Podcasts about eighty

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Best podcasts about eighty

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Latest podcast episodes about eighty

Big Asp Cornhole Podcast
Episode 135: Random stuff and Cozmoez Baggers review

Big Asp Cornhole Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 65:19


Sean and Dane are back! Enjoying several IPAs from Southern Tier Brewing, the guys talk random topics including who has to throw 23' stamped bags. More dramatic readings fuel further discussion and then they review 4 series of bags by Cozmoez Baggers (Virus, Eighty-8, Eighty-9 and B-Boy).BIG ASP Cornhole Patreon page: 4 Tiers to choose from!! Come join our growing community and get insider info, become an active participant in show content, be eligible for bag giveaways and more!!!https://www.patreon.com/bigaspcornholehttps://www.localbagcompany.com/-Throw like a pro….Throw Local-Code: AlienResin for 20% offhttps://www.cornholesolutions.com/-For all your cornhole board problems-Code: BigAsp saves you 10%byhttps://blackjackcornhole.com/Code: BigAsp saves you 10%https://airwolfathletics.com/Code: BigAsp saves you 10%https://www.harddragpush.com/Your one stop shop for all your cornhole content needs!!Support the show

The BreakPoint Podcast
The Divorce Risk by Marital “Age”

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 1:06 Very Popular


A recent article in Fatherly summed up the risk of divorce by married years. Years 1 to 2 are “high risk.” Years 9 to 15 go down to “low.” By years 15 to 20, the risk rises again to “average.”  “Newlyweds and old married couples,” concluded the article, “can never get too comfortable.”   The numbers don't lie, but the danger of studies like this is portraying divorce as something that just happens because of “falling out of love” or something like that. The truth about marriage is, thankfully, more complicated.   Couples committed enough to fight for their marriage stand a good chance of making it. Eighty percent of couples who participated in Focus on the Family's Hope Restored Marriage Intensive are still together two years later.   It also matters what we believe about marriage. As of 2019, divorce in America had reached a 50-year low, but that's because fewer Americans are getting married at all. So, the ones who marry tend to believe there's something to it.  And there is, which is why when it comes to marriage and the health of our society, none of us should be comfortable. 

Portland Beer Club Podcast
Episode Eighty Five

Portland Beer Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 123:23


PORTLAND BEER CLUB PODCAST YOUR ONLINE BOTTLE SHARE SINCE 2016 Episode: Eighty Five Recorded Date: 08/11/2022 Hosts: Nooner, Beef, Fartcus, & Shitz This Episode… - James Bruce from Brews for New Avenues for Youth - Willamette Week Reader's Poll Results - Binary goes Bakery - Fresh Hops & Pumpkin Beer Season - Beef Travels - Pilsner Chat - Maui Goes Modern - Budweiser Announces BCS Lineup - West Coast Grocery Update - Puckerfest - WABrew Sues OR - Beer Mongers Changes - Breweries Gas Shortage Contact us at portlandbeerclub@gmail.com Listen on most podcast outlets or at www.portlandbeerclubpodcast.com Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, & Untapped A RamShack Production © 2022 and Beyond

GENERATION RIPE
The Eighty-Ninth One… and Jacob Soule

GENERATION RIPE

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 23:47


Episode 89 and Wendi and Dfernando's guest interview is botanist, exotic plants expert and TikTok sensation Jacob Soule.When people ask Jacob Soule what he did during the COVID pandemic, he has a more interesting answer than most: he became TikTok famous. His @theplantprodigy account has almost 1 million followers and his short, entertaining, and informative videos about all things plants have over 26 million likes.  And it all started by sibling rivalry. “My brother told me that he was in a viral video that a friend had made. It got half a million views,” Soule said. “He was joking about being TikTok famous. I tried to get big on TikTok to prove him wrong. I didn't have success at first, but after December 2021, I got the ball rolling.” Soule, who has autism, has long been interested in plants. He can remember picking daisies with his grandmother. When he was in second grade he read a book that piqued his interest in carnivorous plants and he bought his first one. “I got a Venus flytrap and a pitcher plant, but they all died,” he said. “They're not that tricky if you know what you're doing and I didn't know what I was doing when I was 9 or 10 years old.” Like some plant species, his interest in plants went dormant in about 2015. But, it sprang back to life in 2017 when his current collection began to grow. He currently has over 100 plants ranging from philodendron micans to desert roses and hoya to several carnivorous pitcher plants, which he now grows quite successfully. TikTok was not his first foray into social media. He has always been interested in influencer culture and he first launched a YouTube Channel after being inspired by one of his favorite YouTubers. He created his Instagram in 2019. In his videos, he documents his own adventures as a plant owner, while also answering questions from plant parents who share videos of their droopy or browning plants. Some of the videos offer plant-related humor, such as when he stops his aunt from tossing the dregs of her wine glass into a plant pot or when he reacts with horror to atrocities such as people giving their Venus flytrap toothpaste. He'll occasionally address issues such as negative comments about his voice or his lack of knowledge about some things with a disarming honesty, saying that his voice makes him unique and he's proud of having room to grow and learn more. He hopes to parlay his TikTok popularity into a business of some sort, perhaps starting an Etsy plant shop. He is currently attending Kalamazoo Valley Community College with hopes of eventually earning a Horticulture Degree from Michigan State University. “Plants were popular before COVID. They exploded after the lockdown,” Soule said. “Why do people like plants? That's hard to answer. Maybe it's because of the idea of being responsible and taking care of something without having to put an animal or child's life at risk. And many studies show that plants can help benefit mental health. Personally, I just like the idea of growing all kinds of unique plants.”Here are the plants Wendi references in the interview: Gymnarnphora, Trusmadiensis, Miranda, Robcantleyi, and Caesar.Watch Wendi and Dfernando and their Team GENERATION RIPE: Greg Covey, Shelley McLendon and Ponciana Badia on Season 7 Episode 2 of CELEBRITY FAMILY FEUD - now on ABC OnDemand and Hulu and on the GENERATION RIPE website.  Follow us on our Instagram:Wendi McLendon-CoveyDfernando ZarembaGENERATION RIPE… and guest Jacob Soule, his TikTok, and his Twitter.  Remember to subscribe to GENERATION RIPEAnd rate & leave us a review by clicking HERE!Visit Dfernando Zaremba's website: dfernandozaremba.com

Kentucky Fried Homicide
The Unsolved Case of the Cleveland Torso Killer.

Kentucky Fried Homicide

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 42:11


Between 1934 and 1938, thirteen in the Cleveland, Ohio area fell victim to a killer with a taste for the macabre.  Decapitating the victims, only three of the known thirteen have names. And of those, some of the heads were never found. Police were shocked and bewildered, and when the Mayor of Cleveland brought in a prominent law man to take over, the killer only got bolder. Eighty-eight years later, no one knows who committed these heinous murders. Or do they? This is the story of the Cleveland Torso Killer.JOIN THE H2H PRIVATE FB GROUP THE IN-LAWS AND OUTLAWSSTART READING KRIS CALVERT'S BOOKS TODAY FOR FREESources used for this Podcast

Gulf Coast Life
Encore: “America's Embarrassing Reading Crisis: What we learned from COVID”

Gulf Coast Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 24:02


The latest reading scores for students in Florida show that 47% of Florida's 3rd graders are not reading on grade level. And data shows that if a student is struggling in third grade they are very likely to struggle in middle school and beyond. Eighty-percent of high school dropouts were struggling readers in 3rd grade.In the new book "America's Embarrassing Reading Crisis: What We Learned From COVID" Dr. Lisa Richardson Hassler explores reading proficiencies among third-graders, both pre and post-pandemic, and compares established virtual learning methods like those used by Florida's Virtual School with traditional brick-and-mortar schools.

FP&A Today
FP&A Today: Matthew Bernath, Host of The Financial Modelling Podcast

FP&A Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 18:28


Matthew Bernath, based in South Africa, has been a financial modeler for 15 years. Such was his thirst to learn best practices in the field, he set up a podcast, The Financial Modelling Podcast. Eighty episodes and 100,000 followers later The Financial Modelling Podcast  is  now  ranked as one of the  top finance podcasts. Matthew is head of data ecosystems at Shoprite. In  his previous role, Matthew steered the data analytics capability of Rand Merchant Bank, building a Rand-wide data ecosystem. He is also a startup investor. In this special crossover edition between FP&A Today and The Financial Modelling Podcast Paul Barnhurst (aka The FP&A Guy) and Matthew Barnhurst, explore: Why Many FP&A teams are missing a trick to perform real analysis (the “a” in FP&A) How FP&A can better use financial modeling Key skills you need to improve your financial modeling The vital importance of understanding macro events in FP&A Matthew then turns the tables asking Paul key questions such as His take on the state of FP&A? How non-finance people (who hate finance) should approach dreaded budgeting and finance?   Follow Matthew, Host of The Financial Modelling Podcast, on LinkedIn Follow Paul, Host of FP&A Today, on LinkedIn Follow Datarails on LinkedIn for the latest FP&A Insights and Thought Leadership FP&A Today is brought to you by Datarails. Datarails is the financial planning and analysis platform that automates data consolidation, reporting and planning, while enabling finance teams to continue using their own Excel spreadsheets and financial models. With Datarails on your side for FP&A you get improved data integrity and visibility helping your relationships with your internal business partners and external stakeholders; real-time latest version of all your company's data in one place, with version control, audit trail and records, ensuring errors and multiple versions are avoided; the ability to let your data tell your story through proprietary, built-in visualization of critical KPIs in real-down; and drill-downs to answer questions on underlying data on the spot. Get in touch at www.datarails.com Follow DataRails on LinkedIn to find out about upcoming episodes and the latest FP&A news

RNZ: Morning Report
Health experts want at-home Covid-19 deaths investigated

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 3:35


Eighty-seven people have died in their homes from Covid-19 since March and public health experts are calling for their deaths to be investigated. The figure means on average four people a week have been dying from the virus in their homes since the Omicron outbreak hit. But little is known about who they are, or what happened. Here's investigative journalist Anusha Bradley.

Building Blocks
Episode Eighty-Six: Boat Brew

Building Blocks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 80:45


This week's deck has a reputation.  Specifically, a bad one.  More specifically, one of the worst decks that has been played at a Pro Tour.  Looking at the decklist, that totally makes sense.  Putting playsets of both Mind Stone and Figure of Destiny in the main is almost an anti-combo.  Playing Windbrisk Heights and only nine creatures that cost less than three mana doesn't exactly scream synergy. However, it fit a specific niche.  Reveillark is more than good enough to carry an entire archetype, and Ajani Vengeant never had a better home.  From the mind of Brian Kowal (and the Magic Cruise) comes Boat Brew!

Earth Station Trek
Andreea Kindryd - Earth Station Trek Episode Eighty-Three

Earth Station Trek

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 75:51


This week the EARTH STATION TREK crew had the privilege of speaking with Andreea Kindryd, author of the upcoming book From Slavery to Star Trek, about her time at Desilu studios during The Original Series. She shared stores of working closely with Gene L. Coon and the Star Trek production team, her family's journey out of slavery, working with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., her close relationship with Nichelle Nichols, and much more. We also pay our own tribute to Nichelle Nichols and her legacy. Earth Station Trek is a part of the ESO Podcast Network, Executive Producer Mike Faber.

Baseball Connection
Big Sweeps | Dodgers School Padres | Phillies' Unique Opportunity | St. Louis Stays Solid

Baseball Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022


Some teams made a statement over the weekend with big sweeps. The Dodgers swept the Padres, showing why LA is still the class of the National League. The Phillies stayed hot as they swept the Nats. Eighty percent of the Phillies' remaining games are against teams with a losing record. The Cardinals had an impressive sweep of the Yankees. All this on today's episode.

Baseball Connection
Big Sweeps | Dodgers School Padres | Phillies' Unique Opportunity | St. Louis Stays Solid

Baseball Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022


Some teams made a statement over the weekend with big sweeps. The Dodgers swept the Padres, showing why LA is still the class of the National League. The Phillies stayed hot as they swept the Nats. Eighty percent of the Phillies' remaining games are against teams with a losing record. The Cardinals had an impressive sweep of the Yankees. All this on today's episode.

ESO Network – The ESO Network
Andreea Kindryd – Earth Station Trek Episode Eighty-Three

ESO Network – The ESO Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 75:51


This week the EARTH STATION TREK crew had the privilege of speaking with Andreea Kindryd, author of the upcoming book From Slavery to Star Trek, about her time at Desilu studios during The Original Series. She shared stores of working closely with Gene L. Coon and the Star Trek production team, her family’s journey out … Andreea Kindryd – Earth Station Trek Episode Eighty-Three Read More » The post Andreea Kindryd – Earth Station Trek Episode Eighty-Three appeared first on The ESO Network.

CY6 - Check Your Six
Episode 95: Jason Arthur - Eighty Seven Degrees Business Coaching - "The Right Angle of Business Coaching"

CY6 - Check Your Six

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 29:38


Episode 95 of the Check Your Six Podcast brought Jason Arthur into the GRP Studios to talk about business coaching. Jason grew up working in the family owned business and had first hand experience how a business operates, especially contracting. Jason has used his education, his experience to help create and develop a plan to help those businesses in the contracting industry to grow and be more profitable. Lots of conversation about things like the differences in similar construction trades even within the same state, the benefits of belonging to a local Chamber, if it is one that actually helps business and is not just a social club, some of the questions that he asks  in working with business owners. Of course, his recommendations about belonging to the Chamber had nothing to do with his wife Rebekah being the Executine Vice President of the Seminole Chamber, that was a total coincidence!! 

Baseball Connection
Big Sweeps | Dodgers School Padres | Phillies' Unique Opportunity | St. Louis Stays Solid

Baseball Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 6:51


Some teams made a statement over the weekend with big sweeps. The Dodgers swept the Padres, showing why LA is still the class of the National League. The Phillies stayed hot as they swept the Nats. Eighty percent of the Phillies' remaining games are against teams with a losing record. The Cardinals had an impressive sweep of the Yankees. All this on today's episode.

No Country for Otakus
No Country for Otakus || Let's Chat Anime: 86 - Eighty Six - Ep 55

No Country for Otakus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 39:03


The Republic of San Magnolia has been at war with the Giadian Empire for nine years. Though it initially suffered devastating losses to the Empire's autonomous mechanized Legions, The Republic has since developed its own autonomous units—Juggernauts—which are directed remotely by a Handler. While on the surface the public believes the war is being fought between machines, in reality, the Juggernauts are being piloted by humans and all of them are the Eighty-Six, the designation given to the sub-humans of the Eighty-Sixth Sector who are persecuted and stripped of their rights by the racist-led Alba government. Major Vladilena "Lena" Milizé is an Alba noble and military officer in the Republic's Military who is assigned as a Handler of the Spearhead Squadron of the Eastern Front, an elite unit composed entirely of Eighty-Sixer veterans who have earned names led by their squad leader, Shinei "Undertaker" Nouzen. As Lena gets to know Shinei and the rest of the Spearhead Squadron, she becomes sympathetic to his people's plight and tries to help them. At same time, Lena and Shinei learn a dark secret: the Republic and the war with the Empire is not what it seems. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/no-country-for-otakus/support

ESO Network – The ESO Network
San Diego Comic-Con 2022 – Earth Station Trek Episode Eighty-Two

ESO Network – The ESO Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 61:12


PICARD! LOWER DECKS! STRANGE NEW WORLDS! There was a lot of Star Trek news at San Diego Comic-Con 2022, and we discussed it all! Earth Station Trek is a part of the ESO Podcast Network, Executive Producer Mike Faber. The post San Diego Comic-Con 2022 – Earth Station Trek Episode Eighty-Two appeared first on The ESO Network.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
August 5, 2022: Albemarle Supervisors endorse Rio Road Corridor plan; Charlottesville seeks input on next Police Chief

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 21:06


What recourse do we have except to simply pursue this August 5 in the best manner possible? On this Blogger Day, I celebrate with another installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement, a newsletter and podcast intended to shed light on various happenings in and around the area. I’m the writer and host, Sean Tubbs. What are you writing these days? Sign-up for free, but paid subscriptions come with benefits and the satisfaction you’re helping pay for the PACER bills! Ting will match. See below! On today’s program: The former Commissioner of Revenue in Greene County has been sentenced to three months in federal prison for attempted witness tamperingUnemployment drops to pre-pandemic levelsCharlottesville seeks input on what kind of person should be the next police chiefAlbemarle Supervisors endorse a pan for improvements on Rio Road but one member says that doesn’t mean final decisions have been madeCharlottesville City Council is briefed on the preparation for the next fiscal year First shout-out goes to the Charlottesville Jazz Society In today’s first subscriber supported public service announcement, are you looking for something new to listen to in the form of live music? The Charlottesville Jazz Society has you covered with an ongoing list of dozens of events coming up at venues across the area. That ranges from rumba guitar duo Berta & Vincent at Glass House Winery this Saturday afternoon to the Charles Owen Trio at Potter’s Craft Cider on Saturday, August 28. The Charlottesville Jazz Society is your source to plot out your musical journey and you can get started at cvillejazz.org. Thanks to a subscriber for being on both Patreon and Substack to qualify for this shout-out.Greene’s former Commissioner of Revenue sentenced in witness tampering caseThe former Commissioner of Revenue in Greene County has been sentenced to three months in federal prison for intervening in an investigation of his son’s drug distribution charges. Larry Snow, 73, pleaded guilty in May to one count of attempted witness tampering for trying to dissuade a confidential informant. “According to court documents, Larry Snow used his access as the former Commissioner of Revenue to a Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) database as part of an effort to retaliate against and tamper with the confidential informant, Person A, after Person A aided law enforcement in controlled purchases of methamphetamine and heroin from Bryant Snow,” according to a release from the United State Attorney for Western District of Virginia. Specifically, the elder Snow sought to print out material identifying the informant for his son to use to intimidate and to discredit that person while incarcerated at Central Virginia Regional Jail. Snow resigned in May 2022 as Commissioner of the Revenue in Greene, having been elected in 2019 while under indictment. National employment returns to pre-pandemic levelsThere were 528,000 nonfarm jobs added across the United States of America in July, according to the latest employment figures released this morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unemployment rate is at 3.5 percent. “Both total nonfarm employment and the unemployment rate have returned to their February 2020 pre-pandemic levels,” reads a release that was sent out this morning. The report also notes that the number of permanent job losers is now lower than February 2020. The long-term unemployed is defined as those jobless for more than 27 weeks, and that figure is also below pre-pandemic levels. Other statistics in the release are worth noting. In July, 7.1 percent of the workforce continued to telecommute due to the pandemic. The labor force participation rate is defined as “the percentage of the civilian noninstitutional population 16 years and older that is working or actively looking for work.” That figure was at 62.1 percent in July, lower than the February 2020 figure of 63.4 percent. The next employment numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics will be out September 2. Charlottesville seeking input on police chief searchHow much experience should the next Charlottesville Police Chief have? What leadership qualities would you like to see? What should the police department leader’s top priority be?Those are some of the questions in a survey that the firm POLIHIRE is conducting as part of their contract to conduct a search for the next chief. The survey is open through August 15 and is available in English and Spanish. (fill out the survey)The person hired will replace Acting Chief of Police LaTroy A. Durrette who has been in the position since former City Manager Chip Boyles fired RaShall Brackney after three years on the job. Brackney sued the city and several individuals for race, color, and gender discrimination, as well as interference with contract, unlawful retaliation, violation of the state’s whistleblower statute, and more. According to a series of waivers filed in the case, all defendants have until sixty days after July 1 to respond to the case. Albemarle Supervisors endorse Rio Road Corridor PlanThe Albemarle Board of Supervisors has officially endorsed a plan that offers guidance for how future intersection improvements on Rio Road may look in the future. “This is a planning level document that establishes a vision for improvements along the corridor with sufficient analysis of the conceptual design to understand whether the proposed concepts can address future and existing conditions and can meet [Virginia Department of Transportation] and other relevant engineering standards,” said David Benish, development process manager for Albemarle County. The county hired the civil engineering firm Line + Grade to develop the plans. Supervisors were last briefed on the work last October and the Planning Commission saw the draft in May. The work was split into two sections to reflect two different roadway characters. “Phase one is very much an arterial roadway [with] five lanes with a continuous left-hand turn lane in the middle,”  said Dan Hyer with Line + Grade. “Whereas phase two still resembles in many locations the local collector that it is. It’s very much a local road.” Hyer said the work involved analyzing crash data such as at the intersection of Hillsdale Drive and Rio Road. Eighty-nine percent of crashes at the location are left-hand turns. As such, recommended changes are to eliminate that movement at Hillsdale, Old Brook and Northfield. “The solution that we have recommended basically absolves all left-hand turn movements by replacing the two intersections with a singular dog-bone or bean-shaped roundabout,” Hyer said.  Belvedere Drive and Rio Road would be turned into a “Continuous Green-T” intersection and Albemarle has applied for funding. A roundabout is funded at John Warner Parkway and Rio Road and that will soon get under design. The second phase of the project is broken into three segments, with the northern one including two planned developments. The Board of Supervisors approved the 328 Rio Point apartment complex last December, and an application has been filed for 43 town homes just to the south in a project called Rio Commons. “And we think that if those developments can work with this plan that the corridor can transform in a positive way and that some of the risks that we’ve identified can be mitigated through the build-out of these developments,” Hyer said. Supervisor Ned Gallaway of the Rio District was the lone vote against the Rio Point development last December. He said he was concerned about more people in the area.“As we approve the sidewalks and the access down to the Parkway, we’re only creating more pedestrian activity and that’s going to introduce a vehicular piece which is going to be really dangerous so I think we need to get our heads around that sooner rather than later,” Gallaway said.Gallaway said his endorsement of the plan did not mean that he supported the specific recommendations involved. He said there is a competing plan to reroute Hillsdale Drive that would take away the need for the bean-shaped roundabout. “We know that that intersection is completely problematic and needs a solution but it just may not be the solution that’s in the study so if we vote to approve the study, it doesn’t mean we’re necessarily voting to approve that project,” Gallaway said. As for phase two, Gallaway said he would like to see more traffic calming to slow down the speed of traffic, similar to the bump-outs on Park Street in the City of Charlottesville between the U.S. 250 bypass and downtown. Gallaway said he was grateful staff was able to work to get the corridor study done. The vote to endorse the plan was unanimous and it will now be considered as part of the update of the Albemarle County Comprehensive Plan, otherwise known as AC44.Second shout-out: Save the date for Rivanna Conservation Alliance’s Community Watershed clean-upIn today’s second Patreon-fueled shout-out: Mark your calendar for RCA’s third annual Rivanna River Round-Up community watershed cleanup coming up on Saturday, September 24. The RCA organized the first round-up in September 2020 as a safe way for the community to give back to the river during the COVID-19 pandemic. Over the last two years, a total of 245 volunteers have cleaned up 67 miles of streams, nearby trails and the Rivanna River, removing 192 tires and 213 large bags of trash from the waterways. Details will soon be made available and you can get those by signing up for the Rivanna Conservation Alliance newsletter at rivannariver.org. You can get your own shout-out for a $25 a month Patreon contribution! For more information, visit Information Charlottesville.Charlottesville City Council briefed on planning for next year’s budget Fiscal Year 2023 is just over a month old, but the budget process in Virginia never really stops as local governments seek to provide services. In April, Council adopted a $212.9 million general fund budget that was 10.76 percent higher than the one for the year before. That’s built on increased assessments for both real estate and personal property as well as a one-cent increase in the real estate tax rate. That was the first such increase in several decades. There are about 30 weeks until whoever is City Manager in March 2023 presents a recommended budget and 36 weeks until Council is expected to adopt their amended document. Council got a briefing this past Monday and learned about some of the factors coming up and some suggested the schedule be moved up. (view the presentation)Will the budget continue to grow at a double-digit level, or will it be more modest? How much will it cost to implement pay and benefit increases that may come through a collective bargaining ordinance? What about the cost of inflation? While the answers aren’t yet known, the foundation is being laid for whatever will end up happening. At the end of August, city departments will be sent packets to request funds for capital projects and these will be due by the early October. There’s at least one change to that process.“We’re going to include a Planning Commission member on the review team,” said Krissy Hammill, the city’s director of budget and performance analysis.Requests from nonprofits and outside agencies are due sometime in mid-October and recommendations from the Vibrant Community team will be completed in mid-January. Also around that time will be another change to the budget process.“It’s called the city manager budget forum,” Hammill said. “The date for this will be January 10 and it will be held at Carver Recreation Center. This will be an opportunity for the city manager to make a presentation and to engage in public discussion.”Hammill said the growth in the budget for next year is expected to be more modest than the 10.76 percent increase from FY22 to FY23. She’s also keeping an eye on inflation.“We already know that there are cost increases that we’re seeing both just in general things as well as capital projects due to supply chain issues and inflation,” Hammill said. “We’re not sure of what exactly what the revenue impact would be for a potential recession if there to be one.” There will likely be higher compensation costs for city employees due to collective bargaining as well as a need to carry on the ongoing costs of positions funded using one-time money. Between now and the budget adoption, Council may have an updated strategic plan paid for through the city’s use of American Rescue Plan Act funding. “The time is right,” said interim City Manager Michael C. Rogers. “In doing the strategic plan right, we’ll get a consultant to engage you individually and collectively over the next few months and by the time we get to April, we ought to have a new direction or at least some themes.”City Councilor Michael Payne said he wanted to make sure there is funding to address a human resources phenomenon known as compression, funding for climate, and for city investment in nonprofits to build subsidized housing. “How can we get our adopted Affordable Housing Plan and that $10 million a year into a more stable place in terms of how we’ll fund it at $10 million a year which is what the plan calls for,” Payne said. Payne also wants to make sure there is funding to invest in public transportation. Rogers said a compensation study is expected to be completed by the end of the year. “That will tell us where we are compared to other jurisdictions in the region in terms of our salaries,” Rogers said. “It will define a competitiveness gap.”The Fluvanna County Board of Supervisors were briefed on their compensation study on Wednesday. Rogers said the August 15 Council work session will feature a presentation of the collective bargaining ordinance followed by a first reading on September 6 with adoption currently anticipated on September 19. “And we expect that there will be a push to begin to recognize collective bargaining units after that,” Rogers said. Another direction to budget staff is to reexamine a policy where 40 percent of new revenues created by additional real estate taxes goes to Charlottesville City Schools. Some on the current Council have called for that agreement to be revisited, and Rogers said budget staff would look into it and begin preliminary discussions with the school system.“And at some point the Council probably should have that meeting with schools to discuss an issue like this,” Rogers said.As for increased spending on public transit, Rogers said current planning by the Thomas Jefferson Planning District is relevant. A governance study for how to implement a proposed Regional Transit Vision is about to get underway.“The long term play is probably the discussion about a regional transit agency, and what are the dynamics that need to be in place for us to move that forward,” Rogers said. “It’s been talked about a long time.” The current calendar calls for the second public hearing on the budget to be held on April 3, 2023 and for adoption at a special meeting on April 11. City Councilor Sena Magill said she wanted to adjust the schedule so that the final public hearing does not happen during the week City Schools are on spring break. “And it’s just one more way that it makes it harder for some people to serve on Council,” Magill said. Charlottesville Mayor Lloyd Snook said he would like to see the budget process moved up further so that Council could have more influence. The budget is introduced to the public the first week of every March. “There are places, particularly in Northern Virginia, where Council is involved in budget discussions by mid-December,” Snook said. “They’re not waiting until February or March and the practical effect of what we do is that our opportunity for actually commenting on things is compressed into about four weeks.” Snook said he would like to see the budget introduced in early February. Rogers said he would look into seeing if that could be accomplished, but it would leave for no break at all for budget staff. Hammill suggested holding budget development work sessions when needed. One such work session that comes to mind is the one last September when Council signaled its willingness to transfer a financial commitment for the West Main Streetscape toward school reconfiguration. That gave staff direction as they built the FY23 budget.Payne pointed out that Albemarle County has adopted their budget in May for the past two years. Rogers and Hammill said they would return with more options. For all of my stories on the budget process in Charlottesville, visit Information Charlottesville.Housekeeping notes for edition #416When will the next installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement? Good question. I can tell you there will be a Week Ahead out on Sunday as well as the Government Glance which is a look at what’s coming up in all of the localities across the Fifth Congressional District of Virginia. Reporting for today’s installment included a look-up on the Public Access to Court Electronic Records to learn a little more about the lawsuit filed by the former Police Chief. Today’s search only cost $2, but this is the kind of cost it takes to produce informational content that intends to keep you up to date. So, if you’re like to support this program which includes expenses like court reporting, consider a paid subscription through Substack. If do so, Ting will match your initial payment! And, if you sign up for their services through this link you’ll get a free standard install, your 2nd month free, and a $75 downtown mall gift card! Enter the promo code COMMUNITY for full effect. Music comes from the D.C. entity that currently goes by the name Wraki, selected randomly from a bin of basement-recorded cassette tapes. You can support that work by purchasing the album Regret Everything for whatever you would like to pay. Now, off to prepare for a trip to a different location in which I will continue to produce a couple editions of Charlottesville Community Engagement. It’s my pleasure to do so and I do hope you will help support me to keep this going for a long time come. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Earth Station Trek
San Diego Comic-Con 2022 - Earth Station Trek Episode Eighty-Two

Earth Station Trek

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 61:11


PICARD! LOWER DECKS! STRANGE NEW WORLDS! There was a lot of Star Trek news at San Diego Comic-Con 2022, and we discussed it all! Earth Station Trek is a part of the ESO Podcast Network, Executive Producer Mike Faber.

National Parks Traveler Podcast
National Parks Traveler Episode 181: Musical Kīlauea

National Parks Traveler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 40:58 Very Popular


If you're interested in volcanoes, you need not go further than our national parks to get your fill. Eighty-four units of the National Park System have volcanic resources. These parks run the gamut of having very active volcanic features to those where volcanoes formed the landscape and contribute to the geodiversity of the park. The most active volcano in our park system is Kīlauea in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park on the Big Island of Hawaii. It's also one of the most monitored and researched volcanoes anywhere. This week the Traveler's Lynn Riddick talks to Professor Leif Karlstrom, whose recent research of Kilauea might be music to your ears.

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate
Episode One Hundred - Eighty-Nine

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 54:31 Very Popular


On this episode of Mystery Crate, Billy, Tony, Jess, and Roy (but mostly Billy and Tony) pitch their ideas to the Meadowlark/DraftKings brass in a segment called "Mark Tank". Also, the Shipping Container discuss the lack of team bonding the group does and specifically a shortage of pachangas. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

In Focus by The Hindu
Afghanistan under the Taliban regime | In Focus podcast

In Focus by The Hindu

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 23:17


The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Afghanistan, Richard Bennett, has spoken of the “advancing erasure” of women from public life under a new look Taliban regime. Twenty-three out of Afghanistan's 40 million people are in need of food assistance, he said in a recent statement. The United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan, or UNAMA as it is known, pointed out in a July report that seven hundred people have been killed and a little over 1400 wounded in the country since the Taliban takeover in August last year. At least 160 instances of extra-judicial killings have been reported of former government and security officials and more than 120 media workers have faced arbitrary arrest or detention. Eighty per cent of all women journalists have been fired from their jobs. All secondary schools remain closed for girls. 

Sounds Of Eighty Six
Episode 22: Sounds of Eighty Six, July 2022

Sounds Of Eighty Six

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 119:55


We're back with our July show

Le Batard & Friends Network
MC- Episode One Hundred - Eighty-Nine

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 54:31


On this episode of Mystery Crate, Billy, Tony, Jess, and Roy (but mostly Billy and Tony) pitch their ideas to the Meadowlark/DraftKings brass in a segment called "Mark Tank". Also, the Shipping Container discuss the lack of team bonding the group does and specifically a shortage of pachangas. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

8111
Matt Wallin

8111

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 106:48


This week on 8111 the tables are turned and my hero/mentor Kim Bromley interviews me about my career and background. I grew up in the Los Angeles suburbs in the 70's and 80's skateboarding and going to the movies. In 1992 I earned my degree in Cinema from San Francisco State University.That same year, I began my career at George Lucas' Industrial Light and Magic where I worked for nearly a decade in the company's computer graphics division. For over 25 years I have worked around the world at the top visual effects houses; Peter Jackson's Weta Digital in New Zealand, Tippett Studio in Berkeley, Sony Pictures Imageworks in Los Angeles, Warner Bros. ESC Entertainment in California, Brainstorm Digital in New York, and the Moving Picture Company in Vancouver. My film credits include; The Mummy, Twister, Star Wars: The Special Editions, Matrix Reloaded and Matrix Revolutions, Hellboy, Constantine, King Kong, Watchmen, and Jurassic Park: The Lost World.Outside of Hollywood, I served as the Visual Effects Supervisor for American artist Matthew Barney's five-part Cremaster Cycle and the follow up experimental film, Drawing Restraint 9 staring Icelandic pop star Bjork.I am the host of the 8111 (Eighty-one Eleven) podcast. Each episode is a conversation with a guest who worked at George Lucas' Industrial Light and Magic during its 40+ year history. Guests discuss their journeys and career paths, and how working at ILM changed them. I'm also the co-host of FX Guide's VFX Show podcast listened to by visual effects professionals, fans, and aspiring artists from all over the world.Today I am the senior full-time faculty and Chair in the department of Communication Arts in the School of the Arts at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia. I teach numerous courses specializing in 3D computer graphics, visual effects, and the creative application of emerging digital technologies. http://mattwallin.com/

Earth Station Trek
Interview with Justin T. Lee - Earth Station Trek Episode Eighty

Earth Station Trek

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 39:11


This week, the EARTH STATION TREK crew is joined by Justin T. Lee, the genius behind the TNG and VOY scenes done in the style of the Animated Series! Justin is co-founder and Executive Producer of Gazelle Automations, which creates puppet work and practical and digital effects for properties like Doctor Who and Thunderbirds as well as their own series Miikshi and Space Bao. Check out the video of our interview either on the EARTH STATION TREK Facebook Group or on our YouTube Channel! Earth Station Trek is a part of the ESO Podcast Network, Executive Producer Mike Faber.

MATRIXX RADIO W/ Barley Paers
GUY TIMES Podcast - Episode Eighty Nine (DRUNK CARDS TEST?)

MATRIXX RADIO W/ Barley Paers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 43:13


The gang decides to take a new game out for a spin to see if it's worthy of introducing to Our Family Jewels sometime down the road.

ESO Network – The ESO Network
Interview with Justin T. Lee – Earth Station Trek Episode Eighty

ESO Network – The ESO Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 39:11


This week, the EARTH STATION TREK crew is joined by Justin T. Lee, the genius behind the TNG and VOY scenes done in the style of the Animated Series! Justin is co-founder and Executive Producer of Gazelle Automations, which creates puppet work and practical and digital effects for properties like Doctor Who and Thunderbirds as … Interview with Justin T. Lee – Earth Station Trek Episode Eighty Read More » The post Interview with Justin T. Lee – Earth Station Trek Episode Eighty appeared first on The ESO Network.

The New Yorker: Politics and More
Trump's Hundred and Eighty-seven Minutes of Inaction on January 6th

The New Yorker: Politics and More

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 32:09 Very Popular


On Thursday evening, the committee charged with investigating the January 6th attack on the Capitol presented what it has learned so far about President Trump's behavior on that eventful day. As members of the President's staff and family urged him to do something about the rioters, he watched television in the White House dining room. “He chose not to act,” as Representative Adam Kinzinger, a member of the committee, put it. The hearing featured testimony from military and security officials and the President's legal counsel, and it included an outtake from an address on January 7th in which Trump admitted, “I don't want to say the election's over.” In the fourth installment of a special series for the Politics and More podcast, three members of The New Yorker's Washington bureau—Evan Osnos, Susan B. Glasser, and Jane Mayer—take us through the revelations from this week's hearing, the last of the summer.

GENERATION RIPE
The Eighty-Eighth One... and Pleasant Gehman

GENERATION RIPE

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 66:08


Episode 88 and Wendi and Dfernando's guest interview is multi-disciplinary artist, writer, professional dancer, actor, psychic, musician and painter Pleasant Gehman.  A Hollywood rock ‘n' roll icon, during the 1970s, she was one of the first punks in Los Angeles, documenting the scene she helped create in her fanzine LOBOTOMY, which lead to writing for the top mainstream rock publications. During the 1980s, she toured fronting her three bands, all of whom released multiple recordings: Screamin' Sirens, The Ringling Sisters and Honk If Yer Horny. Concurrently, she was the talent booker for the seminal Los Angeles “alternative” clubs Cathay De Grande and Raji's.Since the early 1990s, under the stage name Princess Farhana, she has appeared internationally as a professional belly dance and burlesque performer and teacher, touring in Egypt, Turkey, China, Australia, and constantly across Europe, the United Kingdom and North America. She's danced and acted in numerous motion pictures, in music videos and on television shows and has been featured in many documentaries on belly dance and burlesque, performing and as an interview subject. In 2009, she was the star of Steve Balderson's feature-length documentary UNDERBELLY: A YEAR IN THE LIFE OF PRINCESS FARHANA, released worldwide in theaters as well as on DVD. A practicing witch, her work as a psychic, intuitive Tarot reader and energy healer has been life-long; she currently shares her gifts with clients worldwide. From the age of sixteen onwards, Pleasant has been a journalist and cultural commentator with literally thousands of articles published nationally and internationally on everything from rock ‘n' roll to the paranormal, from magic to homeless teenagers. Her memoirs, short stories and poetry have been widely anthologized and many works were recorded on her spoken word CD Ruined. In March 2020, she launched the  popular podcast THE DEVIL'S MUSIC, which explores the intersection of rock'n'roll and the occult. It is available across all podcasting platforms. Pleasant is the author and/or editor of eight books, including THE BELLY DANCE HANDBOOK and the memoir SHOWGIRL CONFIDENTIAL: MY LIFE ONSTAGE, BACKSTAGE AND ON THE ROAD.Her latest book ROCK 'N' ROLL WITCH: A MEMOIR OF SEX MAGICK, DRUGS AND ROCK 'N' ROLL, is a memoir of her astonishing life, where music and the unexplained have been constants for decades. Her supernatural experiences unfold to a soundtrack of old school punk, 50's rockabilly, vintage blues, classic rock and girl groups. Stranger than fiction, her true stories of spirit encounters, synchronicity and her own psychic abilities are populated with the friends who also experienced them, including The Go-Go's, The Cramps, The Germs, The Gun Club, The Blasters and many more. Her writing is riveting, loaded with humor and extraordinary details that will make readers question their own reality.She authored her own chapters in John Doe and Tom Desavia's UNDER THE BIG BLACK SUN: A PERSONAL HISTORY OF LA PUNK and MORE FUN IN THE NEW WORLD: THE UNMAKING AND LEGACY OF LA PUNK. She currently hosts BELL, BOOK & CANDLE - an occult burlesque show at El Cid in Los Angeles that is held every third Wednesday of every month.  Pleasant lives in Hollywood, California, with four spoiled rescue cats.Also on Episode 88, Dfernando and Wendi celebrate his new status as a new Californian and their weekend attending the play TILDA SWINTON ANSWERS AN AD ON CRAIGSLIST (at Los Angeles' Casita Del Campo) written by past guest Byron Lane and starring (another past guest) Tom Lenk.  And Wendi mentions she spoke on Lux ATL's MAKE IT HAPPEN VIRTUAL RETREAT.  Watch Wendi and Dfernando and their TEAM GENERATION RIPE: Greg Covey, Shelley McLendon and Ponciana Badia on Season 7 Episode 2 of CELEBRITY FAMILY FEUD - now on ABC OnDemand and Hulu and on the GENERATION RIPE website.  Follow us on our Instagram:Wendi McLendon-CoveyDfernando ZarembaGENERATION RIPE... and our guest Pleasant Gehman, her Twitter, and her Facebook page. Remember to subscribe to GENERATION RIPEAnd rate & leave us a review by clicking HERE!Visit Dfernando Zaremba's website: dfernandozaremba.com

KBKabaret
KBKabaret Week Eighty Nine Podcast

KBKabaret

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 55:34


KBKabaret Week Eighty Nine Podcast Show Notes Music and Comedy Variety Show 55:34 A Kallaballo of Variety in Parlor City Upstate New York:  Leatherstocking Region Comedy and Music Variety Show contains original comedy skits, music, short stories, and even recipes Producer, Host, and Head Writer:  Bree Harvey Actors:  Bree Harvey, Judy McMahon, Bonnie DeForest, Charles Berman, John Carey, and John Montgomery. TRUE STORIES Special Guest:  Kate Murray Special Musical Guest:  Patricia Silverberg The Bird Written by Bree Harvey Starring Bree Harvey and Charles Berman Splash Mountain Written and Narrated By Bree Harvey Musical Guest Patricia Silverberg From the Album Don't Look Back “Always There” The Dysfunctionals Family Trip Written by Bree Harvey Starring Bree Harvey, Kate Murray, John Montgomery, and John Carey Where Do Babies Comes From Written and Narrated by Bree Harvey Musical Guest:  Patricia Silverberg “You Should Know” Dog on Plane Written and Narrated by Bree Harvey Starring:  Kate Murray, Molly Murray, and Bill Murray How I Killed the Pope Written by John Montgomery Starring  John Montgomery, John Carey, Judy McMahon and Bree Harvey Musical Guest:  Patricia Silverberg “Hear My Song.” Sound Engineer and Announcer:  Charles Berman Assistant Sound Engineer:  Valentine- Terrell- Monfeuga Original Music Written By Bree Harvey Music Arranged by Cristina Dinella and Dave Rice of Basement Studios Produced by BHH Productions L. L. C. ©2017 All rights reserved

Detroit Stories
Seasoned Saints: Celebrating Our Elders

Detroit Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 15:22


On World Day for Grandparents and the Elderly, Catholics recognize the importance of engaging the 'backbone of our parishes' (0:02) The narrator offers depressing statistics about the state of elder loneliness in America, including one statistic that shows up to a quarter of those 65 and older are considered “socially isolated,” which comes with its own set of health risks. The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated these trends. (1:51) One Family of Parishes in the Archdiocese of Detroit has decided to do something about this, building community by starting with the heads of families — seniors. The movement began with Pope Francis declaring a worldwide celebration of World Day for Grandparents and the Elderly on the fourth Sunday in July. (2:55) Cindy Portis, Christian service coordinator at St. Colette Parish in Livonia and evangelical charity coordinator for the Northwest Wayne 2 Family of Parishes, talks about the importance of engaging seniors at the parish level. Portis contends its this group that's likely to evangelize their family members. (4:09) Portis describes a new senior group at the Family of Parishes, called “Seasoned Saints.” Portis explains the significance of the name and describes its purpose. (5:22) At the first meeting in March, attendees were visibly excited, Portis said. For many, it was the first chance to get out of isolation after a long COVID winter. The group got to work planning activities and outings throughout the year, including monthly themes. (8:41) Eighty-three people showed up to the first meeting, ages 68 to 101. Portis talks about the collective wisdom of the group, which combined holds a wealth of knowledge and experience from decades of life lessons. (10:00) Liam Neary and his wife, Charlotte, were among the attendees. In their 80s, the couple describe themselves as “roamin' Catholics” but say they've found a home within the group at St. Colette. (12:15) Liam and Charlotte volunteered during the COVID-19 pandemic to call and check in on lonely seniors, including those in hospice. They describe themselves as “lucky,” because they still have each other. (12:41) Sandy MacLeod, 82, of St. Kenneth Parish in Plymouth, describes the companionship she found with “Seasoned Saints.” MacLeod lost her husband in 2007, and was never able to have children. To her, the group is a breath of fresh air. (15:03) The narrator describes the value of seniors to the Catholic community, the glue holding the parish together. They are volunteers, family matriarchs and patriarchs, and faithful prayer warriors who hold their church in prayer. As the narrator says, “Today, let's celebrate them.” Reporting, script and narration by Casey McCorry; production by Ron Pangborn This episode of Detroit Stories is brought to you by our friends at Catholic Funeral and Cemetery Services, a ministry of the Archdiocese of Detroit. Pre-planning your Catholic funeral is a gift of love for those you cherish. To learn more about pre-planning to prepare those you care about for this journey, visit CFCSdetroit.org. Listen to ‘Detroit Stories' on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or Fireside. Podcasts also will be posted biweekly on DetroitCatholic.com.

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST 07.19.22 - Dem Staffers Unionize

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 41:08


Hour 2 -  Good Tuesday morning! Here's what Nick Reed covers this hour: The Congressional Workers Union announced today eight Democratic offices will be the first to unionize. Eighty-five staffers from the offices of Reps. Cori Bush (D., Mo.), Chuy Garcia (D., Ill.), Ro Khanna (D., Calif.), Andy Levin (D., Mich.), Ted Lieu (D., Calif.), Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D., N.Y.), Ilhan Omar (D., Minn.), and Melanie Stansbury (D., N.M.) moved to join the new union. Sesame Place Philadelphia is facing backlash after a mother posted a video online showing a character appearing to snub her two black daughters. The company will now conduct training for employees.

Building Blocks
Episode Eighty-Five: Smuggler's Copter

Building Blocks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 67:21


This is by far the most recent topic we've ever covered.  Debuting only six years ago, Smuggler's Copter was immediately pegged as the best card in Kaladesh, and did not disappoint.  In the first tournament after release, it had tremendous representation at the top tables.  We're talking seven of the top eight, and thirteen of the top sixteen.  With that introduction, how long did it take for the premier vehicle to be taken off the road?

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate
Episode One Hundred - Eighty-Seven

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 55:07 Very Popular


It's time for the crew to take an exploratory dive into Chris Wittyngham's dating life: DM sliding, first date advice, texting protocol, likes and dislikes in a potential partner, and so much more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Le Batard & Friends Network
MC - Episode One Hundred - Eighty-Seven

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 55:07


It's time for the crew to take an exploratory dive into Chris Wittyngham's dating life: DM sliding, first date advice, texting protocol, likes and dislikes in a potential partner, and so much more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Midnight Train Podcast
The F'n Electric Chair

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 92:13


www.patreon.com/accidentaldads  An American-developed method of execution known as the "electric chair" involves strapping the condemned individual to a specially constructed wooden chair and electrocuting them using electrodes attached to their head and leg. Alfred P. Southwick, a dentist from Buffalo, New York, proposed this form of execution in 1881. It was developed during the 1880s as a purportedly merciful substitute for hanging, and it was first used in 1890. This technique of execution has been utilized for many years in the Philippines and the United States. Death was first thought to arise from brain injury, but research in 1899 revealed that ventricular fibrillation and ultimately cardiac arrest are the main causes of death.   Despite the fact that the electric chair has long been associated with the death sentence in the United States, lethal injection, which is generally regarded as a more compassionate mode of execution, has replaced the electric chair as the preferred method of execution. Except in Tennessee and South Carolina, where it may be used without the prisoner's consent if the medications for lethal injection are not available, electrocution is only still permitted as a second option that may be selected over lethal injection at the request of the prisoner in some states. In the states of Alabama and Florida, where lethal injection is an alternate technique, electrocution is an optional method of execution as of 2021. Inmates who are condemned to death for crimes committed before March 31, 1998 and who elect electrocution as their method of execution no longer have access to the electric chair; instead, they are put to death by lethal injection, as are those who do not pick electrocution. In the event that a judge rules that lethal injection is unlawful, electrocution is also permitted in Kentucky. If alternative methods of execution are later determined to be unlawful in the state where the execution is taking place, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Oklahoma have permitted the use of the electric chair as a backup method. On February 8, 2008, the Nebraska Supreme Court ruled that the state's constitution prohibits "cruel and unusual punishment," which included electric chair execution. As a result, Nebraska, the only state that continued to use electrocution as the exclusive form of death, stopped carrying out these kinds of executions.   Newspaper stories about how the high voltages used to power arc lighting, a type of brilliant outdoor street lighting that required high voltages in the range of 3000-6000 volts, were published one after another in the late 1870s and early 1880s. It was a strange new phenomenon that appeared to instantly strike a victim dead without leaving a mark. On August 7, 1881, one of these mishaps in Buffalo, New York, resulted in the invention of the electric chair. George Lemuel Smith, a drunk dock worker, managed to get back inside the Brush Electric Company arc lighting power house that evening and touch the brush and ground of a large electric dynamo in search of the excitement of a tingling feeling he had felt while holding the guard rail. He died instantaneously. The coroner who looked into the matter brought it up before a Buffalo-area scientific group that year. Alfred P. Southwick, a dentist with a technical background who was also in attendance at the talk, believed the strange event may have some practical use.   Southwick participated in a series of studies that involved electrocuting hundreds of stray dogs alongside doctor George E. Fell and the director of the Buffalo ASPCA. They conducted tests using the dog both in and out of the water, and they experimented with the electrode kind and location until they developed a consistent procedure for electrocuting animals. After publishing his theories in scholarly publications in 1882 and 1883, Southwick went on to argue for the employment of this technique as a more compassionate alternative to hanging in capital cases in the early 1880s. His work gained widespread attention. In an effort to create a system that might be scaled up to operate on people, he developed calculations based on the dog experimentation. Early on in his plans, he used a modified dental chair to confine the condemned; this chair would later come to be known as the electric chair.   There was growing opposition to hangings in particular and the death penalty in general following a string of botched executions in the United States. A three-person death penalty commission was established in 1886 by newly elected New York State Governor David B. Hill to look into more humane ways of carrying out executions. The commission was chaired by the human rights activist and reformer Elbridge Thomas Gerry and included Southwick and lawyer and politician Matthew Hale from New York. There was growing opposition to hangings in particular and the death penalty in general following a string of botched executions in the United States. A three-person death penalty commission was established in 1886 by newly elected New York State Governor David B. Hill to look into more humane ways of carrying out executions. The commission was chaired by the human rights activist and reformer Elbridge Thomas Gerry and included Southwick and lawyer and politician Matthew Hale from New York. They also went to George Fell's dog electrocutions, who had collaborated with Southwick on early 1880s tests. Fell continued his research by electrocuting sedated, vivisected dogs in an effort to understand how electricity killed a victim. The Commission suggested execution in 1888 utilizing Southwick's electric chair concept, with the convicted person's head and feet hooked to metal wires. With three electric chairs put up at the jails in Auburn, Clinton, and Sing Sing, they further suggested that the state execute prisoners rather than the individual counties. These ideas were incorporated into a measure that was approved by the legislature, signed by Governor Hill on June 4, 1888, and was scheduled to take effect on January 1, 1889.   The New York Medico-Legal Society, an unofficial organization made up of physicians and lawyers, was tasked with assessing these criteria because the bill itself did not specify the kind or quantity of electricity that should be utilized. Since tests up to that point had been conducted on animals smaller than a human (dogs), some committee members weren't sure that the lethality of alternating current (AC) had been conclusively proven. In September 1888, a committee was formed and recommended 3000 volts, but the type of electricity, direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC), wasn't determined.   At this point, the state's efforts to develop the electric chair were mixed up with the conflict between Thomas Edison's direct current power system and George Westinghouse's alternating current-based system, which came to be known as the "war of the currents." Since 1886, the two businesses had been engaged in commercial competition. In 1888, a sequence of circumstances led to an all-out media war between the two. Frederick Peterson, a neurologist who served as the committee's chair, hired Harold P. Brown to serve as a consultant. After numerous people died as a result of the careless installation of pole-mounted AC arc lighting lines in New York City in the early months of 1888, Brown embarked on his own war against alternating current. Peterson had assisted Brown when he publicly electrocuted dogs with AC in July 1888 at Columbia College in an effort to demonstrate that AC was more lethal than DC.  Thomas Edison's West Orange laboratory offered technical support for these experiments, and an unofficial alliance between Edison Electric and Brown developed. On December 5, 1888, Brown set up an experiment back at West Orange as Thomas Edison, members of the press, and members of the Medico-Legal Society, including Elbridge Gerry, the head of the death sentence panel, watched. Brown conducted all of his experiments on animals larger than humans using alternating current, including four calves and a lame horse, which were all operated under 750 volts of AC.  The Medico-Legal Society advocated using 1000–1500 volts of alternating electricity for executions based on these findings, and newspapers emphasized that the voltage used was just half that of the power lines that run over the streets of American cities. Westinghouse denounced these experiments as biased self-serving demonstrations intended to constitute an outright attack on alternating current, and he charged Brown of working for Edison. Members of the Medico-Legal Society, including electrotherapy specialist Alphonse David Rockwell, Carlos Frederick MacDonald, and Columbia College professor Louis H. Laudy, were tasked with determining the specifics of electrode placement at the request of death sentence panel chairman Gerry. They resorted to Brown once more for the technical support. Treasurer Francis S. Hastings, who appeared to be one of the key figures at the company trying to portray Westinghouse as a peddler of death dealing AC current, tried to acquire a Westinghouse AC generator for the test but discovered that none could be acquired. Brown requested that Edison Electric Light supply the equipment for the tests. They ultimately used Edison's West Orange facility for the animal testing they carried out in the middle of March 1889. Austin E. Lathrop, the superintendent of prisons, petitioned Brown to create the chair, but Brown declined.  Dr. George Fell created the final designs for a straightforward oak chair, deviating from the suggestions of the Medico-Legal Society by moving the electrodes to the head and the center of the back.  Brown did accept the responsibility of locating the generators required to run the chair. With the aid of Edison and Westinghouse's main AC competitor, the Thomson-Houston Electric Company, he was able to covertly purchase three Westinghouse AC generators that were being retired, ensuring that Westinghouse's equipment would be connected to the first execution. Edwin F. Davis, the first "state electrician" (executioner) for the State of New York, constructed the electric chair.   Joseph Chapleau, who had been sentenced to life in prison after being found guilty of killing his neighbor with a sled stake, became the first victim of New York's new electrocution legislation. William Kemmler, who had been found guilty of killing his wife with a hatchet, was the next prisoner on the death row. Kemmler filed an appeal on his behalf with the New York Court of Appeals, arguing that the use of electricity as a manner of execution amounted to "cruel and unusual punishment" that was in violation of both the federal and state constitutions of the United States. Kemmler's petition for a writ of habeas corpus was rejected by the court on December 30, 1889, according to a long decision by Judge Dwight:  “We have no doubt that if the Legislature of this State should undertake to proscribe for any offense against its laws the punishment of burning at the stake, breaking at the wheel, etc., it would be the duty of the courts to pronounce upon such an attempt the condemnation of the Constitution. The question now to be answered is whether the legislative act here is subject to the same condemnation. Certainly, it is not so on its face, for, although the mode of death described is conceded to be unusual, there is no common knowledge or consent that it is cruel; it is a question of fact whether an electric current of sufficient intensity and skillfully applied will produce death without unnecessary suffering.”   On August 6, 1890, Kemmler was put to death in Auburn Prison in New York; Edwin F. Davis served as the "state electrician." Kemmler was rendered unconscious after being exposed to 1,000 volts of AC electricity for the first 17 seconds, but his heart and respiration were left unaffected. Edward Charles Spitzka and Carlos F. MacDonald, the attending doctors, stepped forward to examine Kemmler. Spitzka allegedly said, "Have the current turned on again, quick, no delay," after making sure Kemmler was still alive. But the generator required some time to recharge. A 2,000 volt AC shock was administered to Kemmler on the second attempt. The skin's blood vessels burst, bled, and caught fire in the vicinity of the electrodes. It took roughly eight minutes to complete the execution. A reporter who witnessed the execution reported that it was "an horrible scene, considerably worse than hanging," and George Westinghouse subsequently said, "They would have done better using an ax."   Following its adoption by Ohio (1897), Massachusetts (1900), New Jersey (1906), and Virginia (1908), the electric chair quickly replaced hanging as the most often used form of execution in the country. Death by electrocution was either legal or actively used to kill offenders in 26 US States, the District of Columbia, the Federal government, and the US Military. Until the middle of the 1980s, when lethal injection became the method of choice for carrying out legal executions, the electric chair remained the most popular execution technique.    It appears that other nations have thought about employing the technique, occasionally for unique motives. From 1926 to 1987, the electric chair was also used in the Philippines. In May 1972, Jaime Jose, Basilio Pineda, and Edgardo Aquino were killed there in a well-known triple execution for the 1967 kidnapping and gang rape of the young actress Maggie de la Riva. Lethal injection was used instead of the electric chair when executions resumed in the Philippines after a break in 1976.   Some accounts claim that Ethiopia tried to use the electric chair as a means of capital punishment. According to legend, the emperor Menelik II purchased three electric chairs in 1896 at the urging of a missionary, but was unable to put them to use since his country did not have a stable source of electricity at the time. Menelik II is rumored to have used the third electric chair as a throne, while the other two chairs were either utilized as garden furniture or gifted to guests.   During the Royal Commission on Capital Punishment, the results of which were released in 1953, the United Kingdom explored lethal injection in addition to lethal injection, the electric chair, the gas chamber, the guillotine, and gunshot as alternatives to hanging. The Commission came to the conclusion that hanging was preferable to the electric chair in no specific way. In the UK, the death penalty was abolished for the majority of offenses in 1965.   In 1894, serial killer Lizzie Halliday was given a death sentence via electric chair; however, after a medical committee deemed her crazy, governor Roswell P. Flower reduced her death sentence to life in a mental hospital. Maria Barbella, a second woman who received a death sentence in 1895, was exonerated the following year. On March 20, 1899, Martha M. Place at Sing Sing Prison became the first female to be put to death by electric chair for the murder of her stepdaughter Ida Place, who was 17 years old.   Ruth Snyder, a housewife, was put to death in the electric chair at Sing Sing on the evening of January 12, 1928, for the murder of her husband in March of that year. Tom Howard, a news photographer, sneaked a camera into the execution chamber and captured her in the electric chair as the current was put on for a front-page story in the New York Daily News the next morning. It continues to be among the most well-known instances in photojournalism.   On July 13, 1928, a record was set at the Kentucky State Penitentiary in Eddyville, Kentucky, when seven men were put to death in the electric chair one after the other.   George Stinney, an African-American boy, was electrocuted at the Central Correctional Institution in Columbia, South Carolina, on June 16, 1944, making him the youngest person ever to be put to death by the electric chair. In 2014, a circuit court judge annulled his sentence and reversed his conviction on the grounds that Stinney had not received a fair trial. The judge found that Stinney's legal representation fell short of his constitutional rights as guaranteed by the Sixth Amendment.   Following the Gregg v. Georgia ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1976, John Spenkelink was the first person to be electrocuted on May 25, 1979. He was the first person to be put to death in this way in the United States since 1966.   Lynda Lyon Block was the last person to be put to death in the electric chair without having the option of a different execution technique on May 10, 2002 in Alabama.   On the day of the execution, the condemned prisoner's legs and head are both shaved. The condemned prisoner is led to the chair and placed there before having their arms and legs firmly restrained with leather belts to prevent movement or struggle. The prisoner's legs are shaved, and electrodes are fastened to them. A hat covering his head is made of a sponge soaked in saltwater or brine. To avoid presenting a gory scene to the onlookers, the prisoner may wear a hood or be blinded.   The execution starts when the prisoner is told the order of death and given the chance to say one last thing. Alternating current is delivered through a person's body in several cycles (changes in voltage and length) to fatally harm their internal organs. The initial, stronger electric shock (between 2000 and 2,500 volts) is meant to induce instantaneous unconsciousness, ventricular fibrillation, and eventually cardiac arrest. The goal of the second, weaker shock (500–1,500 volts) is to fatally harm the essential organs.   A medical professional examines the prisoner for signs of life once the cycles are finished. If none are found, the medical professional notes the moment of death and waits for the body to cool before removing it to prepare for an autopsy. The doctor alerts the warden if the prisoner shows signs of life, and the warden would often order another round of electric current or (rarely) postpone the execution (see Willie Francis).   The reliability of the first electrical shock to consistently cause rapid unconsciousness, as proponents of the electric chair sometimes say, is disputed by opponents. According to witness accounts, electrocutions gone wrong (see Willie Francis and Allen Lee Davis) and results of post-mortem investigations, the electric chair is frequently unpleasant during executions.   The electric chair has drawn criticism since in a few cases the victims were only put to death after receiving many electric shocks. As a result, the practice was called into question as being "cruel and unusual punishment." In an effort to allay these worries, Nebraska implemented a new electrocution procedure in 2004 that required the delivery of a 15-second application of electricity at 2,450 volts, followed by a 15-minute wait period during which a representative checked for signs of life. The current Nebraska protocol, which calls for a 20-second application of current at 2,450 volts, was introduced in April 2007 in response to further concerns voiced about the 2004 procedure.   Before the 2004 protocol revision, a first application of current at 2,450 volts for eight seconds, a one-second interval, and then a 22-second application at 480 volts were given. The cycle was performed three more times after a 20-second rest.   Willie Francis tried to escape the electric chair in 1946 and reportedly screamed, "Take it off! Let me Breathe!" when the current was turned on. It turned out that an inebriated jail officer and convict had illegally set up the portable electric chair. In a case titled Louisiana ex rel. Francis v. Resweber, attorneys for the convicted person contended that, although not dying, Francis had indeed been put to death. Francis was put back in the electric chair and killed in 1947 after the argument was rejected on the grounds that re-execution did not violate the double jeopardy provision of the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution.   Allen Lee Davis, who had been found guilty of murder, was put to death in Florida on July 8, 1999, using the "Old Sparky" electric chair. Pictures of Davis' injured face were taken and afterwards uploaded to the Internet. According to the results of the study, Davis had started bleeding before the electricity was turned on, and the chair had performed as planned. According to Florida's Supreme Court, the electric chair is not "cruel and unusual punishment." When flames sprang from Pedro Medina's skull during his execution in Florida in 1997, it stirred much debate. Medina's brain and brain stem were damaged by the initial electrical surge, which caused him to pass away quickly, according to an autopsy. A court determined that "unintentional human error" rather than any flaws in the "apparatus, equipment, and electrical circuitry" of Florida's electric chair was to blame for the occurrence.   The Louisiana legislature modified the manner of death in 1940; as of June 1, 1941, electrocution was the only option left. At first, Louisiana's electric chair was moved from parish to parish to carry out executions since it lacked a permanent location. Typically, the electrocution would take place in the jail or courtroom of the parish where the condemned prisoner had been found guilty. The first person to be executed with an electric chair in Louisiana was Eugene Johnson, a black man who was found guilty of stealing and killing Steven Bench, a white farmer who resided close to Albany. Johnson was killed at the Livingston Parish Jail on September 11, 1941.    To house all executions in Louisiana, it was decided to construct an execution chamber in the Louisiana State Penitentiary in 1957. Elmo Patrick Sonnier, the prisoner who served as the inspiration for the movie Dead Man Walking, and Willie Francis were notable executions on the chair (the only inmate to survive the electric chair; he was ultimately executed after the first attempt failed). Lethal injection was chosen by the State of Louisiana as the only execution technique in 1991 as a result of new law. Andrew Lee Jones was the last person put to death aboard "Gruesome Gertie" on July 22, 1991. Eighty-seven executions took place using "Gruesome Gertie" during the course of its fifty-year lifespan. The Louisiana Prison Museum presently houses it.  Death row convicts referred to the electric chair in Louisiana as " Gruesome Gertie."  It is also well-known for being the first electric chair execution to fail, when Willie Francis was put to death. As mentioned earlier.   The electric chair used in New Jersey's state prisons, known as Old Smokey, is displayed in the New Jersey State Police Museum. Richard Hauptmann, the person responsible for the Lindbergh kidnapping, was the chair's most well-known victim. The electric chair in Tennessee and Pennsylvania both went by this moniker.   Alabama in the United States has an electric chair called Yellow Mama. From 1927 through 2002, executions were held there.   The chair was first put at Kilby State Prison in Montgomery, Alabama, where it was given the moniker "Yellow Mama" after being sprayed with highway-line paint from the nearby State Highway Department lab. The chair was created by a British prisoner in 1927, the same year that Horace DeVauhan was executed for the first time.   Lynda Lyon Block, who was executed in 2002, was the final person to be executed in Yellow Mama. Since then, the chair has been kept at the Holman Correctional Facility in an attic above the execution room.   Since the introduction of lethal injection in 1979, which is now the standard procedure in all U.S. counties that permit capital punishment, the usage of the electric chair has decreased.   Only the American states of Alabama, Florida, South Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee still allow the use of the electric chair as a method of execution as of 2021. The laws of Arkansas and Oklahoma allow for its application in the event that lethal injection is ever ruled to be unlawful. It or lethal injection are the only options available to inmates in the other states. Only prisoners convicted in Kentucky prior to a specific date may choose to be executed by electric chair. In the event that a judge rules that lethal injection is unlawful, electrocution is also permitted in Kentucky.   Tennessee was one of the states that offered convicts the option of the electric chair or a lethal injection; nevertheless, the state approved a statute enabling the use of the electric chair in the event that lethal injection medicines were unavailable or rendered inadmissible in May 2014.   The Nebraska Supreme Court ruled on February 15, 2008, that the Nebraska Constitution forbids "cruel and unusual punishment," which includes death by electrocution.   Before Furman v. Georgia, Oklahoma witnessed the last legal electrocution in the US. This occurred in 1966. The electric chair was used relatively regularly in post-Gregg v. Georgia executions throughout the 1980s, but as lethal injection became more popular in the 1990s, its use in the United States steadily decreased. The most recent US electrocution, that of Nicholas Todd Sutton,  who was responsible for murdering two acquaintances and his own grandmother in North Carolina and Tennessee from August to December 1979, took place in Tennessee in February 2020. A handful of states still give the death penalty option to the convicted, allowing them to choose between lethal injection and electrocution. https://www.listal.com/movies/electric%2bchair

Kawaii Desuppointment
86 -Eighty Six-

Kawaii Desuppointment

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 59:06


Join the Kawaii Desuppointment gang as they talk about 86 -Eighty Six-! Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/KawaiiDesuPod Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, TikTok, and Instagram: @KawaiiDesuPod Join our Facebook group: The Official Kawaii Desuppointment Group Go to our website: KawaiiDesuPod.com for all links and episodes! Intro/Outro is PRIDE by Souichi Sakagami Break Music is Jazzy Abstract Beat by Coma-Media Interludes used: 86 -Eighty Six- This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Pretty Pretty Pretty Good: A Curb Your Enthusiasm Podcast

Send us your comments, questions, feedback and suggestions at CurbPostman@gmail.com Follow us on Twitter: @asinensky @achester99 @PrettyGoodCurb Give us a 5 Star Rating and Review: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pretty-pretty-pretty-good-a-curb-your-enthusiasm-podcast/id1497313159 Give us money: https://anchor.fm/pretty-good-curb-pod --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pretty-pretty-pretty-good/support

Eighty Proof
Eighty Proof 142

Eighty Proof

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 125:48


Veterans Corner Radio
Do you know of a veterans group or one that serves vets who may need money, then listen in. Eighty Million has already been distribute and more is avaialble.

Veterans Corner Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 20:14


Anne Marie Dougherty is CEO of the Bob Woodruff Foundation. On Jan. 29, 2006, while reporting on U.S. and Iraqi security forces for ABC's “World News Tonight,” Bob Woodruff was seriously injured by a roadside bomb that struck his vehicle near Taji, Iraq. Following his recovery, he and his wife founded the Bob Woodruff Foundation. To date, the foundation has invested over $80 million to find, fund, and shape programs helping veterans, service members, and their families nationwide. Listen in to hear how this foundation may well be able to help an organization that cares about and serves veterans. 

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, July 9, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsSaturday of the Fourteenth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 388All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Augustine Zhao Rong and Companionsclass="content"> Jul 9, 2020 Franciscan Media Image: Stained glass window of Saint Augustine Zhao Rong and companions | The Hong Kong Catholic Cathedral of The Immaculate Conception | photo by hugo poon Saints of the Day for July 9 (d. 1648 - 1930) Audio file Saint Augustine Zhao Rong's and Companions' Stories Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria in the 600s. Depending on China's relations with the outside world, Christianity over the centuries was free to grow or was forced to operate secretly. The 120 martyrs in this group died between 1648 and 1930. Eighty-seven of them were born in China, and were children, parents, catechists, or laborers, ranging in age from nine years to 72. This group includes four Chinese diocesan priests. The 33 foreign-born martyrs were mostly priests or women religious, especially from the Order of Preachers, the Paris Foreign Mission Society, the Friars Minor, Society of Jesus, Society of St. Francis de Sales (Salesians), and Franciscan Missionaries of Mary. Augustine Zhao Rong was a Chinese soldier who accompanied Bishop John Gabriel Taurin Dufresse of the Paris Foreign Mission Society to his martyrdom in Beijing. Not long after his baptism, Augustine was ordained as a diocesan priest. He was martyred in 1815. Beatified in groups at various times, these 120 martyrs were canonized together in Rome on October 1, 2000. Reflection The People's Republic of China and the Roman Catholic Church each have well over a billion members, but there are only about 12 million Catholics in China. The reasons for that are better explained by historical conflicts than by a wholesale rejection of the Good News of Jesus Christ. The Chinese-born martyrs honored by today's feast were regarded by their persecutors as dangerous because they were considered allies of enemy, Catholic countries. The martyrs born outside China often tried to distance themselves from European political struggles relating to China, but their persecutors saw them as Westerners and therefore, by definition, anti-Chinese. The Good News of Jesus Christ is intended to benefit all peoples; today's martyrs knew that. May 21st-century Christians live in such a way that Chinese women and men will be attracted to hear that Good News and embrace it. Enjoy this list of popular patron saints! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate
Episode One Hundred - Eighty-Six

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 38:35 Very Popular


The Shipping Container wraps up the week with a treasure trove of topics: lottery strategies, what to do with $1 Billion, cow heists and animal sanctuaries, treasure hunting shows, how many rooms you would need in your dream house, a new reality show for the crew, and a whole lot more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Le Batard & Friends Network
MC - Episode One Hundred - Eighty-Six

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 38:35


The Shipping Container wraps up the week with a treasure trove of topics: lottery strategies, what to do with $1 Billion, cow heists and animal sanctuaries, treasure hunting shows, how many rooms you would need in your dream house, a new reality show for the crew, and a whole lot more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate
Episode One Hundred - Eighty-Five

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 47:32


Mystery Crate has interviews with TWO world class athletes this holiday weekend: Joey Chesnut in the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and Sean O'Malley on UFC 276. The Shipping Container sits down with each of these fierce competitors to preview their upcoming events...and have some fun in the process. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Le Batard & Friends Network
MC - Episode One Hundred - Eighty-Five

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 47:32


Mystery Crate has interviews with TWO world class athletes this holiday weekend: Joey Chesnut in the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and Sean O'Malley on UFC 276. The Shipping Container sits down with each of these fierce competitors to preview their upcoming events...and have some fun in the process. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Trumpet Daily Radio Show
#1805: The Biden Recession

Trumpet Daily Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 51:41


[00:30] Recession Sets In (18 minutes)“The S&P 500 capped its worst first half in more than 50 years,” CNBC reported yesterday. The New York Post noted that, already in the first half of this year, “around $9 trillion in equity wealth has been wiped out.” Joe Biden's recession is fully here as he continues to war against America's energy sector. Eighty-five percent of Americans believe the country is going in the wrong direction. [18:30] Trump Responds to Hutchinson's Testimony (9 minutes)Yesterday, Donald Trump responded to Cassidy Hutchinson's testimony, saying that Cassidy “is living in fantasy land.” The problem with our post-truth age is that many in the news media also dwell in the world of fantasy. [27:45] Bible Study: Godly Ambition (10 minutes)In his autobiography, Herbert W. Armstrong wrote how that young men in particular need a lot of ambition in life. In this segment, we briefly discuss the kind of godly ambition we all need to do God's Work. [34:00] E-mail Feedback (20 minutes)

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate
Episode One Hundred - Eighty-Three

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 62:05 Very Popular


On this episode of Mystery Crate, the Shipping Container discuss repressed middle school dress codes, unfunny people inspired by Borat, and the perils of deep massages. Then, another episode of Darth Amin's Rule of 2, where Darth Amin and producer Darth Cornpuzzle discuss the best episode of the Obi Wan series by leaps and bounds as Vader uses the force to stop a shuttle, Obi Wan displays his trademark craftiness, and the twists and surprises pay off in bunches. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Le Batard & Friends Network
MC- Episode One Hundred - Eighty-Three

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 62:05


On this episode of Mystery Crate, the Shipping Container discuss repressed middle school dress codes, unfunny people inspired by Borat, and the perils of deep massages. Then, another episode of Darth Amin's Rule of 2, where Darth Amin and producer Darth Cornpuzzle discuss the best episode of the Obi Wan series by leaps and bounds as Vader uses the force to stop a shuttle, Obi Wan displays his trademark craftiness, and the twists and surprises pay off in bunches. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices