Podcasts about Copper

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Chemical element with atomic number 29

  • 1,604PODCASTS
  • 3,578EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 23, 2021LATEST
Copper

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Best podcasts about Copper

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Latest podcast episodes about Copper

Arizona's Morning News
Emily Ryan, Valley Political Analyst, Copper State Consulting

Arizona's Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 5:03


Jim Sharpe asks Emily Ryan why there are so many undecided voters regarding the Governor's race, and if she was surprised by the new numbers in the poll. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bronze and Modern Gods
Our Underrated DC Silver Age Comics, plus Groo hits the screens, Ms. Tree & more!

Bronze and Modern Gods

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 27:39


T-shirts & more are finally available!! http://tee.pub/lic/BAMG By popular demand, John & Richard share their picks for Underrated Silver Age DC comics - how many do you have? Plus, our Hot Book of the Week is pure Magik and our Underrated Books of the Week feature Ms. Tree and Groo! Bronze and Modern Gods is the channel dedicated to the Bronze, Copper and Modern Ages of comics and comic book collecting! Follow us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/BronzeAndModernGods Follow us on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/bronzeandmoderngods #comics #comicbooks #comiccollecting --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bronzeandmoderngods/support

Hey Gurl! with Bill Janisse
GURLS just wanna have fun

Hey Gurl! with Bill Janisse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 123:45


We made it to the Season 2 Finale !!! Many of you have been requesting the presence of my next guest for quite some time now. Well the day is finally here. I am thrilled to welcome the brilliant Kristen Vesely. Kristen has been a huge mover and shaker in the liquor world as an award winning mixologist, brand ambassador, United States Bartenders Guild President, Queen of Copper (absolut elyx) , brand educator and is currently the Director of On Premise Sales for Republic National Distributing Co. in Texas and is also my best friend. Listen along as we talk about her impressive resume and journey in the exciting beverage world. This is by far the longest episode I've ever produced, so you may have to listen in shifts lol. Either way kick back, pour yourself a cocktail and enjoy the love, laughter and stories. Kristen Vesely Instagram: @kvesely8Kristen FB: https://www.facebook.com/kristen.schaefer.3 Bill Janisse Instagram: @billjanisseBill FB: @billjanisse Hey Gurl! Instagram: @heygurl.podcastHey Gurl! FB: @heygurlpodcast Hey Gurl! Tik Tok: @heygurlpodcastHey Gurl! Website: www.heygurlpodcast.com 

Mining Stock Daily
Introduction to Alto Verde Copper

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 14:50


Paul Harris welcomes in Chris Buncic, President and CEO of Alto Verde Copper, for an introduction to the company and their assets in Chile.

The Safe Haven
Katrina and The Copper Bell; From Jobless to Business

The Safe Haven

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 27:26


Katrina Bell is the owner of The Copper Bell, making and selling natural soy candles.  After losing her job at the beginning of the pandemic, she found herself at home with a toddler and without a job… so she turned a new found interest into a business that's growing quickly! She's got a great sense of humour and brings her truest self into her work. In this conversation, Katrina shares the backstory to her pivot into entrepreneurship and creating The Copper Bell. We talk about the ups and downs of owning your own business and what showing up online authentically looks like for Katrina. ---LINKS:The Copper Bell on Instagram: @the.copper.bellThe Copper Bell's Website: thecopperbell.caWebsite: thesafehaven.coInstagram: @thesafehavenpodcastFrequency Podcast Network: The Safe HavenFacebook: The Safe HavenAll the good stuff: linktree/thesafehavenpodcastEmail: hello@thesafehaven.co

That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs
Episode 347: Allison Trowbridge + Copper Books

That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 58:56


As the holiday week starts, I'm so happy to have my friend Allison Trowbridge in the studio, talking about books and reading and Copper Books! I know we love to talk books and reading (more coming before the end of the year) and Copper Books is such an awesome environment for readers like us! . . . . . Sign up to receive the AFD Week In Review email and ask questions to future guests! #thatsoundsfunpodcast . . . . . Thank you to our partners! Thistle Farms: Get 15% off your purchase at thistlefarms.org when you use the discount code THATSOUNDSFUN. That Sounds Fun Podcast Tour: We're coming to a city near you in February and March of 2022! Just go to anniefdowns.com/events for all the details and to get your tickets! Rothy's: Rothy's: Get $20 off your first purchase at rothys.com/SOUNDSFUN. Indeed: Get started with a $75 sponsored job credit to upgrade your job post at Indeed.com/soundsfun Pendulum: Visit pendulumlife.com to find out more. And use promo code THATSOUNDSFUN for 20% off your first bottle of membership.

Regenerate You by Dr. Nirvana
Hormones, Anemia and Copper

Regenerate You by Dr. Nirvana

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 8:56


Welcome to Regenerate You™! If you're experiencing anxiety, hormonal imbalances, heavy, painful periods, PMS, digestive issues, adrenal fatigue and insomnia…and despite taking supplements while making dietary & lifestyle changes, but don't see a shift in your symptoms...this one mineral may be to blame. I see this frequently where my patients are doing ‘all the right things,' but they're still not seeing any improvement.  If this sounds like you, there's a high chance that copper toxicity may be one of the key underlying causes driving your symptoms that you're missing.If you're looking for additional advice, feel free to visit my blog here. You can also stay connected with me on my Facebook page @DrNirvanaHeals or on my Instagram @DrNirvana.And remember, when you regenerate, there's a new you every day!

Bronze and Modern Gods
Viewer Mail, Comic Book NFT madness, more collecting burnout chat & more!

Bronze and Modern Gods

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 25:33


T-shirts & more are finally available!! http://tee.pub/lic/BAMG Bonus Episodes are back, as John & Richard answer your questions about comic book collecting burnout, the Veve Marketplace and more! And in the Comic NFT Watch, what the heck is going on with VeVe and those DC NFTs? Bronze and Modern Gods is the channel dedicated to the Bronze, Copper and Modern Ages of comics and comic book collecting! Follow us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/BronzeAndModernGods Follow us on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/bronzeandmoderngods #comics #comicbooks #comiccollecting --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bronzeandmoderngods/support

Crypto Unstacked
Special Episode: Copper | Accelerating flexUSD to a $1 Billion Market Cap with Copper ClearLoop

Crypto Unstacked

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 45:39


This is a special episode recorded for the CoinFLEX x Copper partnership launch. We unstack:- Entrepreneurial lessons - Trial by fire as Chief Product Officer- What problems Copper solves for active crypto participants- Who are Copper's clients?- What's different about the ClearLoop clearing and settlement solution?- Significance of Copper's flexUSD stablecoin integration+ more!FOLLOW OUR GUESTCopper (Website)This episode is presented by CoinFLEX.CoinFLEX is the Home of Crypto Yield and committed to providing institutional and retail investors an easily accessible platform to earn and trade crypto. CoinFLEX creates innovative solutions to bring investors and markets together through simple and intuitive products such as flexUSD, the world's first interest-earning stablecoin, and AMM+, the most-capital efficient automated market maker in the world. Visit www.coinflex.com for more information. DISCLOSUREThe Crypto Unstacked Podcast is meant for informational purposes only and should not be considered as financial or investment advice. Nothing expressed in this podcast should be construed as a solicitation, recommendation, endorsement or offer to buy or sell any financial products. 

Rock N Roll Pantheon
The Mistress Carrie Podcast 76: Jay Jay French Author and Twister Sister Guitarist

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 95:37


Episode #76 Jay Jay French, Host of The French Connection Podcast, Founding member of Twisted Sister, Artist management, Columnist for Inc, Goldmine & Copper, and Keynote Speaker just released his new book Twisted Business: Tales from my Life in Rock N Roll. Mistress Carrie and Jay Jay talked technology, touring, inspiration, partying, Twisted Sister, MTV, New York, Boston, Sports, Radio, Ramones, David Bowie, the heyday of Rock in 1971, and the future of Rock. Episode Notes Thanks to DCU for sponsoring this episode. Check out the custom playlist for Episode #76 here Find JayJay French Online: Website Facebook Twitter Instagram Find Mistress Carrie online: Official Website The Mistress Carrie Backstage Pass on Patreon Twitter Facebook Instagram YouTube Cameo Pantheon Podcast Network Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bronze and Modern Gods
Comic Book Collecting burnout? Plus, Sword Master, The Question & Black Panther

Bronze and Modern Gods

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 31:44


T-shirts & more are finally available!! http://tee.pub/lic/BAMG John & Richard are a little burnt out on collecting - how do we deal with it? Plus, our Hot Book of the Week is an Avengers classic and our Underrated Books of the Week feature Sword Master, The Question and...Rorschach! Bronze and Modern Gods is the channel dedicated to the Bronze, Copper and Modern Ages of comics and comic book collecting! Follow us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/BronzeAndModernGods Follow us on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/bronzeandmoderngods #comics #comicbooks #comiccollecting --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bronzeandmoderngods/support

Old Time Radio Westerns
Copper Gulch Patrol – Challenge of the Yukon (12-12-49)

Old Time Radio Westerns

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 31:12


Original Air Date: December 12, 1949 Host: Andrew Rhynes Show: Challenge of the Yukon Phone: (707) 98 OTRDW (6-8739) Stars: • Paul Sutton (Sgt. Preston) Writer: • Fran Striker Producer: • George W. Trendle Exit music from: Roundup on the Prairie by Aaron Kenny https://bit.ly/3kTj0kK

Challenge of the Yukon - OTRWesterns.com
Copper Gulch Patrol – Challenge of the Yukon (12-12-49)

Challenge of the Yukon - OTRWesterns.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 31:12


Original Air Date: December 12, 1949 Host: Andrew Rhynes Show: Challenge of the Yukon Phone: (707) 98 OTRDW (6-8739) Stars: • Paul Sutton (Sgt. Preston) Writer: • Fran Striker Producer: • George W. Trendle Exit music from: Roundup on the Prairie by Aaron Kenny https://bit.ly/3kTj0kK

The Mistress Carrie Podcast
76 - Jay Jay French Author and Twister Sister Guitarist

The Mistress Carrie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 95:07


Episode #76 Jay Jay French, Host of The French Connection Podcast, Founding member of Twisted Sister, Artist management, Columnist for Inc, Goldmine & Copper, and Keynote Speaker just released his new book Twisted Business: Tales from my Life in Rock N Roll. Mistress Carrie and Jay Jay talked technology, touring, inspiration, partying, Twisted Sister, MTV, New York, Boston, Sports, Radio, Ramones, David Bowie, the heyday of Rock in 1971, and the future of Rock. Episode Notes Thanks to DCU for sponsoring this episode. Check out the custom playlist for Episode #76 here Find JayJay French Online: Website Facebook Twitter Instagram Find Mistress Carrie online: Official Website The Mistress Carrie Backstage Pass on Patreon Twitter Facebook Instagram YouTube Cameo Pantheon Podcast Network Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Scriptnotes Podcast
525 - The Story This Was Based On

Scriptnotes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 62:53


John and Craig invite investigative reporter Zeke Faux (Bloomberg) for a new round of How Would This Be A Movie. They cover stories ranging from the secret history of sushi to fake Scottish rappers. Zeke shares what it's like to option an article to Hollywood and tricks for getting noticed by producers. In follow-up, we get a romantic update from Oops and answer a listener question on whether it's worth watching prior adaptations of a given work. In our bonus segment for premium members, we ask: what are the remaining distinctions between writing for Hollywood and writing for magazines? Scriptnotes Hoodies order by November 18 in time for the Holidays! Veterans in Media and Entertainment Movie Pass is Back! 339 – Mostly Terrible People sign up for the full episode at Scriptnotes.net Zeke Faux and on Twitter! How Thieves Stole $40 Million of Copper by Spray-Painting Rocks By Andy Hoffman and Benedikt Kammel Secret History of Sushi by Daniel Fromson with illustrations by Igor Bastidas for the NYT The Migrant Laborers Who Clean Up after Disasters by Sarah Stillman for the New Yorker ‘The story of a weird world I was warned never to tell' by Sarah McDermott for the BBC Silibill N' Brains: Meet the Two Scottish Rappers Who Conned the World by Tom Seymour for Vice and Fake It Till You Make It: The Great Hip Hop Hoax by Samuel on DDW Magazine Inevitable Foundation Friendsgiving Miry's List Jasmila Žbanić, Quo Vadis, Aida? and #Craigana Roam Research Get a Scriptnotes T-shirt! Gift a Scriptnotes Subscription or treat yourself to a premium subscription! Craig Mazin on Twitter John August on Twitter John on Instagram Outro by Ryan Gerber (send us yours!) Scriptnotes is produced by Megana Rao and edited by Matthew Chilelli. Email us at ask@johnaugust.com You can download the episode here.

Your Call
One Planet: How the copper & zinc Ambler Road project threatens Alaska's Native communities & wildlife

Your Call

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 52:29


Proven and Probable
Andrew Hecht - Green Energy Are Catalysts For Lithium And Copper

Proven and Probable

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 21:25


Please share this video: https://youtu.be/5F5yG9WRw08 Joining us for a conversation is Andrew Hecht a world renowned commodities analyst with over 40 years of experience. Noram Lithium: (TSX.V: NRM | OTCQB: NRVTF) Website: https://noramlithiumcorp.com/ Corporate Presentation: https://noramlithiumcorp.com/investors/presentations/ Nevada Copper: (TSX: NCU | OTC: NEVDF) Website: www.nevadacopper.com Corporate Presentation: https://nevadacopper.com/investors/presentations/ Website| www.provenandprobable.com Call me directly at 855.505.1900 or email: Maurice@MilesFranklin.com Precious Metals FAQ - https://www.milesfranklin.com/faq-maurice/ Proven and Probable Where we deliver Mining Insights & Bullion Sales. I'm a licensed broker for Miles Franklin Precious Metals Investments (https://www.milesfranklin.com/contact/) Where we provide unlimited options to expand your precious metals portfolio, from physical delivery, offshore depositories, and precious metals IRA's. Call me directly at (855) 505-1900 or you may email maurice@milesfranklin.com. Proven and Probable provides insights on mining companies, junior miners, gold mining stocks, uranium, silver, platinum, zinc & copper mining stocks, silver and gold bullion in Canada, the US, Australia, and beyond.

Red Sneaker Writers
Creating Unique Characters with Lynne Reeves

Red Sneaker Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 41:33


Bestselling author William Bernhardt discusses the latest news from the world of books, offers writing tips, and interviews Lynne Reeves, author of the terrific new thriller The Dangers of an Ordinary Night.Chapter 1: IntroductionChapter 2: Newsa) Justice Department sues to block PRH acquisition of Simon & Schuster:b) The proposed Copper author social media platform starts early adopter list;c) Amazon adds "transparency codes" to POD books; andd) Atticus is a new book formatting platform for PCs and Macs.Chapter 3: InterviewBernhardt interviews Lynne Reeves about her new novel and other topics, such as:a) her nonfiction work on parenting and family life;b) why she inaugurated a new pseudonym with this book;c) why she has multiple books in progress at one time;d) why all characters should have their own DNA; ande) why every character should be flawed.Chapter 4: Parting WordsBernhardt's new novel, Exposed (Splitsville Legal Thriller Series Book 2), is now on sale in hardcover and eBook editions: https://amzn.to/30v5YSTJoin the RedSneaker Writers Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/113141678727273Support this podcast and keep it ad-free by becoming a patron: https://www.patreon.com/willbernWilliam Bernhardtwww.williambernhardt.comwillbern@gmail.com

Distillers Talk
Distillers Talk #79 - Mike Root, Copper Sky Distillery

Distillers Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 72:39


Alan Bishop and Christi Atkinson chat with Mike Root of Copper Sky Distillery and try a sampling of their whiskeys

The Full Go with Jason Goff
The Bulls Better Buckle Up for This West Coast Trip, Plus WNBA Finals MVP Kahleah Copper

The Full Go with Jason Goff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 70:24


Jason opens with the news that Nikola Vucevic will miss time after a positive COVID test and explains why the Bulls might have to just hang on and hope for the best during their upcoming West Coast swing (00:30). Next, he chats with Kahleah Copper of the WNBA champion Chicago Sky about her Finals MVP, how her career brought her to Chicago, what she's learned from Candace Parker, and more (19:18). Finally, he closes it out with some voicemails on the Bulls and whether Bears fans should get their hopes up after Justin Fields's performance on 'Monday Night Football' (43:24).  We always want to hear from you! Leave Jason a message on the Listener Line at 773-359-3103. Host: Jason Goff Guests: Kahleah Copper Producer: Steve Ceruti and Chris Tannehill Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Mining Stock Daily
Corporate Update with Kutcho Copper

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 13:29


Paul connects with Kutcho Copper's Vince Sorace, CEO, and Rob Duncan, COO.

CopperCasts
Rebecca Ferguson - Actress - CopperCasts Ep 017

CopperCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 38:26


In somewhat of a departure from our regularly scheduled programming, we bring you a unique episode of Coppercasts with our special guest, award-winning actress Rebecca Ferguson. Copper recently released its first foray into the world of television advertising, with a 30 sec exclusive spot on Bloomberg. In this episode we speak to our leading lady about her star-studded career, growing up in Sweden, shooting her newest film Dune (out now, and amazing!), NFTs, and crypto writ large. I can honestly say I've never had this much fun talking about crypto. We don't have our usual Show & Tell element, but in this case we have something better. Check out Rebecca and Copper's first TV commercial here. Don't forget to download the full episode, and subscribe on Spotify and Apple Podcasts. You can hear more from the Copper team by following @CopperHQ, or visit our site and subscribe to our weekly newsletter, copper.co/insights.

The Piff Pod
Ep 180 - So Why Are The Children Crying?

The Piff Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 34:12


Paul Dabek returns to The Piff Pod! After catching up on Paul's recent move into the Piff the Magic Dragon Warehouse, Paul, Piff, and Matt take a deep dive into their individual shows and try and get at exactly what kind of magic they're presenting to the audience every night. Copper poisoning, magnets, self love, and more! Plus, Matt Donnelly: The Mind Noodler definitely has a new advertising slogan! Follow Paul on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pauldabek Check out Piff the Magic Dragon on PIFFTREON for VIP access including EXCLUSIVE PODCAST EPISODES every week, regular updates on all things Piff, exclusive merch, and much more! https://www.patreon.com/PiffTheMagicDragon

Financial Survival Network
Financial Deflation Coming Soon - Bob Hoye #5321

Financial Survival Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 43:22


Summary: Ever since the election, the 1970s type of inflation has come into full swing, and Hoye has observed that the big game in the financial markets is inflation and financial assets. Hoye has looked at the history of these financial bubbles and the patterns that accompany them to determine what we can expect out of the current circumstances Highlights: -Since the election, the 1970s type of inflation has come into play -In the financial markets, Hoye has observed that the big game is inflation and financial assets -In a history of interest rates, you've never had anything trade negative on a nominal basis -People are saying tangible assets are going forward, but Hoye thinks this is improbable -Following every great financial bubble, there is a pattern -The fed was unaware in the dangers of the great financial bubble—once it's over, most prices have deflated -The rise in commodity prices is associated with the increase in business activity you get at the final stages of a business mania -Rising real rates will be part of the post-bubble world -Copper is declining, gold's real prices is declining, interest rates are declining, and the dollar is prepared to rally -These items are doing what they've done at the climax of previous bubbles Useful Links: Financial Survival Network Charts and Markets  

Bronze and Modern Gods
Our Most Wanted Books for 2022, plus Ren & Stimpy & the Marvel key everyone is sleeping on!

Bronze and Modern Gods

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 43:03


T-shirts & more are finally available!! http://tee.pub/lic/BAMG John & Richard share their comic book collecting goals for 2022 - what's on your grail list? Plus, our Hot Book of the Week is a Todd McFarlane classic and our Underrated Books of the Week feature the Legion of Super-heroes and SHIELD! Bronze and Modern Gods is the channel dedicated to the Bronze, Copper and Modern Ages of comics and comic book collecting! Follow us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/BronzeAndModernGods Follow us on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/bronzeandmoderngods #comics #comicbooks #comiccollecting --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bronzeandmoderngods/support

Mangala Shri Bhuti - The Link
Contemplating the Copper-Colored Mountain: Reflections on Kongtrul Rinpoche's Supplication to Guru Rinpoche (Link #582)

Mangala Shri Bhuti - The Link

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 51:47


Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast
Too Much Zinc Causes a Copper Deficiency

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 2:49


If you take zinc, don't forget to also take copper! TRACE MINERALS ENHANCED: https://bit.ly/3CL5VAo FREE COURSE ➜ ➜ https://courses.drberg.com/product/how-to-bulletproof-your-immune-system/ FREE MINI-COURSE ➜ ➜ Take Dr. Berg's Free Keto Mini-Course! ADD YOUR SUCCESS STORY HERE: https://bit.ly/3z9TviS Talk to a Dr. Berg Keto Consultant today and get the help you need on your journey (free consultation). Call 1-540-299-1557 with your questions about Keto, Intermittent Fasting, or the use of Dr. Berg products. Consultants are available Monday through Friday from 8 AM to 10 PM EST. Saturday & Sunday from 9 AM to 6 PM EST. USA Only. Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 51 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional & natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government & the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning. Dr. Berg's Website: http://bit.ly/37AV0fk Dr. Berg's Recipe Ideas: http://bit.ly/37FF6QR Dr. Berg's Reviews: http://bit.ly/3hkIvbb Dr. Berg's Shop: http://bit.ly/3mJcLxg Dr. Berg's Bio: http://bit.ly/3as2cfE Dr. Berg's Health Coach Training: http://bit.ly/3as2p2q Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drericberg Messenger: https://www.messenger.com/t/drericberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drericberg/ YouTube: http://bit.ly/37DXt8C

Bronze and Modern Gods
"Could you ever sell your collection?" Plus, Eternals, and more oddball comics including Prez!

Bronze and Modern Gods

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 24:55


T-shirts & more are finally available!! http://tee.pub/lic/BAMG Buying Comics on Instagram - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xh1jjcT-TAk Whitmans - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwhUN7P67CE Bonus Episode time, as John & Richard answer your questions about what precious comic books in their collections they could never sell, plus you chime in with your favorite oddball comics! And in the Comic NFT Watch, it's a weird week for VeVe! Bronze and Modern Gods is the channel dedicated to the Bronze, Copper and Modern Ages of comics and comic book collecting! Follow us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/BronzeAndModernGods Follow us on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/bronzeandmoderngods #comics #comicbooks #comiccollecting --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bronzeandmoderngods/support

Mining Stock Daily
Missing Pieces to the Copper Market & Is China Ready for Afghanistan?

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 82:16


Today we connect with Simon Hunt, a man who knows the copper market and the Chinese economy after years of analysis and reporting. He breaks down both for us and dives into some missing pieces of the copper market we've neglected to see. We then turn to Chris Wnuk, an exploration geologist with working knowledge on the geology and mineral endowments of Afghanistan. We discuss the topic of China moving into that country since American withdrew personnel. Many political pundits have misconceptions of this topic. We'd like to thank our sponsors: Integra Resources is advancing the past-producing DeLamar Project in southwestern Idaho. The Company has continued to demonstrate resource growth and conversion through greenfield and brownfield exploration and plans on delivering a pre-feasibility study in Q4 2021 to further de-risk and advance the project towards permitting. Integra Resources trades on the TSX-V under ITR and the NYSE American under ITRG. Corvus Gold is a North American gold exploration and development company, focused on its near-term gold-silver mining projects in southwestern Nevada. The Company holds a commanding land position within the Bullfrog Mining District. Neighbouring, adjacent projects controlled by AngloGold Ashanti, Kinross Gold and Coeur Mining highlight this active District. The two 100% owned North Bullfrog & Mother Lode projects have a combined nearly 4-Million oz gold of in-pit resource and continues to grow with an on-going, successful, resource expansion drill program. Corvus trades on the TSX and the Nasdaq with the symbol KOR. Western Copper and Gold is focused on developing the world-class Casino project in Canada's Yukon Territory. The Casino project consists of an impressive 11 billion pounds of copper and 21 million ounces of gold in an overall resource. Western Copper and Gold trades on the TSX and the NYSE American with WRN. Be sure to follow the company via their website, www.westerncopperandgold.com. Rio-2 is advancing the Fenix Gold Project in Chile, the largest undeveloped gold heap leach project in the Americas. Fenix consists of 5 million ounces in the measured and indicated resource category and 1.4 million ounces in the inferred resource category. With a robust PFS in place, Fenix is set up for fast-tracked construction and production. You can find a list of project and company information on their website, rio2.com.

Green Industry Podcast
An Absolute Essential w/ Brent Stoy aka Mow Muscles

Green Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 24:43


In today's episode Brent and Megan Stoy talk about their lawn care business and journey to better health. This was recorded at the lawn care industry's largest party of the year at Copper and Kings Distillery in Louisville, Kentucky. This annual event had hundreds in attendance and this episodes helps to capture some of the joy that was present at this lawn care community meet up aka the GIE Rally.  GreenIndustryPodcast.com @greenindustrypodcast Try Jobber Best Business Practices for Landscapers - Audiobook Best Business Practices for Landscapers - Paperback Gulf Coast Bookkeeping TheHardscapeAcademy.com LawntrepreneurAcademy.com (Podcast Save 10%)

Corporate Escapees
350 - 5 Reasons To Build Your Own Leads As A Cloud Partner

Corporate Escapees

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 10:39


After years of working along with Copper, a sales CRM platform, Paul shares his experience on lead generation as a cloud partner. The more valuable lesson: Create your own leads. During this 10 minute episode, he lists 5 reasons why you should take a shortcut and simply learn from his experience and where you can get help if you're not building those leads quickly enough.   Links 350 - Show Notes Take the Accelerated Pulse Check! Masterclass Accelerated Sales Program   Connect With Paul  On LinkedIn On Facebook On Twitter: @BuildLiveGive On Instagram: @paulhigginsmentoring Email: Paul@paulhigginsmentoring.com   Thank You for Tuning In!

Mining Stock Daily
Corporate Introduction to World Copper

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 18:07


Paul Harris connects with World Copper CEO Nolan Peterson for an introduction into the company and its projects in Chile and Arizona.

Mining Stock Daily
Corporate Update from Ero Copper

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 15:19


David Strang, CEO of Ero Copper, joins us to provide his corporate commentary on the company and producing copper during this cycle.

Mining Stock Daily
Update from Northwest Copper and Successful Exploration Drill Holes

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 12:45


Northwest Copper recently shared results of good grade and widths of copper, silver and gold mineralization. Paul revisits the story with CEO Peter Bell.

Financial Survival Network
Good Time to Buy Mining Stocks? - Rob Stevens Summary: #5315

Financial Survival Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 19:54


Summary: Rob Stevens comes on the podcast to help us get a better understanding of why mining stocks move the way that they do, and he gives us some context around the current situation. Companies are expanding resources and making discoveries, but people are holding back on riskier stocks due to the equity markets. Tune in to learn more about what's to come, and to get information on resources that can help you comprehend the inner workings of this industry. Highlights: -When it comes to understanding the mining sector, you want an understanding of why these stocks move in a certain direction—especially when you don't expect them to -When you think you know what you're doing here, that's when you're most vulnerable -Market indifference towards drilling results -Companies are expanding resources and making discoveries -People are holding back on riskier stocks because the equity markets are a bit depressed -There has been a lot of financing -The vast majority of investors in the market are at the wrong side of the trade -The metal price index is sitting at the same high point as it was in 2012 -We are going to see a lot more news flow and activity as we get into the new year -There's a lot of money on the sidelines waiting for a peak -Electric vehicles increase interest in commodities like copper -Copper hit its peak and pulled back, but it's definitely in an up trend -$4.50-$5 copper makes new discoveries really attractive—copper is something to keep your eye on -$4 seems to be the new floor for copper -Gold is treading water, but at good prices -There are so many different influences on gold price -Safety is always an issue for uranium -You also need to understand the mining process to understand why the stocks do what they do Useful Links: Financial Survival Network Mining Essentials How to Analyze Exploration Company Drill Results with Dr. Rob Stevens Non-Technical Resource Investors Can Succeed if They Are Willing to Put in the Work with Rob Stevens

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 135: Part 2 - Why Jewelers of the 60s and 70s Were Part of the Counterculture—Even if they Didn't Realize It with Jewelry Experts Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 24:57


What you'll learn in this episode: The characteristics that define contemporary American jewelry What narrative art jewelry is, and why it was so prevalent in the 1960s and 70s What defines American counterculture, and why so many 60s and 70s jewelers were a part of it Who the most notable American jewelry artists are and why we need to capture their stories How Susan and Cindi developed their book, and why they hope other people will build on their research About Susan Cummins Susan Cummins has been involved in numerous ways in the visual arts world over the last 35 years, from working in a pottery studio, doing street fairs, running a retail shop called the Firework in Mill Valley and developing the Susan Cummins Gallery into a nationally recognized venue for regional art and contemporary art jewelry. Now she spends most of her time working with a private family foundation called Rotasa and as a board member of both Art Jewelry Forum and California College of the Arts. About Cindi Strauss Cindi Strauss is the Sara and Bill Morgan Curator of Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design and Assistant Director, Programming at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH). She received her BA with honors in art history from Hamilton College and her MA in the history of decorative arts from the Cooper-Hewitt/Parsons School of Design. At the MFAH, Cindi is responsible for the acquisition, research, publication, and exhibition of post-1900 decorative arts, design, and craft. Jewelry is a mainstay of Cindi's curatorial practice. In addition to regularly curating permanent collection installations that include contemporary jewelry from the museum's collection, she has organized several exhibitions that are either devoted solely to jewelry or include jewelry in them. These include: Beyond Ornament: Contemporary Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2003–2004); Ornament as Art: Avant-Garde Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2007); Liquid Lines: Exploring the Language of Contemporary Metal (2011); and Beyond Craft: Decorative Arts from the Leatrice S. and Melvin B. Eagle Collection (2014). Cindi has authored or contributed to catalogs and journals on jewelry, craft, and design topics, and has been a frequent lecturer at museums nationwide. She also serves on the editorial advisory committee for Metalsmith magazine. Additional Resources:  Museum of Fine Arts Houston Art Jewelry Forum  Photos: Police State Badge 1969/ 2007 sterling silver, 14k gold 2 7/8 x 2 15/16 x 3 15/16 inches Museum of Arts and Design, New York City, 2012.20 Diane Kuhn, 2012 PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Portrait of William Clark in a bubble_2 1971                        photographer: Unknown Necklace for the American Taxpayer 1971 Brass with silver chain  17 " long (for the chain)  and 6.25 x 1.25 " wide for the hanging brass pendant. Collection unknown Dad's Payday 1968 sterling, photograph, fabric, found object 4 ½ x 4 x ¼ inches Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg Photo: Lynn Thompson Title: "Slow Boat" Pendant (Portrait of Ken Cory) Date: 1976 Medium: Enamel, sterling silver, wood, copper, brass, painted stone, pencil, ballpoint pen spring, waxed lacing, Tiger Balm tin, domino Dimensions: 16 3/4 × 4 1/8 × 1 in. (42.5 × 10.4 × 2.5 cm) Helen Williams Drutt Family Collection, USA Snatch Purse 1975 Copper, Enamel, Leather, Beaver Fur, Ermine Tails, Coin Purse 4 ½ x 4 x 3/8” Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg The Good Guys 1966 Walnut, steel, copper, plastic, sterling silver, found objects 101.6 mm diameter Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, 1977.2.102'                        PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Fetish Pendant 1966 wood, brass, copper, glass, steel, paper, silver 3 ½ x 3 ½ x 5/8 inches Detroit Institute of Art, Founders Society Purchase with funds from the Modern Decorative Arts Group, Andrew L. and Gayle Shaw Camden Contemporary and Decorative Arts Fund, Jean Sosin, Dr. and Mrs. Roger S. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Danto, Dorothy and Byron Gerson, and Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Miller / Bridgeman Images November 22, 1963 12:30 p.m. 1967 copper, silver, brass, gold leaf, newspaper photo, walnut, velvet, glass 6 ¼ x 5 x 7/8 inches Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Rose Mary Wadman, 1991.57.1 Front and back covers Pages from the book Transcript: What makes American jewelry American? As Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss discovered while researching their book, In Flux: American Jewelry and the Counterculture, contemporary American jewelry isn't defined by style or materials, but by an attitude of independence and rebellion. Susan, who founded Art Jewelry Forum, and Cindi, who is Curator of Decorative Arts, Crafts and Design at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about what it was like to interview some of the most influential American artists; why they hope their book will inspire additional research in this field; and why narrative jewelry artists were part of the counterculture, even if they didn't consider themselves to be. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Definitely, it's a history book, but it's not, because you really do get that flavor for who they are or what they were passionate about or what they were trying to express. I'm just curious; how did you distill all of this into counterculture? Was that something that you decided in a brainstorm? You could have come up with a lot of different things. Cindi: I'm going to let Susan to take that, because—and I admit this freely—I had a very specific idea of what the counterculture was and how people slotted into that. Through Susan and Damian, my understanding of the counterculture was broadened in such an incredible way. They really pushed me to open up my mindset and think about it in many different, layered ways, and I have benefited from that dramatically. So, Susan led that. Susan, I'll turn it over to you. Susan: O.K., and I'll try and answer. We had decided to focus on the 60s and 70s and limit it to that time period. That was the counterculture time period, and as I said before, there are so many in the craft world, which I was participating in during that time, that reflect the sensibilities of the counterculture. As we were interviewing these people, what was really interesting is that many of them didn't necessarily think of themselves of part of the counterculture. They thought of themselves as hardworking jewelers that couldn't be part of the counterculture because that was the dropout, don't do anything, take drugs part of the world. But that wasn't really the counterculture.  The counterculture was especially young people who were opposed to the way that people were living their lives. That got really defined in the 50s, which was a very austere, go to work, make money, buy a refrigerator, get a house and even if it was killing you, do this kind of life. They said, “We don't want that. We want a life that feels meaningful to us, that has real value.” In all kinds of different ways, that was what the counterculture consisted of: thinking in a different way about how life could be for us, something that's meaningful, something that you love doing, something that has some consideration of ecology and equal rights and all of the counterwar attitudes reflected in it. That was really what people wanted to do. The counterculture is big and broad.  A lot of people who thought, for example, that Fred Woell was a Boy Scout. If you asked Fred or you saw his papers or you asked his wife, “What kind of car did Fred drive?” A VW van. What kind of food did he eat? Natural foods. Did he build himself a house? Yes, he did, with solar panels on it. He was a counterculture guy. He just looked like a Boy Scout. A lot of the things you learn in the Boy Scouts were actually part of the counterculture, too, the survival skills and all of that. It's a funny thing to say, but I think in the process of writing this book, we convinced a lot of the jewelers we interviewed that they were part of the counterculture even though they hadn't realized it themselves either. Sharon: That's interesting. Did you enter this process thinking that these people were part of the counterculture, or was that something that came to you as put everything together? Susan: I think it was kind of there from the beginning, but not really. I think we discovered it along the way. In fact, I don't think we were thinking about having the word counterculture in the title. I think for a long time we thought it would be “American Jewelry in the 60s and 70s.” I think it was a provocative idea to put counterculture in the title. It might be that it was a bad idea because, as Cindi said, a lot of people have a narrow point of view as to what the counterculture is, but I hope that if anybody decides to pick up the book, they can find a much broader definition, which I think is the real definition. To limit it is not fair to the expression. Sharon: I think the book does broaden the definition. Before reading the book or looking at the book, I entered into it thinking of Sausalito. I grew up on the West Coast, so to me, the counterculture was Sausalito. My family and I drove through there once when I was a young person, so that was the counterculture, or Berkeley was the counterculture. I Googled the word counterculture, and it's interesting because it goes through all different periods of history that were counterculture. It wasn't just the 60s and 70s. Who did you feel it was wrenching to leave out of the book when you had make some decisions? Cindi: Before I would answer that specifically, to give a little more context, there were a number of jewelry artists who were personally active in all the ways we were highlighting in this book, but their jewelry itself didn't reflect that. We had long debates about how to deal with that. Ultimately, for better or for worse, it came down to the fact that at the end of the day, the book was about the jewelry. It was rooted in the actual works of art. There were artists whose jewelry did not reflect their personal lives. With those artists, we were able to include them in the book in terms of quotes and information that helped set the stage and provide information, whether it was about things from their own lives, if they were professors, what was in their program, but their jewelry wasn't necessarily featured. I'm thinking of someone like Eleanor Moty, who was incredibly helpful in terms of the interview that Susan did and being a sounding board, but her jewelry didn't make it into the book pictorially. There were others who were also like that.  I think I wouldn't necessarily call it gut-wrenching, but it was something we struggled with over a period of time, because these were artists who were very active; they were active in shows; they were teaching; they were going to Summervale; they were going to SNAG, some of them, some of them not. For me, Wayne Coulter is probably the big regret. I did an extensive interview with Wayne and his wife, Jan Brooks, and it was a great interview. He was very involved with Summervale, and a lot of his jewelry would have fit pictorially in the book, but we were never quite able to get the images and the materials we needed to include the jewelry. He's included, as is Jan, in terms of quotes and things like that. For me, that would be one that I regret. Sharon: This is not to say anybody's second tier. I don't mean that. Cindi: Oh no, not at all. Sometimes there are practicalities. This is a time when a lot of the artists don't even know, necessarily, where their jewelry from the late 60s or early 70s resides. Maybe they had slides of it, but those slides may not exist, or they may have been completely discolored. There were practical issues that made certain pieces and/or certain artists—we were unable to go as far as we wanted to. Susan, what do you think? Susan: Yeah, I completely agree with all that. I would say that we interviewed a lot of people that didn't get in the book. There was a lot of jewelry that started up right at the very end of the 70s and went into the 80s. We squeaked in a couple of those people, but what you have to think about is that we're showing you or talking about examples of people in various phases. Some people were very political. Some people weren't so political in their work necessarily, but they lived a counterculture lifestyle and participated in counterculture activities, and it shows up in their jewelry but not as strongly as in others. We tried to give a mix of examples of the things we were talking about, but as Cindi said, there were lots of people we interviewed that never showed up in the book. We must have interviewed Laurie Hall, for example, about three times. Her work isn't in the book, but Damian went on to write about her. That book will be coming out in the fall. We acquired an awful lot of information that didn't ever get in the book and people we interviewed that didn't get in the book. You just have to go with the most obvious choices at a certain point and think of them as examples of other people that you could have included, but you didn't. Maybe some people were upset by that, but you do have to make some decisions. As Cindi said, there are certain practical limitations. Sharon: I think I gave a birthday party when I was 13, and I was so traumatized by having to make decisions about the guest list. I always wonder about it, if you make decisions about who to put in and who to leave out. Do you know the name of the book about Laurie Hall? What's it called? Susan: It's called North by Northwest: The Stories of Laurie Hall. Or maybe The Jewelry of Laurie Hall. Sharon: That leads into my next question. Is there going to be a part two or an addition to the book you just wrote, In Flux? There's so much more material. Susan: Definitely, there's more material. Somebody needs to look at African-American jewelers. We barely got to include some aspects of that. Native American jewelers, too, have a whole history that we didn't really cover at all. These things are whole topics unto themselves, really. We hope someone will take up the mantle and find out more about that. There's a huge amount of continuing research. We don't have any plans to do that, so anybody listening can definitely take it up. Go for it. It's up to you. Sharon: It sounds like a great PhD project. Cindi: Yeah, it can be a PhD thesis. There could be a series of articles. It doesn't have to be a big book about something. You could do all whole symposium based on this topic. You started off with a question about our jewelry journey. I think this is and will be, for all of us, an ongoing journey. Susan and Damian have written this book on Laurie Hall. There will be other threads that, either collectively or individually, we'll want to take up in continuing our own journey off of this book, areas that piqued our interest and we'll go from there. As Susan said, we're hoping people will pick up the mantle. One of the things we learned through this process, and it's probably a lesson that should have been obvious to us beforehand, but the field of American jewelry is a young field. For most of its history, there have been dominant narratives. I'm part of that group of people who have helped with those dominant narratives. As a field evolves, you lay down the baseline, then you focus on individual artists, then you go back and start to layer in additional histories in a way that you can actually understand the full field. A lot of the artists we included in In Flux worked on the outskirts of what was previously the dominant narrative. I think as we proved, that doesn't make their work any less significant, influential, etc. from artists who were part of the dominant narrative. It's a phenomenal way for the field to continue to grow. I hope that as more institutions of all types focus on contemporary jewelry, it will engender additional layers of that story which will continue to propel the field forward. Sharon: Cindi, I noticed that when you look the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston website, you've been involved in a lot of online programming and symposia and things I didn't realize. I'm wondering when you're going to have a symposium on this subject. Cindi: It would be terrific. Up to this point, Susan and I have been invited to give talks. We did one with Craft in America last fall. We did with MAD. We've been invited on your jewelry podcast. I'm also going to be speaking for the Seattle Metals Guild Symposium next month. I would love to do a symposium. For me, in order to do a symposium right, it's not just about getting speakers together, which you can do virtually, but it's really about them coming together and having that in-person experience where you can have breakout sessions; you have the conversations in the hallways, all of those kinds of things. I would absolutely love to do that when it's safe to do it, which is not to say that—there are no current plans. I think our virtual talks have been fantastic, but it would be great to gather the tribe, so to speak, to gather people we interviewed for this book, to gather people who are interested and to share a day or two together to dive into this. I hope that can happen. Certainly, the door is open to it. I just think right now we're still figuring out what we can do in person and what we can't. Susan: I know many of those people are quite elderly at this point in time. Even as we were writing the book, people were dying. Cindi: Yeah, Ed Woell died. Ron Hill died, and now Nancy Gordon has died. Susan: Mary Tompkins passed away. Cindi: Mary Tompkins passed away. Several people had already passed away, but this history will not be quite the same unless people go and interview these older makers soon. This is part of the problem: with them dies a huge amount of information. It's impossible to know anything concrete about a jeweler unless you actually talk to them. Anyway, I hope that if people do want to take up this mantle or if they do a symposium, they do it soon, because they may be all gone by the time we get there. Sharon: People do it on Cartier and Renee Beauvois, and they're not around. Susan: They also kept better records and took better photographs. With those wealthy jewelry companies, it's very different than being a unique maker on your own in your little studio. Many of these people weren't even taking photographs of the work at the time necessarily, or if they were, certainly they were not great ones. They just clicked on a photo link on a slide back. This is not the wealthy, recorded advertising world of Cartier. This is a very different world. Cindi: As someone who has done a Cartier exhibition, I can also tell you that it's about the firm and about styles. You don't learn about who the individual designers were of X, Y and Z pieces, but Susan's right. For artists who are listening to this, it is incumbent upon you to document your work. Today, there are obviously tools that artists from the 60s and 70s could not have availed themselves of, which would have made it much easier. So, document your work, keep track of your work and update the way you document it, so that somebody 30 or 40 years from now who is wanting to do something in depth on you is not having to battle with an old technology that nobody knows how to use anymore, which then can make things invaluable. I'm old school. I'm a big believe in paper. I know that is completely against the way the world works, but I am wary. I have experience with recorded, even digital formats, that we don't have the equipment to use anymore; nobody knows how to use it. If you have a paper printout, you're never going to have that problem. I know that this is environmentally incorrect, that everybody's moving towards digital files. I have them myself, but I still like paper because it's what's going to be preserved for history. Sharon: That's very good advice about documenting. It benefits the artist now and makes life easier for those who follow as historians and people who want to look at it academically. Susan and Cindi, thank you so much for being with us today. It was so interesting. Susan, we look forward to your next part, 1A I guess we'll call it. Thank you so much. Susan: Thanks for having us, Sharon. It's been wonderful. Cindi: Thank you, Sharon. Sharon: Delighted to have you. Cindi: Please do let your audiences know that the book is widely available. My plug on all these things is that we know you can buy books from Amazon. Please buy your book from a local independent bookseller, or even better, come to the MFAH's website. You can buy it off of our website, which goes to support our museum's programs.   We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

The Robert Scott Bell Show
The RSB Show 10-29-21 - Workers vow to quit, Morley Robbins, Cu-RE Your Fatigue, Copper hydrosol

The Robert Scott Bell Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 112:40


The RSB Show 10-29-21 - Workers vow to quit, Morley Robbins, Root Cause Protocol, Cu-RE Your Fatigue, Copper hydrosol, Scott Jensen attacked AGAIN

Swine.It
Zinc, copper, or probiotics - what is the best antimicrobial for pigs? - Dr. Wes Schweer

Swine.It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 32:22


Preventing bacterial infection in the young piglet is critical for all farmers as they have weakened immune systems in the early stages of their life. In the past we used antibiotics until antibiotic resistant strains became more prevalent. Now zinc oxide is the most used antimicrobial feed additive during the nursery period but is it the most effective method? In today's talk with Dr. Schweer, he discusses alternative feeding strategies for preventing bacterial infection of the piglet. "

Financial Survival Network
Mickey Fulp's Monthly Major Market Review (October 2021)

Financial Survival Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 19:10


For October, markets were up across the board. Dow up 5.8% 35800 and S&P 500 up 6.9% to 4605, Nasdaq up 7.3%. Russell 2000 up 4.2%, TSX up 4.8%, and TSX.V posted a major 10.6% increase. VIX settled back down to 16.3. The Dollar was mostly flat closing at 94.14 and the Euro was .2%. 10 Year yield up slightly 2.6% to 1.56. Bitcoin closed at 60698 for a massive 38.5%. Gold's up an unimpressive 1.7% to 1784. Silver was up 8.1% to 23.85. Pt added 6% to 1018. Pd was up 5.3% for the month to 1937. Copper up 10% to $4.46. WTI keeps going higher 11.4% to 83.57. Brent up another 10% to 84.43. Natgas skidded 7.5% to bring it to 5.43. Uranium added to its parabolic move up 7.1% to $45.50, more thanks to the Sprott Uranium Trust.  Ratios:  Au:Ag down to 74.7, Pt:Au .57, Pt:Pd .53. BRT:WTI 1.01, WTI:HH 15.4, and AU:WTI 21.3.  

Mining Stock Daily
Exploration Update from Chakana Copper

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 14:59


Paul Harris connects with David Kelley, CEO of Chakana Copper, to provide some corporate commentary on this morning's exploration results and to also discuss the political news from the country of Peru.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
11-01-21 - Recapping A Great Fun Night At Copper Blues For Night Of Singing Dead - Dog Named Peroni After The Penis Disease - The Band's Costumes - Brady's Night As Thanos In His Hood

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 32:20


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Opening Break - Monday November 1, 2021

Bronze and Modern Gods
Our Favorite Oddball Books! Plus, House of Slaughter, Alpha Flight and Dark Shadows comics!

Bronze and Modern Gods

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 38:13


T-shirts & more are finally available!! http://tee.pub/lic/BAMG John & Richard share their favorite oddball comics - which ones do you have? Plus, our Hot Book of the Week is House of Slaughter and its various variants, and our Underrated Books of the Week feature Alpha Flight and Dark Shadows! Bronze and Modern Gods is the channel dedicated to the Bronze, Copper and Modern Ages of comics and comic book collecting! Follow us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/BronzeAndModernGods Follow us on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/bronzeandmoderngods #comics #comicbooks #comiccollecting --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bronzeandmoderngods/support

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 135: Part 1 - Why Jewelers of the 60s and 70s Were Part of the Counterculture—Even if they Didn't Realize It with Jewelry Experts Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 26:30


What you'll learn in this episode: The characteristics that define contemporary American jewelry What narrative art jewelry is, and why it was so prevalent in the 1960s and 70s What defines American counterculture, and why so many 60s and 70s jewelers were a part of it Who the most notable American jewelry artists are and why we need to capture their stories How Susan and Cindi developed their book, and why they hope other people will build on their research About Susan Cummins Susan Cummins has been involved in numerous ways in the visual arts world over the last 35 years, from working in a pottery studio, doing street fairs, running a retail shop called the Firework in Mill Valley and developing the Susan Cummins Gallery into a nationally recognized venue for regional art and contemporary art jewelry. Now she spends most of her time working with a private family foundation called Rotasa and as a board member of both Art Jewelry Forum and California College of the Arts. About Cindi Strauss Cindi Strauss is the Sara and Bill Morgan Curator of Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design and Assistant Director, Programming at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH). She received her BA with honors in art history from Hamilton College and her MA in the history of decorative arts from the Cooper-Hewitt/Parsons School of Design. At the MFAH, Cindi is responsible for the acquisition, research, publication, and exhibition of post-1900 decorative arts, design, and craft. Jewelry is a mainstay of Cindi's curatorial practice. In addition to regularly curating permanent collection installations that include contemporary jewelry from the museum's collection, she has organized several exhibitions that are either devoted solely to jewelry or include jewelry in them. These include: Beyond Ornament: Contemporary Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2003–2004); Ornament as Art: Avant-Garde Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2007); Liquid Lines: Exploring the Language of Contemporary Metal (2011); and Beyond Craft: Decorative Arts from the Leatrice S. and Melvin B. Eagle Collection (2014). Cindi has authored or contributed to catalogs and journals on jewelry, craft, and design topics, and has been a frequent lecturer at museums nationwide. She also serves on the editorial advisory committee for Metalsmith magazine. Additional Resources:  Museum of Fine Arts Houston Art Jewelry Forum  Photos: Police State Badge 1969/ 2007 sterling silver, 14k gold 2 7/8 x 2 15/16 x 3 15/16 inches Museum of Arts and Design, New York City, 2012.20 Diane Kuhn, 2012 PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Portrait of William Clark in a bubble_2 1971                        photographer: Unknown Necklace for the American Taxpayer 1971 Brass with silver chain  17 " long (for the chain)  and 6.25 x 1.25 " wide for the hanging brass pendant. Collection unknown Dad's Payday 1968 sterling, photograph, fabric, found object 4 ½ x 4 x ¼ inches Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg Photo: Lynn Thompson Title: "Slow Boat" Pendant (Portrait of Ken Cory) Date: 1976 Medium: Enamel, sterling silver, wood, copper, brass, painted stone, pencil, ballpoint pen spring, waxed lacing, Tiger Balm tin, domino Dimensions: 16 3/4 × 4 1/8 × 1 in. (42.5 × 10.4 × 2.5 cm) Helen Williams Drutt Family Collection, USA Snatch Purse 1975 Copper, Enamel, Leather, Beaver Fur, Ermine Tails, Coin Purse 4 ½ x 4 x 3/8” Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg The Good Guys 1966 Walnut, steel, copper, plastic, sterling silver, found objects 101.6 mm diameter Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, 1977.2.102'                        PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Fetish Pendant 1966 wood, brass, copper, glass, steel, paper, silver 3 ½ x 3 ½ x 5/8 inches Detroit Institute of Art, Founders Society Purchase with funds from the Modern Decorative Arts Group, Andrew L. and Gayle Shaw Camden Contemporary and Decorative Arts Fund, Jean Sosin, Dr. and Mrs. Roger S. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Danto, Dorothy and Byron Gerson, and Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Miller / Bridgeman Images November 22, 1963 12:30 p.m. 1967 copper, silver, brass, gold leaf, newspaper photo, walnut, velvet, glass 6 ¼ x 5 x 7/8 inches Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Rose Mary Wadman, 1991.57.1 Front and back covers Pages from the book Transcript: What makes American jewelry American? As Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss discovered while researching their book, In Flux: American Jewelry and the Counterculture, contemporary American jewelry isn't defined by style or materials, but by an attitude of independence and rebellion. Susan, who founded Art Jewelry Forum, and Cindi, who is Curator of Decorative Arts, Crafts and Design at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about what it was like to interview some of the most influential American artists; why they hope their book will inspire additional research in this field; and why narrative jewelry artists were part of the counterculture, even if they didn't consider themselves to be. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guests are Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss, who, along with Damian Skinner, are the co-authors of In Flux: American Jewelry and the Counterculture. Susan is the founder of Art Jewelry Forum and for several decades drove the organization. Cindi Strauss is the Curator of Decorative Arts, Crafts and Design at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston. Susan and Cindi, welcome to the program. Susan: Thank you. Cindi: Thank you for having us, Sharon. Sharon: So glad to have you. Can you each give us a brief outline of your jewelry journey? Susan, do you want to start? Susan: Sure. My journey started in the 80s. I had a gallery in Mill Valley, California. I was showing various crafts, ceramics mostly, and a bit of glass, fiber, a whole grouping, and then I decided I should show jewelry. I don't really know why, because I didn't wear jewelry, but it sounded like a good idea. I started showing it, and I was very impressed with how smart and incredibly skilled the artists were. I continued to show that, and the gallery became known for showing jewelry. In 1997, I still had the gallery, and I decided along with numerous other craft groups that we should start an organization that represented the collectors of jewelry. I started Art Jewelry Forum with the help of several other people, of course. That has continued onto today, surprisingly enough, and it now includes not only collectors, curators and gallerists, but also artists and everybody who's interested in contemporary art jewelry. Sharon: It's an international organization. Susan: Yes, it's an international organization. It has a website with a lot of articles. We plan all kinds of things like trips to encourage people to get to know more about the field. I also was part of a funding organization, shall we say, a small private fund called Rotasa, and years ago we funded exhibitions and catalogues. That switched into funding specific things that I was working on instead of accepting things from other people. I've been very interested in publishing and doing research about this field because I feel that will give it more value and legitimacy. It needs to be researched. So, that's one of the reasons why this book came into being as well as Flocks' book. It really talks about the beginnings of American contemporary jewelry in the 60s and 70s. That's my beginning to current interest in jewelry. Sharon: I just wanted to say that people can find a lot more if they visit the Art Jewelry Forum website. We'll have links to everything we talk about on the show. Cindi? Cindi: Sure. My jewelry journey was surprising and happened all at once. The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, had no contemporary jewelry in its collection until 2000, when we acquired an Art Smith necklace from 1948. That was my first real knowledge of post-Arts and Crafts jewelry and post-Mid-Century, people like Harry Bertoia. That led me to Toni Greenbaum's Messengers of Modernism catalogue, a fantastic resource for American jewelry from the 30s through the 50s. It opened a whole new field for me, and I started to think about how we should focus on some modern jewelry from that period to expand on the Art Smith necklace, because that Mid-Century design was a specialty of the institution.  Truly, I would say my life changed in respect to jewelry for the better in every way I could explain. When the museum acquired, in 2002, Helen Williams Drutt's private collection of artist-made contemporary jewelry, dating from 1963 to 2002 at the time of the acquisition, in one fell swoop, we acquired 804 pieces of international jewelry as well as sketchbooks and drawings and research materials. We began to build an extensive library. Helen opened her archives and we had recordings of artist interviews. It was just going from zero to sixty in three seconds and it was extraordinary. It was a field I knew really nothing about, so I was on a very steep learning curve. So many people in the field, from the artists to other curators to collectors—this is how I met Susan—were so generous to me in terms of being resources. The story about how the acquisition happened is familiar to probably many of your audience, so I'll keep it brief, which is to say that there was an exhibition of Gijs Bakker's jewelry that Helen organized for the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft. Sharon: Cindi, I'm going to interrupt you for a minute because a lot of people listening will not have heard of Gijs Bakker. Cindi: Sure. Gijs Bakker, one of the most prominent Dutch artists, began his career in the 1960s, along with wife, Emmy van Leersum, and was part of the group of Dutch jewelry artists who revolutionized the concept of contemporary jewelry using alter-native materials. They created a lot of photo-based work challenging the value system of jewelry and also challenging wearability. It was his photo-based work that was shown in a small exhibition at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft in March 2002 as part of a citywide festival called Photofest, which is all photography-based work. It was through that exhibition, at the opening weekend—that's how I met Helen. I said to her, “This is something I don't know anything about. I'm interested in exploring it. I'm starting to build a collection for the museum. Could we meet and have coffee and talk?” So we met, and I peppered her with a lot of questions and said, “Could I call on you for advice in terms of building a collection?” Of course, at this time she had the gallery, and she said, “Well, you know, I have a collection,” and I said, “Yes, I know, and I understand it's going to the Philadelphia Museum of Art,” her hometown museum. She said, “Not necessarily. We haven't had any formal talks about that.” So, one thing led to another, and six months later, we signed papers to acquire the collection. That set me off on my initial five-year journey, which resulted in the exhibition and catalogue “Ornament as Art: Contemporary Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection” that opened in Houston and traveled to Washington, D.C., to Charlotte, North Carolina, and to Tacoma, Washington. After that point, I felt that I was really steeped in the field. I have, since that point, been adding works to the collection. It was always going to be a long-term commitment and journey for the museum. We have works installed all over the museum in relationship to other contemporary art, whether it's photography, prints and drawings, sculpture, painting. We also have a robust presentation of jewelry in our departments' galleries. It is an ongoing journey, just like with Susan. It's a journey that never ends, happily. There are always new artists to discover and new ideas. Part of that is our meeting of the mind, if you will, and then with Damian, is what resulted in this book. Sharon: How did you come to write the book? Susan, you started to mention it. The research in this is jaw-dropping. How did you decide to write the book? Why this particular period, the two of you? Susan: We decided to write the book because I was wondering what's American about American jewelry. Europeans have done a lot of research and writing about their beginnings, but I didn't see a document or a book that really talked about the American origins. As Cindi mentioned, Gijs Bakker started in the 60s. So did American contemporary jewelry, but it's a very different story than the European one. We wanted to talk to the people who are still alive now, so we did tons of interviews for the book. We specifically concentrated on the pioneers who were responding to the political and social events of the time. In other words, we were investigating those artists who were considered narrative artists, because that was the defining feature of American art to those out of the country. We wanted to discover who was making this work and what were they saying in their narrative, so really answering “What was American about American jewelry?” We did tons of research through old documents of the American Crafts Library. We went all over the country and interviewed, and it was about a five-year-long process to get this point. The book is incredibly condensed. You can feel that there's a lot there, but it took a lot to condense it down to that.  Really, what we hope is that it's an easy-to-read story about the stories that jewelers were telling at the time, which was the origin of all that's come down to us now. It was the beginning of the development of university programs in the country. They just were in the process of expanding them, and people were learning how to make things. Nobody had a lot of skills in this country, so everybody had to learn how to make things. There were a lot of alternative ways of passing around information. The counterculture, we regarded that not as hippies per se, although hippies were part of it, but also a lot about the political and social issues of the time and how people responded to them. The ethos of the time, the values that people developed really became part of the craft counterculture itself. The craft field is based on a lot of those ways of working in the world, a sort of hope and trying to create a new society that had more values than the 50s had aspired to for each individual. People were trying to find ways to have valuable lives, and doing something like making something yourself and selling it at a craft fair became a wonderful alternative for many people who had the skill to do that. That was a very different way of having a life, shall we say, and that's how American jewelry developed: with those values and skills. I still see remnants of it in the current field. That's my focus. Cindi, do you have some things you want to add to that? Cindi: Yeah, the larger public's ideas and thoughts about American jewelry from that period were rooted in a history and an aesthetic that emerged largely on the East Coast, but certainly spread, as Susan said, with the development of university programs. That was an aesthetic that was largely rooted in the organic modernism of Scandinavian influence, as well as what had come before in America in terms of modernist studio jewelry. There's a history there in the narrative, and that narrative played out in early exhibitions. It played out in the first SNAG exhibition in 1970 in St. Paul, which is considered one of those milestones of the early American studio jewelry movement.  Now, we knew that there were artists like Fred Woell, Don Tompkins, Ken Cory, Merrily Tompkins, who were on the West Coast and working in a different vein, as Susan said, a narrative vein, and who were often working with assemblage techniques and found materials and were making commentary on issues of the day. Within the accepted history of that period, they were a minority, with the exception of Fred Woell and really Ken Cory. Their work was not as widely known, as widely collected, as widely understood. Damian and Susan and I started after we thought, as Susan said, “What is American about American jewelry?”  Fred Woell was an artist who immediately came to mind as embodying a certain type of Americanness. We had an extraordinary trip to visit with Fred's widow, Pat Wheeler, and to the see the studio and go through some of his papers. When we went, we thought we would be doing a monograph on Fred Woell. It was on that trip that we understood that it was a much larger project, and it was one that would encompass many more artists. As part of our research, there were certain artists who were known to us, and our hope was that we would rediscover artists who were working intently during that period who had been lost to history for whatever reason. There were also artists whose work we were able to reframe for the reasons that Susan mentioned: because of their lifestyle, their belief system, the way they addressed or responded to major issues during the day. So, we started developing these list of artists. I think what readers will find in the book is looking at some of the well-known artists, perhaps more in depth and in a new frame of analysis, but also learning about a plethora of other artists. For us, it was five years of intense work. There's a tremendous amount of research that has gone into this book, and from what we've been hearing, it has enlightened people about a period. It's not an alternative history, but it is an additional history. We hope it will inspire people to pick up the mantle and go forth because, of course, one has constraints in terms of word counts for publishing. At a certain point, you have to get down to the business of writing and stop the research, but there are so many threads that we hope other scholars, curators, students, interested parties will pick up and carry forth. In some ways we were able to go in depth, and in other ways we were able to just scratch the surface of what has been a fascinating topic for all of us. Sharon: I have a lot of questions, but first, I just wanted to mention that SNAG is the Society of North American Goldsmiths, in case people don't know. Can you explain, Susan or Cindi, what narrative jewelry is? Cindi: There's no one definition. Everybody would describe it a little bit differently, but I think a basic definition is jewelry that tells a story, that uses pictorial elements to tell a story. Whatever that story is can range from the personal to the public, to, in our case, responding to things like the Vietnam War, politics, etc. Susan, do you want to add to that? Susan: It's a very difficult thing to do when you think about. Narratives usually have a storyline from this point to that point to the next point. Here's a jeweler trying to put a storyline into one object, one piece. It is tricky to bring enough imagery that's accessible to the viewer together into one piece to allow the viewer to make up the story that this is about or the comment it's trying to make. You have to be very skilled and smart to make really good narrative jewelry. Sharon: It sounds like it would be, yes. When you realized what this book was going to entail—it sounds like you didn't start out thinking this was going to be such a deep dive—were you excited, or were you more like, “I think I'd probably rather run in the other direction and say, ‘Forget it; I can't do it'”? Susan: I don't think at any point did we stop and think, “Oh, this is a gigantic project.” We just thought, “Let's see. This person's interesting; O.K., let's talk to this person. Oh, gosh, they said these about this other person. Let's talk to them.” You just go step by step. I don't think, at any point, did any of us realize how vast a project this was until the end, probably. Cindi: Yeah, I would say because it happened incrementally, deep dive led to another and another. We would have regular meetings not only over Skype, but we would get together in person, the three of us, for these intense days in which we would talk about—we each had different areas we were focusing on. We'd bring our research together and that would lead to questions: “Should we explore this avenue?” Then someone would go and explore this avenue and come back, and we would think, “Maybe that wasn't as interesting as we thought it was going to be,” or maybe it was far more interesting than we thought, so it spun out a number of different avenues of research.  At a certain point, we started looking at the most important threads that were coming out and we were able to organize them as umbrellas, and then look at subthemes and think about the artists. It became like a puzzle. We had pockets of deep research, whether it was the in-person artist interviews or whether it was the archival research that was done, whether it was the general research. Damian and I were not alive during this time. Susan was, which was fantastic because I learned a lot about this in history class and school. Damian is a New Zealander, so he was coming at it from an international perspective. There was a lot of reading he did about American history, but Susan was the one gave us all the first-person accounts in addition to the artists. She participated in the American Craft Council Craft Fairs and was able to balance the sometimes emotionless history books with the first-person experiences that made it come alive. I think that's what you see throughout the book. It was important to us that the book would be readable, but it was also important to us that it would have a flavor of the times. When you do oral history interviews, there are many different kinds of questions that can be asked. We set out to talk not only about the jewelry that artists were making, but their lives, what was important to them, how they felt. The richness of experiences and emotions that came out in those interviews really inflected the book with feeling like you were there and a part of what these artists were thinking. This is a 2 part episode please subscribe so you can get part 2 as soon as its released later this week. 

Bronze and Modern Gods
Viewer Mail, a crazy week for Comic Book NFTs on VeVe, price hikes at CBCS & more!

Bronze and Modern Gods

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 33:23


T-shirts & more are finally available!! http://tee.pub/lic/BAMG It's another Bonus Episode, as John & Richard answer your questions about organizing your comics, which comic book NFTs are good buys & more! Plus, the Comic NFT Watch covers the crazy drops this past week and the first Comic NFT error edition! Bronze and Modern Gods is the channel dedicated to the Bronze, Copper and Modern Ages of comics and comic book collecting! Follow us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/BronzeAndModernGods Follow us on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/bronzeandmoderngods #comics #comicbooks #comiccollecting --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bronzeandmoderngods/support

Occultae Veritatis Podcast - OVPOD
Case # 163b: Mysteries of the Egyptian Pyramids

Occultae Veritatis Podcast - OVPOD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 100:42


Case # 163b: Mysteries of the Egyptian Pyramids   Classification: [Real world Lore]   We've covered the culture and history behind these great structures, we've looked at a day in the life of a builder and TODAY in this episode, we finish off the case. We look at the step by step process taken to build a pyramid, bite a chunk out of some “ancient alien” grifters, and bust some myths   -Sponsored by- Our Patrons at http://www.patreon.com/ovpod   https://www.ovpod.ca/

Financial Survival Network
This Copper Project is the “Real Deal” Says Torq Resources' Michael Henrichsen

Financial Survival Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 13:01


Torq Resources' Executive Chair Shawn Wallace and Chief Geologist Michael Henrichsen came on to discuss their recently acquired Chilean gold-copper Santa Cecilia project. Wallace mentioned that Santa Cecilia was always their major goal. He had been hinting at something big during our last interview and now he's delivered. At 32.5 square kilometers, it's sitting on a major system in the world-class Maricunga belt. Some historical work had been done in the 1990's, and then it inexplicably sat on ice for decades, ignored by all. According to Henrichsen, “This is the real deal… The initial discovery has already been made…” Now they just have to identify the most promising targets. It's an extremely unique place, which explains why the team spent the better part of two years on its acquisition. Henrichsen's global mining network was instrumental in getting the deal done, especially in light of the global health concerns that made international travel all but impossible. To sum it all up, Wallace says, “The Santa Cecilia gold-copper project represents the culmination of our acquisition strategy in Chile. It is our belief that exploration at a project of this magnitude will be transformative for Torq. Now that the project is in place, it's time to start to realize its exploration potential.” www.TorqResources.com Ticker Symbols - TSX.V : TORQ OTCQX : TRBMF  

Occultae Veritatis Podcast - OVPOD
Case # 163a: Mysteries of the Egyptian Pyramids

Occultae Veritatis Podcast - OVPOD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 82:39


Classification: [Real world Lore] 4580 years ago, before Iron, before coins, before cranes, before basic machines, Ancient Egyptians cut, refined, and transported over two million stones, weighing multiple tons each, up to 800 miles, and stacked them in a 450 foot tall structure that survives to this day. Just how did they pull this off?   -Sponsored by- Our Patrons at http://www.patreon.com/ovpod https://www.ovpod.ca/

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #59: Ski Cooper President and GM Dan Torsell

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 100:05


The Storm Skiing Podcast is sponsored by Mountain Gazette - Listen to the podcast for discount codes on subscriptions and merch.WhoDan Torsell, President and General Manager of Ski Cooper, ColoradoRecorded onOctober 18, 2021Why I interviewed himWe’ve all seen the signs, westbound on I-70. Ski Cooper this way. Copper Mountain that way. And many of us have probably thought some version of “that’s funny, I wonder how many European tourists mix them up and show up at Ski Cooper with their Ikon Pass? Anyway, which way to the free lots at Copper?” And that’s as much as most of us have probably thought about the place.It’s easy to overlook. Lost between the world-famous monsters of Summit and Eagle counties, Ski Cooper is mostly a locals refuge. Most people reading this have probably skied some combination of Vail, Beaver Creek, Copper Mountain, Breckenridge, Keystone, and Arapahoe Basin, all Epic- or Ikon-aligned mountains, the smallest of them more than three times Cooper’s 500-ish acres. And yet, Cooper persists. It is, according to the NSAA, the fifth oldest ski area in Colorado, founded in 1942 as a training site for the legendary 10th Mountain Division, whose alumni would go on to found at least 64 ski areas throughout the United States. Any place with that kind of history and grit was, I figured, worth learning more about.What we talked aboutPennsylvania ski culture; turning skiing from passion to career; moving from snow-draped Utah to gritty Tussey Pennsylvania to frantic Killington; the dramatic technological advancements and swashbuckling energy of the late ‘80s-to-early-‘90s ski industry; applying the lessons of monster ski areas to community bumps; why Dan left the ski industry and what drew him back in; why small ski areas matter; the intensity of running a night-skiing operation with a short season; the thrill and challenge of running big parts of Sugarbush; working under Win Smith as he revitalized the resort; the story behind Sugarbush’s cabin Cat; first impressions of top-of-the-world Cooper; leaving an East Coast ski career to manage Ski Cooper; transitioning from one of the Northeast’s top dogs to one of Colorado’s underdogs; the enormous terrain expansion opportunities at Cooper; how the Tennessee Creek Basin expansion has transformed the mountain; why the ski area went with a T-bar for that terrain; running Cooper debt-free; snow distribution across the three sides of the ski area; avalanche mitigation; Cooper’s minimalist grooming philosophy; U.S. America’s culture of over-grooming; the scale of Chicago Ridge Cat Skiing and whether it will return this year; whether portions of the Cat-skiing terrain could ever be folded into the lift-served side of Ski Cooper; the potential to increase the ski area’s vertical drop; potential lift additions and upgrades; timelines for improvements; why the frontside double is likely to stay intact even if the mountain adds another lift; the beautiful simplicity of running a ski are with no snowmaking; why Ski Cooper doesn’t play the stay-open-as-late-as-possible game with A-Basin even though they have the coverage to ski until June; Ski Cooper’s bargain season pass and its incredible coalition of coast-to-coast reciprocal partnerships; how the mountain managed to mostly eliminate partner blackouts; how many passes it sells; why reciprocal partnerships are proving resilient even with the advent of the Indy Pass; why Ski Cooper raised its minimum wage to $15.25 per hour; whether the mountain will institute a worker vaccine mandate; and how Ski Cooper will build off its record 2020-21 ski season. Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewAs anyone who reads this newsletter on a regular basis knows, I’m obsessed with the evolving U.S. season pass landscape. In particular, the evolution of the multi-mountain pass under the giant ski conglomerates, and how independent ski areas are responding to that. Some are joining the Indy Pass. Others are banding together to form reciprocal coalitions for their passholders. Cooper is a master of the latter strategy, building a partner network so vast that the mountain’s season pass is a de facto national megapass. And a cheap one.I first connected with Torsell and the pass’ conductor, Dana Johnson, over the summer. It was supposed to be a quick-hit interview, but I was impressed by the whole operation. Ski Cooper is the definition of composure in the maw of impossible competition. Would you open a ski area next door to Vail? Would you be able to keep one open if it was one-tenth the size and one one-millionth as famous? It takes resilience, patience, and some kind of brilliance to make it as a ski area in ruthless Colorado, ground zero of the modern skiglomerate. With a big expansion behind them and vast potential ahead, I knew Ski Cooper was a story worth following.Questions I wish I’d askedIt occurred to me while I was editing this that I had no idea who owned Ski Cooper. As you’ll see in our conversation, however, the mountain has plenty of big things ahead, and something tells me that Dan will be back on the podcast at some point to talk about those developments, and I’ll save the ownership question for then. In the meantime, this article by The Colorado Sun’s Jason Blevins details the whole ownership structure. I’d also like to have talked a bit more about the mountain’s founding as a training ground for the 10th Mountain Division.Why you should ski CooperBecause why not? When a lift ticket at its six closest neighbors is roughly the price of a new Cadillac, the compromises you make on sheer vertical drop and skiable acreage to hit Cooper seem acceptable. With no crowds and a magnificently affordable season pass, this is an entirely reasonable supplement to Epic and Ikon passholders looking for a weekend and holiday refuge. And while Cooper has traditionally been an intermediates mountain with very little terrain for the freight train skiers, the Tennessee Creek Basin expansion – opened just before the Covid shutdown – adds a rambling pod of full-throttle double-blacks. Yes, the runs are short – the T-bar rises just around 700 feet – but that’s roughly the same vertical drop you get on The Dumps at Aspen, and no one’s filling up the complaint box about those elevator shafts. Add in a minimalist grooming philosophy and all-natural snow, and you have a damn fine ski experience if you go in accepting what the place is, rather than obsessing over what it’s not.About that incredible season passIn July, I wrote an extended analysis of Ski Cooper’s amazing $299 (now $499) season pass, which acts as a de-facto alternate Indy Pass/megapass. I called it “America’s Hidden Mega Ski Pass:Ski Cooper’s sprawling season pass access is also the logical end state of a lift-served skiing universe increasingly defined by the Epic and Ikon passes, with their dazzling collections of poke-through-the-clouds resorts, relentless marketing, and fantastically achievable price points. Small ski areas, sitting alone, have a harder story to tell and far fewer resources to do it. Band together, and the story gets more interesting. And Ski Cooper is telling one of the best stories in skiing.Since I wrote that article, the ski area has added several new partners, including Lookout Pass, which sits on the Idaho-Montana border but does not appear on this map:Additional resourcesLift Blog’s inventory of Ski Cooper liftsHistoric Ski Cooper trailmapsSki Cooper today: Get on the email list at www.stormskiing.com

The Sell More Books Show: Book Marketing, Digital Publishing and Kindle News, Tools and Advice
Episode 395 - Conferences, Audience Insurance, and Ditching the WIP

The Sell More Books Show: Book Marketing, Digital Publishing and Kindle News, Tools and Advice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 42:00


This week Claire is joined by Jami Albright and we have a great show in store for you! Leave us a review on Apple Podcast and answer the Question of the Week in the comment section. The winner this week is Kamuela Kaneshiro. Top Tips of the week include how to promote your audiobook on Instagram, when to bail on a project..or not, and how to make a fantasy world map for your book or readers. The 5 News stories that matter most to indies this week include Why you need to have a print book not just an ebook, why your cover matters so much, what new social media platform is coming just for readers and writers, what indie author event is less than two weeks away. Question of the Week: Will you be checking out the Copper social media site, and if so, how do you see yourself using it?

Broad Street Hockey: for Philadelphia Flyers fans
Checking out the competition: Stay out of the box, dummies

Broad Street Hockey: for Philadelphia Flyers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 21:11


It's been, approximately, 85 years since the Flyers last played the Edmonton Oilers, and there's been a lot of change on that roster in the time since these two teams last met. Preston Hodgkinson of Copper & Blue joined us to fill us in on all of the *not* Connor McDavid reasons why the Flyers need to worry about the Oilers on Wednesday night. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices