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Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Connecticut Public Radio


    • Dec 31, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 48m AVG DURATION
    • 392 EPISODES


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    Latest episodes from Where We Live

    Author Katherine May On Wintering: The Power of Rest and Retreat

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 48:00

    New England winters are a good time to lean into our favorite winter activities or get more sleep! Author, Katherine May writes the act of wintering goes beyond the season. It can be a period of reflection and down time when life throws the worst at us.   Before we close out the year, we listen back to my conversation with May about her book Wintering: The Power of Rest and Retreat in Difficult Times. She writes we “must learn to invite the winter in. We may never choose winter, but we can choose how.”  How are you wintering? GUEST: Katherine May - author of Wintering: The Power of Rest and Retreat in Difficult Times  Cat Pastor contributed to this program which originally aired February 19, 2021. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Grit And Games: Getting To The Paralympics, A Connecticut Story

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 48:00

    Six athletes with disabilities — and with ties to Connecticut — represented the U.S. at the Tokyo Paralympics 2020, bringing home four medals. Fairfield University trained two medaling para swimmers, Colleen Young and Matthew Torres,  while Laura Goodkind,10th in the trunk and arms mixed double sculls in the 2016 Paralympics, most recently won the PR2 mixed doubles sculls at the 2020 Olympic Trials. Children with disabilities are placed with integrated sports teams, designed by the Special Olympics Connecticut, in nearly all schools across the state. GUESTS Matthew Torres - Para-swimming Bronze Medalist, Paralympics Tokyo 2020; Junior at Fairfield University Anthony Bruno - Head Coach, Men's and Women's, Swimming and Diving, Fairfield University  Laura Goodkind - Two-time Paralympian, Para-rowing (2016, 2020). Graduate of The Forman School, Litchfield Maggie Vanoni -Sports Reporter, Hearst  Beau Doherty - President, Special Olympics Connecticut  Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Beneath The Surface With Photojournalist Brian Skerry

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 48:45

    Sharks. They're among the apex predators of the ocean, swimming with stealth and agility across our blue planet. But more than that, they're sources of myth and fear, stirring imaginations with their serrated jaws and cutting dorsal fins. So what, then, does it take to photograph these -- and other -- awe-inspiring marine creatures? This hour, we talk with underwater photojournalist Brian Skerry and preview his upcoming appearance at The Connecticut Forum. Plus, with Memorial Day just around the corner, what should New Englanders keep in mind as they hit the region's beaches and dip into its shark-inhabited waters? We find out and we also hear from you.  GUESTS: Brian Skerry - Renowned underwater photographer and author of several books, including Shark (@Brian_Skerry) Dr. James Sulikowski - Marine biologist and professor at the University of New England Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    From Sailor To Astronaut: Kayla Barron On NASA's Program To Return to the Moon

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 47:00

    Right before Christmas, the international space station passed over New York City carrying astronaut Kayla Barron, a member of NASA's Artemis Program--the program aims to put the first-ever woman on the moon. Barron was part of another groundbreaking group-- she was one of the first women commissioned as a submarine warfare officer in the US Navy.  This week Where We Live, revisits our best conversations. Barron joined us earlier this year to talk about her training for the next set of missions to return to the moon.  What's it like to be an astronaut? Do you have a young, aspiring astronaut in your life? GUESTS: NASA Astronaut Kayla Barron - Member of NASA's Artemis team; she's also a Navy Lieutenant Commander and Submarine Warfare Officer  Cathryn Prince - Visiting assistant professor of journalism at SUNY Purchase and author of the nonfiction book A Professor, A President, and A Meteor: The Birth of American Science Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired January 8, 2021.  Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Seeking joy despite another pandemic Christmas

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 49:00

    It wouldn't be a pandemic Christmas without a little chaos/ Today, we want to hear about your holiday plans as we face another COVID surge and the omicron variant. We talk to Dr. Albert Ko, a physician and Yale epidemiologist and take your questions about how to gather this holiday season. We want to know, how are you planning to see your family safely? Do you have a custom Christmas mask to mark the occasion? GUESTS: Dr. Albert Ko - A physician and epidemiologist at the Yale School of Public Health Rabbi Debra Cantor - B'nai Tikvoh-Sholom Synagogue in Bloomfield, Connecticut Andrea Bonior - licensed clinical psychologist on the faculty with Georgetown University, and author of Detox Your Thoughts: Quit Negative Self Talk For Good and Discover the Life You Always Wanted Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The next move for Purdue, Sacklers, and Connecticut

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 49:00

    A federal judge overturned Purdue Pharma's bankruptcy settlement which offered the Sackler family immunity from future civil liability. Purdue Pharma's $4.5 billion settlement would have funded treatment programs for opioid use disorder. This hour, Connecticut Attorney General William Tong discusses the state's successful appeal to reject the bankruptcy settlement and the continued push for accountability from the Sacklers. He's joined by corporate law professor, Joshua Silverstein, an expert in bankruptcy proceedings. Acute care nurse practitioner Stephen P. Wood, a Visiting Researcher at Harvard Law School, traces the history of Purdue Pharma and the Sacklers, a drug dubbed ‘Mother's Little Helper,' and the overseas sales of opioids by Purdue Pharma subsidiary Mundipharma. Anthropologist Alexa Dietrich of Wagner College, a researcher on the role of corporations in society, discusses ethics and corporate governance. Produced by Sujata Srinivasan and Abe Levine Technical Producer Cat Pastor GUESTS: William Tong: Connecticut Attorney General Joshua Silverstein: Professor of Law, University of Arkansas, Little Rock Stephen P. Wood: Bioethicist, Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Visiting Researcher at Harvard Law School Alexa Dietrich: Associate Professor of Anthropology, Wagner College Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    How the Yale Peabody Museum is reimagining its "curatorial voice"

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 49:00

    By what rights does a museum hold an object or artifact, and with what authority does that museum get to interpret it? Those are some of the existential questions driving a storytelling overhaul at the Yale Peabody Museum. This hour, we preview changes to be unveiled to the public in 2024, from added gallery and classroom space to some major updates to storytelling. Hear about the museum's efforts to expand its "curatorial voice" by involving members of the local community. GUESTS: Kailen Rogers - Associate Director of Exhibitions, Yale Peabody Museum Neeti Jain - Student, Yale School of the Environment; Fellow, National Science Foundation Natasha Ghazali - Student, Yale College; Former Member, Yale Peabody Museum Sci.CORPS Rawaa Ghazi - Chef, Sanctuary Kitchen Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The adventures of real-life Captain Nemo, Robert Ballard

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 46:59

    In 1985, Robert Ballard discovered the Titanic wreckage off the coast of Newfoundland. But his explorations didn't stop there!  This week, we showcase our best conversations of 2021. Robert Ballard joined us earlier this year to talk about his new book, Into The Deep: A Memoir From The Man Who Found Titanic.  We hear about his amazing adventuresand his recent attempt to find Amelia Earhart.  We also learn what Ballard discovered about himself. What questions do you have for this great explorer? GUEST: Robert Ballard - Author of Into The Deep: A Memoir From The Man Who Found the Titanic Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Little Town of Bethlehem

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 49:00

    Today, we hear about an 80 year tradition at the Bethlehem Connecticut post office that has earned it the nickname Christmastown. Thousands of cards and packages come through this tiny post office every year to get one of their cachets. On Friday, the Connecticut Mirror reported that Sema4, the laboratory based in Stamford responsible for managing 15 out of the 23 state testing sites, has pulled out of it's contract with the state. The company will exit the testing business by mid-January. With the holidays coming up and latest surge in cases, this could not have come at a worse time. Connecticut Mirror investigative reporter Dave Altimari joins us. And later, the Connecticut Social Equity Council is working to set the criteria for those that want to open an adult-use marijuana business on the state. We'll also hear from Andrea Comer, the Social Equity Council Committee Chairwoman. GUESTS: Dave Altimari - Investigative Reporter at Connecticut Mirror Vera Rosa - retired postal clerk of the Bethlehem Post Office Andrea Comer - Interim Deputy Commissioner for the Department of Consumer Protection and the Social Equity Council Committee Chairwoman Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    What to listen to, binge watch and read over the holidays

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 40:43

    It's the holiday season! Time to binge watch shows, read ALL the books piling up on our nightstands and listen to podcasts on the long drive to grandma's house. Today on Where We Live, we talk about the best podcasts, shows and books of 2021. NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans joins us to share his favorite TV shows of 2021. Later, we hear from one of the owners of Breakwater Books in Guilford, Connecticut and hear what books were standouts in 2021. We want to hear from you, Where We Live. What are you binge watching, listening and reading over this holiday season? GUESTS: Eric Deggans - NPR's TV Critic Richard Parent - Co-owner of Breakwater Books in Guilford Connecticut Emma Carey - freelance culture and entertainment writer, and weekly contributor to Esquire Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Local outreach counters COVID misconceptions amid "Spanish-language disinformation dilemma"

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 40:38

    Misinformation is a factor for anyone online, but research has shown false and misleading statements about COVID-19 that are in Spanish will linger longer on social media. Hear about this national problem from Free Press Senior Counsel Nora Benavidez, and about the local efforts to help close the gap in vaccine distribution among Hispanic residents in our state. Connecticut officials say more than 6 out of 10 Hispanic residents have received at least one dose, compared to more than more than 7 in 10 white residents. Junta for Progressive Action and the Hispanic Health Council join, along with Fair Haven Community Health Care, to discuss their real-world success in dispelling viral misconceptions. What can you do to combat COVID-19 misinformation? GUESTS: Nora Benavidez - Senior Counsel and Director of Digital Justice and Civil Rights, Free Press Dionne Kotey - Director of Wellness and Health Management, Hispanic Health Council Dr. Suzanne Lagarde - CEO, Fair Haven Community Health Care Bruni Pizarro - Executive Director, Junta for Progressive Action Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Beyond gender, representation in the toy industry

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 41:03

    The iconic Mr. Potato Head from Hasbro is now simply the gender neutral Potato Head. Also this year, LEGO, WildBrain, and Mattel launched the Everyone is Awesome set, the Teletubbies Pride collection, and UNO's Play with Pride deck in celebration of Pride Month. This hour on Where We Live, we discuss diversity and inclusion in the toy industry, and its impact on child development. We hear from experts on the trends and changing norms in the understanding of gender and how diversity must go beyond tokenization by toy manufacturers. GUESTS: Diane Gervais: Owner, Amato's Toy and Hobby Middletown  Jeffrey Trawick-Smith: Professor Emeritus, Center for Early Childhood Education, Eastern Connecticut State University, and Author of Young Children's Play: Development, Disabilities, and Diversity  Ellen Lambert: Advisor – Equity, Inclusion, & Diversity, the Toy Association and the Toy Foundation Eileen Foley: Toy Curator and Owner, Little Acorn Learning LLC, Redding, Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Attorney General William Tong meets with TikTok, and Instagram meets with Congress

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 41:18

    Attorneys General across the country are demanding change from the big social media companies. This hour, we talk to Attorney General William Tong about his recent meeting with TikTok over disturbing trends happening on the platform. And later, Wall Street Journal tech reporter Georgia Wells walks us through some of the key takeaways from a recent Senate Hearing with Instagram head Adam Mosseri. We hear about some bipartisan efforts to regulate social media. Can the government make social media safer for children? GUESTS: Connecticut Attorney General William Tong Georgia Wells - Tech Reporter at the Wall Street Journal Michael Robb - Senior Director of Research Common Sense Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Should State Capitol statue of John Mason be removed?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 40:33

    Should a statue of Connecticut Colony founder John Mason, who led a massacre of Pequot people in the 1600s, be removed from the State Capitol Building? That's the question before the State Capitol Preservation and Restoration Committee after weighing public input, with a vote expected Tuesday. This hour, hear the perspectives of the Mashantucket Pequot Tribe, and the State Historian. How can we better understand our shared history, and the monuments to it? Plus, U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona weighs in on what rising Covid-19 infection rates means for schools; and school safety, student loan debt, and more. GUESTS: Rodney Butler - Chairman of the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation Walter Woodward - Connecticut State Historian Miguel Cardona - U.S. Secretary of Education Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Amid nationwide nursing shortages, hear from locals entering the profession

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 49:00

    Nursing shortages are being reported across the country, but there's also rising interest in this critically important profession. This hour, hear from nurses entering the field in our state, and from nursing educators and experts about why the term “burnout” doesn't capture what's driving the shortage. University of Saint Joseph professor Heather Evans prefers the term “moral distress.” Nurses are by nature the noticers, the canaries in the coal mine, but the conditions of the pandemic have prompted reports of higher-than-average nurse-to-patient ratios, exacerbating a long-looming shortage. As nurse and author Theresa Brown wrote, "nurses are not an infinitely elastic resource; they're people, many of whom are exhausted, traumatized, barely holding themselves together. It's time to really see and care for them." What are the barriers to keeping new nurses in the field? GUESTS: Theresa Brown, PhD, BSN, RN - Nurse; Author, “Healing: When A Nurse Becomes a Patient” (2022) Heather Evans, Ph.D., RNC-MNN, CLC - Nurse; Assistant Professor of Nursing, University of Saint Joseph Victoria Rufo, RN - Nurse; Student, University of Saint Joseph Tori Johnston, CNA - Nurse; Student, Quinnipiac University Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    How do we think about the role of homework?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 49:00

    Homework is a part of every student's curriculum. But how much homework is too much? Experts say high school students can receive up to two hours of homework every night! Cathy Vatterott joins us. She's Professor Emeritus of Education at University of Missouri St Louis and the self proclaimed “Homework Lady.” How much homework does your child get? First, long time education reporter Kathy Megan joins us today to discuss Connecticut Supreme Court's landmark decision Sheff v O'Neill. A recent Connecticut Public documentary focuses on the people impacted by this decision decades ago. GUESTS: Kathy Megan - Associate Producer and Reporter on Connecticut Public documentary CUTLINE Special | Sheff v. O'Neill: Striving Toward Education Equity Henley Solomon - teaching assistant at Conard High School in West Hartford Kate Dias - Connecticut Education Association State President and high school math teacher from Manchester, Connecticut Cathy Vatterott - Professor Emeritus of Education at University of Missouri St Louis. Author of Rethinking Homework: Best Practices that Support Diverse Needs Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Attracting, training, and retaining women in manufacturing

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 49:00

    Manufacturing jobs like industrial engineering and mechanical engineering technicians are projected to increase between 15% and nearly 30% by 2026, fetching an annual salary of around $65,000, according to the Connecticut Department of Labor. These jobs don't require a traditional four-year college degree. And there are opportunities for students to go to trade school while they're finishing high school. The drumbeat from employers and local leaders has been how to attract and train new workers to support a key sector in the state economy. There's money pouring in to enable this. This year, Connecticut was one of only five states to receive a U.S. Department of Labor $10 million State Apprenticeship grant. The Connecticut Manufacturing Innovation Fund Advisory Board recently approved $8.3 million to support new and established programs in Connecticut's manufacturing sector, including an advertising campaign to highlight career opportunities in manufacturing. And, the Connecticut Small Business Development Center, hosted at the UConn School of Business, received one of four federal grants, to operate a national Advanced Manufacturing Center. The $2 million grant will give assistance to minority-owned businesses to help them expand. This hour on Where We Live, we hear from a high-school student who's earning college credits in manufacturing, a young woman who's working on the shop floor, a manufacturer, academia, and the state. And, we find out more about what's being done to attract more women to the industry, including minority owned businesses. GUESTS: Anya Santa Lucia: Manufacturing Program Student at Goodwin University, and High School Student at the Connecticut River Academy Sara Langevin: CNC Machinist, Trumpf Inc. Matthew Dadona: Assistant Superintendent of Pathways and Partnerships, Goodwin University Magnet School Systems Keri Valente: Manufacturing Apprenticeship Representative at the Office of Apprenticeship Training, State of Connecticut Christine Benz: Head of Training Services, Trumpf Inc. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    An hour with Governor Ned Lamont on Covid, climate, reelection and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 49:00

    This hour Where We Live, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont answers your questions. Connecticut's Covid-19 positivity rate is back above 5%. With Omicron's detection over the weekend, we discuss the latest on the local response, and whether statewide restrictions could return. GUEST: Ned Lamont - Governor of Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Connecticut task force looks at medical benefits of magic mushrooms

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 49:00

    Next month a task force will release its recommendations about so-called magic mushrooms. Did that get your attention? Today, we learn why lawmakers and others have been studying the effects of psilocybin, the main ingredient in magic mushrooms. Alex Kwan, an associate professor of psychiatry from the Yale School of Medicine joins us to talk about clinical trials happening in Connecticut. Could magic mushrooms be the next big antidepressant? Later, speaking about seeing colors, we hear about a special exhibit happening at the Florence Griswold Museum featuring the prints of Currier and Ives. GUESTS: State Representative Josh Elliott, D-Hamden Bill Yule - amateur mycologist and retired teacher  Alex Kwan - Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Yale Medicine Amy Kurtz Lansing - Curator at the Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme, Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The role oysters play in the health of Long Island Sound

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 49:00

    More than $100 million in federal infrastructure funds will go towards protecting and preserving Long Island Sound. Hear from Soundkeeper Bill Lucey about spending plans, Save the Sound's priorities, and why oysters are so unique. Plus, Norm Bloom of Copps Island Oysters explains why conservation is his business; and Tessa Getchis with the Connecticut Sea Grant and UConn Extension Program provides an update on the Shellfish Restoration Project. GUESTS: Bill Lucey - Long Island Soundkeeper, Save the Sound Norm Bloom - Owner, Copps Island Oysters Tessa Getchis - Aquaculture extension specialist, Connecticut Sea Grant and UConn Extension Program Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    3 billion birds are gone, scientists tell us the ways to bring them back

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 49:00

    Scientists have warned us: since 1970 nearly 3 billion North American birds have disappeared. This hour, ornithologist Pete Marra, from Georgetown University joins us to talk about how to reverse this troubling statistic. And later scientist Brooke Bateman explains how climate change affects birds and talks about natural climate solutions. Today, the Connecticut Audubon Society releases its latest State of the Birds Report. What birds are at risk where we live? GUESTS: Dr. Peter Marra - Laudato Si Professor of Biology and the Environment at Georgetown University and the director of The Earth Commons: A Georgetown University Institute for Environment and Sustainability Dr. Brooke Bateman - Director of Climate Science at National Audubon Society Tom Andersen - Director of Communications at the Connecticut Audubon Society To read the Connecticut Audubon Society 2021 State of the Birds Report visit ctaudubon.org. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Childbirth options are changing in rural Connecticut

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 49:00

    Three rural Connecticut hospitals have recently suspended labor and delivery services or announced plans to do so, leaving locals with fewer and farther away options. Today on Where We Live, we get the latest on what this means for rural residents. How are labor and delivery services changing in our state? Plus, the Connecticut Paid Leave Authority begins accepting applications December 1, with paid leave benefits going into effect in 2022. Hear from CEO Andrea Barton Reeves. GUESTS: Andrea Barton Reeves - CEO, Connecticut Paid Family and Medical Leave Authority Nicole Leonard - Health Reporter, Connecticut Public Ilda Ray - Chairperson, Windham/Willimantic NAACP Education Committee; Windham Board of Education John Brady - Executive Vice President, AFT CT Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Let's talk about sex (education), baby

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 48:00

    Sex ed curriculum varies greatly across our state and our country. Today, please be advised we're talking about sex specifically, sex education. Although schools are required to teach human development and disease prevention, Connecticut schools are not required to teach sexual health education. It's often a short curriculum taught in high school. And conversations about consent, and LGBTQ inclusivity are left out. We want to hear from you. What do you wish you had learned from your sex ed class in school? GUESTS: Michelle Rawcliffe - Comprehensive School Health Educator at Woodstock Middle School Taz Weisgerber  - Training and Technical Assistance Manager at Answer Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Getting More Women to Launch, Fund Businesses in Connecticut

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 49:00

    Women-founded or co-founded firms in the U.S. raised $25.12 billion in venture capital in the first half of 2021, more than in any prior year, according to PitchBook. The reason? Women founders are raising a greater share through late-stage deals and high-value sectors. More women are writing checks at VC firms. And networks of female founders are thriving in cities like New York. Yet the investments are just 2.7%, or $3.54 billion, of the total VC funding pie, PitchBook noted. Within that statistic, across the U.S., just 34 Black female founders raised $1 million in VC money in 2018. That number, according to ProjectDiane, shot up to 93 Black women in 2020. Connecticut saw the launch of a couple of women-owned investment firms and the acquisition of women-founded companies this year -- Mizzen Capital and Greenworks Lending, for instance -- but the majority of women entrepreneurs continue to struggle for funding in a state that has yet to return to its pre-pandemic level workforce. How do women entrepreneurs navigate the funding environment? GUESTS:  Marie Rocha: Founder & General Partner, Realist Ventures Wendy Ward: Founder & CEO, futures Thrive Liddy Karter: Managing Partner, Mizzen Capital Alexandra Cooley: COO & Co-founder, Greenworks Lending from Nuveen Mary Anne Rooke: President and Managing Director, Angel Investor Forum Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Alcohol Use Disorder In Women

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 48:00

    A new study by the National Institutes of Health and the Research Triangle Institute, found alcohol consumption by women with children younger than age 5, surged 323% during the pandemic. Researchers compared alcohol consumption rates in February 2020 to April of 2020, when stay-at-home guidelines were in effect, and further along into the pandemic year in November. More women than men exceeded recommended drinking guidelines between April and November. But for as long as nearly a century, women have been closing the gender gap in the consumption of alcohol, binge-drinking, and alcohol use disorder.What are some triggers, coping mechanisms, and treatment options available to treat women with alcohol use disorder? GUESTS: Kathleen Callahan - Stratford resident; sober for 10 years Beverley Brakeman - West Hartford resident; sober for 31 years Amanda Aronson - Principal, Aronson Consulting, West Hartford; sober for 7.5 years Dr. Jeanette Tetrault - Professor of Medicine and Public Health, and Director of the Addiction Medicine Fellowship, Yale School of Medicine, and and Associate Director of Addiction Medicine at Yale Medicine Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired September 20, 2021. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Meet two Connecticut artists showing where they live in a different light

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 49:00

    Photography can be documentary, capturing a place and time as they are. It can also provide a means for reimagining the world around us. Hear from two Connecticut artists using the medium to show where they live in a different light. Pablo Delano is a visual artist and Trinity College fine arts professor based in West Hartford, whose book of photography 'Hartford Seen,' was the first to focus on the capital city. Delano discusses the ways the book defies traditional depictions of Hartford. Plus, artist and photographer Rashmi Talpade believes art is everywhere and creativity is within everyone. Hear about her collaborations with different Connecticut communities, reimagining their surroundings through large-scale collage. GUESTS: Pablo Delano - Visual Artist and Photographer; Professor of Fine Arts, Trinity College Rashmi Talpade - Artist and Photographer Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Connecticut Author Roya Hakakian On Her New Book, A BEGINNER'S GUIDE TO AMERICA

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 48:45

    Roya Hakakian came to the US as a refugee from Iran when she was just a teenager. Now, the Connecticut author and poet has drawn on her life story to create a “guidebook” about the immigrant experience. This hour, Hakakian joins us to talk about her new book, A Beginner's Guide To America. We want to hear from you, too. How has the history and experience of immigration in your family shaped your experience as an American? GUESTS: Roya Hakakian - Author, poet, and Connecticut resident. Her latest book is A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    100th anniversary of insulin discovery, what's next?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 49:00

    One hundred years ago in November, two Canadian researchers at the University of Toronto, Frederick Banting and Charles Best, discovered insulin, the life-saving drug for people with diabetes. What was once a death sentence is today a manageable condition with a tubeless insulin pump, and potentially oral insulin not far down the road. The rate of diagnosis of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has surged among the U.S. youth population between 2001 and 2017. Data published Aug. 2021 shows a 45% increase in the number of children and youth under age 20 living with type 1 diabetes, while the number of children and youth living with type 2 diabetes climbed by 95%. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) points to studies that estimate five million people in the U.S. to have T1D by 2050, including nearly 600,000 youth. But racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in blood-glucose outcomes among ethnic and racial minorities exist, as reported in the Type 1 Diabetes Exchange (T1DX) Research Registry and SEARCH study cohorts. In Connecticut, Medicaid covered 1156 children and youth below age 20 for type 1 diabetes in 2021, and 928 for type 2 diabetes, per the latest data. The HUSKY Health / Medicaid program covered 408,082 children and youth below the age of 20 for 2021, year to date. In this hour on Where We Live, we discuss trends, technologies, disparities, access, and outcomes. GUESTS:  Marie Snow: Public school teacher in Guilford. Mother of Olive, diagnosed with type 1 diabetes Olive: Diagnosed at age 9 with type 1 diabetes Dr. Jennifer Sherr: Pediatric Diabetes Specialist at Yale Medicine, and Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Yale School of Medicine Jon Muskrat: Executive Director, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (Connecticut and Western Massachusetts Chapter) Mark Abraham: Executive Director, DataHaven Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    A look at health care in Connecticut for the transgender and nonbinary community

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 49:00

    The results from the first statewide LGBTQ+ needs assessment survey are in. More than 3,000 residents weighed in, informing the first-of-its-kind report for Connecticut's LGBTQ+ Health and Human Services Network. This hour, we focus on health care for transgender and nonbinary residents. "Transgender respondents were 11 times more likely than cisgender respondents to have been refused health care services because of their LGBTQ+ identity," according to the report. Hear more about the survey from the Connecticut TransAdvocacy Coalition, plus Health Care Advocates International, and the Middlesex Health Center for Gender Medicine and Wellness, one of the first full-spectrum care locations for trans and nonbinary people in the state. What challenges are there for trans and nonbinary people in getting health care in Connecticut? GUESTS: Diana Lombardi - Executive Director, Connecticut TransAdvocacy Coalition Katy Tierney - Medical Director, Middlesex Health Center for Gender Medicine and Wellness Tony Ferraiolo - Youth and Families Program Director, Health Care Advocates International Dr. Christy Olezeski - Director and Co-founder, Yale Pediatric Gender Program Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    What's in a name? Hartford Seminary, now Hartford International University, explains

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 49:00

    Hartford Seminary has a new name. It's now the Hartford International University for Religion and Peace. Today, we talk to its President Joel Lohr. And we hear from other faculty members about their efforts to create a more inclusive, interreligious university focusing on peace studies. There have been a lot of conversations about diversity and inclusion initiatives in the workplace - but often, talk of religious inclusivity is left out of those discussions. How can we have more productive discussions about faith? GUESTS: Joel Lohr - President of Hartford International University Aida Mansoor - Chaplain and Director of Field Education at Hartford International University Deena Grant Associate - Professor of Jewish Studies and Director of Global Community Partnerships at Hartford International University Fatima Basharat - a student in the inaugural MA in International Peacebuilding program at Hartford International University Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Pet Nation: Pandemic Puppies Take On The World

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 48:00

    Could that pandemic puppy you adopted last year be welcome at your workplace? More public spaces, such as restaurants, grocery stores and even offices, have become more welcoming to pets. This hour, we talk about how pets are changing the way we work and play and how they're making us much healthier! We hear from Mark Cushing, author of Pet Nation: The Inside Story of How Companion Animals Are Transforming Our Homes, Culture, and Economy. Later, we learn how a shortage of veterinarians is impacting the pet economy. Did you get a pandemic puppy? GUESTS: Mark Cushing - founder and CEO of animal policy group and author of Pet Nation: The Inside Story of How Companion Animals Are Transforming Our Homes, Culture, and Economy. Dr. Kim Brinton - owner of Country Companion Veterinary Services in Bethany, Connecticut, and President of Connecticut Veterinary Medical Association Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Author Phil Klay shines a spotlight on modern warfare

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 49:00

    Phil Klay's works of fiction and nonfiction have confronted the sometimes dissonant or disconnected public understanding about how America's wars are waged — and its veterans. The Fairfield University MFA professor and Marine Corps veteran joins Where We Live to reflect on how some public perceptions have shifted in recent months. Klay revisits his debut book, Redeployment, and touches on his latest book, Missionaries. How much do we really know about America's military missions overseas? GUESTS: Phil Klay - Author and Fairfield University MFA Professor of Creative Writing Click here to read an excerpt from MISSIONARIES by Phil Klay, published by Penguin Press, an imprint of Penguin Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House LLC. Copyright © 2020 by Phil Klay. Available in paperback. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Connecticut seeing climate change impact on human health

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 49:00

    This hour on Where We Live, a look at climate change and health. Physicians turned climate activists see worsening asthma, COPD, and seasonal shifts in vector-borne diseases, plus higher ER visits for heat stress. Hartford and New Haven have the unfortunate distinction of being in the list of Top 20 Asthma Capitals in the country, according to the 2021 report from the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. The American Lung Association puts Fairfield County in its map for the highest ozone in the eastern half of the U.S., in part because of pollution transported from other states. The Governor's Council on Climate Change, Science and Technology Working Group in its 2020 report projected that average temperatures in Connecticut could increase by 5º F (2.7º C) by 2050 compared to the 1970-1999 baseline. Our planet is heading towards a crisis brought on by climate change, but experts say our physical and mental health is also at risk. A 2020 report by the Yale Center on Climate Change and Health found that between 2007 and 2016, heat stress led to an average 422 emergency department visits and 45 hospitalizations per year. Connecticut Public Radio's Nicole Leonard reported that New Haven, Hartford, Litchfield, Tolland, and Windham counties experienced an increase in heavy precipitation, which can and has led to a growth in ticks and mosquitoes, increasing the risk for vector-borne diseases. Meanwhile, health insurers including Connecticut-headquartered Cigna and Aetna hold $24 billion in investments in fossil fuel. As the United Nations' climate summit — COP26 — is in its second week in Scotland with world leaders negotiating how best to limit global warming, what can we do at the state and individual level? GUESTS: Kate Rozen: Asthmatic Cyclist, Woodbridge Dr. David Hill: Member, National Board of Directors, American Lung Association, Director of Clinical Research, Waterbury Pulmonary Associates Susan A. Masino: Professor of Applied Science at Trinity College, and a Charles Bullard Fellow at Harvard Forest. Past Co-chair, the Governor's Council on Climate Change, Science and Technology Working Group Tom Swan: Executive Director, Connecticut Citizen Action Group  Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The pros and cons of saying "I quit!"

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 49:00

    Deciding to quit your job often takes time and consideration. But more and more people are saying, “I quit” with or without two weeks' notice. This hour, we talk about why Americans are leaving the workplace. Some have dubbed it “The Great Resignation” The labor shortage goes beyond people quitting; it includes those that won't return to low wage jobs with bad managers. Coming up, we hear from Karla Miller, Work Advice Columnist at the Washington Post. And later, Jackie Gallo of Chief Operating Office Whitcraft Group joins us. Facing the labor shortage head on, she has worked to employ formerly incarcerated residents in her workplace In August, 4.3 million Americans quit their jobs. Were you one of them? We want to hear from you. GUESTS: Karla Miller - Work Advice Columnist at the Washington Post Jackie Gallo - Chief Operating Office at Whitcraft Group in Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Connecticut's historic haunts, and the restoration experts who bring them back to life

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 48:50

    Without adding any frills or frights, the Mark Twain House & Museum spotlights the home's history with spiritualism, and maybe some spirits along the way. Hear from staffers there, and the restoration experts who help bring historic homes like it back to life. Plus, learn about the "ghost signs" from the 1800s being delicately unearthed in Old Saybrook. Mallory Howard - Mark Twain House & Museum Assistant Curator Grace Belanger - Mark Twain House & Museum Associate Director of Interpretation John Canning - John Canning & Co. Founder and Principal David Riccio - John Canning & Co. Principal Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    ‘Farm-to-school' grants offer schools opportunity to address infrastructure, nutrition gaps

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 49:00

    A new two-year, $500,000 grant program can help Connecticut schools improve on child nutrition through "farm-to-school" programming. Overseen by the Department of Agriculture and with funding through the American Rescue Plan Act, schools can tailor the grant to address infrastructural needs, whether a stove or a new greenhouse; to buy local farm fresh food; or to integrate experiential learning opportunities with agriculture. Schools may teach kids about where their food comes from, but how often is that experience hands-on? Hear from FoodCorps along with local schools and farms about why farm-to-school programming isn't a niche extracurricular, but a factor of food security. Dawn Crayco - FoodCorps Northeast Regional Director Joey Listro - New Britain ROOTS Founder and Executive Director; New Britain Board of Education Wellness Committee Chair Erika Bahler - Agricultural Science & Technology Education Department Head at Rockville High School Monica Maccera-Filppu - Common Ground High School Executive Director Zania Johnson - Micro2Life Co-founder Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    How Catholicism has evolved in the 21st century

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 49:00

    President Biden has met with Pope Francis in Rome. The President later sharing that the Pope told him he was a good Catholic and should continue to receive communion. This hour, we talk about what it means to be Catholic in the 21st century. Although the Vatican has not changed much of its doctrine, lay Catholics viewpoints and opinions have changed and evolved with the times. We hear from Celia Viggo Wexler, author of Catholic Women Confront Their Church: Stories of Hurt and Hope. We want to hear from you. How did the church shape your ideas and opinions? Do you still practice today? GUESTS: Francis X. Rocca - Vatican Correspondent at the Wall Street Journal Celia Viggo Wexler - Journalist and Author of Catholic Women Confront Their Church: Stories of Hurt and Hope Sister Emily Tekolste - Grassroots Mobilization Coordinator at Network and member of the Sisters of Providence at Saint Mary of the Woods, Indiana Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Suicide attempts by 10-17 year-olds on the rise; stretched ERs, shortage of pediatric mental healthcare resources

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 49:00

    The American Academy of Pediatrics declared a national emergency in children's mental health in October. Data from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that in 2020, mental health–related emergency department (ED) visits among adolescents aged 12–17 years increased 31% compared to 2019. During February 21–March 20, 2021, ED visits for suspected suicide were 50.6% higher among girls aged 12–17 years than during the same period in 2019. But even before the pandemic, suicide was the second leading cause of death for young people in the 10-24 age group by 2018, across the U.S. In Connecticut, 30 young people aged 10 to 24 died by suicide in 2020, according to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. The crisis is exacerbated by a lack of adequate mental health resources in schools and pediatrician clinics, crowded EDs, and a shortage of beds and workforce at inpatient and outpatient pediatric mental health facilities. What should the federal and state governments do? Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    How newsrooms and J-schools are redefining 'objective' coverage

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 49:00

    How can journalists address issues of trust and representation in order to better serve their audiences? Some newsrooms and journalism schools are addressing how the idea of objectivity or neutrality has been misapplied. Hear from Poynter's Director of Training & Diversity Doris Truong and UConn Professor Amanda Crawford. Plus, Southern California Public Radio's Chief Content Officer Kristen Muller and Newmark J-School student Abē Levine spotlight their success with the engagement journalism model. GUESTS: Doris Truong - Poynter Director of Training and Diversity Kristen Muller - Southern California Public Radio Chief Content Officer Amanda Crawford - UConn Assistant Professor of Journalism Abē Levine - Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism Student; Connecticut Public Radio Intern Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Describe the pandemic in six words

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 49:00

    How would you describe the pandemic in just six words? Today, we talk to Larry Smith, the founder of “six word memoirs” and hear about his new book “A Terrible, Horrible, No Good Year.” It features six word memoirs from students, teachers and parents navigating the pandemic. And later, we hear from Dr. Ulysses Shawdee Wu, Chief Epidemiologist at Hartford Healthcare to answer all your questions about COVID-19 and vaccinating children. Connecticut health officials say the COVID 19 vaccine for children 5-11 could be available starting November 4. Is your child getting the vaccine? GUESTS: Larry Smith - Founder and Editor of Six Word Memoirs Rachel Lloyd - English teacher in English department Suffield Academy Dr. Ulysses Shawdee Wu - Assistant Director of Infectious Diseases, Chief Epidemiologist and Chief Antimicrobial Steward at Hartford Healthcare Maggie Johndrow - Financial Advisor & Partner at Johndrow Wealth Management in Farmington Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Celebrating end of life on your own terms

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 49:00

    Losing someone you love is one of the most devastating experiences in life. Today, we talk about how we grieve as we approach All Souls Day and Dia de los Muertos or Day of the Dead. We talk with the co founder of Farewelling. The company transforms funerals, believing they should be as unique as weddings and birthday parties. And later, bereavement periods in the US can be quite short, with the expectation we make a quick return to work and normal life. Should we rethink how we process grief? GUESTS: Caitlin Abrams - grave cleaner from Southern Vermont Elizabeth Meyer Karansky - Co-founder of Farewelling, a company working to transform funerals. She is also a funeral director, thanatologist, and a death doula Jelena Kecmanovic - psychologist and director of Arlington Behavior Therapy Institute Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    New Haven author Tochi Onyebuchi on why 'Riot Baby' is not a dystopian story

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 49:00

    Riot Baby is author Tochi Onyebuchi's first foray into adult fiction, a “fiery” response to the “horrifically regular death” of unarmed black men and the non-indictments of officers responsible. It has been heralded by critics as “searing" and "devastating,” garnering a long list of awards and nominations. Although Riot Baby has also been called "dystopian," Onyebuchi explains why that isn't exactly the case when it comes to this work of speculative fiction. Plus, hear from nurse practitioner and poet Cortney Davis about her book, “I Hear Their Voices Singing.” How can genres like science fiction and poetry help us to better understand - or cope with - our world? Guests: Tochi Onyebuchi - Author, Riot Baby Cortney Davis - Nurse Practitioner and Poet Laureate of Bethel (2019-2022) Where We Live Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Baseball legend Bobby Valentine says he has his ‘plot' in Stamford, raises over $500,000 for Nov. 2 mayoral race

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 49:00

    Bobby Valentine, an unaffiliated candidate for Stamford mayor, has drawn big-name Republican donors – former president George W. Bush, and Anthony Scaramucci and Linda McMahon, former president Donald Trump appointees. In a debate Oct. 21 on News 12, hosted by the Stamford Chamber of Commerce, Valentine summed up his motivation for the upcoming Nov. 2 election: “I want to be the mayor of this city for one reason and one reason only. I'm not going to Hartford from here, I'm not going to D.C. from here. I'm staying here till the end. I have my plot here, and I want to make the city of Stamford proud.” Valentine is under fire for recent comments including referring to Stamford voters as “dumb” and “lazy,” calling his opponent Rep. Caroline Simmons a “35-year-old girl,” and in a 28 second video clip, stating, “If you're not owning, you're not caring,” and Stamford renters are “not leaving the community better than when they got here.” As per the Oct. 12 filing with the Stamford Town Clerk's office, Valentine's campaign raised $520,645.21. Combined, the candidates have raised more than $1 million in one of the most high-profile, divisive, and closely contested mayoral races in Stamford's history. Guests: Bobby Valentine - Mayoral candidate, (unaffiliated), Stamford. Former Director of Public Health and Safety, city of Stamford. Former professional baseball player – L.A. Dodgers, California Angels, New York Mets, and the Seattle Mariners. Former manager – the Texas Rangers, New York Mets, Boston Red Sox. Brianna Gurciulo - Politics Reporter, Stamford Advocate Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Theater aims to become more inclusive and equitable

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 47:51

    Slowly and surely, live theater has come back to life but that doesn't mean theater is completely back to normal. Today, we check in with theaters in Connecticut and hear about what's coming to the stage this fall, all while keeping actors and theater patrons safe. We learn how the types of performances that you see might have changed as well. Are you going to see a show?  GUESTS: Jacqui Hubbard - Executive artistic director at Ivoryton Playhouse in Ivoryton, Connecticut Kit Ingui - Managing Director of Long Wharf Theater in New Haven, Connecticut Melia Bensussen - Artistic Director at Hartford Stage Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Feeling the strain of supply and staffing shortages, Connecticut restaurants ask you to "be kind"

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 49:00

    First, a new series from The Accountability Project at Connecticut Public Radio shines a spotlight on juvenile justice in the state. Walter Smith Randolph and Jacqueline Rabe-Thomas preview their findings. Then, with staffing shortages and supply chain snags impacting eateries across the state, a new social media campaign reminds you to #BEKINDtoRestaurants. Hear from Connecticut restaurant owners, chefs and managers, plus the folks behind this much needed PSA. Are you being kind when you dine? Walter Smith Randolph - Investigative Editor and Lead Reporter for The Accountability Project Jacqueline Rabe-Thomas - Investigative Reporter for The Accountability Project at Connecticut Public Radio April Gibson - Executive Chef, The North House in Avon Dylan Reis - General Manager, The North House in Avon Jared Schulefand - Chef, Owner and Operator, Home Restaurant in Branford Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Let's talk about sex (education), baby

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 49:00

    Sex ed curriculum varies greatly across our state and our country. Today, please be advised we're talking about sex specifically, sex education. Although schools are required to teach human development and disease prevention, Connecticut schools are not required to teach sexual health education. It's often a short curriculum taught in high school. And conversations about consent, and LGBTQ inclusivity are left out. We want to hear from you. What do you wish you had learned from your sex ed class in school? GUESTS: Michelle Rawcliffe - Comprehensive School Health Educator at Woodstock Middle School Taz Weisgerber  - Training and Technical Assistance Manager at Answer Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Stamford mayoral race heats up as big names throw their support behind State Rep. Caroline Simmons

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 49:00

    Harvard grad and Yale School of Medicine policy advisor Caroline Simmons, State Representative for the 144th District since 2014, has won an endorsement from fellow Democrats Gov. Ned Lamont and former President Barack Obama for her candidacy as mayor of Stamford, one of the wealthiest and fastest growing cities in Connecticut. The Greenwich native is up against baseball legend Bobby Valentine, 71, who's running unaffiliated. Former Homeland Secretary Janet Napolitano, former Secretary of the Treasury Lawrence Summers, and Speaker of the House Matt Ritter are a few high profile donors to Simmons' campaign, which has raised $503,122 to date. So what's at stake? The unemployment rate at Stamford is at 6.2%, and the city's labor force contracted by 4,096, from 68,698 to 64,698 in the second quarter of 2021, compared to the same period the prior year. Also, mold in schools, housing affordability, and urban planning as the city continues to grow. GUESTS:  Rep. Caroline Simmons: Democratic Mayoral Candidate, Stamford. Co-Chair, Commerce Committee; Member, Committee on Human Services, and Member, Higher Education and Employment advancement Committee, Connecticut General Assembly. Senior Specialist, Policy Innovation and Impact, Yale School of Medicine. Brianna Gurciullo - Politics Reporter, Stamford Advocate Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Adam Harris: Fixing Racism In Higher Education

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 48:30

    In 1831, Simeon Jocelyn, a New Haven abolitionist, tried to establish a Black college near Yale. Now Adam Harris, the author of The State Must Provide: Why America's Colleges Have Always Been Unequal — And How To Set Them Right, documents this ill-fated attempt — and others nationally — to establish institutions of learning for African-Americans against the tide of public and legislative opposition. Harris also examines a long history of underfunding Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), established before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and how Black students are affected, to this day, by a lack of investment and equity in higher education. What's next? Harris explains. GUESTS: Adam Harris - Author of The State Must Provide: Why America's Colleges Have Always Been Unequal — And How To Set Them Right; Staff Writer, The Atlantic Jane Gates - Provost and Senior Vice President, Academic and Student Affairs, Connecticut State Colleges and Universities (CSCU) Orsella Hughes - Executive Director, Prosperity Foundation Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    With outcry over critical race theory, we hear from Connecticut educators and students

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 49:00

    With a General Election just around the corner, the so-called “sleepy” town of Guilford has made national headlines, gripped by a polarizing debate over what's being taught in schools. Guilford High School English Chair George Cooksey and Superintendent Paul Freeman explain that while critical race theory is not itself taught in the K-12 environment in Guilford, “dimension” and diversity of source material is still a priority. Plus, a new Black and Latino Studies elective is rolling out in Connecticut high schools next fall, following the first mandate of its kind in the country. A Windsor High School teacher and student who are piloting the course weigh in. How are educators and curricula adapting to reflect our world? And how can they be caught in the political crossfire? Dr. Paul Freeman - Superintendent, Guilford Public Schools George Cooksey - English Chair, Guilford High School Daisha Brabham - Windsor High School Social Studies Teacher Shakila Campbell - Windsor High School Student Dr. Saran Stewart - Associate Professor of Higher Education and Student Affairs; Director of Global Education at UConn's Neag School of Education Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Some politicians are using Holocaust analogies as anti-vaccine rhetoric

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 49:00

    Republican state representative, Anne Dauphinais recently criticized Governor Lamont over his vaccine and mask mandates comparing him to Adolf Hitler. She's not the first politician to reference Nazi Germany and the Holocaust to criticize public health rules in the pandemic. Today, we talk about why these analogies are harmful. Avinoam Patt, Director of the Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life at the University of Connecticut joins us. Do these references and jokes in popular culture point to the need for better Holocaust education? Later, we're going to talk about a really interesting story that brought an anthropologist and an archaeologist together after Superstorm Sandy. To learn more about this story, register for this free virtual event “Forensic Analysis of the Lincoln Oak Skeletal Remains,” hosted by the New Haven Museum. GUESTS: Avinoam Patt - Director for the Center of Judaic Studies at the University of Connecticut. He is also the Doris and Simon Konover Chair of Judaic Studies Dr. Nick Bellantoni - emeritus, Connecticut State Archaeologist Dr. Gary Aronsen - research associate and manager at Yale University Biological Anthropology Laboratories Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    How the global supply chain crisis is affecting Connecticut

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 40:15

    You've heard about the global supply chain crisis, from manufacturing snags abroad, to clogged ports on the West Coast and staffing shortages across the country. But how is that playing out in Connecticut? While the crisis is not as acute at Connecticut's ports, there are some strong signals of supply chain issues in the local retail industry, along with staffing shortages. Hear from the Connecticut Retail Merchants Association and local business owners. Lori Hershman - Owner, Evan's, Jesse's and Jordie's Toy Shoppes Tim Phelan - President, Connecticut Retail Merchants Association Scott Preston - Owner, Preston Market Fred Carstensen - UConn Finance Professor; Director at Connecticut Center for Economic Analysis at UConn Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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