Podcasts about national institutes

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Best podcasts about national institutes

Show all podcasts related to national institutes

Latest podcast episodes about national institutes

Kevin Kietzman Has Issues
Trump Goes Social, Fauci Lied, NBA Star Banned in China, Chiefs v Titans

Kevin Kietzman Has Issues

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:51


   It's official, Donald Trump has gone social with a brand new platform cleverly called "Trump Social."  Of course it can help him if he runs for president but nobody knows exactly how successful it may be.  We'll discuss the possibilities.    A scientist at the National Institute of Health has provided a letter to congress that the U.S. funded gain of function research in Wuhan and that Anthony Fauci and NIH Director Collins both knew about it an lied under oath.    Enes Kanter of the Boston Celtics knows more about international politics and persecution than you and I and it's getting him and his team in some trouble.  The Celtics are now banned in China along with the 76ers, because of a pair of shoes Kanter wore.  This is an incredible story.    Andy Reid said what we've all been thinking... it's time for the Chiefs to stop talking and start playing.  We preview the Chiefs and Titans game.

Ortho Science BYTES Podcast
Key learnings from COVID-19 for the Labs with Dr. Arturo Casadevall

Ortho Science BYTES Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 13:44


The COVID-19 pandemic has been already in our lives since late 2019 and the variants surge is rapidly increasing. Is there anything we can learn from the experience? Fast forward to the fall of 2021, what are the recommendations for Hospitals and Laboratories around the world for the current pandemic and future spread of diseases? In this podcast episode, we will have a conversation with Dr. Arturo Casadevall an infectious disease specialist and Bloomberg Distinguished Professor at Johns Hopkins University about learnings from this pandemic, vaccines, variants, and how antibody testing can play a key role. About our Speaker: Dr. Arturo Casadevall is a professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He holds a joint appointment in molecular microbiology and immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His research focuses on how microbes cause disease and how the immune system defends itself. Dr. Casadevall serves as chair of the W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He received his M.S., Ph.D., and M.D. from New York University. His team is currently engaged in understanding how hosts defend against the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans. Dr. Casadevall's work has been recognized with numerous awards, including the American Society for Microbiology Founders Distinguished Service Award, the National Institutes of Health Merit Award, and the Rhoda Benham Award from the Medical Mycology Society of America.  He was elected to the National Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Dr. Steve Hatfill

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 52:55


DR. STEVE HATFILL, M.D., Physician, Virologist and Bio-Weapons Expert, Former Fellow, Oxford University and the National Institutes of Health and the National Research Council, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Tropical Medicine, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences Dr. Steve Hatfill: The first time we had an actual pandemic response plan was during the first term of the Bush administration Has the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) stopped counting non-life-threatening breakthrough infection cases for COVID-19? Why did the U.S. government downgrade the effectiveness of the Pfizer vaccine? Natural immunity Vs. Covid vaccines: Which is more effective at preventing COVD-19? Back in the mid-1990s, a checklist for how to cope with a biological attack to the homeland was drafted Dr. Hatfill delves into the hydroxychloroquine saga

Wayne Dupree Show
S10E1401: FDA to Allow 'Mix and Match' Approach for COVID Booster Shots

Wayne Dupree Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 73:23


The Food and Drug Administration is predicted to announce approval for mixing and matching COVID-19 booster shots, according to the results of a recent study. This new "mix-and-match" approach set to be announced Wednesday evening follows the findings of a National Institutes of Health study released on Oct. 13. The FDA found that recipients who had received the Johnson & Johnson single-dose vaccine and then received a Moderna vaccine showed an increase in antibody levels, the New York Times reported. Support the show: https://patreon.com/wdshow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This is Growing Old
38. What is Geroscience? Dr. Felipe Sierra, International Advocate for Geroscience, Explains.

This is Growing Old

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 19:38


Dr. Felipe Sierra is an internationally known research leader and advocate in the field of geroscience. He is also the former director of the National Institute on Aging's Division of Aging Biology. Alliance for Aging Research President and CEO Sue Peschin talks with Dr. Sierra about geroscience and the upcoming Euro-Geroscience conference, which he is chairing. Learn more about the conference, taking place March 24-25, 2022 in Toulouse, France: http://www.euro-geroscience.com.

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition
Top 6 Organic Essential Oils and their Do's & Don'ts

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 33:23


Join us for a dive into the power of essential oils in our daily lives. The interest in essential oils is rapidly on the rise according to Google Trends. The trend line is fascinating. Why? What makes essential oils so sought after? They work! Organixx carries a line of organic and pure essential oils. Today we will share the top 3 uses of the top single essential oils in our line.   Lavender Lavender oil is believed to have antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties. We've all heard by now that lavender promotes deeper sleep, but did you know…   There's promising research for breast health too. 2014 Iranian research published in the journal Nutrition and Cancer found that lavender oil kills breast cancer cells but leaves healthy cells unharmed. It's important to note that this study was on cells in a petri dish, not on humans. The researchers concluded that: “L. angustifolia has cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines, and apoptosis is proposed as the possible mechanism of action.”1 Stops the itch and burn of insect bites. Even fire ants! Put a drop of lavender oil on a bee sting, mosquito, or other bug bite to stop pain, itching, and reduce swelling. Reapply as necessary. Lavender oil works really well for this, especially if applied immediately. Use it as a flavor booster. Add a drop of high-quality lavender oil suitable for consumption to brownie batter, chocolate icing, cookie dough, dessert recipes, raw chocolate, or even salad dressings. It's absolutely delicious.   Is Lavender Oil Safe? Using diluted lavender oil topically or in aromatherapy is generally considered safe for most adults but may not be recommended for children. Applying pure lavender oil to your skin (especially open wounds) may also cause irritation, so we recommend infusing it with a carrier oil, such as olive oil or coconut oil. Dissolving it in water also works.   Be careful not to rub lavender oil in your eyes and mucous membranes. If this happens, wash it out immediately. Lavender oil may also cause allergic reactions in people with unusually sensitive skin, so do a spot test before using it. Simply apply a drop of lavender oil to your arm and see if any reaction occurs.   The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) also warns against using lavender oil when taking medications like barbiturates, benzodiazepines and chloral hydrate, as it may increase their sedative effects and cause extreme drowsiness and sleepiness.     Tea Tree (Melaleuca) This versatile oil possesses antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antifungal properties.   Due to its potent anti-inflammatory benefits, tea tree oil helps to relieve inflammatory skin conditions, especially eczema and psoriasis. Dilute as necessary and apply to affected area two to three times daily. Tea tree oil has long been used as a natural bug repellent by native Australian aboriginal people. Chinese research in 2016 found tea tree to be effective against the cereal weevil, Sitophilus zeamais.3 The cereal weevil is considered to be an extremely destructive pest to stored cereals all over the world. Tea tree also helps to relieve the pain, itching, and inflammation of insect bites. If it's an extra-hot day and your deodorant has failed, apply again, but this time with a drop or two of tea tree oil to help kill bacteria. Tea tree oil's potent antibacterial properties are well proven with dozens of research studies.   Is Tea Tree Oil Safe? The answer is yes, as long as it is applied topically in appropriate doses and NOT swallowed. This oil may irritate your skin, especially if used for the first time. We recommend starting with low concentrations until you figure out your tolerance. Determine if you have an allergy to tea tree oil before using it by doing a skin test — apply a small amount to your inner arm to see if any reaction such as a rash or hives occurs.   The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) recommends avoiding oxidized oil, which has been exposed to air, because it may help trigger allergies more than fresh tea tree oil.  Avoid using undiluted tea tree oil as well and use tea tree oil-infused products instead to reduce your risk of skin irritation.   Lemon The health benefits of lemon oil can be attributed to its stimulating, calming, astringent, detoxifying, antiseptic, disinfectant and antifungal properties. *Important to note: Lemon essential oil can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. Lemon oil has a balancing effect on the oil glands of the scalp. Massage a drop or two of lemon oil into your scalp before you go to bed at night. Wash it out in the morning. Done over a period of weeks, you will notice much less oily hair. It will make your pillow smell nice and fresh too! Diffuse lemon oil to help kill airborne bacteria. Research carried out by Dr. Jean Valnet (co-author of the book The Practice of Aromatherapy: A Classic Compendium of Plant Medicines and Their Healing Properties) shows that diffused lemon oil can rapidly kill off the bacteria that causes meningococcal infections, typhoid fever, staph infections, pneumonia, diphtheria, and tuberculosis. Several essential oils are haemostatic, i.e. they help to stop bleeding by speeding up the coagulation of the blood. The most useful of these is oil of Lemon, though Geranium and Rose have similar, though less powerful, effects.   Is Lemon Oil Safe? It is advisable not to use lemon oil without diluting it first, as it can irritate skin. It must be used with a carrier oil for direct application to the skin. Effective carrier oils include coconut oil, olive oil and jojoba oil.   There are findings showing that lemon oil may promote photosensitivity, which increases your sensitivity to the sun and may lead to sunburn and uneven darkening of the skin. We also recommend you avoid applying lemon oil and other citrus oils to your skin when outdoors, as blistering may occur.   People with sensitivities should use essential oils with caution. Reactions can vary from person to person. Some may experience skin reactions, while some may have respiratory problems. Consult your physician first before use. Pregnant women and children should also see a doctor before applying lemon oil.   Peppermint According to a review conducted by the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, peppermint has significant antimicrobial and antiviral activities. It also works as a strong antioxidant, displays anti-tumor actions in lab studies, shows anti-allergenic potential and pain-killing effects, helps to relax the gastrointestinal tract and may be chemopreventive.4   Note: Chemoprevention is the use of a medication, vitamin or supplement to stop cancer from happening. This is most often used for people who have a high risk of developing cancer. The high menthol content of peppermint makes it great for cooling off during hot flashes. At the first sign of a hot flash developing, place a drop at the back of the neck, at the base of the skull, or on the collarbones. Breathe it in. This has an instant cooling and calming effect. Peppermint oil not only relaxes skeletal muscles, it also helps to relax the muscles of the respiratory system. Inhaling the scent of peppermint helps to relieve congestion due to allergies and counteract the effects of pollen. Especially powerful when combined with lavender and lemon to ease seasonal allergies! Peppermint oil is superb for helping to relieve indigestion and heartburn. Put just one drop of peppermint oil into a glass of water and drink. It works much more quickly than peppermint tea due to the concentrated nature of peppermint oil. If it's too strong for you, just dilute it and rub it across the tummy.   Is Peppermint Oil Safe? Peppermint oil is safe in low amounts in most adults, but it can trigger side effects in people with sensitivities. It is important for the following individuals to either avoid using this essential oil or to use it carefully only with the help of a healthcare professional. Pregnant and nursing women — Peppermint oil or other similar products may have emmenagogue and abortifacient effects, so it would be wise not to use peppermint oil without your physician's approval. Infants and children 7 years old and younger — Peppermint oil must not be used undiluted because there isn't enough information regarding its safety for them. Diabetics — Using peppermint oil may raise your risk of low blood sugar levels or hypoglycemia. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia patients — Peppermint can relax the sphincter between the stomach and esophagus, and cause acid to move up to the esophagus. People with gallbladder problems — Peppermint oil may cause gallbladder inflammation; those diagnosed with gallstones should consult a physician before using peppermint oil. People taking antacids — These drugs can cause peppermint oil capsules to break down easily, increasing the risk of heartburn.   Eucalyptus The healing benefits of Eucalyptus Oil can be attributed to its anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, decongestant, deodorant, and antiseptic qualities, among other valuable properties.   Eucalyptus oil is known to be a vasodilator, meaning it dilates, or opens, blood vessels. In 1994, Austrian researchers discovered that eucalyptol, a phytochemical in eucalyptus oil (also known as 1,8-cineol) improved global blood flow to the brain, after only 20 minutes of inhalation.9 A newer study released in 2016 by Korean researchers found that eucalyptol is also able to pass through the blood-brain barrier. This research also found eucalyptol's high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties to be helpful in the management of chronic conditions such as respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, and degenerative nerve and brain diseases. Some studies have shown that several different species of eucalyptus may help to reduce blood sugar levels in mice. Also because eucalyptus is such an excellent vasodilator, the entire body benefits from this increase in blood circulation. To help combat poor blood circulation, dilute eucalyptus oil and massage it into the legs, hands, and feet as needed. Eucalyptus oil's anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and anti-phlegm properties work very quickly to open congested airways. Make a steam inhalation by boiling two cups of water, pour it into a large bowl, then let it cool for five minutes. Add a drop or two of eucalyptus oil. Then create a tent from a small towel draped over your head. Place your face over the bowl and carefully breathe in the vapor until you get some relief. This should only take a couple of minutes. This is great for bronchitis, head colds, chest colds, and asthma.   Is Eucalyptus Oil Safe? Essential oils like eucalyptus oil are generally safe to use, but with specific precautions. Before using it, consult a holistic doctor to see if your condition would allow you to do so, and undergo an allergen patch test to check for possible allergic reactions and lower your risk for developing side effects. In general, adults should not take eucalyptus oil orally except under a doctor's supervision, and this oil mustn't be given to children, especially those under 2 years old.   While eucalyptus oil is generally safe when applied to adult skin, refrain from applying the oil, salve or chest rub on the face or nose of baby because of its potential side effects. Lastly, pregnant and breastfeeding women should also avoid using the oil as evidence is lacking regarding its safety for these groups of women.     Frankincense – The KING of essential oils! Frankincense essential oil is distilled from the resin of the Boswellia tree that grows in many regions within northern Africa and the Middle East. Oman, Somalia, and Ethiopia are the most prominent suppliers today.   Research shows that the natural plant chemical constituents in frankincense oil stimulate the immune system.2   But it supports so much more… Frankincense is a powerful health support for respiratory problems such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, and bronchitis. It even helps when suffering from laryngitis. Diffuse it into the room where you intend to spend some time. For best results, use an ultrasonic cool mist diffuser. Never heat essential oils because heating them diminishes their therapeutic effects. Whether your skin is dry and mature or oily and blotched with blemishes, frankincense oil has wonderful balancing qualities. It helps to reduce lines and wrinkles by tightening and toning skin, accelerates the healing of blemishes, skin ulcers and wounds, and stimulates cell regeneration. For anti-aging benefits, put several drops into your favorite night time moisturizer. For acne and blemishes, apply it neat directly on the problem area, unless you have very sensitive skin, then dilute. Use frankincense oil to help calm and center the mind, to promote spiritual awareness, and to cultivate a sense of inner peace while meditating. Frankincense contains compounds known as sesquiterpenes which work directly on the limbic system of the brain, the center of memory and emotions. Frankincense is calming, grounding, and centering to the nervous system. Diffuse it into your room, or just inhale directly from the bottle at the start of your meditation.   Is Frankincense Oil Safe? Yes, frankincense oil is generally safe. Just make sure to undergo an allergen patch test before applying frankincense oil topically to see if you have any sensitivity to this oil.   For some groups of people, frankincense oil isn't recommended, since it may trigger adverse reactions. If you're pregnant or nursing, avoid using frankincense oil because it may trigger contractions, prompt menstruation and lead to a miscarriage. As for children, there is very limited information regarding the potential use of this oil for this age group, so if you're a parent or guardian, do not let them use this oil.   How to Dilute Essential Oils Although essential oils can be used neat (undiluted) in many cases, it is best (and more economical) to dilute essential oils before applying them to the body. Add a drop or two of your chosen oil to one-half to one teaspoonful of an organic carrier oil such as coconut, almond, hemp, or jojoba.   If using with children or pets, use even less essential oil because their smaller bodies cannot tolerate an adult dose. It's best to consult a qualified aromatherapist before using essential oils with pets or children.    A Final Word About Quality Always choose high quality, organic essential oil that has been properly distilled so that its phytochemical content is not compromised. Look for bottles labeled 100% pure oil and beware of cheap oils that may be diluted with potentially toxic chemical ingredients.   In addition to the powerful essential oils we touched on today, Organixx carries 6 more beautiful single oils just as powerful and effective to help you maintain optimal health; Orange, Grapefruit, Oregano, Geranium Rose, Rosemary, and Clove. Resources: Organixx Essential Oils - 100% Pure, Organic, Non-GMO 1 Comparative studies of cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of different extracts and the essential oil of Lavandula angustifolia on malignant and normal cells. 2 Immunomodulatory activity of biopolymeric fraction BOS 2000 from Boswellia serrata. 3 Insecticidal Activity of Melaleuca alternifolia Essential Oil and RNA-Seq Analysis of Sitophilus zeamais Transcriptome in Response to Oil Fumigation. 4 A review of the bioactivity and potential health benefits of peppermint tea (Mentha piperita L.). National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy – Safety Information 12 Top Essential Oils & 60+ Uses Non-Toxic DIY Essential Oil Mosquito Repellent Tummy Troubles? The Best Essential Oils for Digestive Problems What Are Essential Oils? 21 Facts About Essential Oils You May Not Know

Issues, Etc.
2924. The Ethical Track Record of Outgoing Director of the National Institutes for Health Francis Collins – John West, 10/19/21

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 24:44


John West of the Discovery Institute Francis Collins's Troubling Record at NIH The Tragedy of Francis Collins's Model for Science-Faith Integration

Voices in Advocacy Podcast
American Institute of Architects Building Grassroots Advocates that Empower Their Voices

Voices in Advocacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 39:37


On this episode we speak with Davon Gray, Senior Director of Advocacy Capacity Development at The American Institute of Architects, where he is build grassroots champions that empower their voices. Davon Gray, Senior Director of Advocacy Capacity Development at The American Institute of Architects. He is an advocacy strategist and leader in political affairs with a demonstrated record of leading PAC and grassroots campaigns that ignite action on a range of policy issues for 20 years. Davon is passionate about building strong advocacy organizations that empower member's voices. In 2020, Davon was named to the National Institute of Lobbying and Ethics top 20 list for his association advocacy work. Thank you to our sponsor: Rap Index, tell them Roger sent you. https://www.rapindex.com   This podcast is dedicated to the art of advocacy. Also listen for this episodes advocacy tip. Contact Voices In Advocacy at: www.VoicesinAdvocacy.com 480 488-9150 At Voices in Advocacy we work with organizations that want to inspire, educate, engage, and activate their supports to become even better influential advocates.  

Relaxing White Noise
Infant Sleep Sound White Noise 8 hours | Helps a Baby Fall Asleep & Stay Sleeping

Relaxing White Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 480:47


Many infants respond well to white noise, quickly calming down when they hear the soothing sound. When a baby is fussy, crying, suffering from colic or not sleeping well, play this calming white noise and watch them quickly settle down. Bring peace to your infant and to your household with this relaxing baby sleep sound. Baby white noise is an effective way to soothe a crying infant and lull your newborn to sleep. White noise resembles sounds the baby heard in the womb, which has a calming effect. It also masks other distracting noises so that your baby can fall asleep and remain sleeping. While playing white noise for babies, it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your infant is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Soothe your crying baby and enjoy a moment of calm! Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. This podcast has the sound for you whether you use white noise for studying, to soothe a colicky baby, to fall asleep or for simply enjoying a peaceful moment. No need to buy a white noise machine when you can listen to these sounds for free. Cheers to living your best life! DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2018. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relaxingwhitenoise/support

Collaborative Endeavors
Dr. Tara Mehta & Urban Initiatives: A partnership to promote children's mental health

Collaborative Endeavors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 23:30


FEATURED RESEARCHERS & PARTNERSTara Mehta, PhDAssociate Professor of Clinical PsychologyDepartment of Psychiatry, UIC College of MedicineConsultant, CCTS Community Engagement & Collaboration CoreUrban Initiatives650 W. Lake St., Suite #340Chicago, IL 60661info@urbaninitiatives.orgLearn more about the CCTS Pilot Grant program at ccts.uic.edu/funding If you would like to see your interdisciplinary team featured on the podcast, reach out to me at laurenw@uic.edu. Interested in volunteering to participate in health research? Today's researchers want to make sure that treatments and cures are designed for everyone's unique needs. Are you ready to make a difference? Learn more at go.uic.edu/healthresearch. The University of Illinois at Chicago Center for Clinical and Translational Science is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, through Grant UL1TR002003. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Content Sells: Attract, Convert & Keep Your Ideal Clients with Content Marketing That Works
170 - Repurposing Your Content & Making More With Less - with Ruth Buczynski

Content Sells: Attract, Convert & Keep Your Ideal Clients with Content Marketing That Works

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 59:37


Imagine making $3 million in sales with your online program (already awesome!). Now imagine taking that SAME content and repurposing it into a range of NEW products and programs that brings in an ADDITIONAL $15 million in sales! Yep -- you read that right. Adding $15M and more than 500% in revenue with ONE Repurposing Strategy. In this episode, your hosts, Suzi Dafnis and Michelle Falzon chat with a very special guest -- Ruth Buczynski of The National Institute for the Clinical Application of Behavioral Medicine. Ruth is not only a leader in her field making a difference to the lives of thousands of health and mental health practitioners worldwide, she's also a genius online marketer and content creator and she's developed a way to keep repackaging and repurposing her paid content into saleable products that are generating millions and serving her audience more fully in the process. This can be a GAME-CHANGER in your business - especially if you already sell online courses or you deliver large programs or certifications - because Ruth has literally cracked the code on how you can launch one large product and then, over time, repurpose that content into smaller and smaller products. SPECIAL GIFT As a special gift from Ruth and the team at The National Institute for the Clinical Application of Behavioral Medicine - here's a “no-optin-required” link to “Working With Perfectionism” (for all us content perfectionists out there!) Listen to this episode to hear more about: The simple philosophy that catapulted Ruth's business growth How Ruth pivoted from a “one and done” approach to a repurposing strategy (and why that immediately turned into 3X revenue) The counterintuitive repurposing pricing strategy that will blow your mind (and make a massive difference to your income) How Ruth was able to make an additional $3 million in revenue from a $1 million product Why you “gotta have chunks!” to make this strategy work The things you need to consider BEFORE you start your repurposing strategy (that make ALL the difference!) The KEY to repurposing content so it's powerful, relevant and still wanted over and over by your market How Ruth structures her annual calendar and her product promotions (this alone is worth listening to this episode for - absolute GOLD!) What frequency should you be offering your repurposed content? (Ruth's answer might surprise you!) The simple 3-email strategy that is bringing in millions and helping more practitioners get the support they need. And much more! Also mentioned in this episode: HerBusiness Success Mastermind Working With Perfectionism - Special Gift from RuthBuczynski 

Did You Bring the Hummus?
Episode 23 - Healing with plants - an interview with Anthony Masiello of Plant Based TeleHealth

Did You Bring the Hummus?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 59:30


Today, I am joined by Anthony Masiello, co-founder and CEO of Plant Based TeleHealth, a national lifestyle telemedicine service focused on the prevention and reversal of disease with lifestyle medicine and whole food plant-based nutrition. Anthony has been working in healthcare for more than 25 years. His professional career started in the 90s at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) doing bioinformatics for the Human Genome Project. He later shifted into Research and Development at Novartis Pharmaceuticals, where he was interested in contributing more directly to the development of new disease therapies. Finally, after learning there is a better way, he shifted his focus once again and is now 100% focused on providing access to medical services centered on the prevention and reversal of disease utilizing lifestyle medicine rooted in whole food plant-based nutrition. Anthony first came to a plant-based lifestyle himself after being denied a 20-year term life insurance policy at age 33. He was morbidly obese, weighing more than 360 pounds, medicated for high blood pressure, and suffering from psoriasis, eczema, migraine headaches, and sleep apnea. Through the transition to a whole food plant-based diet and healthy lifestyle, Anthony lost 160 lbs. and reversed all of these conditions. He has maintained that weight loss, optimal health, and a greatly improved quality of life for more than 15 years and counting. Anthony's personal health transformation has been featured on the Megyn Kelly Today show, on PBS, in The Huffington Post, in the bestselling book Eat to Live, and by Forks Over Knives, Runners World, and numerous magazines, web sites, radio shows, podcasts, and articles. Visit his website: https://plantbasedtelehealth.com/ Follow Anthony: Instagram: @amasiello https://instagram.com/amasiello/ @plantbasedtelehealth https://instagram.com/plantbasedtelehealth Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/anthonymasiello https://www.facebook.com/PBTeleHealth and YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/PlantBasedTeleHealth Be sure to subscribe to the podcast and if you're loving it, please give Did You Bring the Hummus a 5 star rating, it's an easy way to keep supporting the show. Are you a change-maker? Do deeply care about changing the systems which oppress others and is it important to you to reduce suffering and to find powerful, consistent ways to do that? My new course, The Vegan Voyage, launching October 19th, is just what you're looking for. Visit my website for more details. https://www.didyoubringthehummus.com/veganvoyage Theme song: ©2020 JP Winters © 2021 Kimberly Winters - Did You Bring the Hummus LLC

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Sarah Hammer & Sameer Gupta - Introducing Cypher, Penn's New Blockchain Accelerator

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 38:27


Anirudh Singh sits down with Sarah Hammer and Sameer Gupta to discuss launching the Cypher Accelerator. Topics include: - Sameer's work at Point72 - Why Sarah is well-positioned to lead Cypher - Cypher's incredible board of advisors - What excites the two most about Crypto / Blockchain And much more! Sarah Hammer:  Sarah Hammer is Managing Director of the Stevens Center for Innovation in Finance and Senior Director of the Harris Alternative Investments Program at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. In these roles, she focuses her efforts on private capital investments and financial technology. Sarah is also Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, teaching an upper-level juris doctor course on financial regulation. Previously, Sarah was Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary for Financial Institutions and Director of the Office of Financial Institutions Policy at the United States Department of the Treasury. In this role, she led and directed the Department's policy responsibilities involving financial institutions, as well as oversaw the Federal Insurance Office and the Office of Critical Infrastructure Protection and Compliance Policy (cybersecurity). Sarah earned a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, an M.B.A. from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, and a Master of Studies from Oxford University. She is a Harry S. Truman Scholar and a Member of the American Law Institute. Sameer Gupta:  Sameer Gupta is the Head of Data Solutions at Point72 and for the New York Mets. He is responsible for creating end-to-end solutions in data and analytics for all Point72 businesses as well as the Mets. Before joining Point72, Gupta was the chief operating officer at iSentium, an artificial intelligence startup where he led key business functions including sales, business development, fundraising, engineering, and operations. Before iSentium, he was the COO for the Global Electronic Trading and Americas Cash Equities business at JPMorgan. Gupta also served in business development and product management roles at New York Stock Exchange Technologies, and in software development and technology strategy positions at Goldman Sachs. He is also actively involved in the New York City startup community through TechStars and New York University's Endless Frontier Labs. Sameer earned his MBA from Harvard Business School, M.S. in Information Systems Management from Carnegie Mellon, and B.S. in Computer Science from the National Institute of Technology in India.

BioTalk with Rich Bendis
Seth Toback, Novavax and Divya Chadha Manek, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) (EP.97)

BioTalk with Rich Bendis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 42:47


A US – UK Discussion: How to Conduct Clinical Trials as Seth Toback, Vice President, Clinical Development at Novavax and Divya Chadha Manek, Director of Business Development at the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) join Rich Bendis on BioTalk.    

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Lessons from Concurrent Pandemics of COVID-19 and HIV/AIDS

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 62:06


Join us for an important intergenerational conversation with LGBTQ Asians and Pacific Islanders and their allies. Our panelists will share QTAPI stories and experiences of the dual pandemics of HIV/AIDS and COVID-19; their histories as Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States; their past and current roles in community organizing and the political process; as well as other issues that are part of the current cultural and political shifts and relevant to the experiences of QTAPI individuals. Meet the Speakers Ignatius Bau was the HIV prevention program coordinator at the Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum in the mid-1990s, and served as a member of the President's Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS and advisory groups about HIV/AIDS for the federal Office of Minority Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Institutes for Health. He also has served on the board of directors for the Gay Asian Pacific Alliance Community HIV Project, Asian & Pacific Islander Wellness Center, National Minority AIDS Project, and Funders for LGBTQ Issues. Cecilia Chung is the senior director of strategic initiatives and evaluation at Transgender Law Center, a health commissioner of San Francisco and an internationally recognized civil rights leader in the LGBT and HIV community. Chung has served as the co-chair of GNP+ and is currently a member of the WHO Advisory Council of Women Living with HIV. Vince Crisostomo is a gay Chamorro (Pacific Islander) long-term HIV/AIDS survivor who believes in the healing power of community and has dedicated more than 30 years to HIV/AIDS activism and LGBTQ communities. He is passionate about bringing health care to all and social justice equity to people of every sexual identity, HIV status, gender, race and age. Crisostomo is SFAF's director of aging services and previously managed the Elizabeth Taylor 50 Plus Network for long-term HIV survivors. He co-chaired the HIV & Aging Work Group and was an active member of the Mayor's Long-Term Care Coordinating Council. Crisostomo has led a number of grassroots HIV advocacy and LGBTQ organizations in the United States and overseas. He was executive director of the Coalition of Asia Pacific Regional Networks on HIV/AIDS, founded the Pacific Island Jurisdiction AIDS Action Group, and served as a United Nations NGO delegate for the Asia Pacific. In 2019, having won the popular vote, he was community grand marshall for San Francisco Pride. In July 2021, he was appointed to the San Francisco Human Rights Commission's LGBTQI+ Advisory Committee. NOTES This is a free program; any voluntary donations made during registration will support the production of our online programs. A complimentary lunch will be provided before the program for in-person attendees. The Commonwealth Club thanks Gilead Sciences, Inc. for its generous support of The Michelle Meow Show.  Program presented in partnership with GAPA Theatre, The Connection at the San Francisco Community Health Center, the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, and The Commonwealth Club of California. This project was made possible with support from California Humanities, nonprofit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. SPEAKERS Ignatius Bau Former HIV Prevention Program Coordinator, Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum; Former Member, President's Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS Cecilia Chung Senior Director of Strategic Initiatives and Evaluation, Transgender Law Center; Health Commissioner, San Francisco Vince Crisostomo Director of Aging Services, San Francisco AIDS Foundation Michelle Meow Producer and Host, "The Michelle Meow Show," KBCW TV and Podcast; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors—Host and Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on October 6th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

InsideTheBoards for the USMLE, COMLEX & Medical School
Addiction 101: Where We're Going | Dr. Nora Volkow, Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse

InsideTheBoards for the USMLE, COMLEX & Medical School

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 48:27


Sections from today's episode Encourage your patients to be open and honest about addiction  How to ask about addiction without judgement and how to intervene  "By not intervening, we're condoning" Addiction is a disease of free will and treating addiction is not replacing one drug with another Today's guest Nora D. Volkow, M.D., is Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health. NIDA is the world's largest funder of research on the health aspects of drug use and addiction. Dr. Volkow's work has been instrumental in demonstrating that drug addiction is a disease of the human brain. As a research psychiatrist and scientist, Dr. Volkow pioneered the use of brain imaging to investigate the toxic and addictive properties of abusable drugs. Her studies have documented changes in the dopamine system affecting, among others, the functions of frontal brain regions involved with motivation and self-regulation in addiction. She has also made important contributions to the neurobiology of obesity, ADHD, and aging and to the imaging field. Dr. Volkow has published more than 780 peer-reviewed articles, written more than 100 book chapters and non-peer-reviewed manuscripts, and co-edited the Neuroscience for the 21th Century Encyclopedia and edited four books on neuroimaging for mental and addictive disorders. Read her full bio on the National Institute on Drug Abuse website. If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, there is help available. SAMHSA National Helpline Confidential free help, from public health agencies, to find substance use treatment and information. www.samhsa.gov 1-800-662-4357 Shatterproof Browse addiction resources from treatment finders to recovery groups to grief support. www.shatterproof.org/ National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-8255 Further Learning National Institute on Drug Abuse The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) supports and conducts research across a broad range of disciplines and leads the nation in scientific research on the health aspects of drug abuse and addiction. www.drugabuse.gov Health Management Associates Helping Communities Improve Care for People with Complex Health and Social Needs www.HMAedu.com Study on the go with the ITB Audio QBank app Download for free on iOS or Android. If you want to upgrade, you can save money on a premium subscription by customizing your plan until your test date on our website! Our other podcasts: Crush Step 1 Step 2 Secrets Physiology by Physeo Step 1 Success Stories The InsideTheBoards Study Smarter Podcast The InsideTheBoards Podcast Beyond the Pearls Produced by Ars Longa Media To learn more about us and this podcast, visit arslonga.media. You can leave feedback or suggestions at arslonga.media/contact or by emailing info@arslonga.media. Produced by: Christopher Breitigan Executive Producer: Patrick C. Beeman, MD Legal Stuff InsideTheBoards is not affiliated with the NBME, USMLE, COMLEX, or any professional licensing body. InsideTheBoards and its partners fully adhere to the policies on irregular conduct outlined by the aforementioned credentialing bodies. The information presented in this podcast is intended for educational purposes only and should not be construed as professional or medical advice. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

With the Bark Off: Conversations from the LBJ Presidential Library
“I'm 80 years old. I'm not looking for another job.” A Conversation With Dr. Anthony Fauci

With the Bark Off: Conversations from the LBJ Presidential Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 43:23


Since the outbreak of COVID-19 in late 2019, Dr. Anthony Fauci has become a household name. As the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the chief medical advisor to the President, Dr. Fauci is the public health official who has been most visible around the pandemic. But his service to our country goes well beyond combating COVID-19. In his nearly 40 years at the NIAID, he has advised every president since Ronald Reagan and has worked to find remedies for HIV/AIDS, SARS, MERS, Ebola, H1N1 (swine flu), and Anthrax.  Dr. Fauci talks frankly about what he has learned in his fruitful life and career in medicine, the high praise and scorching criticism he has received along the way, and the unparalleled challenges he has faced in helping to keep our country safe from COVID-19. 

Nana Tingz
Taking Back My Narrative

Nana Tingz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 27:40


On todays episode of "Nana Tingz", I (@AntonioILiranzo) wanted to start another series called "Owning Our Narrative", where I discuss topics that involve trauma, trauma bonding and emotional immature parents/people in our lives. I have been facing my own trauma from childhood and wanted to share my story so I can help others. All I want to say is, it is beautiful to be 29 and be able to have a new life form, from realizing that it was never me it was my mom. The biggest advice I can give anyone that was raised with traumatizing emotionally immature parents, know that, it wasn't your fault

Axios Today
Clearing up the latest confusion around boosters

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:38


New data from the National Institutes of Health shows that people who got the Johnson & Johnson vaccine might benefit from getting a Pfizer or Moderna booster shot. But J&J has asked the FDA to approve a second shot for its own vaccine. Plus, Miya Marcano, and new attention on missing and murdered women of color. And, Snapchat is trying to get its users to run for office. Guests: Axios' Caitlin Owens and Alexi McCammond, and attorney Marlon Hill. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, Alex Sugiura, Lydia McMullen-Laird, Michael Hanf, and David Toledo. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Go deeper: J&J booster confusion ahead Miya Marcano Memorial Fund Snapchat young candidate project gets buzz Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ben Greenfield Fitness
An Herbal, Plant-Medicine Based Approach To Managing COVID Vaccination Risks, New & Emerging Vaccines (NovaVaxx, Covaxin & Vaxxinity), Bias Against Herbal Medicine & More With Donnie Yance

Ben Greenfield Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 90:40


For comprehensive show notes, including links to everything Donnie Yance and I discuss on today's episode, visit BenGreenfieldFitness.com/donnie My guest on today's podcast, Donald (“Donnie”) Yance, is an internationally known master herbalist and nutritionist. He received his herbal training through Sequoia College and is a professional member of the American Herbalists Guild. He was trained as a clinical nutritionist through the National Institute of Nutritional Education and holds certification through the National Association of Nutrition Professionals. He is also professed as a Secular Franciscan (SFO), which equips him with the breadth and wisdom to touch on the spiritual aspects of healing. Donnie is the founder and formulator of Natura Health Products, for which he created a unique line of therapeutic-grade botanical and nutritional supplements. The current Natura portfolio consists of over forty formulations derived from botanical and nutritional agents acquired from around the world. These products have made a significant contribution to his tangible success in improving the health of his patients, specifically by providing therapeutic amounts of key ingredients that would otherwise be unattainable anywhere in the world. Here are a few of the more salient points you'll hear in today's episode: -The story behind Mederi Medicine...12:20 -The importance of spiritual health when it comes to one's overall wellbeing...19:30 -Donnie's concerns about current Covid vaccines...39:35 -Why we shouldn't be quick to ignore ancient healing knowledge when it comes to viruses...1:03:30 -And much more... Upcoming Events: Keep up on Ben's LIVE appearances by following bengreenfieldfitness.com/calendar Episode sponsors: -Kion Clean Protein -CAR.O.L -Organifi Red Juice -Paleo Valley Organ Complex BenGreenfieldFitness.com/donnie

Morning Announcements
Thursday, October 14th, 2021

Morning Announcements

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 5:19


We start with a new study about booster vaccines from the National Institute of Health. On Tuesday, the FDA authorized the first ever e-cigarette. Meanwhile, the chair of the Senate Homeland Security, senator Gary Peters has asked TikTok to provide information on its policies surrounding violent and extremist content. Next, we move to our new and exciting segment, Democracy Watch. To close, we end with Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas' memo ordering U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to stop mass worksite raids. Plus, we have an update on the potential strike by IATSE. Resources/Articles mentioned in this episode: CNN: "FDA to take up Moderna, J&J Covid-19 booster questions this week" AP News: "FDA authorizes first e-cigarette, cites benefit for smokers" CNN: "Senate Homeland Security chair asks TikTok for policies on extremist content" Mother Jones: "Texas Republicans Are Pulling Out All the Stops to Dilute the Voting Power of People of Color" Washington Post: "2020 Census may have undercounted Black Americans, new analyses say" Hollywood Reporter: "IATSE Sets Oct. 18 Strike Date if Contract Talks Aren't Resolved"

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.13.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 57:32


The Government Assault Against Ivermectin and other Safe SARS-2 Treatments    Richard Gale and Gary Null PhD Progressive Radio Network, September 1, 2021     Had the FDA and Anthony Fauci's National Institute for Allergies and Infectious Disease (NIAID) started approving existing clinically-proven and inexpensive drugs for treating malaria, parasites and other pathogens at the start of the pandemic, millions of people would have been saved from experiencing serious infections or dying from the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Why federal health officials never followed this strategy is a question the mainstream media refuses to ask.    Another question that the medical establishment, let alone our compliant media, is why have they failed to ask whether there are reliable studies in the peer-reviewed literature and testimonies from thousands of day-to-day clinical physicians worldwide who treat Covid-19 patients with these drugs, in particular hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and Ivermectin. We may also point out the many different natural remedies, such as nigella sativa, curcumin, vitamin D, melatonin, etc, which have been shown to be effective against SARS-2 infections. In most nations, there has been enormous success in treating Covid patients at the early and moderate stages of infection. However, in the US, Anthony Fauci, Bill Gates, the FDA and our federal medical officials have categorically denied their use.  In fact during the past couple weeks, there has been an aggressive and concerted effort to erect obstacles to prevent the employment of these more effective drugs. More recently a widespread campaign is underway to denigrate them altogether.   For example, the TOGETHER trial is now touted by the mainstream media as a flagship study showing that ivermectin is ineffective and even dangerous to prescribe. The study was conducted by professor Edward Mills at McMaster University in Ontario. If we are to believe the New York Times, the trial, which enrolled 1,300 patients, was discontinued because Mills claimed the drug was no better than a placebo. However, there is strong reason to believe this entire trial was nothing less than a staged theatrical performance. When asked, Mills denied having any conflict of interests.  However, Mills happens to be employed as a clinical trial advisor for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.  The Gates Foundation was also the trial's principal funder.  It may be noted that various organizations and agencies in other nations, such as the Health Products Regulatory Authority in South Africa, which have banned ivermectin, are often funded by Gates. It is naïve to believe that Gates has any philanthropic intentions whatsoever to see a highly effective treatment for SARS-2 infections reach worldwide approval. These drugs are in direct competition to his enormous investments and unwavering commitment to the Covid-19 vaccines.   In the meantime, Americans only have monoclonal antibody therapy and the controversial and ineffective drug Remdesivir at their disposal. Remdesivir's average effectiveness for late stage treatment is only 22 percent.  A Chinese study published in The Lancet found no statistically significant benefit in the drug and 12 percent of participants taking the drug had to discontinue treatment due to serious adverse effects, especially liver and kidney damage.    When questions are posited as a general argument for advocating expedient measures to protect public health during this pandemic, would it not have been wise to have prioritized for emergency use HCQ, Ivermectin, and other remedies with a record of curtailing Covid, such as the antibiotic azithromycin, zinc, selenium, Vitamins C and D, and melatonin as a first line of defense?  There was absolutely no need to have waited for experimental vaccines or experimental drugs such as Remdesivir before the pandemic became uncontrollable.  But this is what Fauci and Trump, and now Biden, permitted to happen.   If this strategy of medical intervention had been followed, would it have been successful?  The answer is likely an unequivocal “yes”.  Both HCQ and, even better, Ivermectin have been prophylactically prescribed by physicians working on pandemic's front lines with enormous success.  Yet those American physicians struggling to get this urgent message out to federal health officials are being marginalized and ridiculed en masse. Only in the US, the UK, France, South Africa and several other developed nations has there been a stubborn hubris to deny their effectiveness. The World Health Organization recommends Ivermectin for Covid-19 so why not the US and these other nations? Under oath, multiple physicians and professors at American medical schools have testified before Congress to present the scientific evidence supporting HCQ and Ivermectin.  These are otherwise medical professionals at the very heart of treating Covid-19 patients.    Today, American journalism is in shambles. In fact, it is a disgrace.  The American public is losing trust in the media. Whether it is CNN, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the liberal tabloid Daily Beast, NPR or PBS, each has unlimited resources to properly investigate the federal and institutional machinery behind the government health policies being thrust upon us.  Yet no mainstream journalist has found the moral compass to bring this truth to the public.    In the meantime, we are allowing millions to die, and countless others to be seriously affected from a severe infection because of professional medical neglect and a healthcare system favoring the pharmaceutical industry's frantic rush to develop expensive novel drugs and experimental vaccines. The incentive by the drug makers is to take every advantage available within the FDA's emergency use loopholes to get their products approved as quickly as possible.  The primary advantage is that these novel drugs and vaccines can then leap over regulatory hurdles, which otherwise would require them to conduct lengthy and thorough clinical trials to prove their efficacy and safety. The consequence is that none of the new pharmaceutical Covid-19 interventions have been adequately reviewed.   On the other hand, HCQ and Ivermectin have an established legacy of prior research and have been on the market for decades. Worldwide, it is not unreasonable to claim that billions of people have been treated with these drugs.     Below is a breakdown of the studies conducted so far for HCQ, Ivermectin and Vitamin D specifically for combatting the SARS-CoV-2 virus   Hydroxychloroquine   344 studies, 250 peer-reviewed have been conducted specifically for Covid-19 281 have been clinical trials that involved 4,583 scientists and over 407,627 patients 64% improvement in 31 early treatment trials 75% improvement in 13 early stage infection treatment mortality results 21% improvement in 190 late stage infection treatment trials (patients in serious condition) 23% improvement in 44 randomized controlled trials Full list of HCQ studies and details:  https://c19hcq.com   Ivermectin    131 studies, 52 peer-reviewed have been conducted specifically for Covid-19 63 have been clinical trials that involved 613 scientists and over 26,398 patients 58% improvement in 31 randomized controlled trials  86% improvement in 14 prophylaxis trials 72% improvement in 27 early stage infection treatment trials 40% improvement in 22 late stage infection treatment trials 58% improvement in 25 mortality results Full list of Ivermectin studies and details:  https://c19ivermectin.com   Other inexpensive repurposed drugs for treating SARS-2   Fluvoxamine   88% improvement in early treatment 29% improvement in late stage treatment 63% improvement in all 7 peer-reviewed studies   Vitamin D   101 studies conducted by over 875 scientists 63 sufficiency studies with 34,863 patients 33 treatment trials with 46,860 patients 42% improvement in 33 treatment trials 56% improvement in 68 sufficiency studies 55% improvement in 19 treatment mortality results Full list of Vitamin D studies and details:  https://c19vitamind.com   In contrast there have been 21 studies enrolling 35,744 patients in Remdesivir trials showing only a 22% improvement in all studies combined. This rate is below that of simply taking probiotics (5 studies at 24% improvement), melatonin (7 studies at 62% improvement), curcumin (4 studies at 71% improvement), nigella sativa (3 studies at 84% improvement), quercetin (4 studies at 76% improvement), and aspirin (7 studies at 37% improvement).  Despite the small number of trials and low numbers of enrolled participants, early results indicate that greater attention and funding needs to be allocated for more rigorous research if there is to be any success in curbing SARS-2 infections' severity.   Please share this information. The inept policies and measures being taken by our federal health officials and by both the former Trump and present Biden administrations are unparalleled in American healthcare history. And never before has the media been so willing to self-censor and been so grossly irresponsible to hide the published science and the truth.   

Public Health On Call
383 - Molnupiravir: The Game-changing Oral Antiviral Pill for COVID-19?

Public Health On Call

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 15:20


This week, Merck applied for FDA Emergency Use Authorization for its COVID-19 oral antiviral drug, molnupiravir. Dr. Carl Dieffenbach, director of the Division of AIDS at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, talks with Stephanie Desmon about how the drug works to help people recover from COVID-19 quicker and the drug's history starting a decade ago as an experimental treatment for Ebola. Dieffenbach talks about how the drug could complement pandemic response and why it's not a substitute for vaccination. *Note: This podcast was recorded on October 6.

Anxiety Road Podcast
ARP 262 Depression and Negative Talk

Anxiety Road Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 9:58


There is a study reported by the medical journal The Lancet about the increase in levels of anxiety and depression during the pandemic.  The first sentence in the report got me thinking.  Mental disorders are among the leading causes of the global health-related burden I have to look up the meaning of burden because I've never thought of my anxiety as a burden. A thorn, a pain in the ass, or at best, this thing that I have but not a burden. It has two meanings. a load, typically a heavy one. Or the main theme or gist of a speech, book, or argument.   The Lancet is a UK publication and I'm an American bringing other meaning to the words used to describe mental health issues.   At first, I took it as the world was burdened with people who have a mental health condition. Then I thought, maybe they mean the people that have a mental health condition that have the burden?   I might be wrong about this, but I think this is the UK's English way of expressing a thesis statement.    In this episode, a definition of depression and negative talk (or cognitive dissonance) symptoms when it comes to depression.   Negative talk symptom isn't the opposite of so-called happy or positive thoughts. It is a pattern of thinking that is designed to invalidate the worth of a person or their value to other people. Resources Mentioned:  Ad Age Mental Health is the Monumental Brief that Needs the Power of Our Industry. American Psychiatry Association explanation page What is Depression?   Downloadable booklet – What is Depression? from the National Institute of Mental Health  Also by NIMH, Signs and Symptoms of Depression.    How Does Social Media Play a Role in Depression? a post by Very Well Mind   Social Media and Mental Health via Helpguide.org If you need support contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, the Trevor Project at 1-866-488-7386 or text “START” to 741-741. Disclaimer:  Links to other sites are provided for information purposes only and do not constitute endorsements.  Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with questions you may have regarding a medical or mental health disorder. This blog and podcast is intended for informational and educational purposes only. Nothing in this program is intended to be a substitute for professional psychological, psychiatric or medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

Relaxing White Noise
Baby White Noise Hairdryer 8 hours | Calm a Crying Infant with Sleep Sound for Colicky Babies

Relaxing White Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 480:47


Many parents have found that the sounds of a hair dryer soothe a crying baby. Here's an 8 hour high-quality hairdryer recording that's a useful tool to calm a colicky newborn. The white noise helps lull a baby to sleep. While playing white noise for babies, it's important to keep tabs on the volume, because any white noise machine, smartphone, or computer can put out levels that are too loud for your child. It's recommended to play the sound at least a few feet from where your infant is sleeping and to keep the volume no louder than the sound of a soft shower. Parents can download an app to turn their smartphone into a sound level meter. One good, free, option is the sound level meter app created by the U.S. National Institutes for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) available on the app store as the NIOSH SLM app. Soothe your crying baby and enjoy a moment of calm! Check out the 10-Hour version on YouTube Contact Us for Partnership Inquiries Relaxing White Noise is the number one destination on YouTube for white noise and nature sounds to help you sleep, study or soothe a baby. With more than a billion views across YouTube and other platforms, we are excited to now share our popular ambient tracks on the Relaxing White Noise podcast. People use white noise for sleeping, focus, sound masking or relaxation. We couldn't be happier to help folks live better lives. This podcast has the sound for you whether you use white noise for studying, to soothe a colicky baby, to fall asleep or for simply enjoying a peaceful moment. No need to buy a white noise machine when you can listen to these sounds for free. Cheers to living your best life! DISCLAIMER: Remember that loud sounds can potentially damage your hearing. When playing one of our ambiences, if you cannot have a conversation over the sound without raising your voice, the sound may be too loud for your ears. Please do not place speakers right next to a baby's ears. If you have difficulty hearing or hear ringing in your ears, please immediately discontinue listening to the white noise sounds and consult an audiologist or your physician. The sounds provided by Relaxing White Noise are for entertainment purposes only and are not a treatment for sleep disorders or tinnitus. If you have significant difficulty sleeping on a regular basis, experience fitful/restless sleep, or feel tired during the day, please consult your physician. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2018. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this text/visual/audio is prohibited. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relaxingwhitenoise/support

First Voices Radio
10/10/21 - Christine Diindiisi McCleave, Lori Jump

First Voices Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 60:00


In early June 2021, remains of 215 Indigenous children were found at the Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia, Canada. The school was one of the largest Indian residential schools in Canada and operated from the late 19th century to the late 1970s. Indigenous children, some as young as 3 years old, we were forcibly taken from their families and put into residential schools in Canada. This is also what happened in Native boarding schools in the U.S. during the same time period — children's hair was cut off, they were forbidden to speak their Indigenous languages, and to see their families. Some didn't return home for many years and some never returned. Tiokasin Ghosthorse speaks with Christine Diindiisi McCleave (Turtle Mountain Ojibwe), CEO, National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition about the organization's support of the introduction of a U.S. Bill for a Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies. Christine is a leader and an activist for Indigenous rights advocating for truth, justice and healing for the genocidal policy of U.S. Indian Boarding Schools. She has dedicated her life and work to pursuing truth and healing for the Indigenous survivors of historical trauma at the hands of colonialism and settler-states. Visit https://boardingschoolhealing.org/October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. According to the National Institute of Justice, domestic violence disproportionately impacts Native Americans and Alaska Natives, with more than 1.5 million Native women and 1.4 million Native men experiencing violence during their lifetime, often by non-Native perpetrators. Domestic violence among Native Americans is not natural or traditional. The domination and subjugation of Native Americans began with colonization and continues today. Colonization was responsible for the theft, occupation, pollution and exploitation of Indigenous lands. Today, Natives who are living in tribal communities on or near lands that are exploited by extractive industries face the highest rates of domestic and sexual violence. Tiokasin talks with Lori Jump (Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians), executive director of StrongHearts Native Helpline, a 24/7 culturally appropriate domestic, dating and sexual violence helpline for Native Americans and Alaska Natives. Lori is the former executive director and current board member of Uniting Three Fires Against Violence, Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault tribal coalition in Michigan. She served on the Federal Task Force researching Violence Against American Indians and Alaska Native Women and has more than 26 years of tribal advocacy experience in her community. StrongHearts Native Helpline can be reached by calling or texting 1-844-762-8483 or clicking on the chat icon at strongheartshelpline.org.Production Credits:Tiokasin Ghosthorse (Lakota), Host and Executive ProducerLiz Hill (Red Lake Ojibwe), ProducerMalcolm Burn, Studio Engineer, Radio Kingston, WKNY 1490 AM and 107.9 FM, Kingston, NY Tiokasin Ghosthorse, Audio Editor Music Selections:1. Song Title: Tahi Roots Mix (First Voices Radio Theme Song), Artist: Moana and the Moa Hunters, CD: Tahi (1993), Label: Southside Records (Australia and New Zealand)(00:00:44)2. Song Title: All Along the Watchtower, Artist: Featuring Warren Haynes, Ivan Neville, Cyril Neville and John Cruz, CD: Listen to the Music (2018), Label: Motema Music(00:23:28) 3. Song Title: The Path (acoustic version), Artist: Vince Fontaine's Indian City, CD: Code Red (November 2021), Label: Rising Sun Productions, Inc., Winnipeg, Manitoba(00:50:50) 4. Song Title: Above the Bones, Artist: Mishka, CD: Above the Bones (2009), Label: Mishka Music(00:54:33)

WGTS 91.9 Mornings Podcast
Relationship FYI: Helping Your Relationship Survive Football Season

WGTS 91.9 Mornings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 14:55


Dr. Greg Smalley joined Jerry and Blanca to share tips for couples during football season! Jerry & Blanca spoke with Greg Smalley about the importance of putting your spouse first. Dr. Greg Smalley serves as the vice president of Marriage at Focus on the Family. In this role, he develops and oversees initiatives that prepare individuals for marriage, strengthen and nurture existing marriages and help couples in marital crises. Prior to joining Focus, Smalley worked for the Center for Relationship Enrichment at John Brown University and as president of the National Institute of Marriage. He is the author of 20 books including Crazy Little Thing Called Marriage and Fight Your Way to a Better Marriage, and he is the co-author of The DNA of Relationships for Couples.

Local Matters
Bob Bell & NIET And Learning Loss

Local Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 34:04


Bob Bell sits down with Dr. Sharon Anderson, 9-12 Curriculum Supervisor for Putnam County Schools, and Keely Potter, Regional Director for the National Institute for Excellence in Teaching (NIET). They discuss what the NIET is and what their partnership with Putnam County Schools entails, what learning loss is and how it has impacted  Putnam County Schools due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as what a learning coach is, and how they help train and support teachers in the classroom. Listen to the latest Local Matters Podcast… Presented by Office Mart.

Here's The Thing with Alec Baldwin
Anthony Fauci Could Use a Day Off

Here's The Thing with Alec Baldwin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 54:53


Alec talks with Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Chief Medical Advisor to President Biden. He talks to Alec about the latest in the pandemic and his long career.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 10-12-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 4:59


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for October 12th, 2021. Merck asked U.S. regulators yesterday to authorize the pill it has for treating COVID. If they hear what they want to hear from the FDA, and that could happen in a few weeks, that'd be the first pill shown to treat the illness. There are other drugs, but they require an IV or injection. Merck said earlier this month the pill cut hospitalizations and deaths by half among patients with early symptoms. Meanwhile AstraZeneca's antibody cocktail against COVID, already shown to work as a preventative shot in the non-infected, was also shown to save lives and prevent severe disease when used as treatment within a week of first symptoms. Two new studies indicate pregnant women who develop Covid symptoms risk emergency complications and additional problems, and the disease puts their babies at risk. Of the 100 Covid-positive moms who delivered babies between March and September of 2020 at one Texas hospital, 58% of those with symptomatic infections delivered in emergency circumstances. For those with an asymptomatic case, 46% did. It's a sure way to fight Covid…sue people. A parent in southern Wisconsin has sued their school district after her son got Covid-19 from a classmate. She's upset the board removed a student mask requirement and other Covid-19 mitigation measures in May. Her son, who was wearing a mask, sat next to a kid who had symptoms and was infected regardless. The suit calls for the district to comply with CDC guidelines. Do you habitually smoke weed? Never mind, you don't have to tell me. But you should know a study from an arm of the National Institutes of Health says the risk of getting a coronavirus breakthrough infection in the U.S. may be 7.8% higher among those who habitually smoke weed. The risk is also there, but a little lower, for those with tobacco use disorder. In the United States cases were down 19%, deaths are down 2%, and hospitalizations are down 21% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,793,733 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Michigan 21%, Minnesota 16%. Pennsylvania 15%. North Dakota 14%. And Montana 10%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Bethel Census Area, AK. Stark, ND. Lewis, KY. Kodiak Island Borough, AK. Whitley, KY. Knox, IN. Clay, TX. Custer, MT. McCreary, MT. And Big Horn, WY. There have been at least 713,770 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 70.2%, Connecticut at 69.4%, and Rhode Island at 69.3%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia at 40.7%, and Wyoming and Idaho at 42.4%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 56.4%. The five countries with biggest 24-hour increases in the number of fully vaccinated people: Oceana, Cambodia up 2%, and Saudi Arabia and India 1%. Globally, cases were down 12% and deaths were down 12% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 26. There are 17,913,065 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The U.K. 34,320. The United States 29,520. Russia 28,647. Turkey 28,370. And India 19,018. There have been at least 4,855,635 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.11.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 58:37


Can low temperature-aged garlic enhance exercise performance? Korea Univesity & National Institute of Agricultural Sciences (South Korea), October 8, 2021 Scientists from South Korea's National Institute of Agricultural Sciences and Korea University looked at aged garlic to see whether it could help reduce fatigue. To do this, they conducted a study on mice fed with a special low-temperature-aged garlic (LTAG). Their findings were published in the Journal of Medicinal Food. Testing the fatigue-fighting effects of low temperature-aged garlic The researchers chose to use LTAG because it lacked the pungent odor and spicy flavor of regular garlic, making it easier to use for animal testing. To create the LTAG, the researchers stored garlic in a sealed container, aging at 60 C for 60 days. The resulting LTAG was then peeled and pulverized, before being added to 200 milliliters of 70 percent ethanol (EtOH), which was then subjected to ultrasonic extraction three times. This 70 percent EtOH and LTAG extract was then concentrated under a vacuum at 45 C and then lyophilized to create a dry LTAG residue. After the creation of the LTAG, the researchers then separated mice into six groups. The first group was given a low dose of LTAG extract; the second was fed a high dose of LTAG extract; the third was given a low dose of garlic extract; and the fourth was given a high dose of garlic extract. The fifth and sixth groups consisted of normal mice that were given phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) instead of garlic. One of these control groups was made to exercise while the other group was not. The mice in the five groups were forced to run on a treadmill for four weeks. With each passing week, the amount of exercise the mice would have to do on the treadmills would increase. This was done by increasing both the speed that the mice had to run, and the amount of time they had to spend running. (Related: How to alleviate fatigue with herbal medicine.) After 28 days of treatment, five mice from each group were subjected to a final, exhaustive treadmill test. This test increased the treadmill speed from 15 meters per minute (m/min) to 40 m/min every 3 minutes. During this test, the running time was monitored until each mouse failed to follow the increase in speed on three consecutive occasions and lag occurred. At this point, the mouse's total running time was recorded. The effect of the LTAG on the levels of glucose, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), free fatty acid (FFA) and lactate in the mice's blood. Following the final exercise, the mice were killed and blood samples were collected from them. In addition, the mice's gastrocnemius muscles were also isolated and frozen in liquid nitrogen for testing. LTAG treated mice demonstrated less fatigue Following the exhaustive running tests, the researchers found that the mice treated with LTAG extract were able to run for much longer than the control mice. Meanwhile, looking at the blood tests, they noted that the mice treated with LTAG extract exhibited lower levels of glucose, LDH, FFA and lactate. More importantly, the LTAG treated mice had increased amounts of glycogen and creatine kinase (CK) in their muscles. Glycogen storage is an important source of energy during exercise. It serves a central role in maintaining the body's glucose homeostasis by supplementing blood glucose. Because of this, glycogen is seen as an accurate marker for fatigue, with increased glycogel levels closely associated with improved endurance and anti-fatigue effects. CK, on the other hand, is known to be an accurate indicator of muscle damage. During muscle degeneration, muscle cells are dissolved and their contents enter the bloodstream. As a result, when muscle damage occurs, muscle CK comes out into the blood. As such, fatigue tends to lead to lower muscle CK levels and higher blood CK levels. Higher levels of glycogen and muscle CK in the LTAG treated mice indicated that they experienced less fatigue than the other groups. Based on these findings, the researchers believe that LTAG has potential for use as an anti-fatigue agent.       Mindfulness meditation helps preterm-born adolescents University of Geneva (Switzerland), October 7, 2021 Adolescents born prematurely present a high risk of developing executive, behavioral and socio-emotional difficulties. Now, researchers from Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) and the University of Geneva (UNIGE) have revealed that practicing mindfulness may help improve these various skills. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggests using mindfulness as a means of clinical intervention with adolescents, whether prematurely born or not. Several studies have already shown that very preterm (VPT) children and adolescents are at higher risk of exhibiting cognitive and socio-emotional problems that may persist into adulthood. To help them overcome the difficulties they face, researchers from the HUG and UNIGE have set up an intervention based on mindfulness, a technique known to have beneficial effects in these areas. Mindfulness consists in training the mind to focus on the present moment, concentrating on physical sensations, on breathing, on the weight of one's body, and even on one's feelings and thoughts, completely judgment-free. The mindfulness-based interventions generally take place in a group with an instructor along with invitations to practice individually at home. To accurately assess the effects of mindfulness, a randomized controlled trial was performed with young adolescents aged 10 to 14, born before 32 weeks gestational weeks. Scientists quickly found that mindfulness improves the regulation of cognitive, social and emotional functions, in other worlds, our brain's ability to interact with our environment. Indeed, it increases the ability to focus on the present—on thoughts, emotions and physical sensations, with curiosity and non-judgment. Thanks to this practice, adolescents improve their executive functions, i.e. the mental processes that enable us to control our behavior to successfully achieve a goal. As a result, young people find it easier to focus, manage and regulate their behavior and emotions in everyday life. For eight weeks, the young teens spent an hour and a half each week with two mindfulness instructors. They were further encouraged to practice mindfulness daily at home. Parents were also involved in this study. They were asked to observe their child's executive functions, for example the ability to regulate their emotions and attentional control, their relationships with others and their behavior. The adolescents also underwent a series of computerized tasks to assess their reactions to events. A comparison of their test results with a control group that did not practice mindfulness shows a positive impact of the intervention on the adolescents' everyday life and on their ability to react to new events. "Each teenager is unique, with their own strenghts and difficulties. Through their involvement in this study, our volunteers have contributed to show that mindfulness can help many young people to feel better, to refocus and to face the world, whether they were born preterm born or not," agree Dr. Russia Hà-Vinh Leuchter, a consultant in the Division of Development and Growth, Department of Paediatrics, Gynaecology and Obstetrics at Geneva University Hospitals, and Dr. Vanessa Siffredi, a researcher at the Child Development Laboratory at the Department of Paediatrics, Gynaecology and Obstetrics at the UNIGE Faculty of Medicine, two of the authors of this work. "However, while the practice of meditation can be a useful resource, it is important to be accompanied by well-trained instructors", they specify. The adolescents who took part in the program are now between 14 and 18 years. Scientists are currently evaluating the long-term effects of mindfulness-based intervention on their daily attention and stress. Furthermore, to validate their clinical data with neurobiological measurements, researchers are currently studying the effects of mindfulness on the brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).   Iron deficiency in middle age is linked with higher risk of developing heart disease University Heart and Vasculature Centre Hamburg (Germany) 6 October 2021 Approximately 10% of new coronary heart disease cases occurring within a decade of middle age could be avoided by preventing iron deficiency, suggests a study published today in ESC Heart Failure, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 “This was an observational study and we cannot conclude that iron deficiency causes heart disease,” said study author Dr. Benedikt Schrage of the University Heart and Vasculature Centre Hamburg, Germany. “However, evidence is growing that there is a link and these findings provide the basis for further research to confirm the results.” Previous studies have shown that in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure, iron deficiency was linked to worse outcomes including hospitalisations and death. Treatment with intravenous iron improved symptoms, functional capacity, and quality of life in patients with heart failure and iron deficiency enrolled in the FAIR-HF trial.2 Based on these results, the FAIR-HF 2 trial is investigating the impact of intravenous iron supplementation on the risk of death in patients with heart failure. The current study aimed to examine whether the association between iron deficiency and outcomes was also observed in the general population. The study included 12,164 individuals from three European population-based cohorts. The median age was 59 years and 55% were women. During the baseline study visit, cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities such as smoking, obesity, diabetes and cholesterol were assessed via a thorough clinical assessment including blood samples. Participants were classified as iron deficient or not according to two definitions: 1) absolute iron deficiency, which only includes stored iron (ferritin); and 2) functional iron deficiency, which includes iron in storage (ferritin) and iron in circulation for use by the body (transferrin). Dr. Schrage explained: “Absolute iron deficiency is the traditional way of assessing iron status but it misses circulating iron. The functional definition is more accurate as it includes both measures and picks up those with sufficient stores but not enough in circulation for the body to work properly.” Participants were followed up for incident coronary heart disease and stroke, death due to cardiovascular disease, and all-cause death. The researchers analysed the association between iron deficiency and incident coronary heart disease, stroke, cardiovascular mortality, and all-cause mortality after adjustments for age, sex, smoking, cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, body mass index, and inflammation. Participants with a history of coronary heart disease or stroke at baseline were excluded from the incident disease analyses. At baseline, 60% of participants had absolute iron deficiency and 64% had functional iron deficiency. During a median follow-up of 13.3 years there were 2,212 (18.2%) deaths. Of these, a total of 573 individuals (4.7%) died from a cardiovascular cause. Incidence coronary heart disease and stroke were diagnosed in 1,033 (8.5%) and 766 (6.3%) participants, respectively. Functional iron deficiency was associated with a 24% higher risk of coronary heart disease, 26% raised risk of cardiovascular mortality, and 12% increased risk of all-cause mortality compared with no functional iron deficiency. Absolute iron deficiency was associated with a 20% raised risk of coronary heart disease compared with no absolute iron deficiency, but was not linked with mortality. There were no associations between iron status and incident stroke. The researchers calculated the population attributable fraction, which estimates the proportion of events in 10 years that would have been avoided if all individuals had the risk of those without iron deficiency at baseline. The models were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, body mass index, and inflammation. Within a 10-year period, 5.4% of all deaths, 11.7% of cardiovascular deaths, and 10.7% of new coronary heart disease diagnoses were attributable to functional iron deficiency. “This analysis suggests that if iron deficiency had been absent at baseline, about 5% of deaths, 12% of cardiovascular deaths, and 11% of new coronary heart disease diagnoses would not have occurred in the following decade,” said Dr. Schrage. “The study showed that iron deficiency was highly prevalent in this middle-aged population, with nearly two-thirds having functional iron deficiency,” said Dr. Schrage. “These individuals were more likely to develop heart disease and were also more likely to die during the next 13 years.” Dr. Schrage noted that future studies should examine these associations in younger and non-European cohorts. He said: “If the relationships are confirmed, the next step would be a randomised trial investigating the effect of treating iron deficiency in the general population.”     Consumption of a bioactive compound from Neem plant could significantly suppress development of prostate cancer National University of Singapore, September 29, 2021   Oral administration of nimbolide, over 12 weeks shows reduction of prostate tumor size by up to 70 per cent and decrease in tumor metastasis by up to 50 per cent   A team of international researchers led by Associate Professor Gautam Sethi from the Department of Pharmacology at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has found that nimbolide, a bioactive terpenoid compound derived from Azadirachta indica or more commonly known as the neem plant, could reduce the size of prostate tumor by up to 70 per cent and suppress its spread or metastasis by half.   Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. However, currently available therapies for metastatic prostate cancer are only marginally effective. Hence, there is a need for more novel treatment alternatives and options.   "Although the diverse anti-cancer effects of nimbolide have been reported in different cancer types, its potential effects on prostate cancer initiation and progression have not been demonstrated in scientific studies. In this research, we have demonstrated that nimbolide can inhibit tumor cell viability -- a cellular process that directly affects the ability of a cell to proliferate, grow, divide, or repair damaged cell components -- and induce programmed cell death in prostate cancer cells," said Assoc Prof Sethi.   Nimbolide: promising effects on prostate cancer   Cell invasion and migration are key steps during tumor metastasis. The NUS-led study revealed that nimbolide can significantly suppress cell invasion and migration of prostate cancer cells, suggesting its ability to reduce tumor metastasis. The researchers observed that upon the 12 weeks of administering nimbolide, the size of prostate cancer tumor was reduced by as much as 70 per cent and its metastasis decreased by about 50 per cent, without exhibiting any significant adverse effects.   "This is possible because a direct target of nimbolide in prostate cancer is glutathione reductase, an enzyme which is responsible for maintaining the antioxidant system that regulates the STAT3 gene in the body. The activation of the STAT3 gene has been reported to contribute to prostate tumor growth and metastasis," explained Assoc Prof Sethi. "We have found that nimbolide can substantially inhibit STAT3 activation and thereby abrogating the growth and metastasis of prostate tumor," he added.   The findings of the study were published in the April 2016 issue of the scientific journal Antioxidants & Redox Signaling. This work was carried out in collaboration with Professor Goh Boon Cher of Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at NUS, Professor Hui Kam Man of National Cancer Centre Singapore and Professor Ahn Kwang Seok of Kyung Hee University.   The neem plant belongs to the mahogany tree family that is originally native to India and the Indian sub-continent. It has been part of traditional Asian medicine for centuries and is typically used in Indian Ayurvedic medicine. Today, neem leaves and bark have been incorporated into many personal care products such as soaps, toothpaste, skincare and even dietary supplements.       Review looks at the efficacy of acupuncture in treating insulin resistance Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine (China), October 8, 2021 In their report, researcherss from Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine in China explored the role of acupuncture in treating insulin resistance. The study was published in the journal Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. Earlier studies have reported the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating insulin resistance and related conditions. The review looked at acupuncture and its effects on clinical outcomes. The researchers searched the following databases for randomized controlled trials involving insulin resistance patients treated with acupuncture: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials Embase Medline (via OVID) China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) Wan Fang and China Science and Technology Journal Database (VIP) The studies show that homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance significantly decreased with acupuncture treatment. Other significant decreases include fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose and fasting insulin. Acupuncture increased insulin sensitivity with very few adverse effects. In sum, acupuncture is a safe and effective alternative treatment for insulin resistance.     Blueberries may improve attention in children following double-blind trial University of Reading (UK), October 10, 2021  Primary school children could show better attention by consuming flavonoid-rich blueberries, following a study conducted by the University of Reading. In a paper published in Food & Function, a group of 7-10 year olds who consumed a drink containing wild blueberries or a matched placebo and were tested on their speed and accuracy in completing an executive task function on a computer. The double blind trial found that the children who consumed the flavonoid-rich blueberry drink had 9% quicker reaction times on the test without any sacrifice of accuracy. In particular, the effect was more noticeable as the tests got harder. Professor Claire Williams, a neuroscience professor at the University of Reading said: "This is the first time that we have seen the positive impact that flavonoids can have on the executive function of children. We designed this double blind trial especially to test how flavonoids would impact on attention in young people as it's an area of cognitive performance that hasn't been measured before. "We used wild blueberries as they are rich in flavonoids, which are compounds found naturally in foods such as fruits and their juices, vegetables and tea. They have been associated with a range of health benefits including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, and our latest findings continue to show that there is a beneficial cognitive effect of consuming fruit and vegetables, tea, coffee and even dark chocolate which all contain flavonoids." The children were then asked to pay attention to an array of arrows shown on a PC screen and press a key corresponding to the direction that the central arrow was facing. The task was repeated over a number of trials, where cognitive demand was manipulated by varying how quickly the arrows appeared, whether there were additional arrows appearing either side of the central arrow, and whether the flanking arrows were pointing in the same/different direction as the central arrow. Previous Reading research has shown that consuming wild blueberries can improve mood in children and young people, simple memory recall in primary school children, and that other flavonoid rich drinks such as orange juice, can also improve memory and concentration. The Wild Blueberry Association of North America provided a freeze-dried powder made from wild blueberries which was used in the study but did not provide any additional financial support and did not play a role in the design of the study. Wild blueberries are grown and harvested in North America, and are smaller than regular blueberries, and are higher in flavonoids compared to regular varieties. The double-blind trial used a flavonoid-rich wild blueberry drink, with a matched placebo contained 8.9g of fructose, 7.99g of glucose and 4 mg of vitamin C matching the levels of nutrients found in the blueberry drink. The amount of fructose is akin to levels found in a standard pear. This was an executive function task- requiring participants to pay attention to stimuli appearing on screen and responding correctly. The task was a simple one- responding to the direction of an arrow in the middle of a screen (by pressing left/right arrow key) but we then varied how quickly the stimuli appeared, whether there was additional arrows appearing either side of the stimuli and whether those flanking arrows were pointing in the same/different direction as they direction you had to respond. There are 6 main classes of flavonoids: Anthocyanins – found in berry fruits such as the blueberries used in this study and also in red wine. Flavonols - found in onions, leeks, and broccoli Flavones - found in parsley and celery, Isoflavones - found in soy and soy products, Flavanones - found in citrus fruit and tomatoes Flavanols—found in green tea, red wine, and chocolate     Nocebo effect: Does a drug's high price tag cause its own side effects? University Medical Center Hamburg (Germany), October 5, 2021  Pricey drugs may make people more vulnerable to perceiving side effects, a new study suggests—and the phenomenon is not just "in their heads." The study delved into the so-called "nocebo effect." It's the negative version of the well-known placebo effect, where people feel better after receiving a therapy because they expected good things. With the nocebo effect, patients' worries over treatment side effects make them feel sick. In this study, researchers found that people were more likely to report painful side effects from a fake drug when told it was expensive. But it wasn't just something people were "making up." Using brain imaging, the researchers traced the phenomenon to specific activity patterns in the brain and spine. "These findings are a strong argument against the perception of placebo and nocebo effects as being only 'fake' effects—created purely by imagination or delusions of the patient," said lead researcher Alexandra Tinnermann. She is with the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, in Germany. Dr. Luana Colloca, a researcher at the University of Maryland in Baltimore, agreed. "This is not merely a reflection of people's biases," said Colloca, who wrote an editorial published with the study. "Expectations do modulate symptoms and patients' responses to treatment," she said. For the study, Tinnermann's team recruited 49 healthy volunteers and randomly assigned them to test one of two itch-relieving "medical creams." In reality, both creams were identical and contained no active ingredients. However, people in both groups were told that the products could have the side effect of making the skin more sensitive to pain. There was only one apparent difference between the two phony creams: One came in fancy packing with a high price tag; the other was cheap. After participants applied the creams to their forearms, the researchers had them undergo a standard test that measured their tolerance for heat-induced pain. It turned out that people who'd used the expensive cream were more sensitive to pain during the tests. On average, their pain rating hovered around a 15—within the "mild" pain range—whereas people using the cheap cream barely registered any discomfort. It's likely, Tinnermann said, that people expect a pricey medication to be potent—which could also make them expect more side effects. Colloca agreed. We are all "vulnerable" to such outside influences, she said, be it a drug's price or how it's given (by IV versus mouth, for instance). However, we are not just imagining those placebo or nocebo effects, both researchers noted. Using functional MRI brain scans, Tinnermann's team found specific patterns of nervous system activity in people who had a nocebo response to the pricey cream. That included a change in "communication" between certain brain structures and the spinal cord, Tinnermann said. According to Colloca, research like this can have practical uses. Doctors could, for instance, inform patients that drug prices or other factors can sway their expectations about a treatment's benefits and risks—and that, in turn, can influence whether they feel better or develop side effects. There is, however, no research into whether that kind of knowledge helps prevent patients from the nocebo effect, Tinnermann said. But, she added, health professionals can be aware that patients' expectations "play a huge role in medicine"—and be mindful of how they talk about a medication and its possible side effects. It's an important matter, Colloca said, because the nocebo effect can cause people to stop taking needed medications. Colloca pointed to the example of cholesterol-lowering statins. The potential for those medications to cause muscle pain has been widely reported. And one recent study found evidence that this knowledge can make statin users more likely to report muscle pain side effects. Other research, Colloca said, has shown that when people stop taking their statins, their risk of heart attack and stroke rises.

Health is PowHer's Podcast
68. Reiki as a Spiritual Practice and Self-Care with Pamela Miles, Reiki Master

Health is PowHer's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 52:21


Pamela Miles is the foremost Medical Reiki expert, pioneering the use of Reiki practice in conventional medicine. She has a unique perspective on practicing Reiki on our own selves to raise our vibration and health. She has the experience and credentials including: Collaboration with prestigious healthcare institutions on care, education and research, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), medical schools (Harvard, Yale, Einstein) and hospitals (New York Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center). Specifically, she has: Been published in peer-reviewed medical journals, including the prestigious Journal of the American College of Cardiology Developed the first hospital Reiki program in an infectious disease clinic Presented and taught Reiki in medical schools across the country, including Harvard and Yale Collaborated on medical research, including an NIH-funded study and a heart rate variability (HRV) study at Yale Served as the lead reviewer for the NIH/NCCAM Reiki Backgrounder Presented at medical conferences, including the NIH/NCI/OCCAM research conference, October 2007 and the Integrative Healthcare Symposium Trained the global Reiki community in skills and perspective needed for conventional healthcare collaboration Consulted with hospital administrators integrating Reiki practice into clinical care She is also the the author of the award-winning book REIKI: A Comprehensive Guide (Tarcher/Penguin) and numerous popular articles. As a leading spokesperson for Reiki in the media, my work has been featured on The Dr. Oz Show, CBS, NBC, The Atlantic, New York Magazine, US News and World Report, The Daily Beast, Refinery29, and Allure magazine. We hope you enjoy this episode and start practicing Reiki!!! Much love, Dr. Anna, MD P.S. She has free global self-practice sessions in hopes of helping you and others collectively across the world. To manifest a beautiful body, mind, soul and rejoice in love.  Sign up HERE! ---------------------------------------------------------------- Our Manifestation 4-Step Hypnosis Recordings is Still Available on Our Website for a Limited Time You can sign up here! ------------------------------------------------------------------ We hope you enjoy the episode and if you do, please SUBSCRIBE, RATE, and REVIEW So you can help us increase our reach to help more women awaken their best selves, have more energy, and live the life they dreamed of while healing and recovering from any pain and health issues! ----------------------------------------------------------------- The Health Is PowHer wellness coaching members club has launched! We'd love to have you and if you're interested in awakening your best self, having more energy, and living the life to your full health potential, and are determined to feel better then check us out with the link below!  And it's going away in just a few months by the end of the year for lifetime access! https://healthispowher.com/health-is-powher-members-club/ ------------------------------------------------------------------ DISCLAIMER   Anna Esparham, M.D.is a medical doctor, but she is not your doctor, and she is not offering medical advice on this podcast. If you are in need of professional advice or medical care, you must seek out the services of your own doctor or health care professional. The opinions of podcast guests are not necessarily those of Dr. Esparham, MD and Health Is PowHer, LLC and do not represent her or the company.  This podcast provides information only, and does not provide any financial, legal, medical or psychological services or advice. None of the content on this podcast prevents, cures or treats any mental or medical condition. You are responsible for your own physical, mental and emotional well-being, decisions, choices, actions and results. Health Is PowHer, LLC disclaims any liability for your reliance on any opinions or advice contained in this podcast.  

The Health Design Podcast
Shazia Ahmad, Sr Director and Head of Patient & Physician Services at UBC

The Health Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 23:41


Shazia Ahmad, Senior Director, Head of Patient & Physician Services at UBC, earned a B.S. in physiology and neurobiology from the University of Maryland and has 20+ years of experience in the therapeutic development industry. Shazia is a seasoned thought leader in the rare disease space with a passion for ensuring the patient journey and diagnostic experience is implemented in every program she develops. Shazia has also served as a study coordinator at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). While at the NIH, Shazia coordinated intramural clinical trials across the various institutes, including the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Shazia is a thought-leader in patient advocacy, with a desire to improve healthcare and integrate successful solutions that bring optimal access and diversity to clinical trials. Shazia serves as a Board Advisor on the HPV Alliance, a non-profit organization that helps to advance the prevention of HPV-related cancers through education, advocacy and research. Her passion for the diverse people of the rare disease community continues to drive her work though the implementation of patient advocacy initiatives. Connect with her on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shaziakahmad/ Follow her on Twitter at: @ShaziaKAhmad

Audible Bleeding
Dr. Gregorio Sicard and Dr. Frank Caputo on the Management of Endograft Failures, Open Aortic Surgical Training, and Mentorship

Audible Bleeding

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 54:22


Dr. Gregorio Sicard is Professor Emeritus of Surgery and Emeritus Chief of Vascular Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He trained in general surgery at the Barnes Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, and completed the first Transplantation Fellowship there. He eventually became the Chief of Vascular Surgery and Chief of General Surgery at Washington Hospital. He founded the Vascular surgery fellowship there in 1983. He is a former President of the Society of Vascular Surgery, and recipient of the 2018 Society for Vascular Surgery Lifetime Achievement Award. He was a pioneer in the retroperitoneal approach to the aorta, and is regarded as a master aortic surgeon by his peers.  He has a legacy of trainees who have gone on to assume leadership roles in Vascular Surgery.    Dr. Frank Caputo is an Associate Professor of Surgery at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University. He is also the Vascular Surgery Director of the Aorta Center, Program Director of the Vascular Surgery Training Programs. His clinical interests include complex open and endovascular repair of  thoracic, thoracoabdominal and abdominal aortic aneurysms, management of thoracic dissection, endovascular and open repair of  failed endografts. Dr. Caputo earned his medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry New Jersey, Newark, NJ, where he also served his surgical residency and two years as a National Institutes of Health research fellow. He completed his fellowship in vascular surgery at Barnes-Jewish Hospital of Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. where he served as administrative fellow. He joined the Cleveland Clinic medical staff in 2018.  Sicard, Gregorio A, Jeffrey M Reilly, Brian G Rubin, Robert W Thompson, Brent T Allen, M.Wayne Flye, Kenneth B Schechtman, Patricia Young-Beyer, Carey Weiss, and Charles B Anderson. "Transabdominal versus Retroperitoneal Incision for Abdominal Aortic Surgery: Report of a Prospective Randomized Trial." Journal of Vascular Surgery 21.2 (1995): 174-83.   What other topics would you like to hear about? Let us know more about you and what you think of our podcast through our Listener Survey or email us at AudibleBleeding@vascularsociety.org. Follow us on Twitter @audiblebleeding   Learn more about us at https://www.audiblebleeding.com/about-1/ and #jointheconversation.

Mashq Talks Podcast
Ep 47: Rj Umar Nisar Ft. Khalid Wani | Sr. Director Western Digital |

Mashq Talks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 24:02


Khalid Wani leads the Emerging markets for Western Digital a global leader in Digital Storage solutions, Western Digital products nearly account for holding almost 40% of the worlds data on their devices with revenues of 17+ billion As a young achiever with experience in technology distribution and emerging markets Khalid has worked across markets of Africa, Middle East , India and South East Asia and was one of the youngest directors at Western Digital and is considered to be one of the leading voices in the areas of technology distribution, data science & emerging markets. Khalid has earned several recognitions for his incisive business insights and outcomes, besides writing for various publications he was also recently featured on Forbes India and has been featured in leading national and international publications for his work in emerging markets. His work around his areas of interest which are Data science, Inspirational leadership, and especially working with the student community to prepare them for the future in large organizations has seen him work around the globe with various institutions and organizations and deliver many interesting sessions, Khalid is also a visiting faculty at National Institute of Technology in Srinagar & serves as an Advisor to the NIT Industry interaction interface and has worked with leading institutions like University of Kashmir , IIT , IIFT , Amity business school , TA PAI Management Institute , University of Sharjah and many others on areas of Soft skill development & how the youth can get themselves industry-ready. Khalid started JKFED ( Jammu Kashmir forum for Entrepreneur Development ) a pro-bono platform that helps the Youth in J&K to engage with an industry leader to helps them in areas such as career development, consulting, entrepreneur development. Khalid considers himself a complete motorhead and loves spending time with his car and his motorcycles and loves driving & riding in the mountains, loves to travel has been to around 45 countries. Presented By: Irfan Qazi & Humairah Shah Brought to you by: BQE Software Host: Rj Umar Nisar Creative Director: Ada Bhat Sound Eng.: Rishab Raino

Nana Tingz
World Mental Health Day: Owning Your Anxiety

Nana Tingz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 22:40


On part 7 of "Mental Health Year", join me, Antonio Liranzo (@AntonioILiranzo), Host of "Nana Tingz" as I continue raising Mental Health Awareness with Mental Health Year! I want to take away the stigma of mental health and become an advocate speaking about my own anxiety troubles and help motivate people with their stories. On todays episode, we celebrate "World Mental Health Day" by sharing my, how to deal with anxiety tips I have learned through therapy and reading Carolines Foran's amazing book; “Own It.: Make Your Anxiety Work For You”. Grab some water, tea or champagne and enjoy the ride. ✨ According to the National Institute of Mental Health, anxiety disorders affect around 18% of the U.S. population, making them one of the most common mental health disorders in the country. Free Crisis Hotline Numbers If you or someone you love is experiencing a debilitating anxiety attack, help is just a phone call away. Free anxiety attack helplines and resources that are available include: National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Helpline: 1-800-950-NAMI (6264) The staff at NAMI are well-trained to answer questions on a wide range of mental health issues, including anxiety. Available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST, this organization provides free information and referrals to treatment programs, support groups, and educational programs. NAMI also offers help for family members, information about jobs programs, and connections to legal representation in your area. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) If severe anxiety is causing you to experience suicidal thoughts, don't hesitate to call this free, 24-hour crisis intervention hotline. Counselors can help you ease your anxiety and get to the clear headspace you need to seek help. There are separate hotline numbers for Spanish speakers: 1-888-628-9454; the hard of hearing: 1-800-799-4889; and veterans: 1-800-273-8255. You can also chat with a crisis volunteer live on their website. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357) If you're not in danger of harming yourself or others, but are ready to seek medical care for your anxiety, SAMHSA's treatment locator service can help you find a mental health facility near you that specializes in anxiety. The service is available in both English and Spanish 24 hours a day and can also point you to support groups, substance abuse treatment programs, and community-based organizations. Boys Town National Hotline: 1-800-448-3000 Anxiety in teenagers is becoming more common as they face the mounting pressures of schoolwork, college preparation, first jobs, social activities, and becoming an adult, on top of any issues they may face with their families at home. Both children and parents can call this hotline 24/7 for free crisis intervention services, plus information and referrals to valuable mental health resources. Email, text, and online chat-based services are also available. Order “Antonio's Return” and my other books here: Antonioliranzo.com/links Instagram: @AntonioILiranzo “Own It.: Make Your Anxiety Work For You”: https://www.amazon.com/Own-Make-Your-Anxiety/dp/1615195610 Medium Article: https://antonioliranzo.medium.com/world-mental-health-day-owning-your-anxiety-37fe055bb6b --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonioliranzo/support

Behavioral Grooves Podcast
The 5 Healthy Brain Habits Of A Neuroscientist | Dr Daniel Almeida

Behavioral Grooves Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 59:04


What life habits keep our brain healthy? How does our mind respond to trauma? And why does the way we talk about suicide and mental health make such a difference to those who are struggling? We discuss all these topics with neuroscience researcher Dr Daniel Almeida. To mark World Mental Health Day on Sunday, Oct 10, 2021, we decided to delve into the science behind mental health. And who better to help us with this topic than Daniel who has been named as one of Forbes 30 under 30 in science. His incredible work as a neuroscience researcher in the Douglas Research Centre at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, involves psychological autopsies to understand the molecular impacts of severe childhood abuse on the brains of individuals who died by suicide. As you can imagine, this episode is full of difficult yet important topics. But what struck us most about Daniel was how upbeat and positive he is about his work and the difference it's making to people's lives. Daniel kindly shares his top 5 healthy brain habits that we can all adopt to improve our mental wellbeing.  If you, or someone you know needs help with their mental health, please use one of the resources in the links below.  Mental Health Support Suicide Prevention Lifeline (US):https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ American Foundation for Suicide Prevention: https://afsp.org/suicide-prevention-resources Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: National Helpline (US): 1-800-662-HELP (4357). SAMHSA's National Helpline is a free, confidential, 24/7, 365-day-a-year treatment referral and information service (in English and Spanish) for individuals and families facing mental and/or substance use disorders. https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/national-helpline  The Canada Suicide Prevention Service: https://www.crisisservicescanada.ca/en/ Samaritans (UK): https://www.samaritans.org/  United for Global Mental Health (List of support networks around the world): https://unitedgmh.org/mental-health-support    For those looking for information on how to support others: National Institute of Mental Health: https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/suicide-prevention   For the general public looking to be trained in mental health first aid and/or suicide prevention: Living Works (US): https://bit.ly/3oKgsaS  Mental Health First Aid Canada: https://mhfa.ca/ Topics  (6:29) Speed round. (10:14) Does talking about suicide help? (14:15) Why it's very important to talk about “dying by suicide” instead of “committing suicide”. (16:17) About Daniel's work as a neuroscientist. (17:47) What are the links between childhood trauma and suicide? (25:16) What age are children most sensitive to the effects of trauma? (31:19) How the type of trauma experienced by a child matters. (33:36) How resilience is more like a sword than a shield. (35:29) What are the 5 best brain health habits? (41:57) What is a brain bank and how are psychological autopsies used? (44:30) What music isn't noise pollution for Daniel? (46:24) Music and the brain. (48:13) Grooving Session with Kurt and Tim; how to apply Daniel's work to your life. © 2021 Behavioral Grooves Links World Mental Health Day: https://www.who.int/campaigns/world-mental-health-day  Leading Human™ Workbook and Playbook: https://www.behavioralgrooves-store.com/products/copy-of-the-leading-human-playbook-workbook-package Leading Human™, Free Whitepaper Download: https://www.behavioralgrooves-store.com/collections/leading-human/products/human-centered-workplace-checklist Leading Human™ Workshop on Nov 2nd, 2021 (more dates to be added soon): https://www.behavioralgrooves-store.com/collections/leading-human/products/leading-human-workshop Promo Code: GROOVERS to receive $20 off (limited time offer for listeners). Episode 220: How Do You Become Influential? Jon Levy Reveals His Surprising Secrets: https://behavioralgrooves.com/episode/how-to-be-influential-jon-levy/ Dr Brenda Mildner – Mother of Psychological worked on bilateral hypocantim removal: https://www.mcgill.ca/neuro/about/brenda-milner Donald Hebb: https://can-acn.org/donald-olding-hebb/#:~:text=Donald%20Hebb%20(1904%2D1985),which%20was%20published%20in%201949.  “Molecular impacts of childhood abuse on the human brain”  Ibrahim, P.; Almeida, D.; Nagy, C.; Turecki, G. (2021): https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352289521000515?via%3Dihub  “A Slice of the Suicidal Brain: What Have Postmortem Molecular Studies Taught Us?” Almeida, D. and Turecki, G. (2016): https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27671915/  “What Happened to You?: Conversations on Trauma, Resilience, and Healing”, by Oprah Winfrey and Bruce Perry: https://amzn.to/3lF7EQ7  Brain structure of dancers and musicians https://www.falishakarpati.com/bio Support Behavioral Grooves by donating on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/behavioralgrooves   Musical Links  Gladys Knight & The Pips “Midnight Train to Georgia”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0F9lh8TiSM&ab_channel=GladysKnightTPVEVO  Whitney Houston “I Will Always Love You”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3JWTaaS7LdU  The Supremes “Where Did Our Love Go”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTBmgAOO0Nw  Stevie Wonder “As”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYQfWJNWe3I 

Quick to Listen
What Francis Collins Changed for Christians in Science

Quick to Listen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 46:21


This week, Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health, announced that he would retire at the end of the year. An evangelical Christian who previously worked as the head of the Human Genome Project, Collins' 2009 appointment still drew scorn. From a 2010 profile in the New Yorker: Collins read in the Times that many of his colleagues in the scientific community believed that he suffered from “dementia.” Steven Pinker, a cognitive psychologist at Harvard, questioned the appointment on the ground that Collins was “an advocate of profoundly anti-scientific beliefs.” P. Z. Myers, a biologist at the University of Minnesota at Morris, complained, “I don't want American science to be represented by a clown.” Nevertheless, Collins served under three presidential administrations. During the pandemic, Collins has spoken out a number of times in his efforts to dispel misconceptions about the virus and vaccine.  Prior to his term at the NIH, Collins was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He also wrote the best-selling book, The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief, which won a CT Book Award.  Elaine Howard Ecklund joined global media manager Morgan Lee and editorial director Ted Olsen to discuss Collins's legacy in the scientific and Christian communities. What is Quick to Listen? Read more . Rate Quick to Listen on Apple Podcasts Follow the podcast on Twitter Follow this week's hosts on Twitter: Morgan Lee and Ted Olsen Music by Sweeps Quick to Listen is produced Morgan Lee and Matt Linder The transcript is edited by Faith Ndlovu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Janet Mefferd Today
10 - 08 - 21 - Janet - Mefferd - Today - FBI vs. parents | Francis Collins' moral failures

Janet Mefferd Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 47:26


Having just unleashed the FBI on parents over their opposition to Critical Race Theory in public schools, Attorney General Merrick Garland is now caught in a massive conflict of interest on the subject. We'll talk about it. Plus: A Pfizer whistleblower exposes the hidden ties between its COVID-19 vaccine and aborted babies. And we'll discuss why one critic rightly calls the exiting National Institutes of Health's director Francis Collins, a professing Christian, an "appalling moral failure." That and more on Friday's JANET MEFFERD TODAY.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.07.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 51:37


Natural compound in basil may protect against Alzheimer's disease pathology University of South Florida, October 5, 2021 Fenchol, a natural compound abundant in some plants including basil, can help protect the brain against Alzheimer's disease pathology, a preclinical study led by University of South Florida Health (USF Health) researchers suggests. The new study published Oct. 5 in the Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, discovered a sensing mechanism associated with the gut microbiome that explains how fenchol reduces neurotoxicity in the Alzheimer's brain. Emerging evidence indicates that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs)– metabolites produced by beneficial gut bacteria and the primary source of nutrition for cells in your colon—contribute to brain health. The abundance of SCFAs is often reduced in older patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia. However, how this decline in SCFAs contributes to Alzheimer's disease progression remains largely unknown. Gut-derived SCFAs that travel through the blood to the brain can bind to and activate free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2), a cell signaling molecule expressed on brain cellscalled neurons. "Our study is the first to discover that stimulation of the FFAR2 sensing mechanism by these microbial metabolites (SCFAs) can be beneficial in protecting brain cells against toxic accumulation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein associated with Alzheimer's disease," said principal investigator Hariom Yadav, Ph.D., professor of neurosurgery and brain repair at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, where he directs the USF Center for Microbiome Research. One of the two hallmark pathologies of Alzheimer's disease is hardened deposits of Aβ that clump together between nerve cells to form amyloid protein plaques in the brain. The other is neurofibrillary tangles of tau protein inside brain cells. These pathologies contribute to the neuron loss and death that ultimately cause the onset of Alzheimer's, a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of memory, thinking skills and other cognitive abilities. Dr. Yadav and his collaborators delve into molecular mechanisms to explain how interactions between the gut microbiome and the brain might influence brain health and age-related cognitive decline. In this study, Dr. Yadav said, the research team set out to uncover the "previously unknown" function of FFAR2 in the brain. The researchers first showed that inhibiting the FFAR2 receptor (thus blocking its ability to "sense" SCFAs in the environment outside the neuronal cell and transmit signaling inside the cell) contributes to the abnormal buildup of the Aβ protein causing neurotoxicity linked to Alzheimer's disease. Then, they performed large-scale virtual screening of more than 144,000 natural compounds to find potential candidates that could mimic the same beneficial effect of microbiota produced SCFAs in activating FFAR2 signaling. Identifying a natural compound alternative to SCFAs to optimally target the FFAR2 receptor on neurons is important, because cells in the gut and other organs consume most of these microbial metabolites before they reach the brain through blood circulation, Dr. Yadav noted. Dr. Yadav's team narrowed 15 leading compound candidates to the most potent one. Fenchol, a plant-derived compound that gives basil its aromatic scent, was best at binding to the FFAR's active site to stimulate its signaling. Further experiments in human neuronal cell cultures, as well as Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans (worm) and mouse models of Alzheimer's disease demonstrated that fenchol significantly reduced excess Aβ accumulation and death of neurons by stimulating FFAR2 signaling, the microbiome sensing mechanism. When the researchers more closely examined how fenchol modulates Aβ-induced neurotoxicity, they found that the compound decreased senescent neuronal cells, also known as "zombie" cells, commonly found in brains with Alzheimer's disease pathology. Zombie cells stop replicating and die a slow death. Meanwhile, Dr. Yadav said, they build up in diseased and aging organs, create a damaging inflammatory environment, and send stress or death signals to neighboring healthy cells, which eventually also change into harmful zombie cells or die. "Fenchol actually affects the two related mechanisms of senescence and proteolysis," Dr. Yadav said of the intriguing preclinical study finding. "It reduces the formation of half-dead zombie neuronal cells and also increases the degradation of (nonfunctioning) Aβ, so that amyloid protein is cleared from the brain much faster." Before you start throwing lots of extra basil in your spaghetti sauce or anything else you eat to help stave off dementia, more research is needed—including in humans. In exploring fenchol as a possible approach for treating or preventing Alzheimer's pathology, the USF Health team will seek answers to several questions. A key one is whether fenchol consumed in basil itself would be more or less bioactive (effective) than isolating and administering the compound in a pill, Dr. Yadav said. "We also want to know whether a potent dose of either basil or fenchol would be a quicker way to get the compound into the brain."   Researchers find sense of purpose associated with better memory Florida State University, October 6, 2021 Add an improved memory to the list of the many benefits that accompany having a sense of purpose in life. A new study led by Florida State University researchers showed a link between an individual's sense of purpose and their ability to recall vivid details. The researchers found that while both a sense of purpose and cognitive function made memories easier to recall, only a sense of purpose bestowed the benefits of vividness and coherence. The study, which focused on memories related to the COVID-19 pandemic, was published in the journal Memory. "Personal memories serve really important functions in everyday life," said Angelina Sutin, a professor in the College of Medicine and the paper's lead author. "They help us to set goals, control emotions and build intimacy with others. We also know people with a greater sense of purpose perform better on objective memory tests, like remembering a list of words. We were interested in whether purpose was also associated with the quality of memories of important personal experiences because such qualities may be one reason why purpose is associated with better mental and physical health." Nearly 800 study participants reported on their sense of purpose and completed tasks that measured their cognitive processing speed in January and February 2020, before the ongoing coronavirus pandemic took hold in the U.S. Researchers then measured participants' ability to retrieve and describe personal memories about the pandemic in July 2020, several months into the public health crisis. Participants with a stronger sense of purpose in life reported that their memories were more accessible, coherent and vivid than participants with less purpose. Those with a higher sense of purpose also reported many sensory details, spoke about their memories more from a first-person perspective and reported more positive feeling and less negative feeling when asked to retrieve a memory. The researchers also found that depressive symptoms had little effect on the ability to recall vivid details in memories, suggesting that the connection between life purpose and memory recall is not due to the fewer depressive symptoms among individuals higher in purpose. Purpose in life has been consistently associated with better episodic memory, such as the number of words retrieved correctly on a memory task. This latest research expands on those connections to memory by showing a correlation between purpose and the richness of personal memory. "We chose to measure the ability to recall memories associated with the COVID-19 pandemic because the pandemic is an event that touched everyone, but there has been a wide range of experiences and reactions to it that should be apparent in memories," said co-author Martina Luchetti, an assistant professor in the College of Medicine. Along with the association with better memory, previous research has found other numerous benefits connected with having a sense of purpose, from a lower risk of death to better physical and mental health. "Memories help people to sustain their well-being, social connections and cognitive health," said co-author Antonio Terracciano, a professor in the College of Medicine. "This research gives us more insight into the connections between a sense of purpose and the richness of personal memories. The vividness of those memories and how they fit into a coherent narrative may be one pathway through which purpose leads to these better outcomes.   Vitamin D protects against severe asthma attacks Queen Mary University of London, October 3, 2021 Taking oral vitamin D supplements in addition to standard asthma medication could halve the risk of asthma attacks requiring hospital attendance, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and is estimated to cause almost 400,000 deaths annually. Asthma deaths arise primarily during episodes of acute worsening of symptoms, known as attacks or 'exacerbations', which are commonly triggered by viral upper respiratory infections. Vitamin D is thought to protect against such attacks by boosting immune responses to respiratory viruses and dampening down harmful airway inflammation. The new study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research, and published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, collated and analysed the individual data from 955 participants in seven randomised controlled trials, which tested the use of vitamin D supplements. Overall, the researchers found that vitamin D supplementation resulted in: a 30 per cent reduction in the rate of asthma attacks requiring treatment with steroid tablets or injections - from 0.43 events per person per year to 0.30. a 50 per cent reduction in the risk of experiencing at least one asthma attack requiring Accident and Emergency Department attendance and/or hospitalisation - from 6 per cent of people experiencing such an event to 3 per cent. Vitamin D supplementation was found to be safe at the doses administered. No instances of excessively high calcium levels or renal stones were seen, and serious adverse events were evenly distributed between participants taking vitamin D and those on placebo. Lead researcher Professor Adrian Martineau said: "These results add to the ever growing body of evidence that vitamin D can support immune function as well as bone health. On average, three people in the UK die from asthma attacks every day. Vitamin D is safe to take and relatively inexpensive so supplementation represents a potentially cost-effective strategy to reduce this problem." The team's use of individual participant data also allowed them to query the extent to which different groups respond to vitamin D supplementation, in more detail than previous studies. In particular, vitamin D supplementation was found to have a strong and statistically-significant protective effect in participants who had low vitamin D levels to start with. These participants saw a 55 per cent reduction in the rate of asthma exacerbations requiring treatment with steroid tablets or injections - from 0.42 events per person per year to 0.19. However, due to relatively small numbers of patients within sub-groups, the researchers caution that they did not find definitive evidence to show that effects of vitamin D supplementation differ according to baseline vitamin D status. Professor Hywel Williams, Director of the NIHR Health Technology Assessment Programme, said: "The results of this NIHR-funded study brings together evidence from several other studies from over the world and is an important contribution to reducing uncertainties on whether Vitamin D is helpful for asthma - a common condition that impacts on many thousands of people worldwide." Dr David Jolliffe from QMUL, first author on the paper, added: "Our results are largely based on data from adults with mild to moderate asthma: children and adults with severe asthma were relatively under-represented in the dataset, so our findings cannot necessarily be generalised to these patient groups at this stage. Further clinical trials are on-going internationally, and we hope to include data from them in a future analysis to determine whether the promise of today's results is confirmed in an even larger and more diverse group of patients."     Study Shows Lifestyle Choices Have Significant Impact on Multiple Chronic Conditions, Significant Implications For Reducing Costs Yale University,  October 05, 2021 In a study published in the Journal of Preventive Medicine, Adams and colleagues showed a linear association between a number of modifiable risk factors and multiple chronic conditions, making those modifications a key to health care cost savings and to preventing a wide range of conditions. The data analyzed for the study, https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1VpFeKt2pmc9H, were from the publicly available 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and included 483,865 non-institutionalized US adults ages 18 years old or older. Chronic conditions included asthma, arthritis, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cognitive impairment, cancer other than skin, and kidney disease. Risk factors included obesity, current smoking, sedentary lifestyle, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption and sleeping other than seven to eight hours, while depression, hypertension, high cholesterol, and diabetes were considered in each category. Previous research by Thorpe and colleagues had estimated that the care of adults with four or more chronic conditions (17.1% of all adults in the study) is responsible for 77.6% of all health care costs in the U.S. today. The potential savings by reducing just two risk factors (diabetes and hypertension) and their related comorbidity was estimated previously by Ormond and colleagues at $9 billion annually over one to two years and closer to $25 billion a year after 5 years or more, factoring in possible complications. True Health Initiative founder, at Yale University  Director and study co-author David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACLM, pointed out that in addition to costs, another implication of the study results is an individual's access to healthcare if they have one or more of the chronic conditions. "Although insurers decide what qualifies as a pre-existing condition, all the chronic conditions used in this study except cognitive impairment are commonly included," he said. "Individuals with a pre-existing condition could be denied coverage or face higher premiums. While having a pre-existing condition might not affect coverage for adults eligible for Medicare, over half of all adults with multiple chronic conditions are ages 18 to 64 years." American College of Lifestyle Medicine President George Guthrie, MD, MPH, FACLM, said the study confirms the necessity for addressing the root cause of chronic conditions. "The evidence shows that the risks for chronic disease are rooted in lifestyle choices," he said. "More than ever, it is important to emphasize lifestyle medicine as the first treatment option for preventing, treating, and in some cases, reversing the cause of chronic conditions. If we can help people with chronic conditions, we can add years to their life and life to their years, as well as lower the ever-increasing costs of healthcare for everyone."     Physical athletes' visual skills prove sharper than action video game players University of Waterloo (Canada), October 7, 2021 Athletes still have the edge over action video gamers when it comes to dynamic visual skills, a new study from the University of Waterloo shows. For an athlete, having strong visual skills can be the difference between delivering a peak performance and achieving average results. "Athletes involved in sports with a high-level of movement—like soccer, football, or baseball—often score higher on dynamic visual acuity tests than non-athletes," said Dr. Kristine Dalton of Waterloo's School of Optometry & Vision Science. "Our research team wanted to investigate if action video gamers—who, like e-sport athletes, are regularly immersed in a dynamic, fast-paced 2D video environment for large periods of time—would also show superior levels of dynamic visual acuity on par with athletes competing in physical sport." While visual acuity (clarity or sharpness of vision) is most often measured under static conditions during annual check-ups with an optometrist, research shows that testing dynamic visual acuity is a more effective measure of a person's ability to see moving objects clearly—a baseline skill necessary for success in physical and e-sports alike.  Using a dynamic visual acuity skills-test designed and validated at the University of Waterloo, researchers discovered that while physical athletes score highly on dynamic visual acuity tests as expected, action video game players tested closer to non-athletes.  "Ultimately, athletes showed a stronger ability to identify smaller moving targets, which suggests visual processing differences exist between them and our video game players," said Alan Yee, a Ph.D. candidate in vision science. All participants were matched based on their level of static visual acuity and refractive error, distinguishing dynamic visual acuity as the varying factor on their test performance. These findings are also important for sports vision training centers that have been exploring the idea of developing video game-based training programs to help athletes elevate their performance. "Our findings show there is still a benefit to training in a 3D environment," said Dalton. "For athletes looking to develop stronger visual skills, the broader visual field and depth perception that come with physical training may be crucial to improving their dynamic visual acuity—and ultimately, their sport performance."  The study, Athletes demonstrate superior visual dynamic visual acuity, authored by Waterloo's School of Optometry & Vision Science's Dalton, Yee, Dr. Elizabeth Irving and Dr. Ben Thompson, was recently published in the journal Optometry and Vision Science.     Probiotic Akkermansia muciniphila and environmental enrichment reverse cognitive impairment associated with high-fat high-cholesterol consumption University of Oviedo (Spain), September 8, 2021 Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is one of the most prevalent diseases globally. A high-fat, high-cholesterol (HFHC) diet leads to an early NASH model. It has been suggested that gut microbiota mediates the effects of diet through the microbiota–gut–brain axis, modifying the host's brain metabolism and disrupting cognition. Here, we target NASH-induced cognitive damage by testing the impact of environmental enrichment (EE) and the administration of either Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) or Akkermansia muciniphila CIP107961 (AKK). EE and AKK, but not LGG, reverse the HFHC-induced cognitive dysfunction, including impaired spatial working memory and novel object recognition; however, whereas AKK restores brain metabolism, EE results in an overall decrease. Moreover, AKK and LGG did not induce major rearrangements in the intestinal microbiota, with only slight changes in bacterial composition and diversity, whereas EE led to an increase in Firmicutes and Verrucomicrobia members. Our findings illustrate the interplay between gut microbiota, the host's brain energy metabolism, and cognition. In addition, the findings suggest intervention strategies, such as the administration of AKK, for the management of the cognitive dysfunction related to NASH. In this study, we described cognitive, brain metabolism, and microbiota alterations associated with high-fat and high-cholesterol consumption. In addition, we clearly showed that environmental enrichment and A. muciniphila CIP107961 restore cognitive dysfunction. Furthermore, we revealed that cognitive improvement is associated with differential effects of environmental enrichment and this strain of A. muciniphila on brain metabolism and gut microbiota. Finally, we discovered that restored cognitive function was associated with the administration of A. muciniphila CIP107961, but not L. rhamnosus GG, which may be clinically relevant when selecting probiotics for treating HFHC-derived pathologies. In conclusion, the microbiota and cognition are intimately connected through the gut–brain axis, and in HFHC pathologies they can be influenced by environmental enrichment and A. muciniphila CIP107961 administration. Cognitive improvement was accompanied by changes in brain metabolic activity and gut microbial composition analysis, pointing to specific microbiota targets for intervention in diet-induced pathologies. However, some mechanisms other than major changes in microbiota composition and the combined effect of environmental enrichment and A. muciniphila administration, which we identified in this study, may also be biologically relevant and will need to be investigated in future studies due to their relative contributions to the selection of effective treatments for patients.           

Embark
Be Seen. Be Heard. Be You. Megan Hamilton on Speaking Up.

Embark

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 39:00


The fear of public speaking is the most common phobia:  ahead of death, spiders, or heights. The National Institute of Mental Health reports that public speaking anxiety, or glossophobia, affects about 73% of the population. Megan Hamilton of UBU Skills wants to help you eradicate that fear, self-doubt and emotional blocks that keep you from being, well, you. We talk about the best ways to speak up, and how that can lead to better conversations.Speaking of conversations, check out Megan's podcast, UBU Pod.Megan Hamilton is a speaking, visibility and confidence coach with a positive and encouraging approach. She works 1:1, in groups or via online courses, to help you build strength and resilience. Megan uses her 25+ years of theatre training and performance experience to guide you through the 4 main tenets of dynamic speaking skills: Standing, Breathing, Speaking, Reading. We focus on the blocks that are holding you back and build your visibility using a variety of tools including shadow work and intuition training, so that you can learn to reconnect with your gut. With proven techniques and guided practise, you'll build your confidence and be equipped to handle any challenge!

Change the Story / Change the World
Episode 33: Jill Sonke: "Call Arts in Medicine, STAT!"

Change the Story / Change the World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 52:47


Jill Sonke is a creative healer in service to a community of doctors, nurses, artists, educators, and most of all, patients on a journey that reunites the arts and medicine in their age-old roles as healing partners. BIOJill is director of the Center for Arts in Medicine at the University of Florida (UF), and is currently serving as Senior Advisor to the CDC Vaccine Confidence and Demand Team on the COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence Task Force. She is also an affiliated faculty member in the UF School of Theatre & Dance, Norman Fixel Institute for Neurological Diseases, the Center for African Studies, the STEM Translational Communication Center, and the One Health Center. Jill serves on the editorial board for Arts & Health journal and as a consulting editor for Health Promotion Practice journal. She is also director of the EpiArts Lab, a National Endowment for the Arts Research Lab at UF, and the national initiative, Creating Health Communities: Arts + Public Health in America.  Dr. Sonke studied dance at Interlochen Arts Academy, the Florida State University, in London, Paris, and Athens with teachers of the Horton and Duncan techniques including Bella Lewitsky, Lynda Davis, Milton Meyers, Joy Kellman, Lori Belilove, Julia Levine, and Hortense Koluris. She has been a principle dancer and soloist with Lori Belilove & the Isadora Duncan Dance Company in New York and a guest performer and choreographer with Dance Alive! and Stuart Pimsler Dance and Theatre. With 27+ years of experience and leadership in arts in health, Dr. Sonke is active in research, teaching, and international cultural exchange. Her current research focuses on the arts and health communication, the arts in public health, and the effects of music on cost and quality of care in emergency medicine. She is the recipient of a New Forms Florida Fellowship Award, a State of Florida Individual Artist Fellowship Award, an Excellence in Teaching Award from the National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development, a UF Internationalizing the Curriculum Award, a UF Most Outstanding Service Learning Faculty Award, a UF Public Health Champions award, a UF Cross-Campus Faculty Entrepreneur of the Year Award, and over 300 grants for her programs and research at the University of Florida. Delicious QuotesWe were very fortunate to be in an institution with leaders who understood that the arts fit and we're important in a healthcare setting. That people should have the ability to engage creatively to make that experience of healthcare better, not just patients, but staff, and visitors and others. I remember going into rooms and introducing myself, you know, " dancer in residence," and people would furrow their brow and say, “I'm in the hospital, that doesn't belong here.” … Then the view of our program kind of evolved into “It's really nice. … it's really lovely.” And then after a bit more time, the overarching recognition was that this is really important …because our, our care providers we're recognizing that artists are really crucial members of the interprofessional care team. We interviewed all 31 members of the nursing staff on a medical surgical unit over a period of about 18 months to learn about how they perceived the effects of the work of artists in residence on their unit. …So, we learned that nurses recognized the benefits of engagement in the arts for their patients. They were asking the artists to come in when their patients needed distraction and relaxation, those sorts of things. … from a clinical perspective, they noticed that blood oxygen saturation. It would go up. That wasn't the focus of our study. I want to be clear, but observationally, they were noting the clinical things like that. (Dr. Daisy Fancourt) has been able to, to articulate very significant associations between arts and cultural participation in health. For example, people over the age of 50 who go to museums or galleries, … just... Support this podcast

Dynamic Independence
NIH Director Resigns - Who Is The Replacement?

Dynamic Independence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 70:38


We examine the involvement with the National Institute of Health director Francis Collins and his ties to the Chinese Communist Party, and the Peoples Liberation Army. What are the main scandals that the media has ignored? Are we compromised by more than just Collins? Also, are the unvaccinated actually causing the risk? Are we now seeing peoples limits as to what they will or will not do? Is the jab about something much more nefarious? And, Facebook takes a hit. Now a "whistleblower" steps forward. Now Facebook is calling for full internet regulation. Is it legit? Or is it all staged? We ask the questions.

Matters: A podcast from Clio
Being Client-Centered in a Post-Covid World

Matters: A podcast from Clio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 42:48


The COVID pandemic has fundamentally and permanently transformed industries around the world—and the legal industry is no exception. In this episode of Matters, we'll speak to organizational leaders, educators, and practicing attorneys to hear how the practice of law has changed—and what attorneys need to do to keep pace.Specific topics highlighted in this episode include: How the COVID pandemic highlighted the mental health crisis in the legal industry How client behaviors have permanently changed as a result of the COVID pandemic How professional organizations can support law firms through the transition Listen now to learn how your law firm needs to adapt to these permanent changes.Our GuestsCharlene TheodoreMs. Theodore, the President of the Ontario Bar Association, draws on her experience as a lawyer who has practiced international human rights, labour and employment law. She started her career as a human rights lawyer, appearing before administrative tribunals and various levels of court, including Canada's Federal Court of Appeal.  She also represented the interests of Canadians of African descent before federal and provincial legislative committees, as well as United Nations human rights treaty bodies. She then focused her practice on labour and employment law, specializing in complex workplace and union challenges.  Her advocacy extends beyond the courtroom to society at large through her dedication to community service. You can follow Inti on Twitter at @CharleneYYZElise BuieElise Buie is Founder of Elise Buie Family Law Group, a family lawyer, and a Guardian ad Litem based in the Seattle area. Elise is an active member of the Washington Bar and many other bars and legal organizations. She provides her time and services through the Moderate Means program of the Washington State Bar Association, and she completed the ABA Family Law Trial Advocacy Institute sponsored by the National Institute for Trial Advocacy in Boulder, Colorado. Elise and her firm focus on advocating for children's best interest in high-conflict divorce and dependency matters. You can follow her on Twitter at @elisebuieMitch JacksonJon Mitchell “Mitch” Jackson is a senior partner and founding attorney of Jackson & Wilson. He has represented clients in the Orange County, CA, area for over 30 years, and he is committed to providing the trustworthy and skilled legal representation people need during the most difficult times of their lives—after a serious accident or the loss of a loved one. He has met with considerable success in this endeavor, recovering millions on behalf of the injured, including numerous multimillion-dollar settlements and verdicts. Also known as “The Streaming Lawyer,” Mitch is a legal social media expert who speaks regularly across the US and teaches other lawyers how to market themselves better. You can follow Mitch on Twitter at @mitchjacksonBill HendersonBill Henderson joined the Indiana University Maurer School of Law faculty in 2003 following a visiting appointment at Chicago-Kent College of Law and a judicial clerkship for Judge Richard Cudahy of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. Drawing upon more than a decade of research, Bill is a sought-after commentator on the changing legal marketplace and has accumulated numerous awards. In the last five years, he has been named one of the 100 Most Influential Lawyers in America by the National Law Journal, the Most Influential Person in Legal Education by National Jurist Magazine, and one of the inaugural group of “Legal Rebels” profiled by the ABA Journal. You can follow Bill on Twitter at @wihender

What You're Craving
What To Do About Your Kids and Eating Sugar - Actionable Advice on How To Find Balance with Sugarproof's Dr. Michael Goran and Dr. Emily Ventura

What You're Craving

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 50:16


Today's podcast is so so so important and answers the questions that people have been asking me for YEARS - What do I do about my kids? Today, Dr. Michael Goran and Dr. Emily Ventura, authors of Sugarproof: The Hidden Dangers of Sugar that Are Putting Your Child's Health at Risk and What You Can Do, answer these questions with ease, humor and DOABILITY. We all know that sugar is everywhere - and especially in our kids' foods. Dr. Goran and Dr. Ventura talk us through how to protect kids from the harmful effects of sugar, while also balancing their need to make their own choices, enjoying what we eat, the real-world challenges of making changes, and the truth about fruit juice (one of my most beloved topics). This is a must-listen for anyone who interacts with kids and wants to help make positive change with actionable tips - you know those are both my faves!   Dr. Michael Grogan is a Professor of Pediatrics at The Children's Hospital of Los Angeles and  Co-Director of the USC Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute. His research has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health and other Foundations for the past 30 years during which he has raised almost $50m in funding to support this work. He has published over 350 professional peer-reviewed articles and reviews. He is the Editor of the “Childhood Obesity: Causes, Consequences and Intervention Approaches” published in 2017, co-editor of “Dietary Sugars and Health” published in late 2014, and currently serves as Editor-in-Chief for Pediatric Obesity. He has been the recipient of numerous scientific awards for his research and teaching. You can find the full details on Dr Goran's research on his website at: www.GoranLab.com and you can follow him on twitter at @michaelgoran.    Dr. Emily Ventura is a nutrition educator, public health advocate, writer, and cook. Emily has 10 years of research experience in public health with a focus on dietary strategies for the prevention of obesity, diabetes, and cancer. As an advocate for community health, Emily has worked as a nutrition educator for children and families, managed programs in the greater Los Angeles area ,and led public health campaigns for Slow Food International as well as the Jamie Oliver Food Foundation. Emily has spent extensive time abroad, including studying food and culture in Ecuador and serving as a Fulbright Scholar in Italy, where she taught Public Health Nutrition at the University of Gastronomic Sciences and conducted research at the University of Verona.    I'm partnering with Sugarbreak this week on a 7 day No Sugar Challenge. We're two days in, but you can still participate! Follow along on Instagram @takeasugarbreak to join and get tips and inspiration all week through October 10! To check out their book Sugarproof, visit https://sugarproofkids.com! As you know, I'm obsessed with knowing all about you, so please follow (and DM!) me on Instagram and Facebook and find more on my website. We're in this together and the journey is going to be so awesome. Produced by Dear Media

Real Crime Profile
How to Stop a Mass Shooting Epidemic - Part 1

Real Crime Profile

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 51:11


Laura and Jim interview Professors Jillian Petersen and James Densley, co-founders and co-presidents of The Violence Project, a nonprofit, non-partisan research center best known for its mass shooter database, funded by the National Institute of Justice.Together they have written a book called 'The Violence Project: how to stop a mass shooting epidemic.' They have interviewed perpetrators and victims and their families with the aim of preventing future mass shootings. Building on their coverage and analysis of Columbine and other mass shootings, Laura and Jim discuss their findings including making the links across violent offending behaviour, the red flags, the pathway to murder and early identification, intervention and prevention opportunities. You will not want to miss this.#HomicidePrevention #MassShootings #Columbine #Intervention #Prevention #Violence #Analysis #ProfilingYou can buy Jill and James' important new book by clicking on this link!The Violence Project: How to Stop a Mass Shooting Epidemic by Jillian Peterson, Ph.D & James Densley, Ph.D https://amzn.to/3meCjnCJillian Peterson, PhD, is a professor of criminology and criminal justice at Hamline University. She has led large-scale research studies on mental illness and crime, school shootings, and mass violence. James Densley, PhD, is a professor of criminal justice at Metropolitan State University, which is part of the Minnesota State system. He is known for his international work on gangs, criminal networks, violent extremism, and policing. Based in St. Paul, Minnesota, Jillian and James run The Violence Project, a nonpartisan, nonprofit research center known worldwide for its work on mass shooting prevention. The Violence Project has featured in CNN, Fox News, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and other leading media outlets. “One of the most comprehensive studies of the subject”―Wall Street Journal“Reading The Violence Project is like having the lights turned on in a dark stadium. Jillian Peterson and James Densley illuminate for us the darkest corners of our violent predilections. They've told us what to do; the rest is up to us. Groundbreaking!”―Rachel Louise Snyder, bestselling author of No Visible BruisesYou can hear the clip used in this episode in its entirety here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5el7RQosS9g************************************************************Please support our Sponsors. We couldn't do the podcast and help victims without them — so please check out their special offers just for our RCP listeners.BOLL AND BRANCH SHEETS - Boll & Branch is dedicated to quality at every step. Sheets designed and manufactured for maximum comfort and durability. No cutting corners. There are no middlemen between you and Boll & Branch, so you get luxury quality for the fairest price. They stand behind their products and honor a 30-night worry-free guarantee if you are unsatisfied. To experience an entirely new standard of comfort, visit bollandbranch.com○ Get 15% off your first set of sheets with promo code REALCRIME.++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++SUPPORT OUR OTHER SHOWS! CRIME ANALYST - . www.crime-analyst.comThe Case of: Sophie Toscan Du Plantier Laura deeps dives the murder of 39-year-old French TV and film producer Sophie Toscan Du Plantier who was found brutally murdered at the bottom of the driveway to her holiday home in Schull, West Cork, Ireland on the morning of December 23 1996. Join Laura each week in the intelligence cell as she analyses the victimology, the crime scene, the most likely sequence of events the night that Sophie was murdered, the investigation as well as how Sophie was framed in the media and others and how she became a footnote in her own murder #HerNameWasSophieToscanDuPlantierTHE FIRST WIFE: John Meehan's Reign of Terror. Check out Laura's new podcast about Tania Bales who was married to John Meehan long before the world came to know him as “Dirty John”. Go to: https://www.audible.com/pd/The-First-Wife-John-Meehans-Reign-of-Terror-Podcast/B099BYMH4G?fbclid=IwAR3t0WekDIM3PQ5Cq4GRIVDmZ-q0gr2JpUufE-JhNnE9JRV1S483vWXfK04KILLER CASTING PODCAST - Next up is an episode that no TRUE CRIME follower will want to miss. We review the film “Nitram” starring Caleb Landry Jones, Judy Davis and Anthony LaPaglia. This disturbing but important film is based on the horrific mass shooting massacre that happened in Port Arthur, Tasmania on April 28th, 1996 — that killed 35 people and wounded 23 others. The film spotlights the behavior of the lone shooter leading up to the murders and highlights several opportunities of intervention that might have derailed his terrifying plan. Joining us is Dr. Tim Watson-Munro, a renowned forensic psychologist who has analyzed the minds of some of the worst criminals of our times. Dr. Tim is not only an expert on mass shooters, but he actually treated many of the victims who survived the Port Arthur attack. Tune into https://www.killercastingpod.com/podcast or SUBSCRIBE to wherever you listen to your podcasts including Apple Podcasts, https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/killer-casting/id1537283659, Spotify and Stitcher. AMERICA'S MOST WANTED - America's Most Wanted is BACK, with Elizabeth Vargas hosting and Jim Clemente as an Executive Producer. You can stream it right now on Fox. . https://www.fox.com/americas-most-wanted/BEST CASE WORST CASEBe sure and check out Jim's podcast Best Case/Worst Case that he does along with former Federal Prosecutor Francey Hakes. Join them as they go behind police lines with unparalleled access to law enforcement officers, looking back at their most memorable cases – for better or for worse. Subscribe now!https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/best-case-worst-case/id1240002929See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec
Human Events Daily - Oct 5 2021 - FB Whistleblower Calls for Government Censorship of Social Media?!

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 22:00


National Institute of Health director Francis Collins to resign, breaking Veritas news - Pfizer scientists say antibodies are probably better than the vaccination, China PCR Test Orders Soared Before First Reported COVID Case, Government Contracts Show Surges in Wuhan-Area Purchases Starting May 2019, plus new Facebook Whistleblower calls for Gov't censorship of social media accounts.Here's your Daily dose of Human Events with @JackPosobiec 

Markley, van Camp and Robbins
Markley, van Camp and Robbins | October 5, 2021

Markley, van Camp and Robbins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 116:14


MVC&R along with CNBC wanted Dr. Anthony Fauci to say just how rare the “breakthrough infections” are, as we find out China was ordering boatloads of PCR tests back in May of 2019. The White House suggests not dumbing things down, followed by dumbing down by The White House. Left-wing activists harass Senator Kyrsten Sinema on a flight, as well as at the airport. A lotto player says he would buy a whole lot of cocaine if he won, and Mark Zuckerberg lost about $7 billion from Facebook's Monday crash. Francis Collins will be stepping down as director of the National Institutes of Health, and the DOJ will in fact be going after parents who show up at local school board meetings. Penn State plans to “reimagine” kindergarten through the 12th grade, and “antiracism” will be leading the way. The California mask mandates were not all that effective, and teens are being trained as 18-wheeler drivers amid the driver shortage.

KGI: Innovation in Applied Life Sciences & Healthcare
#133 - Animesh Ray and Jeniffer Hernadez NIH Grant

KGI: Innovation in Applied Life Sciences & Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 55:17


KGI Professor Dr. Animesh Ray and Associate Professor of Biopharmaceutical Sciences Dr. Jeniffer Hernandez have been selected as 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director's Transformative Research Award recipients as part of the NIH Common Fund's High-Risk, High-Reward Research program. This fund supports inherently risky and untested projects that can potentially create or overturn fundamental science, technology, and medicine paradigms. For the project, the team is developing a computer assessment procedure for predicting the structure of antibodies that could effectively neutralize a previously unknown antigen or a novel virus that might emerge in the future. In the podcast, Ray and KGI Associate Professor of Biopharmaceutical Sciences Dr. Jeniffer Hernandez sit down to talk about the project and its implications for society.

The Higherside Chats
Dr. Helane’ Wahbeh | The Science Of Channeling, Consciousness, & The Beings Beyond

The Higherside Chats

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 75:17


***Join THC+ for full uninterrupted 2 hour episodes, a dedicated Plus RRS feed, lifetime forum access, merch discounts, & other bonuses like free downloads of THC music: thehighersidechats.com/plus-membershipSee detailed sign up options down below. About Today's Guest: Helané Wahbeh, ND, MCR, is the Director of Research at the Institute of Noetic Sciences and an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Oregon Health & Science University. She completed her undergraduate degree at University of California Berkeley in Anthropology and Pre-Medicine. She obtained her clinical doctorate at the National University of Natural Medicine. She obtained her Master of Clinical Research from Oregon Health & Science University where she has been on faculty in the department of neurology since 2006. She also completed two post-doctoral research fellowships. Her VET-MIND study funded by the National Institutes of Health examined the mechanisms of meditation for combat veterans with PTSD. Her current research interests include healing stress and trauma, examining mechanisms of mind-body medicine, and rigorously studying extended human capacities. Dr. Wahbeh's extensive meditation training includes the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Teacher Training by Jon Kabat-Zinn, a four-year Meditation Teacher Training with CoreLight, and a 19-year regular meditation practice. She has published on and spoken internationally about her studies on complementary and alternative medicine, mind-body medicine, extended human capacities, stress, posttraumatic stress disorder and their relationships to physiology, health, and healing. She was recently named President of the Parapsychological Association. Dr. Wahbeh is the author of some 90+ peer-reviewed publications and the new book The Science of Channeling: Why You Should Trust Your Intuition and the Force That Connects Us All. Brimming with cutting-edge science, the book draws together much of her research on the subject. The Science of Channeling is written in true noetic fashion as it seeks to unite the science with practical application. THC Links: Website: TheHighersideChats.com Merch Store: thehighersideclothing.com/shop Leave a voicemail for the Joint Session Bonus Shows: thehighersidechats.com/voicemail Leave us an iTunes review: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-higherside-chats/id419458838 THC Communities: Telegram: https://t.me/joinchat/RIzmxk8_m_qCW7JZ Subreddit: reddit.com/r/highersidechats Discord: discord.com/invite/rdGpKtW THC Plus Sign-Up Options: Subscribe via our website for a full-featured experience: thehighersidechats.com/plus-membership Subscribe via Patreon, including the full Plus archive, a dedicated RSS feed, & payment through Paypal:: patreon.com/thehighersidechats?fan_landing=true To get a year of THC+ by cash, check, or money order please mail the payment in the amount of $96 to: Greg Carlwood PO Box: 153291 San Diego, CA 92195 Cryptocurrency If you'd like to pay the $96 for a year of THC+ via popular Cryptocurrencies, transfer funds and then send an email to support@thehighersidechats.comwith transaction info and your desired username/password. Please give up to 48 hours to complete. Bitcoin: 1AdauF2Mb7rzkkoXUExq142xfwKC6pS7N1 Ethereum: 0xd6E9232b3FceBe165F39ACfA4843F49e7D3c31d5 Litecoin: LQy7GvD5Euc1efnsfQaAX2RJHgBeoDZJ95 Ripple: rnWLvhCmBWpeFv9HMbZEjsRqpasN8928w3