York.  Nathaniel's time in Nantucket was brief - only for a day - but he wrote these observations in a letter about his trip. [On Nantucket] The mayflower is the most abundant of spring wildflowers, carpeting the moors on the south side of the island and lending a rich, spicy fragrance to the ocean breezes that sweep over these exposed tracts. It is in less danger from picking than from the surface fires, which are common occurrences in spring.  The later blooming wildflowers suffer more or less at the hands of summer tourists, but I was glad to observe that the residents of Nantucket as a whole are keenly alive to the importance of preserving the natural beauties of the island and carefully guard the localities for many rare plants, especially the Scotch heather and the two European heaths (Erica cinerea and E. tetralix) which occur there.   1923 On this day, a schoolyard garden reported outside of Lochness gave the following update, As sheep are constantly breaking into the garden work has been stopped till the walls are rendered sheep-proof.   This little entry was discovered by the modern-day owner of the property Katharine Stewart, and she shared it in her delightful month by month garden book called A Garden in the Hills (2006).  Katharine reflected on the journal entry regarding the sheep and wrote, I know exactly what he meant. More than sixty years later, the sheep, the more agile variety, are still sometimes managing to leap over the wall, where the superimposed netting has given way. That can mean goodbye to all the summer lettuce and the winter greens, not to mention the precious flowering plants and all the work that went into producing them.   The little school in the Scottish highlands closed in 1958. A few years later, Katharine and her husband, Sam, bought the property known as the croft at Abriachan near Loch Ness. There, Katharine began her writing. Reflecting on her first days in the garden at the croft, Katharine wrote, When we arrived, wild raspberries, willowherb, and sweet cicely had largely taken over. To bees and butterflies and to many kinds of birds, this was paradise! For us, it held all the thrill of uncharted territory. Every day a fresh discovery was made. Even now, I come on surprises each summer. Digging [has] revealed many other interesting things-worn-out toys, pieces of pottery, a pile of school slates from a dump against the top wall, evidently discarded when jotters came in-and, most interesting of all, several 'scrapers' dating from prehistoric times.  Meanwhile, I often imagine my predecessors here looking on the same outline of hills, the same scoop of the burn in the hollow, listening to the same sounds of lark and owl, the bark of deer, and many more long gone-the howl of wolf, maybe the growl of bear. The heather would have been their late summer delight, making drinks of tea or ale, thatching for their roofs, and kindling for their fires.  Sometimes envy them the simplicity of their lives, though the hardships must have been great. They didn't have a Christmas to celebrate, but they knew all about the winter solstice, and they must have been happy to see the bright berries on the holly, as we do today.   Late in life, Katharine Stewart went on to become a teacher and then her town's postmistress. She died in 2013 and is survived by her daughter, Hilda.   1940 Birth of Margaret Visser, South African-born writer, and broadcaster who lives in Toronto, Paris, and southwest France. Margaret writes about history and anthropology and the mythology of everyday life. She once wrote, Salt is the only rock directly consumed by man.  It corrodes but preserves, desiccates but is wrested from the water. It has fascinated man for thousands of years not only as a substance he prized and was willing to labour to obtain but also as a generator of poetic and of mythic meaning. The contradictions it embodies only intensify its power and its links with experience of the sacred.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation The Little Library Cookbook by Kate Young This book came out in 2018, and the British food writer and author Bee Wilson gushed, What a joy this is for hungry readers everywhere: stylish, fun, and clever. If there is comfort food, there is also comfort reading, and The Little Library Cookbook is it. The publisher writes, Would you like to taste Paddington Bear's marmalade? Or a clam chowder from Moby Dick? You'll learn how to prepare the afternoon tea served at Manderley and decadent tarts the Queen of Hearts would love—all while reading food-related excerpts from your favorite books. Kate Young was inspired to write this book based on her amazing food blog called The Little Library Café. In The Little Library Cookbook, Kate offers over 100 recipes inspired by beloved works of fiction. There are dishes from classics and contemporary bestsellers with stories for people of any age. Among many others, you will find Turkish delight from Narnia, Mint Juleps from The Great Gatsby, Bread and Butter Pudding from Atonement, Curried Chicken from Sherlock Holmes,  Pancakes from Pippi Longstocking, Coconut Shortbread by Sarah Perry's The Essex Serpent,  Black Ice Cream from The Hundred and One Dalmations, Cinnamon Rolls from Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch, Spaghetti and Meatballs from The Godfather, Apple Pie from The Railway Children, and Honey Rosemary Tea Cakes inspired by Winnie the Pooh. This book is 320 pages of food in fiction brought to life by the sweet, funny, and intrepid blogger, cook, caterer, and writer Kate Young. You can get a copy of The Little Library Cookbook by Kate Young and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $15.   Botanic Spark 1894 On this day, Bovina ("Bo-VYE-na"), Mississippi, reported a case of turtle hail. Newspapers said that during a severe hailstorm, a six-inch-by-eight-inch gopher turtle, fell to the ground, completely encased in ice, at Bovina, which is located about seven miles east of Vicksburg in western Mississippi.    Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

Truth, Lies and Puppy Mills
The 2022 Horrible Hundred Report - And the Pet Stores They Sell To

Truth, Lies and Puppy Mills

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 65:16


Our good friends at The Humane Society of the United States just released their 2022 Horrible Hundred Report, listing violations from some of the worst puppy mills in the country. After going through their report we swiftly scoured our own database and released a companion report connecting those Horrible Hundred puppy mills to pet stores across the country who sell their puppies.  In addition to the Horrible Hundred report release, we also have several ordinances on the verge of passing in cities across the country from Washington to Wisconsin, in addition to a couple of state bills.  Tune in to find out if there is any legislative activity in your area!  To view the HSUS 2022 Horrible Hundred Report, go here:  https://www.humanesociety.org/sites/default/files/docs/HSUS_Horrible-Hundred-2022.pdfTo view our Horrible Hundred/Pet Store Connection companion report, go here: https://bailingoutbenji.com/2022-horrible-hundred/To view current active legislation across the country, go here: https://bailingoutbenji.com/legislationTo purchase tickets to our Gala in September, go here: https://secure.everyaction.com/QNKVcMt8VUm_fAGGBv9O4A2To buy new merchandise to support our work, go here: https://store.bailingoutbenji.com/Support the show

Oborne & Heller on Cricket
Writer, broadcaster, cricketer Isabelle Westbury celebrates the upward trajectory of women's cricket

Oborne & Heller on Cricket

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 56:07


After a playing career in the Netherlands, Middlesex and Somerset Isabelle Westbury has become one of Britain's most acute writers and broadcasters on cricket, in combination with a professional legal career. She is the latest guest of Peter Oborne and Richard Heller in their cricket-themed podcast. In Peter's unavoidable absence, Roger Alton shares the bowling in this edition.Read the full description here: https://chiswickcalendar.co.uk/episode-89-writer-broadcaster-cricketer-isabelle-westbury-celebrates-the-upward-trajectory-of-womens-cricket/Get in contact by emailing obornehellercricket@outlook.com

Heartland Daily Podcast
The Hundred-Year War for American Conservatism (Guest: Matthew Continetti)

Heartland Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 44:48


10 Questions with Adam Zwar
S1E92: Andy Lee

10 Questions with Adam Zwar

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 35:36


This week’s guest is Andy Lee - one half of Australia’s most popular comedy duo ever. He and Hamish Blake started off doing TV and radio at university, before making their commercial radio debut on Fox FM doing the 10pm-to-midnight slot on Mondays. We discuss that in this episode as well as their network TV debut on Channel 7’s The Hamish and Andy Show. As of this moment, Hamish and Andy have enjoyed nearly two decades of unparalleled radio and television success with their drive show on Fox FM often reaching 2.5 million listeners and their TV shows such as Real Stories, Hamish and Andy’s Gap Year, True Story with Hamish and Andy, and Hamish and Andy’s Perfect Holiday getting huge ratings and playing all over the world. In the past few years, Hamish and Andy have branched into more solo work, with Andy hosting The Cube on Channel 10 and The Hundred on Channel Nine. During our chat, Andy and I talk a lot of shop, deep dive into his friendship with Shane Warne, and conclude that there’s no reason you can’t eat pasta on consecutive nights. Please forgive my croaky  voice during this episode. You’d think I’d shut up because I was unbearable to listen to – but, no, I seemed to have a lot to say.Andy discusses turning into his Dad: This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit adamzwar.substack.com

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Matthew Continetti: The Hundred-Year War for American Conservatism

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 72:41


The election of Donald J. Trump in 2016 and the years that followed have brought significant changes to the Republican Party and, for many, what it means to be conservative. These shifts have been in process for many years, but the Trump presidency brought these significant changes to the center of America's political system. In short, from the start of the Reagan Revolution in 1980 to Trump's on-going role in the Republican Party today, the right is undergoing a massive transformation. Where this process leads will impact the shape of America's political system for decades to come, and is of interest to all across the political spectrum. For Matthew Continetti, to know where American conservatism is going one must know where it's been, and this 40 -year shift clouds the history of the conservative movement and its struggles within. In Continetti's latest book, The Right, he describes how the conservative movement began as networks of intellectuals growing a vision for a more perfect government that eventually came under pressure from populist forces. To him, within conservatism there have been two opposing forces, one pulling closer to the center and one toward the fringe, and that these patterns both continue to the present day and explain the shifts of the movement between these two extremes. Join us as Continetti lays out the long history of one of America's largest political ideologies, and shows that by understanding the past, we can better understand American conservatism's future. SPEAKERS Matthew Continetti Senior Fellow, American Enterprise Institute; Founding Editor, The Washington Free Beacon,; Author, The Right: The Hundred-Year War for American Conservatism; Twitter: @continetti George Hammond Author, Conversations With Socrates—Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on Mayhttps://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/archive/podcast/matthew-continetti-hundred-year-war-american-conservatism 2nd, 2022 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Arroe Collins
Arroe Unplugged Page Nine Hundred Ninety Nine

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 9:34


Arroe Collins
Arroe Unplugged Page Nine Hundred Ninety Nine

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 9:34


Mission: DeFi
Mission DeFi EP 57 - Hundred Finance - Borrow on 1 chain against tokens on another? @HundredFinance (Acid Bird & TerraBellus) /

Mission: DeFi

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 46:45


Interview from May of 2022 Acid Bird & TerraBellus Project Name: Hundred Finance Project URL: https://hundred.finance Project Twitter: https://twitter.com/HundredFinance Guest Names: Acid bird and TerraBellus A more conservative lending protocol The magic of mirroring gives users the power to use tokens on one chain towards lending and borrowing on another chain without having to bridge from one chain to the next Goal is a full multichain lending system The difficulties of dealing with protocols across multiple chains and how difficult it can be to be reliant upon the security and code of other protocols Lendly is a powerful new tool for projects to use for their own funding needs by allowing them to borrow using their native token as collateral Theme music is Messed Up Again by Honeycutts - https://www.epidemicsound.com/track/tZyfilYBxJ/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/missiondefi/support

Maritime Noon from CBC Radio (Highlights)
Amanda Rolfe tells us about a fun-loving new scavenger hunt in Miramichi, NB, where clues are posted so people can search for hundred dollar bills. And on the phone-in: Niki Jabbour

Maritime Noon from CBC Radio (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 53:15


People in Miramichi, NB, are excited about a new Facebook group called Miramichi Mystery Machine. Posts on the site give clues for people to find hundred dollar bills. We speak with Amanda Rolfe who found one. And on the phone-in: We do our first gardening show with Niki Jabbour!

Arroe Collins
Arroe Unplugged Page Nine Hundred Ninety Eight

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 6:20


Arroe Collins
Arroe Unplugged Page Nine Hundred Ninety Eight

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 6:20


Arroe Collins
Arroe Unplugged Page Nine Hundred Ninety Seven

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 8:54


Arroe Collins
Arroe Unplugged Page Nine Hundred Ninety Seven

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 8:54


Your Last Resort Podcast
Ep. 109 A Hundred Percent w/ Nat Rogachevsky

Your Last Resort Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 79:57


Welcome back to Your Last Resort Podcast w/ your host Brandon Legendre. This week Brandon is joined by comedian Nat Rogachevsky for episode 109. The two discuss diets, sobriety, heroin addiction, dropping out of highschool, and much more! Make sure to rate, review, & subscribe. Most importantly thank you for letting us be your last resort! Visual: https://youtu.be/b46r8mjAEyU Brandon's Social: https://linktr.ee/brandonlegendre_ https://www.instagram.com/brandonlegendre_/ Nat's Social: https://www.instagram.com/nat.comedian/

Mikey And The Mrs.
B92.1 Hundred Dollar Minute: Andrew The Coroner

Mikey And The Mrs.

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 3:02


Andrew the Mortuary worker takes on the B92.1 Hundred Dollar Minute! Original air date: 4/22/22

Go Float Yourself
Season 5 Episode 3: Sleeping Giants

Go Float Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 72:45


Space crew finds a bunch of murders asleep on the Elegius. Clarke bargains for maddi's life. And then Bellamy bargains for hers! Support the Show! Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Gofloatpod Insta: https://bit.ly/2IHgNIt Twitter: https://bit.ly/2H337qu Theme song: Severe Tire Damage by Kevin MacLeod: https://bit.ly/2ICU0h2  Logo Design by Tori Russell: https://torirussell.com/

Arroe Collins
Arroe Unplugged Page Nine Hundred Ninety Six

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 6:08


RomCom Love
73 - The Hundred-Foot Journey (2014)

RomCom Love

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 54:36


Bianca and Bonnie are headed to the French countryside for this charming tale about family, food, friendship, culture, and competition.  If you haven't seen this Oprah and Spielberg produced gem, watch it and then listen along.  The movie does the beloved book justice, and you'll be planning your next vacation just like we are.  Maybe brakes break for a reason.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
AEI Banter Podcast: Matt Continetti on the Hundred-Year War for American Conservatism

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022


Matt Continetti is a Senior Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, where his work is focused on American political thought and history, specifically focusing on the development of the Republican party and the American conservative movement in the 20th Century. Matt joins Robert and Phoebe on the podcast this week to discuss his new book, “The Right: […]

Bhakti Quest
Hundred Percent Love for Krishna

Bhakti Quest

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 53:22


Stay tuned for daily classes!

Banter: An AEI Podcast
Matt Continetti on the Hundred-Year War for American Conservatism

Banter: An AEI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 37:27


Matt Continetti is a Senior Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, where his work is focused on American political thought and history, specifically focusing on the development of the Republican party and the American conservative movement in the 20th Century. Matt joins Robert and Phoebe on the podcast this week to discuss his new book, "The Right: The Hundred-Year War for American Conservatism" (Basic Books 2022). Matt and our hosts dive into significant figures on the Right, past and present, and the conservative movement's historic successes and tensions. You can learn more about the book https://www.the-right-book.com (here).

Arroe Collins
Arroe Unplugged Page Nine Hundred Ninety Five

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 6:09


Arroe Collins
Arroe Unplugged Page Nine Hundred Ninety Four

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 7:06


Arroe Collins
Arroe Unplugged Page Nine Hundred Ninety Four

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 7:06


Cast Dice Podcast
The Cast Dice Podcast, Episode 154 - 02 Hundred Hours With Graham Davey

Cast Dice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 58:56


This week I am joined by Graham Davey, the man behind Test Of Honour and Grey For Now Games to discuss his newest project. 02 Hundred Hours is a World War Two Commando raiding game that perfectly balances stealth and action. I am really excited about this game!

Arroe Collins
Arroe Unplugged Page Nine Hundred Ninety Three

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 6:09


Arroe Collins
Arroe Unplugged Page Nine Hundred Ninety Two

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 5:24


The Comics Canon
Episode 159 – One! Hundred! Demons!

The Comics Canon

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 70:44


True Stories, our series on autobiographical and nonfiction comics, continues with Lynda Barry's emphatically punctuated One! Hundred! Demons! This collection of vignettes finds the acclaimed cartoonist grappling with such demons as a horrible boyfriend, teenage regrets, a difficult mother, a bad acid trip and the 2000 presidential election. The results are alternately charming, hilarious, melancholy, insightful and heartbreaking. But are they good enough to score a landslide victory at that ballot box known as ... The Comics Canon? In This Episode! The eagerly anticipated return of Kevin's Secret Shame! Snuffy Smith cosplay Lynda Barry invents doomscrolling! The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist by Adrian Tomine Apollo 10 ½: A Space Age Childhood Giant Days Vol. 1 Join us in two weeks as True Stories continues with Rebecca Hall's Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts! Until then: Impress your friends with our Comics Canon merchandise! Rate us on Apple Podcasts! Send us an email! Hit us up on Twitter or Facebook! And as always, thanks for listening!

Supernatural Confessions
#137 - 47 hundred | Kor Kor | A day in the hospital - Friday Night Live Ep19

Supernatural Confessions

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 90:53


47 hundred by Elle Becks (narrated by Allie) A haunted house that affects relationships, causing many families to split after staying in that unit. The funny thing is that this house attracts only one kind of demographic. Kor Kor by Vincent (narrated by Desmond) A family outing at a local chalet got cut short. The confessor only found out the real reason later on. Try explaining this paranormal encounter with rational thought if you can. Know Your Hantu - Wewe Gombel, scary looking, big breasts grandma folktales from Indonesia A day in the hospital by Nayla (narrated by Linda) Be careful who you talk to when visiting the hospital. You never know the stranger you just met with a special message for you could be the spirit of the recently deceased. Links: BUY US COFFEE! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/scfridaylive Full video, click here: Youtube/SupernaturalConfessions You can submit your confession here: Supernatural Confessions You can join our Facebook group here: SC Private Group, It must be the Hantu

Side Hustle School
#1941 - First $1,000: “My roommate threw a wad of hundred-dollar bills on the table…”

Side Hustle School

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 10:47


In this week's First $1,000 segment, we hear from Silver Picker, a college student turned coin reseller who earned $10,000 one summer from coins and metals he finds at estate sales.  Side Hustle School features a new episode EVERY DAY, featuring detailed case studies of people who earn extra money without quitting their job. This year, the show includes free guided lessons and listener Q&A several days each week. Side Hustle School features a new episode EVERY DAY, featuring detailed case studies of people who earn extra money without quitting their job. This year, the show includes free guided lessons and listener Q&A several days each week. Show notes: SideHustleSchool.com Email: team@sidehustleschool.com Be on the show: SideHustleSchool.com/questions Connect on Twitter: @chrisguillebeau Connect on Instagram: @193countries Visit Chris's main site: ChrisGuillebeau.com If you're enjoying the show, please pass it along! It's free and has been published every single day since January 1, 2017. We're also very grateful for your five-star ratings—it shows that people are listening and looking forward to new episodes.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Acton Line: The hundred-year war for American conservatism

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022


Matthew Continetti's new book, The Right, gives readers a clear historical perspective of the conservative movement—from the Progressive era to the present. He tells the story of how conservatism began as networks of intellectuals, developing and institutionalizing a vision that grew over time. This book is essential for anyone looking to understand what it truly […]

What the Hell Is Going On
WTH is going on with the Conservative Movement? Matt Continetti on "The Hundred Year War for American Conservatism.”

What the Hell Is Going On

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 49:27


The American Right is at a crossroads. Donald Trump's presidency continues to divide and challenge the conservative movement both intellectually and politically. What is the future of a principles-first movement in the era of America-First populism? Issues like immigration, the international rules-based order, partisan media, and rising military threats place countervailing pressures on a conservative movement struggling to define its future. Matt Continetti joined Dany and Marc to discuss his new book, “The Right: The Hundred Year War for American Conservatism” (Basic Books, 2022). The book examines a century of the history of the American Right, Warren Harding to Donald Trump. Matt, Dany and Marc analyze historic ties between the conservative movement and populism and the tension between grassroots conservatives and elites. They also talk about implications for foreign policy and the isolationist streak among conservatives. Matt Continetti is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where his work is focused on American political thought and history, with a particular focus on the development of the Republican Party and the American conservative movement in the 20th century. He is also a contributing editor at National Review and a columnist for Commentary Magazine. He has been published in The Atlantic, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post, among other outlets. He also appears frequently on Fox News Channel's “Special Report” with Bret Baier and MSNBC's “Meet the Press Daily” with Chuck Todd. You can learn more about his book https://www.the-right-book.com/ (here).

Acton Line
The hundred-year war for American conservatism

Acton Line

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 63:04


Matthew Continetti's new book, The Right, gives readers a clear historical perspective of the conservative movement—from the Progressive era to the present. He tells the story of how conservatism began as networks of intellectuals, developing and institutionalizing a vision that grew over time. This book is essential for anyone looking to understand what it truly means to be an American conservative. In this episode of Acton Line, Eric Kohn, Acton's director of marketing and communications, sits down with Continetti to discuss The Right and especially where the conservative movement is headed. Subscribe to our podcasts About Matthew Continetti The Right by Matthew Continetti An Awkward Alliance: Neo-Integralism and National Conservatism | Acton Institute Rise of the national conservatives with Matthew Continetti | Acton Institute See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sharon Says So
116. The Right: The Hundred Year War for American Conservatism with Matthew Continetti, Part 2

Sharon Says So

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 40:56


In the second part of a two-part conversation, Sharon continues her talk with journalist and author Matthew Continetti about the evolving history of conservatism over the past one hundred years. They pick up with some of the most important conservative thinkers in the second half of the 20th century, like founder of The National Review, William F. Buckley, the Austrian economist Friedrich Hayek, and American economist Milton Friedman. They also touch on the inner turmoil of the Democratic Party and how it helped usher in a “law and order” Nixon presidency, as well as topics like race, movement conservatism, and abortion. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sharon Says So
115. The Right: The Hundred Year War for American Conservatism with Matthew Continetti, Part 1

Sharon Says So

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 38:41


In this episode, Sharon speaks with journalist and author Matthew Continetti about the evolving history of conservatism over the past one hundred years. Continetti has spent the past few years researching and writing about the American Right. History is the study of change, and Continetti's book leads readers through the changing landscape of America as it has shaped conservative politics since 1920. Sharon and Matthew talk about Abraham Lincoln, the public embracement of Republican leadership after World War I, immigration, the constitution as an anchor for the Republican Party, and more in this first part of a two-part conversation. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.