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Private research university in New Haven, Connecticut, United States

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Best podcasts about yale

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Latest podcast episodes about yale

Susquehanna Alchemy
Your Handbook For The Apocalypse 7: Peacemaker Ley

Susquehanna Alchemy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 96:47


Uncle Mike and Mystic Mark discuss Books, Ezra Stiles, Yale, Godstone, Joseph Smith, Anthracite, Divination Tools, The Peacemaker Ley Line, The Shaking Quakers, DIY Tarot Cards, Life Maps. October 31st come see Mike in New Cumberland, PA http://www.beepresentwellness.com/workshops/2021/10/31/rewilding-consciousness-rivers-amp-the-susquehannas-sacred-flowLeave Us A Message HereSupport MikeIG @susquehannaalchemyVisit My Website Susquehanna AlchemySupport on Subscribe StarBuy Susquehanna Alchemy GearBuy Mikes Book Rites of the 40th Parallel Support MarkOn Patreon For Exclusive Episodes. Check out the S.E.E.E.N.IG: @myfamilythinksimcrazyhttps://www.myfamilythinksimcrazy.com★ Support this podcast ★

Above the Law - Thinking Like a Lawyer
What Will Yale Do Next Week?

Above the Law - Thinking Like a Lawyer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 24:41


Yale just can't keep out of the legal news. Over the last several months we've had high-profile fights with professors, a student club behaving badly, and now this. This time it's the school's commitment to outside counsel Day Pitney, a firm making quite a name for itself pulling discovery shenanigans in the Sandy Hook mass shooting trial. Meanwhile, we have new rankings out featuring the best law school deals and the coolest Biglaw firms. Finally, conservatives have a plan to fix the Supreme Court and it's... renaming the building. Special thanks to our sponsors, Lexicon and Nota.

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
What Will Yale Do Next Week?

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 24:41


Yale just can't keep out of the legal news. Over the last several months we've had high-profile fights with professors, a student club behaving badly, and now this. This time it's the school's commitment to outside counsel Day Pitney, a firm making quite a name for itself pulling discovery shenanigans in the Sandy Hook mass shooting trial. Meanwhile, we have new rankings out featuring the best law school deals and the coolest Biglaw firms. Finally, conservatives have a plan to fix the Supreme Court and it's... renaming the building. Special thanks to our sponsors, Lexicon and Nota.

Race Against Climate Change
Episode 2: Where we live

Race Against Climate Change

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 31:27


GUESTS:Nilson Zepeda, Coordonnateur de la campagne ILEAU, Conseil régional de l'environnement de Montréal Dalila Hassid, volunteer with La Voisinerie, part of the ILEAU campaign Stewart Dutfield, Manager of Public Energy Initiatives, Existing Buildings- Toronto. Part of Transform TO.David Suzuki and Severn-Cullis Suzuki CREDITS:Field production from Ellen Payne Smith and Elysse Deveaux in Montreal.Final audio mix by Aftertouch Audio. Fact check by Dana Filek-Gibson. Artwork by Ata Ojani. Communications from Suzanne Dhaliwal and Luke Ottenhof. Music by Martijn de Boer and Blue Dot Sessions. Additional sound from Eldiariosonoro_, Lonemonk and Helter Skelter from freesound.org.TRANSCRIPTCLIMATE NERD RESOURCES:Links to studies we mention in the showHealth Canada, Reducing urban heat islands to protect healthIPCC fact sheet on climate change and urban areasLearn how your city stacks up using Yale's Urban Environment and Social Inclusion IndexTransform T.O.'s climate plan for buildingsWang, Y., Berardi, U., & Akbari, H. (2016). Comparing the effects of urban heat island mitigation strategies for Toronto, Canada. Energy and Buildings, 114, 2-19. Related articles from CNO: https://www.nationalobserver.com/2021/07/19/news/apartments-condos-too-hot-how-can-we-fix-themhttps://www.nationalobserver.com/2021/07/16/news/overhauling-canadas-buildings-could-add-48b-economyhttps://www.nationalobserver.com/2020/10/22/news/canada-building-codes-development-climate-goals

Marketplace All-in-One
When human rights abuses impact supply chains

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 9:37


Some major retailers are pulling some Chinese-made surveillance cameras and equipment off their shelves. That’s due to concerns the companies that make the equipment, Lorex and Ezviz, have ties to human rights abuses in China. They’re believed to be part of the vast surveillance network targeting Uyghurs, an ethnic minority group of over 12 million people in the country. This was brought to Home Depot’s attention by the publication TechCrunch, which also reported that Lowe’s and Best Buy stopped selling these products. Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams speaks with Samm Sacks, a cyber policy fellow at the nonprofit New America think tank and a research scholar at Yale.

Marketplace Tech
When human rights abuses impact supply chains

Marketplace Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 9:37


Some major retailers are pulling some Chinese-made surveillance cameras and equipment off their shelves. That’s due to concerns the companies that make the equipment, Lorex and Ezviz, have ties to human rights abuses in China. They’re believed to be part of the vast surveillance network targeting Uyghurs, an ethnic minority group of over 12 million people in the country. This was brought to Home Depot’s attention by the publication TechCrunch, which also reported that Lowe’s and Best Buy stopped selling these products. Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams speaks with Samm Sacks, a cyber policy fellow at the nonprofit New America think tank and a research scholar at Yale.

Wisdom From The Top
PepsiCo: Indra Nooyi

Wisdom From The Top

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 73:42


After becoming the CEO of PepsiCo in 2006, Indra Nooyi became the first woman and immigrant to run a Fortune 50 company. From Chennai, India, to Yale's School of Management, Nooyi worked her way up from The Boston Consulting Group, Motorola, and ASEA Brown Boveri before eventually landing at PepsiCo, overseeing the global operation of its countless drinks, snacks, and restaurants. Nooyi's new memoir My Life in Full details her legendary career, exploring her extraordinary personal journey and the demands of being one of the most powerful women on the planet.

Razib Khan's Unsupervised Learning
Trent Colbert: standing athwart the mob

Razib Khan's Unsupervised Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 37:46


Subscribe now Give a gift subscription Share Recently Yale Law School (YLS) student Trent Colbert wrote Why I Didn't Apologize For That Yale Law School Email: We must end the culture of performative repentance for Persuasion. I was broadly familiar with the culture-war saga that Colbert was caught up in, having read a piece a few weeks ago in The Washington Post describing how a seemingly innocent and jocular email triggered accusations of racism at YLS (as well as Aaron Sibarium's piece in The Washington Free Beacon). Colbert's in Persuasion made me curious about him, and I reached out to talk about what he had seen, and the lessons that we as a society and individuals might take from it. First, Colbert gives us his own perspective of what transpired at YLS to make him a “trending topic” on social media. Perhaps to the surprise of Millennials, the 23-year-old Zoomer seemed not entirely familiar with the well-known podcast Chapo Trap House. As a member of Gen X, I have to admit it's a little unnerving to hear Millennials viewed as geriatric elders. But Colbert grew up in a world of super-charged cultural change and perhaps perceives the passage of time differently than those of us who came into adulthood before smartphones. He contended that some of the offense others perceived might be a matter of cohort differences and even just his casual Zoomer manner. Even a few years' difference today might mean an entirely alternative landscape of memes and sensibilities, so a subtle and wry reference among his age-mates could strike an individual only a few years older as offensive, opaque and “tone-deaf.” With that in mind, I was curious about his background, and where he got the strength to stand up to the YLS administrative bureaucracy. We explored his relationship to his Cherokee background, as well as growing up in a moderately conservative household where religion was important. Colbert takes the idea of right and wrong seriously, and he felt that his own conscience would not allow him to agree to an apology that was premised on lies. Importantly, he also had a supportive group of friends at YLS and a wider circle of backers in the community. Eventually, we moved to broader social forces, and how his individual choices and decisions might impact others. By doing the right thing, rather than the easy thing, Colbert hopes to show that it is possible to defeat the kind of bureaucratic machine that was unleashed upon him and trigger a preference cascade that changes the culture on campus. And doing the right thing has not been entirely easy, as Colbert admits to being uncomfortable with realizing how others at YLS viewed him purely through a racial lens, as well as the fact that many prominent organizations accused him of being a racist. Overall, perhaps the take-home lesson is that it doesn't take an exceptional person to take on the system. Just someone who has a core set of principles and friends and family who support them when they might have to make decisions that lead to socially unpopular outcomes. Subscribe now Give a gift subscription Share

The Mikhaila Peterson Podcast
122. Opposing Views: Gun Control | Dan Gross & Dr. John R. Lott

The Mikhaila Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 86:17


Welcome to episode 122 of the Mikhaila Peterson Podcast. This is another opposing views episode where I speak with two people who have opposing views on contentious subjects. This is my favourite format of episode and one I'll be focusing on. In this episode, I spoke with Dan Gross and Dr. John R. Lott about gun control in America. We discussed their stances on gun control, assault weapons, the gun show loophole, and background check laws. I asked them whether states with stricter gun control have less gun violence. We also touched on straw purchasers, misconceptions regarding gun violence, and how politics has pervaded an already complicated debate—which is one of the reasons we need conversations like this one. In the first half, I sat down with Dan Gross. After his brother was wounded in the 1997 Empire State shooting, Gross left a bright career in marketing to become a gun control activist. He has since worked to raise awareness on gun safety, spearheading campaigns that teach gun owners to mitigate risk. Gross is the former president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence and co-founded the Center for Gun Rights and Responsibility. In the second half, I spoke with gun rights advocate, economist, and political commentator John R. Lott. He has worked for Yale, the University of Chicago, and the U.S. Department of Justice under Trump. He is the founder and former president of the Crime Prevention Research Center (CPRC). John Lott has published op-eds in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and more. Remember please keep the comments civil - organizing these episodes is tricky and I really love doing them I think they're so interesting so let's keep things civil so that more people will agree to come on. Next week's episode is opposing views on Bitcoin. I hope you enjoy this episode - if you do please hit subscribe. Enjoy your week! Find more Dan Gross on the website: https://cgrr.us/ Follow Dan Gross on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dangrosspax Find more John Lott on: https://www.johnrlott.com/ Follow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnRLottJr ———————————— Show Notes ———————————— [0:00] Intro [02:45] Dan Gross's background. [05:53] Dan's stance on gun control. [09:24] Dan's suggestion on gun control. [09:59] Finding the balance with gun usage. [10:09] Why Dan was vilified in certain communities. [11:42] Dan's thoughts on who should own guns. [14:55] The gun show loophole. [19:19] The reason behind a gun show loophole. [21:13] The politicized gun debate. [25:03] Do states with stricter gun control have less gun violence? [26:53] Comparing gun access between the states and other countries. [29:44] The REAL problem with guns according to Dan. [31:09] The assault weapon debate. [35:41] Straw purchasers. [38:38] Gun dealers and crime guns. [39:13] Dan's thoughts on how to crack down on straw purchasers. [43:53] Find Dan Gross on Twitter @DanGrossPAX and at The Center for Gun Rights and Responsibility website: https://cgrr.us/ [45:05] John R. Lott Jr.'s background. [45:53] John's view on gun control. [46:07] The sad reality of gun control according to John. [46:42] Inequality in gun control. [53:37] John's perspective on legal gun access. [55:39] Where felons purchase their guns. [56:18] Statistics on gun purchase. [1:02:23] A surprising fact of crime in the US. [1:03:27] Straw purchasers. [01:04:00] John's suggestion to change background checks. [01:07:12] Red flag laws. [01:15:09] John's perspective on gun education. [01:18:52] John's thoughts on children dying from domestic gunshots. [01:19:33] The relationship between gun control and gun crime. [01:20:13] John's advice on governmental gun control. [01:24:55] Find more John Lott on CrimeResearch.org. #MikhailaPeterson #GunRights #GunViolence #OpposingViews #GunControl

The Michael Knowles Show
Ep. 872 - Transing Our Kids Is Their Priority  

The Michael Knowles Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 50:49


A Democrat gubernatorial candidate says “diversity and inclusion” is as important to a student's education as math and English, a Yale epidemiologist encourages parents to pull their kids out of school rather than making them take the Fauci Ouchie, and Dave Chappelle refuses to cower to the woke mob. Daily Wire just signed ousted ESPN sportscaster Allison Williams who resisted Disney's vaccine mandate for a new sports series. Take back your content from the Hollywood elites - get 25% off a Daily Wire membership with code DONOTCOMPLY: https://utm.io/udJyw  My new book 'Speechless: Controlling Words, Controlling Minds,' is now available wherever books are sold. Grab your copy today here: https://utm.io/udtMJ  Subscribe to Morning Wire, Daily Wire's new morning news podcast, and get the facts first on the news you need to know: https://utm.io/udyIF Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Chicago Dog Walk
Tuesday 10/26/21 - Skull & Bones Secret Society

Chicago Dog Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 26:16


Chief joins the show to talk about a secret society at Yale called Skull & Bones. We get into how alot of the Bush family is in it, rumored hazing rituals that take place, how it may have started the CIA, and more.

You Are Here
DISGUSTING! Fauci Okays Torturing Puppies?! Enough is Enough! | Guest: Chad Prather 10/25/21

You Are Here

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 117:26


Dr. Anthony Fauci is under fire again after the White Coat Waste Project, the nonprofit organization that first pointed out that U.S. taxpayers were being used to fund the controversial Wuhan Institute of Virology, exposed cruel puppy experiments. These experiments included cutting the puppies' vocal cords and then letting them be eaten by disease-causing parasites. All might go to heaven, but Dr. Fauci definitely will not. Florida educators tied a mask to a disabled student for six weeks without parental consent. On top of that, the student had already been given a medical exemption for wearing a mask. Are these teachers really acting in the best interest of their students or is this another example of how little they care? Yale epidemiologist professor Dr. Harvey Risch says he would pull kids from public school before forcing them to get vaccinated. Seems like the experts would agree with the parents when it comes to what's best for the children. We're joined in-studio by Chad Prather, host of "The Chad Prather Show." Chad Prather: BlazeTV Host - The Chad Prather Show Twitter - @WatchChad YouTube -  @Chad Prather  Express VPN: If you really want to go incognito and protect your privacy like Elijah and Sydney, secure yourself with the #1 rated VPN. Visit https://www.expressvpn.com/youarehere , and get three extra months for free. Note: The content of this video does not provide medical advice. Please seek the advice of local health officials for any COVID vaccine questions & concerns. Subscribe to You Are Here YouTube: https://bit.ly/2XNLhQw Watch MORE You Are Here on BlazeTV: https://bit.ly/38WB2vw Check out Elijah Schaffer's YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/3C0yWH8 Check out Sydney Watson's YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2YIedK5 Follow Sydney Watson on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SydneyLWatson Follow Elijah Schaffer on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ElijahSchaffer Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

10 Days
The 10 Days Story (Part 5)

10 Days

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 52:41


From 2008-2009, there were four formative 10 Day retreats that still shape the movement today.  Jonathan and Gregg discuss miraculous happenings, God encounters, mistakes made, and lessons learned from these early efforts. Shortly after the life-altering experience of the first 10Days retreat in 2007, Jonathan heads back to Yale to hear first hand from the Fijian "Healing the Land team", a team of revivalists seeing entire towns and villages transformed by the presence of God.  The similarities between their strategy for village transformation and 10 Days encourages him that 10Days is intended to be a city-transformation blueprint.  During 10Days Pentecost in 2008, God "comes to town" in America just as He did in the Fijian villages with signs and wonders and...rain. After hearing stories of transformation, they are now actually living out one of their own. Jonathan shares the process of learning through trial and error what it really means to "mourn" and what God meant when he said that "My people will mourn before I return".  This mourning is not burdensome--it is not full of condemnation towards ourselves or accusation against others.  It's focused on what we have lost and what we lack both personally and corporately and rooted in a deep longing for the Lord's Return.  As he would powerfully experience at the end of 10 Days in 2009, the end goal of Godly mourning is Joy! Support this podcast

Mendelspod Podcast
Quantitative Pathology with David Rimm, Yale

Mendelspod Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021


David Rimm, Professor of Pathology at Yale, was doing spatial biology since before it was called that. He's known for counting. And he's been going beyond—beneath?--the model of the cell in biology for years.

Phi-Lacrosse-ophy Podcast
Phi - Lacrosse - Ophy Podcast Season 4, Ep. 8- Terry Foy - A glimpse into Fall Ball

Phi-Lacrosse-ophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 48:51


In this podcast, Jamie talks to Inside Lacrosse CEO Terry Foy about his experience visiting several DI men's lacrosse program's practices this Fall. They discuss how teams looked and whether or not you could tell a difference between teams that competed in 2021 and teams that didn't. Teams he visited are Yale, Brown, Hopkins, Georgetown, Loyola, Villanova and Delaware.

The Past Lives Podcast
The Past Lives Podcast Ep182 – J. Steve Miller

The Past Lives Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 62:05


Deathbed Experiences as Evidence for the Afterlife. This week I am talking to J. Steve Miller. The thesis of this book is quite simple and intuitive: If you want to look for evidence for the afterlife, observe the dying, to see if there's any indication that they're going somewhere. Researchers are finding that several experiences related to death are global and quite common, including:Primary Deathbed Experiences, where over 80% of the dying in a hospice unit report vivid experiences with deceased relatives and angels Terminal Lucidity, where people lose brain function over time, only to regain full consciousness to say their goodbyes before dying Shared Death Experiences, where healthy people experience a part of their loved one's death experienceCrisis Apparitions, where people otherwise unaware of a person's death somehow know of the person's death After Death Communications, where people claim to receive visits from deceased loved ones. To discover if these can be explained away as lies, exaggerations, or hallucinations, highly respected intellects, connected to many of our top universities, have studied phenomena at death for significant portions of their lives and assessed them for afterlife evidence. Dr. Miller, in a winsome, popular style, discusses many studies and documented reports that point towards an afterlife. Steve's current research/writing obsession is on a sister experience to near-death experiences (NDEs) called deathbed experiences (DBEs). NDEs occur when people almost die, but recover. DBEs occur around the time of final death. They are extremely common; a recent study in a New York hospice found over 80 percent of their patients experiencing DBEs, when interviewed daily. Steve uses the term “deathbed experience” broadly to refer to a cluster of phenomena that occur around death, including: Deathbed visions proper (where the dying claim to see and communicate with deceased relatives and angelic beings prior to death), Terminal lucidity (where people whose brains have been deteriorating for some time, to the point of being comatose, suddenly communicate quite lucidly just prior to death), Shared death experiences (where those who are not dying experience something of the transition of a loved one), Crisis apparitions (where people have visions/sensations that a loved one has passed, even when they didn't know the person was ill), After death communications (where people claim to have experiences with loved ones after they died.) In his earlier study of near-death experiences, he found some studies of deathbed experiences and decided to find out what research had been done on them through the years. He purposed to see if these studies provided any evidence for an afterlife. “Maybe I'll find 100 or so relevant sources to make for a tidy dissertation topic,” he thought. About 500 sources later, he realized he was onto something big. A wealth of research has been done over the last 140 years, but someone needed to bring it together and try to make sense of it. Amazingly, many of the studies were done by top-notch intellectuals connected to some of our top universities, such as Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard and Yale. He has currently found over 800 resources and have transformed the dissertation into two readable volumes of about 250 pages each. The first volume is now available at Amazon.com as both a Kindle (digital) and print version. The second volume should go live sometime early in 2022. Since he's documented it meticulously, he hopes that physicians, apologists, anthropologists and philosophers of religion will be inspired to keep moving this research forward. https://www.amazon.com/Deathbed-Experiences-Evidence-Afterlife-Groundbreaking-ebook/dp/B09FLZ3J9P/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Deathbed+Experiences+as+Evidence+for+the+Afterlife&qid=1634907910&sr=8-1 https://jstevemiller.info/ https://www.patreon.com/pastlivespodcast https://teespring.

The Nathan Barry Show
053: Kimberly Brooks - Taking Intentional Breaks To Reignite Creativity

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 66:51


Kimberly Brooks is a contemporary American artist and author. Kimberly integrates landscape, figuration and abstraction to address subjects of history, memory and identity. Her work has been exhibited and featured internationality.Kimberly received her bachelor's degree in literature from U.C. Berkeley, and was Valedictorian. She has taught art as a lecturer and adjunct faculty instructor, and was a featured speaker at TEDx Fullerton.In this episode, I talk with Kimberly about her work as an artist, author, and editor. We talk about how she uses ConvertKit to reach and grow her audience. We talk about what people can learn from fine art, and apply it to their newsletters. We also cover the path to becoming a successful creator, and much more.In this episode, you'll learn: The secret to achieving your breakthrough moment A job most creators should charge for, but rarely do What you should be doing instead of blogging Should you be posting on Instagram? Links & Resources Huffington Post ConvertKit Craft and Commerce Steve Jobs John Baldessari Adobe Photoshop Adobe Leonard Shlain Milton Glaser Macworld Walt Disney's Imagineering Warner Music Group Seth Godin Leonardo da Vinci Arianna Huffington Huffington Post: Fine Art Later Anderson Ranch Arts Center Otis College of Art and Design Kimberly Brooks's Links Find Kimberly on Instagram Kimberly's website Kimberly's Ted Talk Huffington Post article, “The Gap Logo, New Coke and the Legendary Walter Landor” Kimberly's book, The New Oil Painting Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Kimberly:The fundamental way to learn is, you imitate, assimilate, and then you can improvise with anything. You're going to be thwarted in the beginning many times, and you can't give up. You have to say, “Okay, well, I don't care if it sucks. I don't care if I'm going to fail. If I'm gonna fail, I'm gonna fail big. Let's just go on.”[00:00:29] Nathan:In this episode I talk to Kimberly Brooks. She is a fine artist. So, painting, she has all of her art in galleries, that whole world, which is super fascinating to me. She also plays in the creative world. Newsletters, podcasts, and interviews.She built the whole art editorial section of the Huffington Post. She built that to millions of readers. She's done all kinds of things in the design community from the early days. So, we riff on that; Mad Men-style ad agencies in the ‘80s and ‘90s. Some great stuff.Then she brings it all the way through to talking about what she does with ConvertKit. How she sets up her sequences, and everything else, and things that people can learn from fine art, and apply to their email newsletters and sequences.So, it's a fun episode. We have to do a part two, because we filled up all the time we had, and I think I only got through half my questions.So, anyway, I'm going to get out of the way and dive in. So, here we go.Kimberly, welcome to the show.[00:01:37] Kimberly:Thank you for having me, Nathan.[00:01:39] Nathan:There's so many things I to talk about, because you come to the creator world from a different perspective than I do, though we both share a love for Photoshop.[00:01:50] Kimberly:Oh, yeah.[00:01:51] Nathan:We'll start with where we met. It was at Craft and Commerce, some number of years ago.I can't even think. Three years ago? Four?[00:02:01] Kimberly:I think it was three years ago, and it was such a random whim. I don't even know how I ended up finding it. I fell in rabbit hole. And then I came upon ConvertKit.I was actively looking for a better way to send art show announcements. Because I'm a painter, I'm an artist.I just felt after my previous experiences, I knew how important having a subscriber-based service was. I don't want to get too nerdy, but I didn't really like the competitor who shall remain unnamed. But, I found you guys, and I started getting the advertisement for the conference, and it was in Boise, Idaho.And so I thought, I'll just go. It was like a Ted conference for really creative nerdy people like me, but it was exactly what I was wanting. It was about marketing, which is really such a weird word because it's really about sharing, and I loved the title.I loved everything about it. I met some of the people that I'm really, really close with now. Then the next year it was canceled because of the pandemic, but it was amazing, and I met you, actually.[00:03:28] Nathan:And, and we had a really fun conversation. one thing that I want to talk about, for you is the intersection between fine art, right. And painting and that world. And then now you're also in this world of being a writer and a creator in the sense, right. You you've been a writer and creative for a long time, but, but it's, it's like a different world of the selling things to your audience.And. Earning money directly in that way. And so I want, like, I want to hear that as you like weave in and out of these two worlds and then just your experience there.[00:04:02] Kimberly:Yeah, it's interesting. I, when I was in elementary school, we had a really competitive game of tetherball constantly going on on the playground. And it was just sort of that pole with a ball attached to a rope we would, people would line up and we would get it, and it was, see how many times, and it was just sort of like, it was very intense and I always felt like being an artist.Being an art to me was it was the pole, you know? So like my pole is art is making art and everything about what I do. I write about it. I interview people about it. I interview other artists about their work. I make paintings 90% of the time in my studio. Like, it's all about art, you know? So that's like the beginning.So I do see myself sashaying between different worlds. And I think everybody kind of does that. And then as the bicycle of technology was being built to use kind of like a vague reference to like Steve jobs is, you know, what happens if you put a man on a bicycle and you know, like how fast can he, as the bicycle was kind of entering our world, I thought, what if you kind of mixed art with the bicycle?You know, what, what happens if you, you know, Make an artist's website. So I was like one of the first people I knew that made an artist's website. And I remember, it was, I had, was having lunch with my mentor. Who's, the late John Baldessari. He was a great, great, great artist. And, he's famous for, you know, he burned all this stuff and graduate school and then became a conceptual painter, you know, very, you know, Howard work in, you know, conceptual anyway.So I brought my laptop to this Mexican restaurant in Venice, and I said, I wanted to show you something. I made a website and our studios were really near each other. And he said, Oh, I, I don't know if I would do that. If I were you, I was like, why not? He said, because you're, you'll piss off the dealers, the galleries, the galleries, you shouldn't be selling directly.It's going to take away from what their job is. You know, when you hang a show and you have art in the gallery, the gallery is selling the artist and it's their job, you know, and artists are supposed to be kind of this, you know, semi mute, black turtleneck wearing, you know, mysterious, mystical ShawMan goddess.I call it goddess on the hill. Like you're not supposed to really get in the way of what your artists about. And so I thought, oh gosh, you know, this is, and I had put the paintings for a show was about to have. And so I started making, so my postcard for that show had the name of the show and it had the name of the website, cause no galleries had website.Then this is in like the two thousands, you know, this is a long time ago. And I remember meeting people when I handed them a postcard. If like I felt comfortable with them, I would like secretly write a password so that they could see the website,[00:07:20] Nathan:Oh was you were, you had the website, but it was[00:07:24] Kimberly:Yeah. So I password protected it. I password protected it because John Baldessari told me that it's probably not a good idea to have a website.This is again, no artists ad website.[00:07:35] Nathan:How did the galleries and the community[00:07:37] Kimberly:The galleries didn't have websites either. And the galleries, I remember. They started it. Like some of them had websites, but it was super janky. It was like sometimes most of the time they did an, and it was just sort of this mysterious world that 99.9, nine, 9% of the public didn't understand.Doesn't understand it's better now. And you'd have to be walking down the street or you'd have to know somebody who knows somebody, you know, it's, it was just a different world then.[00:08:08] Nathan:But did any of those negative things come about? Like, did anyone look down on you on it for having a website and for[00:08:14] Kimberly:No, no, no. Eventually I just said, screw it. And I took the password off.And, interestingly, I don't want to date myself, but I think I already have, but the at the time flash was very. sexy. And it was like, and so artists would have, if they did have website, firstly, they would be horribly designed and they would have like a flash animation of a curtain opening and a door.And it was very like CD rom mentality. Like, you know, it was pre-internet thinking, you know, anyway, like I said, the big nerd here.[00:08:48] Nathan:Flash was big until 2000, like the iPhone 2007.[00:08:52] Kimberly:Until Steve jobs killed it, just took a knife. He took a sword and he just, during a keynote, just, you know,[00:09:01] Nathan:Yeah. Oh, and the two biggest reasons were, that the bandwidth of the phones couldn't handle it. And then also the battery life on the phones couldn't handle it.[00:09:10] Kimberly:Wasn't there another reason there was another technical reason that had to do with plays well with others. I can't remember exactly what it was,[00:09:20] Nathan:Yeah. I mean, it was a restricted technology. Like it was owned Macromedia. And so probably that apple was trying to do to get to play. And Adobe was playing hardball and apple was probably like, okay,[00:09:31] Kimberly:Yeah,[00:09:32] Nathan:You know, we'll play this[00:09:33] Kimberly:Yeah. It was, was, it was, it was just the evolution of, you know, of Photoshop and Adobe products. And so I grew up with Adobe. I learned I was an early adopter, always, you know, I just sort of like analogy. Yeah.[00:09:49] Nathan:I want to dive into all kinds of things. I want to talk about, more in the financial world and the business of that and everything else. But back and maybe start earlier in your career.[00:10:01] Kimberly:Than elementary school.[00:10:04] Nathan:I guess we didn't go to elementary school a little bit after elementary school. What what did the early days of your career look like[00:10:12] Kimberly:I was a, you know, I'm a first, or I guess I'm a second generation American, so, and I'm Jewish. So of course I was supposed to be a doctor. So my, we used to get, you can be anything you want just as long as you're a surgeon first. So I got the makings of a woman's surgeon and, you know, it was just like, as a book that was a book that I received many times in my middle school years.And then, you know, it was like, that's great, you're so talented. But you know, you really, you know, after you get out of medical school, you can, it was just sort of what you did in my family. And, and my father he was a well-known surgeon and he became an, I don't want to say artist. He became a writer, so he's a well-known writer.And he started writing. So he kind of became an artist before my eyes, you know, so as I was getting out, as I was graduating college, he published his first bestselling. That was just, and I would like sit at the book, you know, when he gave a lecture at an art gallery, because it was called art and physics.His name is Leonard Shlain so I would like sell, watch him, sell the books, you know, like give a lecture and then I would check out and I would get, take people's cash and then give them a book, you know, at the end of the lecture. And he used to tell me, he used to say, honey, you have to be shameless.You have to be willing to just talk in front of four people. It doesn't matter. You just need to do it. If it's just, it was just a big, it did. It made an imprint on me because I was watching him grow out of his own discomfort zone, which I still struggle with of talking to people like instead of through your paintings or, you know, talking to an audience saying being on video, it took me six months to figure out how to be on video, but I'm getting ahead of it.So you asked me like my CR about my career. So I was an English major. I went to an English, major architecture, minor at UC Berkeley. And at the time that I was graduating, painting was considered dead. And I know that that for artists today, they don't quite appreciate that. But after abstract expressionism, there was sort of this mood in the art world that everything had been done and like, forget about figuration was the last thing people wanted to see, you know, and I wanted to paint people.So I just figured, okay, I'm going to just do that on my own, but I'm going to, I love reading. I love writing. So I became an English major and I was valedictorian of, of the UC Berkeley English department. And so my first job, I wanted to combine my love for art and literature. So my first job was.Design. So my, so I, was mentored by a gentleman named Walter Lander, who is the founder of landlord associates. And he was sort of the west coast, Milton Glaser, Milton Glaser from a design point of view, like he was, he just recently passed in the last five or so years, but he like did the, I love New York, you know, like he's this famous, famous graphic designer because the field of graphic design is, is relatively new.It's relatively, it's like a century old, you know, like th the serious field of it. And Walter was a pioneer in it. And he did, you know, my first job was like working cause I, cause I minored in architecture was, helping design the shell oil, gas station, you know,So I was doing like architecture design, and then he asked me to write speeches.And so they had, their company was kind of designed like a brain. So they had like a language division and they had like the design division, like they did the loose soon milk and they were so famous then such leaders. They had 1800 people in offices all over the world and it was like a big deal. And they had an office on a ferry boat.So that was my first job out of college. I was a speech writer for Walter and I was in the, I was in the word department. Like I think I designed, I helped name, a cigarette, you know, like was just a weird, but it was fascinating, you know? And it was meeting fascinating people. The grateful dead would like come over on the boat after it was, it was, it was a wild time at, in San Francisco in the late eighties, early nineties.Totally wild. So, So I was like, so all the designers are starting to learn Photoshop. So there was this thing called Photoshop because they were doing everything by hand, you know? And then I was like, oh, so I got Photoshop 1.0, you know, and then I had th there was no layers. So you had to do everything in alpha channels.And it's interesting just to be a big nerd. Cause you're a designer too, right? I mean that's yeah. Yeah. So if you can try to imagine there was Photoshop without layers, it meant that you had to do everything inside the masking tool that's built in that nobody really uses or knows about now called alpha channels.So I had to create everything using masks, but it was very oddly more similar to what you did with your Exacto knife and ruler, know, I still think one of the biggest, the saddest things about Photoshop. I mean, I think everybody should know it, but it has some feature bloat, but I think it kind of buries the power of alpha channels.And I think that if people knew how to use it, it would like, it's like a little thing to know that would hugely leap them out of the more artificial aspects of doing those filters on things.[00:16:00] Nathan:Right.[00:16:01] Kimberly:Anyway, like I you have to be careful with me because I can go into real. I can crawl real deep into these nerdy things.But anyway,[00:16:08] Nathan:Are there other things from those early days of, of the graphic design art agency, like that kind of world, that you still take with you today[00:16:19] Kimberly:Thousands of Gillian percent. One of them is the four DS that every project is discover, design develop, deploy. And I know I lost that. I also saw that, like, if you could name it, you could charge it.[00:16:32] Nathan:Is there a story behind that? If you could name it, you could charge for it.[00:16:35] Kimberly:You know, you'd see these hundreds of thousands of million dollar contracts going out to these major people. And I used to have to help write the proposals and I would see how they would divide they'd phase out, like a lot of designers. Again, I don't, I hope we're so not too off topic, but a lot of designers will not charge for discovery.You know what I mean? Because they haven't named it. They didn't name it They'd Just be like, oh, let me Research all about your company. And then you're going to pay me to give you some designs, and then I'll give you the designs and then hopefully they're smarter. Anyway, like I said, big, big topic.[00:17:10] Nathan:Yeah. But think there are a lot of people listening who are in the either freelance or agency space and they, provide services to newsletters or creators or they're growing their own on the side. And I think it's a really important point that, if you're if you're structuring your proposals and all your interactions with clients around the deliverable, then you're failing to talk about a substantial portion of the work And probably the part of the work that differentiates you from the other freelancers who are just like, oh, you need a logo. And they dive like right into Photoshop or whatever tool. Whereas if you're good at what you do, you're probably taking a step back and looking at the whole landscape and spending probably more than half of your time in that Research discovery and learning stage rather than the deliverable stage.[00:17:56] Kimberly:It's actually the most important time intensive stage of any project. And so not just design. I mean, I think you saw my Ted talk, the creative process in eight stages. And I think I talked about how as an artist, I don't want to give anybody whiplash, but like you, as an artist, you have, a period of time where it's like a rest in music where you don't, you're not making work.It doesn't look like you're doing anything on the outside, but that's the most important part. And it's when. Gathering, but you're doing it in a subconscious, like in many different ways when I'm, when I'm making a painting, I'm having to listen a lot, you know, you have to listen and look and just inhale before you can exhale.So anyway, that, but I mean, we could, I think, I think we could do a whole hour on Landour. Cause that was just a, such an interesting, you know? And, and I was actually, I was actually there, I dunno. Well, you're, you probably weren't born, but there was a, Coke released a new design and they, they, and Landour was the leader of this new design.And I was like in the boardroom, in my. In pantyhose. Cause that's what we that's what, like you had aware that it was very far, it was like mad men. It was like mad men where like everybody smoked and the women were gorgeous and the men would like have these glass offices on the side of the boat. And they would like go in and light up a cigarette and call London, you know, like they were like, or Japan and, and they had, it was just extreme, chic, crazy environment, very male dominated.And I was like, I'll often the lone woman in a room, you know, but anyway, that's a separate side conversation and they were introducing the new Coke and it was a flop. It was like, it was like, there was a backlash against the new design because it had like big fat. It was like, whereas the old Coke kind of has that Victorian, which they still use now that, that very Sarah fee or Nate almost like your create above your head, but more, you know, whereas.Where the new version they were doing was super kind of chunky. It was like new Coke, you know, anyway. But, it was a wild experience. I wrote an essay about it and I'll, I'll give it to you if you, if[00:20:35] Nathan:Yeah, we'll put it the Shona[00:20:36] Kimberly:Yeah,[00:20:38] Nathan:On time on that.[00:20:39] Kimberly:Yeah, no, the whole, here's the thing. I wanted to be an artist, and a lot of times I believe a lot of, and I believe there's a lot of people who have an artist inside them and a lot of times they will, work in a field that brings them near art decisions to make themselves feel better.That they're not being an actual artist. And I was one of those people.[00:21:08] Nathan:Okay. So how did that play out for you of your you're close to the design and that sort of[00:21:14] Kimberly:I was like, yeah, it was, I couldn't be closer. I was like, I was like in, I was behind the curtain of Oz doing the, with the, with the best people and everything. Again, this is so long ago, but, but I felt like technology at the time, again, Photoshop was just starting. There was no whatever. I was like, you know, I needed, I need a break.I need to like push the table over. So I quit. I moved to Paris to paint for a year. I played piano in bars at night. That was like a whole other wild. We could do a whole show on that, but, you know, then I was like, well, I can't, I'm not going to be able to make a living doing this. Like I was painting, I was sitting at the sore bone and I was like, I had this little gig in this bar, but it was a couple of Franks and I wasn't legal in Paris.And I just had this big because of my literature background I have does such a, you know, I love you. I was so somewhat of afraid.[00:22:11] Nathan:So how old were you when you[00:22:14] Kimberly:I was in my early twenties.[00:22:16] Nathan:Okay. When you, quit and said it's time to do painting.[00:22:20] Kimberly:Yeah. I was like, it wasn't a straight line. And that's another thing. Like most artists don't like some artists grow up and everybody goes, oh, you're so talented.Which by the way, like hate that expression. I must like tell people, like don't ever tell people they're talented. Say you have great raw material, you know, just say, you know, just like great mom material, but like, you have to like do it for eight hours a day in order to like express something. Great. And then, then we'll talk about talent, but in any case, so some people have parents that say, you're honey, you're so talented.I want to send you to art school. I want to spend a couple hundred grand and I'm going to send you to art school. Undergrad, let's say a good, let's say a typical artist, a college education is this amount. And then I want you to get an MFA from Yale or the best school and have that checked off. And then I want you to go get in galleries and be an artist there's 0.01% of artists have that route.They have parents that say, we support this. This is good. This is a good plan. I would say that's like a very rarefied small group. Cause you have to have, well, there's so many things that need to happen in order to have that setup. Most people, most artists, even artists that I know, like one of my good friends Enrique he was a PA getting his PhD in physics read my dad's book, art and physics and decided he wanted to be a painter[00:23:49] Nathan:Okay,[00:23:50] Kimberly:So like, there's a whole bunch of artists that were doctors that were lawyer, you know, that, that, that they, they were catching the train of you know, the I'm a good student, I'm a diligent worker and they, they, you get routed onto a track and then you're on that track. And then suddenly you wake up at at 30 or whatever, and you say, you know, I'm here and I'm super successful, but this isn't necessarily really how I want to be spending my time.You know? I mean, th this is the conversation, right? You know, how do you, how do you decide and what you can want changes in your life? You know, but if you know what you're pull, the tether poll is like, if you know what, your deep inner core desires. are And, you know, and you, you have, you're remotely in touch with that and you, you need to go, you need to go towards that light.You need to go towards that center then everything will radiate out from you afterwards.[00:24:58] Nathan:Was there a catalyst that pushed you, you know, you were thinking about it, you're feeling this, but what was the thing that made you go like, all right, I'm[00:25:06] Kimberly:Well, okay. Like I said, we don't have enough time to get into all of this, but there were, I made three huge dramatic, you know what? I don't know. Maybe it's a Monty Python movie, I don't know. But like when you push the table over and you throw all the plates and you break everything, like you just come, it's not a reboot, it's way more violent than that.Just kind of like you take the tablecloth out and you just say I'm out of here. You know, I think I did that three times before I got closer to. You know what it is. And one of them was moving to LA after moving to Paris, I moved to New York and then, then I moved to LA and I was like, okay, this time is going to be it I'm being artist.Like, and you know, it's a couple of years later, it's after Paris. Like, you know, cause you have to get, you have to, I had to make money. You know, I had to make a, I had to have a job. And so I had to kind of like do, do design work and stuff like that. So when I moved to LA, my first, I went to a Mac conference, like it was like 60 booths.It was so small, like Mac was seen a teeny little thing and, and Microsoft was the big thing windows and,[00:26:18] Nathan:Yeah.[00:26:19] Kimberly:And I made a business cards and I said, it said artist. And then when I, I walked, went to this conference and I was practically like often the only woman, you know, and I would say, yeah, I'm an artist.And I know. And so the first job I got was making the first CD rom for apple computer that they said distributed to every single apple. So they distributed over 2 million copies worldwide, and my name was on it. And that kind of, that was a huge breakthrough because suddenly I was being offered insane jobs.And next thing you know, I was anyway, like, I don't want to dwell on this because we haven't talked about newsletters yet.[00:27:01] Nathan:That is okay. that is okay. So you just made a leap from, I went to this conference to,[00:27:08] Kimberly:Yeah, by the way speaking, we started with going to a conference.Yeah.[00:27:12] Nathan:A big deal. We are we talking about that as well, but this leap from going to the conference to your work, being on the CD,[00:27:19] Kimberly:Well, so they were, it was like, again, I was on the bleeding edge. I could not explain to my father Who would come down and visit me. In the warehouse. I, it was, it was an artist and a coder who, but they had both met in art school and they brought me on to be the creative director.And it was like, it was almost no money at first. And then it became like a bigger thing and apple, the more that apple saw it, the more they were like, wow, this is really good. so then the next conference I went to was in San Francisco was Macworld and my art was everywhere, everywhere, and I got job offers from Imagineering. They wanted me to design why the Disney, they wanted to be the head. Of Warner music was doing a new interactive division and digital don't digital.I can't remember the names, but it was very, it was a very heady time. It was very, it was very fun. I felt like, wow, I found this place that has it's the intersection of art design, narrative and technology. And it was exactly where I want it to be. And that was just, that was sort of, and I set up an easel in my office, I had a lot of people working for me and it was just, it got very, it got very fancy, you know, and I, and I took a lot of, I took a lot of like what I knew at Landour to attach in this before email this before the internet.[00:28:45] Nathan:You're talking early nineties at this point,[00:28:48] Kimberly:Yeah. Like you no, like a mid yeah. Mid nineties, you know, 96, maybe. So, yeah. So I took a lot of my, knowledge that I gleaned from working at land or like the discover design develop, deploy to whip these engineers and designers into shape, you know? And anyway, I was still stalking what I really wanted to do, you know?[00:29:10] Nathan:Okay. So tell me more about the difference between what you wanted to do and what you were doing, because you just described your art being on everything.[00:29:17] Kimberly:No, no, no, actually, honestly, honestly like I would listen to like Liz fairs, exile in Guyville, as I drove downtown by the toy factory in downtown Los Angeles back and forth, like every day, like at these, I was a big album listener.And when I was designing, I would listen to full albums and I was just like, wow, this is it. I am so excited and energized and everything. then I started studying painting again. So I started so like I had taken a hiatus. And then I got into the, Otis, which is the art school here, You know, when you get professional, when you become a professional in anything, even being an artist, there's a, single-minded rigor focus and clarity. one brings their whole self to what they're doing, you know? And if you know that if If you've been successful in anything else or anything like that, you can, if you bring that to your art, there's literally nothing that can stop.You. You become a wire cutter. It's like, you're going to munch through like, I, you know, really understanding, painting in the deepest way possible. Like I was thinking if I can understand alpha channels, I can figure out how to tone a canvas. You know, just like I just, because painting is a technology, honestly.I took everything in my being to it. And that was like a third moment. Like that was like another moment I skipped some moments, but there was like where I was knocking at the door, knocking at the door. And then I knew that in my art would become the, that I had when I started painting in full force.Like not just having it in my office, but saying this is what I'm going to do. And I'm going to do it as so ferociously, like stand back, everybody, nothing is going to get in my way.[00:31:13] Nathan:So you were painting, I mean, you had is this like painting a few hours a week, a few hours a day, and then you dove into doing that, just like.[00:31:22] Kimberly:This is like 40 hours. I mean, I basically gave myself an assignment and my assignment was I was going to paint a hundred new. Because that's the hardest thing to do as a body. Cause you have to deal with the translucency of skin. And I could literally talk about painting all day, but you have to deal with light form and shadow and thinking in three dimensions and it creates it's.I don't want to knock marketing and technology and the stuff that you do, but painting is that most people do, but painting is a true, like you have to really, it's a very intellectual as well as mindful and spiritual, but it's a very, it's a very deep, deep, deep way to approach the world. And when you become a painter or you actually like listen to the little voice inside you that says that they want to learn this.It's a skill, it's a skill. And when you do that, your brain expands and your world expands and you see things differently. So it's a very transformative thing and it takes years. It takes years and years. So my assignment was I'm going to paint a hundred nudes and, and if I have like 10 good ones, I can have a show.[00:32:41] Nathan:So I want to tie that to maybe the experience that other creators listening would have, or anyone who's on the fence about getting started. Right. It might not be painting that they're trying to do, but they've had these fits and starts of like, I'm going to, learn to code, start a podcast, start a newsletter, any of these things, you know, learning to play an instrument, whatever it is.And then like start and it goes, maybe it goes well for a week or a month, or like what, what advice would you[00:33:11] Kimberly:Isn't there, isn't there like a guru isn't there like a guru in the subject that calls it, the. Who's that guy. Do you know what I'm talking about? Yeah. Somebody told me that, cause I was saying this to somebody and they were like, oh yeah, that's somebody's Seth, Godin's the dip. But yes. You know, when I was younger and all through all through my, you know, middle school and high school and college, I played piano quite seriously.I was a classical pianist and whenever I would learn a difficult piece, I would play it over and over and over again. And I would have to, like, I would start to suck. I would get better, but then I would start to suck and I'd have to walk away and then come back at it the next day before I would be able to play it perfectly.Like, I mean, you know,[00:34:01] Nathan:Yeah.[00:34:04] Kimberly:Learning an instrument actually teaches you this better than anything, because if you make a painting at first and it sucks, you can be easily thwarted, like a, you know, a drawing or whatever. But, but in order to like worry the bone of like how to get that legato, right. And that Greek piano concerto or something like you got to just sort of do it again and again, and again and again, you know, like it's, the fundamental way to learn is you, you imitate, assimilate, and then you can improvise.So you have to like, you play these pieces. And so with anything, you're going to be thwarted in the beginning many times and you can't give up, you have to say, okay, well, I don't care if it even sucks. I don't care if I'm going to fail. If I'm gonna fail, I'm gonna fail big. Like I'm[00:34:52] Nathan:Right[00:34:52] Kimberly:Go all out.Let's just go on.[00:34:54] Nathan:But that specific assignment that you gave yourself of painting 100 nudes, do you think that an assignment like that is a good way to go as a creator of saying this is the commitment that I'm going to make, I'm going to get to a hundred podcast episodes or I'm going to, I don't know, write a hundred blog posts, and then I can decide if this is something I actually want to pursue.[00:35:13] Kimberly:Absolutely. I think that when you make a commitment like that, to devote your energy into building a body of work of any kind in any media, you, your life will change everything. You are going to gain skills that involve every facet of that media. So like, if you're a podcaster and let's say you record in iMovie you're going to learn iMovie or whatever they, whatever they edit podcasts.In And, and I think if, you know, if Leonardo DaVinci were alive today, trusts me. He would know Photoshop He would know he would be all over this stuff, you know, he would love, he would love it in this nether world space, because there's, I'm, I'm going off topic a little bit because there's a little bit of a prejudice in the art world where people were thinking they were resisting the newer technological versions of artwork.But back to process, what you were saying is that if you do something in a committed way and you basically measure it and say, I'm going to do it until I get to this point, I think a hundred might be excessive, but you're going to get the hang of it.[00:36:28] Nathan:Yeah[00:36:28] Kimberly:I mean, I haven't mixed feelings though, about blogging cause I started a blog again, when I was, really getting into.Consuming. I mean, consuming isn't the right word. When I was throwing my entire body into the art world, one of the things that I did to expand my own knowledge was to write about other artists. And I think that's also something that's super unspoken, especially in the art world, because a lot of artists are just saying Me me me I want attention.I want to get people to focus on my show and my work, and I want a gallery and I want this and that. And I think one of the most important, aspects of breaking through to any next level of anything is generosity. Generosity of your attention to other people who are doing the same thing. And that for me, that general, I mean, I didn't think of this.This is red, this is a in retrospect, but at the time when I look back on it, I was airlifting artists that nobody had heard of and writing about them along with other big art, you know? And so I had a successful weekly column where I was keeping a blog again, this was before social media and that's how, and then the Huffington post came along and then I started publishing it, the, having a post.And that's how I said, I was asked by Arianna Huffington to be the, to found an art section. And so I was like, I was perfectly positioned because I was, I was a big nerd. I had had these other experiences. I was a full-on painter. I was having shows galleries the whole thing. And then she was building this incredible Site to celebrate bloggers. And I was one of the bloggers So I had to build an audience from zero to 10 million people within two years. I didn't have to that's what happened.[00:38:26] Nathan:Right.I have so many things that I want to ask about in this, one thing that I want to highlight that you talked about is as you're doing the painting, there's the side of it, of, Research where you're researching other painters, learning from them and all that. Most people keep that Research to themselves, right?That is not a public thing that happens. And I think a lot of the most successful creators that I see are the ones who do that recent. And, and share their notes and share that and work in public and do the interviews and all of that that you were doing. because it does a couple things. One people follow you, not only for your own work, but then also for your notes on other people.And then too, it's incredible for meeting people. Like when you do a profile, either if they're a, say an upcoming artist or someone who's established either way, they're going to be like, when you, you know, when you send them an email, they'll like respond and be interested and engaged. And, you know, I mean, that's a reason that I do this podcast is so that I can meet and hang out with people that I want to more aboutIt's amazing for network.[00:39:30] Kimberly:Yes. I think you're exactly spot on. This is no different than what I did with artists, this, except for I wasn't involving video, I was writing about it and interviewing them. You're right. You're absolutely right. I also think that you can get too carried away with that though. Like you have to be careful, you have to make sure that you're, you know, I can become easily like Clydesdale the horse.I'm like, well, that's another month and I have to do another,[00:39:57] Nathan:It becomes more important than the art, which was the[00:40:00] Kimberly:Well, yeah,[00:40:01] Nathan:It feels more time than[00:40:02] Kimberly:Yeah, yeah. Like, so eventually I had to leave, because it was just sort of eclipsing. It became so much bigger than everything else I was doing that I had to like go, okay, this isn't, you know, I've got a show coming up. I can't devote all this time and energy. And then of course, social media kind of made it all really different.[00:40:24] Nathan:Like in what way?[00:40:25] Kimberly:Well, because not only we could, you know, writing a really thoughtful piece about an artist and looking at their work and, you know, relating it with art history. And I also found that if I could relate it to like a contemporary event, like there was this one painter who painted battle scenes and we were just going to war with Iraq, I think, anyway, we were going to war somewhere.You know, it was a horrible time, but like, I would talk about going, you know, this contemporary news event. And I would link it with the artist who was painting these battle scenes. And then seeing that it went, go.[00:41:04] Nathan:Right.[00:41:04] Kimberly:Was another, that was another big learning lesson is like, if you put a number in a headline, like 10 things, you, you should tell, you know, 10 rules for your kids and screens, you know, then people would read that more.So I could see the analytics of what people clicked on. You know, that was like a interesting learning experience. But when social media happened, then suddenly you also had to tweet it. You had to post it on Facebook and then you had to tweet about it and then it just got to be social media. here's my take, if I could just say one thing, because I want to get it out there.I think social media is great for first impressions so that when people see you for the first time they're going to go that person's like a real artist or they're a real whatever, and they're legit. And they don't just have like three things that they've said about the subject. They've actually like, I trust that they've done some deep things.Like me painting a hundred nudes, you know, like this person knows how to paint.So I think social media, it's just so easy to get carried away. I hope one day it goes away. Is that terrible to say? I think emails should be everything. It should just go away.[00:42:14] Nathan:I don't think it's terrible to say at all. You have something in your Ted talk. you talked about like the compulsion to paint being taken away by your smartphone and these distractions, And I'd love for you to talk about that because I think there's so many things of like, if I'm on Twitter or checking my email, or even interacting with the ConvertKit team 2,700 times a day, you know, it makes it so much harder as a creator.And so I like, I just want to hear more of your experience there.[00:42:45] Kimberly:Well, I mean, in order to even get into my zone mentally to paint, I have to like have at least 90 minutes where I haven't spoken with anybody. Like I just need to kind of like clear it. Like I need to, I mean, I can be in it and I've got all these, you know, because people everybody's different. Some people like beginnings, some people like middles, other people's like ends.So you have to get in touch with which person you are, you know? So I, I love middles and beginning. I actually like all of them, but like, I'm better at certain things. So whenever I go into the studio, I have to start in paintings that are in the middle, that many going on at once. so you have to get in touch with like what time of day you're best at.And I always begin things at the end of the day when I'm already like nice and a well-oiled machine, well-oiled creating Machine.I never begin things in the morning. I always begin. at the end of the day, I never begin paintings in the morning. I was beginning, you know, I mean, I, I'm not, I know I'm not answering your question.Your question is, compartmentalizing your time to protect it away from social media. I teach a master class and I teach a Masterclass with artists who are building their first body of work, or they, they want to build a body of work in the masterclass.I make them take an oath an Instagram oath Instagram is it's so draining psychologically, emotionally, mentally, and the effort that you put into it that you really have to like commit and, and, and artists feel pressure to post their progress and post once a day and stuff like that.And the truth is, that algorithm, the algorithm is so fraught right now because you really only see the last 20 people that you liked more often than not. And you're not, it it's just, it's not healthy. It's not healthy for a visual artist Because you'll be on it. You check it like a diabetic checking their insulin level.It's just like, oh, did it get enough? Likes all that. It's like, Ugh. So I use, later to post once a week because I don't really want to deal with it. So I'll do like four months at a time. But if like I have a museum show opening up on Saturday, so I have to make a post this week. And so that that's like in my brain, oh God, I got to make a post this week.And when my book was coming out, like that's a whole other topic about promote, you know, how to tell people and that a book is coming out. yeah. So I just kind of look at it like, you know, kind of like a creative sinkhole,[00:45:15] Nathan:Yeah. And so it[00:45:15] Kimberly:So it[00:45:15] Nathan:Makes sense to avoid it. I think we hear that advice from a lot of talented creators and it's easy to be like, yeah. Yeah. But I can, I'm the person who can sit down and write with a moment's notice, you know? And then you you get totally stuck on writer's block or whatever thing, because you're like, you actually didn't create that space.And, like you talked about in the Ted talk of that time to like daydream and to actually be there, present with yourself and your thoughts.[00:45:42] Kimberly:Yeah, it's true. I mean, there's this thing in neuroscience called empathetic mirroring. Do you know about[00:45:48] Nathan:I don't know.[00:45:49] Kimberly:It's this, it's like when you see somebody, for example, write on a chalkboard, the neurons in your brain, I'm not going to say this. Right? So if a neuroscientist says I'm like slightly wrong, but like, it, it, it has this effect where you feel like you're doing it, you know, like, and it's, that's why people love to watch people write things.That's why a chalkboard is an excellent device for, I actually have a chalkboard in my office because I started to. Take videos of me make with my talking points of me writing it on a chalkboard, because even though it's considered like, you know, yesteryear technology, it actually helps people receive the information better to see it written[00:46:34] Nathan:Rather than being next[00:46:36] Kimberly:Rather than just show a PowerPoint slide.Yeah. And so this, the act of seeing it rhythm, but so if, if you think about the power of empathetic mirroring, that's going on in your brain, when you look at something happening, think about how much it can pollute your brain. If you're watching a stream of all these things happening in your Instagram feed or your Facebook feed, it's like dangerous.Like you have to be protective of what is going inside your mind. It's that they say like garbage in, garbage out, you know,[00:47:04] Nathan:I want to hear about you getting into the world of, of like teaching classes and that side of it, and then you have a book as well. There's a lot.[00:47:12] Kimberly:Oh yes. So I have this book,[00:47:15] Nathan:There[00:47:15] Kimberly:So, you know, around a decade into, you know, being a serious painter, I started to feel bad from the fumes because painting isn't really taught the way other things are taught. Painting is sort of like, there's, there's been this somewhat mystical, you know, here's a bunch of art supplies go to the art store and then let's see what you come up with.And then the, the, the classes tend to be more about critiques, about what you've done versus about,[00:47:45] Nathan:How do something.[00:47:46] Kimberly:About the, the true, true granular house, you know, the, how, like the basics, like things that you should know. And, so I started to get sick and I happened to be the arts editor at the time of the Huffington post.And I reached out to, and blogging was a very interesting, it was around 2004 or five, I think. Maybe, maybe it was a little bit later, but it was an interesting time because other people were thinking what I was thinking and I could see it in search for it. Whereas I couldn't, I couldn't have done that a decade earlier.And so I would reach out to leaders in the field, scientists, whatnot, to write about this topic of safety, you know, like that. And, but then when I read and I had, by the way, been consuming, Disneyland books, everything about painting, and I just saw this huge gaping hole of knowledge of how. Communicated. So I started writing this book all about painting and the book that I ended up publishing with Chronicle books is just one small piece of it because it was kind of too big.It was like James Joyce's Ulysses, you know, it was like a tone. It was like a Magnum Opus. and it's one of the key things that people don't realize is that you don't need to use solvent's P many people believe that you need to have like an open can of turpentine or some kind of solvent to dip your brush and defend the oil paint.So it's like super basic and most people when they go to the art store, and this is just my short, my short, skinny on the book. As most people, when they go to the art store, it would be like only buying canned or prepackaged. They don't know what's in it, you know, they don't know like that you don't need all those things.Like, but if you were like learning how to cook, you would know the difference between a garlic and a shallot and when to use canola oil or olive oil extra-virgin, you know, so I wanted to create, to start a book called the Y that was like Strunk and White's elements of style, but for oil paintings. So that's like the famous book that most writers use and just sort of shows you.And it's funny, actually, it's like a great book. So I wrote that book and that's called the new oil painting and it's published by Chronicle and it came out in June and it's like staying at the top, like five books of oil painting, which is great, you know? So I'm very excited about that. But in any way, in that journey of writing the book, the book, the book deal I got was two years ago.It was like a while ago. And so Susan. Did that I thought, you know, I would be a fool to not have a class that went with the book. So to the summer of 2019, I had, I had like four solo exhibitions in a row and I thought, okay, I'm going to devote six months and I'm going to record videos and I'm going to do that.You know? So I created this class that I wish that I had, and it was way bigger than the book. It was like everything I've ever thought about oil painting and that's called oil painting, fluency and flow. And, so yeah, so I launched a class, so the classes are out there[00:50:52] Nathan:Are the classes something that, you know, you're teaching in an online course? Are you there in person or through a partnership with.[00:50:58] Kimberly:So once I, once I learned about. That you can oil paint anywhere like you, Nathan tomorrow could decide, you know what? I w I've got an artist in me. I want to, I want to learn how to paint and you could set it up next year, you know, like in a little side table next to your computer, and there would be no fumes, no nothing.And it's much better for the environment it's not made out of plastic. It's like, you know, you could do it. So I wanted to get the word out. And, so my first class is, and so I was started teaching at major institutions. So the Anderson ranch in Colorado and the Otis where I actually took lessons, I taught there.And then, I just thought to myself, you know, this is highly inefficient because I have to like schlep over there and go there for, you know, hours at a time. And I could reach so many more people if I recorded. Instruction. And so I made these recordings, that's a hybrid of recordings and live sessions and critiques.And I have, you know, I have about 78 students right now. They're from all over the world and it's like the boast enriching wonderful, fabulous thing I've ever done[00:52:08] Nathan:Yeah.[00:52:09] Kimberly:To being an artist, you know,[00:52:11] Nathan:And so how does that interact with the newsletter that you have?[00:52:14] Kimberly:Well, I mean, so all of my experience, just as an artist has taught me that you, your value that you bring to any situation is the people that you can tell about what you do. It's like a tree falls in the forest. Nobody knows you're having a show. You know, you can't just rely on your art dealer.And the The dynamic has changed where. People don't have one, rarely do people have one gallery that represents them. And then they've got a bunch of satellite galleries. So you kind of have to be a little bit more entrepreneurial as an artist. And so you need to gather an email list. And so I stopped blogging and instead I have a newsletter because I want, you know, and I I have a narrative of stories that I tell about creativity about, about like I'll crawl deeply inside the making of a single painting of mine, or maybe another one.And I, and each email I send out, I spend a lot of time on, and it's like a work of art by itself because it's, again, it may be a different thing. a newsletter may be slightly different than a blog, but it's still words and image and it's just how. It's like another work of art, it's another work of art.And I love, using ConvertKit. I mean, I really, really do I tell people about it. I tell people about it all the time, because I think it's, it's the first software I've encountered that, allows you to very easily create a sequence. And, you know, you can I tell people, I say like, if you want to think about it, you could unspool Tolstoy's war and peace.If you wanted, like you could, every week you could give like a little section and you can start at the beginning and it takes the pressure off needing to constantly have every email be a first impression. So you can really get, let people to get, to know you in a much deeper, more personal way, because you create a sequence of letters to them that[00:54:23] Nathan:Right[00:54:24] Kimberly:Over time.[00:54:24] Nathan:Well, I think that's a really important point about starting at the beginning, because when you're sending these one-off emails to your newsletter, you don't know where people are joining. Some people for years and other people that is the very first thing. And so every time I find myself adding these caveats are like, Hey, if you're new here, you know, any of those things and with a, an email sequence, you know, the automated series, it starts at the beginning every time and it works people through it.And so I've had that. I've had so much fun creating those because you can chip away at them. Like I have one that I'm kind of writing now on, I guess it's on personal finance, you know? And it's just things that I wish that I had known as like, Moderately successful creator. Like, Hey, you're now earning a full-time living, what what's next?And so I can just write about that when I feel like it and add to this, that's now like 10 or 12 emails long.[00:55:20] Kimberly:And what's your frequent.[00:55:22] Nathan:That one I said to every week, but if I don't write for it, everyone just kind of pulls up at the end and weights, you know, for the next email. So it's 10 emails And then I add to it. And so like last week I didn't add a new one. And so now there's like a hundred people that are all the way at the end and they didn't get an email last week,[00:55:41] Kimberly:Yeah, no, I have that situation. I have a two year sequence[00:55:45] Nathan:Oh, wow.[00:55:45] Kimberly:I mean, I know like I sound, I probably seem super extroverted and voluble and everything like that, but like, I, I, it's very difficult for me to sell. It's very, it's very not. It's not cool for an artist to be. So like, I mean, it's just hard.It's also just hard for me. It's my personality. Like I even posting on Instagram is like a stressful thing for me. It's like, did I get everything that, you know, like I just, it's just not, I'm not one of those people that just casually throw stuff out there. I just, I'm very thoughtful and I want it, you know, it to be meaningful.And, but anyway, I was having trouble announcing that a workshop was over. Like serious trouble. Like I would put it off and I'd say, I can't do it. I can't press the send button. Like I just, even though you have the schedule feature on the broadcast, I was like, I can't do it. I can't do it. And you know, I, I can't remember the name of the marketing guru who was, have the five day sequence or, you know, basically a launch sequence is a series of emails where you first email is all about it.The second email might address one's reservations about it. The third Emile email might be testimonials. And then the fourth and fifth email are like last chance to get it. Like that to me is like, I would rather have needle eyes surgery than do that, you know, so I built it in, so I basically have the sequence where every quarter there's a launch sequence.Is that crazy[00:57:13] Nathan:No, it's fantastic[00:57:14] Kimberly:Because then, so, so that way, like I can just set it and forget it, like back to the Crock-Pot thinking like, you know, like, you know, just set it and forget it. You're going to sign up. You're going to get an announcement for a walk shop, a workshop a couple months after you've gotten to know me.[00:57:30] Nathan:Do you think that, well actually I guess really quick, the thing that I love about that is you can be completely immersed in your painting, right? And there you are selling a workshop and you're like, you don't, you have to think about it or know about it. Cause you did that work once and now you've finished a whole day of, of painting.Start something new at the end of the day. Cause that's the way that you roll. And then also you can say like finish up and check those sales and check that engagement. See, oh, people.[00:57:58] Kimberly:Yyeah, yeah. I mean, it's, it's just, it's I think people before they're going to buy anything, need to feel. Most people need to feel, you know, a level of comfort about what that person is about. so, you know, I haven't touched you tube. I haven't really, I honestly, I haven't made, I haven't made a huge effort because I've had the book coming out and I F I ha I had a big exhibition in June because, I designed a series of, excuse me.I designed, I painted a series of abstract paintings, for the cover of the book, because I wanted the cover, the book to be stellar and represent like a specified stroke, like hanging in air, like, to just convey the idea of painting and not be like a landscape, because for some crazy reason, if you, if you look up oil, painting, all the books, About oil painting are so poorly designed.It's like, it's strange because you would think people who are artists would care about design, but it's like pink pallet, Tino, bold 14 point font over like a green sunset. it's[00:59:07] Nathan:Yeah, well, design and painting are not necessarily the same thing you happen to come from a world where you have a lot of this. Even those two worlds have intertwined for you a lot over your career. So it makes sense to[00:59:18] Kimberly:Yes, but, but when, when, but if you get, but the painting books, like if you see a PA a painting book that has like a landscape on it, what if you don't like the landscape or they all have a landscape, or it has like the, the, you know, a face that's loosely drawn with, you know, painted with turbine, you know, Alla prima anyway.I've had so many exhibitions and like, I have a, I have a show coming up on Saturday and I've got to tell people about it. So like, I have to be, I'm already out there as an artist. So I have two different sequences and newsletters. I've got like a workshops for people who express interest in a workshop within the main newsletter.Like if, if, like, I'll say like I have this one great newsletter where the subject line is, who is this gorgeous woman? And then I show a picture cause they used to paint these beautiful renditions of the faces of the Egyptian mummies inside the sarcophagus, like beyond gorgeous. Like if you looked it up, you'd say, oh my God, this most beautiful painting I've ever seen.And it looks a lot like Francesco Clemente, which is an artist that like paint uses the same aspect ratio. It's like, you sort of go, oh, that's where that guy got that idea, you know? But. I'll talk about the pigments and that they used to, like, they used to burn mummies and then take the ashes and make a pigment called mummy brown.I know that sounds really kind of gross, but like, but, but they that's what they did. And I I'll say like, if this interests you, you might be interested in like a workshop. then if they say yes, then they'll go into my workshop sequence and they'll get notified when I open them.[01:01:00] Nathan:Are there other things that you do with email and with your newsletter[01:01:04] Kimberly:Yeah. Like I, like, I really want, I really want people to easily update their preferences. So I created a jot form like that simple select, you know, check box check if you're no longer interested in, workshops. No problem. Let me know. And I don't get enough work. Ominous, but hopefully, hopefully you'll put that feature in soon.[01:01:30] Nathan:We're actually working on building that feature now. So,[01:01:33] Kimberly:Are you kidding? When does it come out[01:01:34] Nathan:It's one of those asking where the paintings are done. It'll be done when it's done.[01:01:40] Kimberly:The other thing that I do is I really think gifts are important. And I think the marketer, the marketing community is really cheesy about it. Like they always do like outtakes from friends for reaction shots.And it's just so horrible, but I mean, it's just corny and you know who I'm talking about, but, you know, anyway, a gift is a beautiful thing because it's a movie that plays automatically and it doesn't have sound and. it can be so beautiful and subtle, you know, so every time I make a news that I usually have like an, it's like a work of art to me, you know?And sometimes if I want to emphasize a word, I'll paint a picture of that word and I'll integrate it in it. So like I really spend, I really love making them special. Yeah. I have one about the creative process and about not, not the Ted talk that you saw, but like I have one that's on the lead up to talking about the masterclass.Where it's called the curse of perfection. And I show, I talk about how, when I was a kid, my mother used to always like, she would sometimes wear like super smudge makeup and it was psych, it was called the smoky eye. I mean, they still do it now, but now the beauty people make it super specific, but then it was not that it was a little bit more like, woo.And I found a beautiful GIF of like a smokey eye, like slowly opening and closing. And I then go off on this whole subject about how, you know, it's as a painter, you have to let go of that, of the chains of perfection. You have to let it go in order to.[01:03:22] Nathan:Yeah. Well, I love that you're taking a medium that you know, of email or gifts or any of these things that a lot of people use in one way. And you're bringing those styles in that like class and sophistication and really just the level of effort. I think a lot of people are like hearing. Oh, I'm supposed to have, images or gifts.I'm supposed to be funny. And so they just look for something and slap it in there. And there's a level of effort that's not happening there, but because you're doing these automated sequences and you know that if you put this effort into it, it will last and work for you for years, then it's worth it.You can do a custom painted, you know, word or something like that to illustrate a point.[01:04:04] Kimberly:I mean, I have the luxury of having hundreds of paintings, and pieces of paintings, and video of—there's nothing sexier and more beautiful than watching somebody mix paint. There's literally nothing more gorgeous than that—So, I'm lucky.And I understand that other creators have to find other things, but there's a way to do things that have like a metaphorical—I here's what I would say. I would recommend that people seek to enhance their ability to think in metaphor when they write.So if they're gonna talk about a subject, and they're talking about a roadblock, instead of drawing a boulder on a road, find some other image or GIF. I use a lot of GIFs from ballet. You can find beautiful GIFs just by searching “Swan Lake” GIF, and it implies a physical movement.It goes back into that empathetic mirroring, where you feel that your own body is doing these movements that are surrounding this idea. It's not directly about what you're talking about, but it's like a little bit to the left, or it's just kind of a metaphorical version of it. It creates the space in between what you're literally saying, and what you're actually seeing that ignites the imagination and the view.[01:05:35] Nathan:Yeah. I love that. Just putting that extra bit of effort into defining the thing that's adjacent, rather than blatantly the first thing that came to mind. I think that makes a huge difference.[01:05:46] Kimberly:Yeah,[01:05:46] Nathan:We need to do a part two, because I have like 25 more questions to ask you, and we're out of time.[01:05:52] Kimberly:I'm in. I'm in.[01:05:54] Nathan:This has been amazing. Where should people go to subscribe to the newsletter?[01:05:58] Kimberly:They should go to KimberlyBrooks.com. The newsletter's right there in the footer and on the top. I really love communicating this way, and it's been an honor to be on this podcast, because I really love the product you've created. I really couldn't do it without you—without ConvertKit.So, I just, I'm such a fan, and I'm an evangelist, so kudos to you.[01:06:19] Nathan:Wow, thank you.Well, we're exci

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 10-25-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 5:20


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for October 25th, 2021. Sure you got one dose of Johnson & Johnson, or two doses of Pfizer or Moderna, but you may soon no longer be considered fully vaccinated. The head of the CDC said it may update its definition of what constitutes full vaccination as initial vaccine effectiveness wanes and booster shots are being promoted. Say what you want about it, but the cottage industry of scaring pregnant women about the vaccines is enjoying success. In September, the CDC urged expecting mothers to get vaccinated because complications from COVID can truly be deadly for mother and baby. Risks include stillbirths, restricted growth, and pre-eclampsia. And yet, two-thirds of America pregnant women think the vaccines are more dangerous than COVID and have not been vaccinated. While things continue to look good in many parts of the world, not so in eastern Europe. The number of infections so far there surpassed 20 million yesterday, and they're dealing with the worst outbreak since the pandemic started. Less than half of the population in the region have gotten a single vaccine dose. With just 4% of the world's population, eastern Europe accounts for about 20% of all new cases reported globally. A bleak prediction for unvaccinated Covid survivors from a study out of Yale and the University of North Carolina. On average, they should expect to be reinfected with COVID every 16 to 17 months. COVID hasn't been around long enough, so they studied reinfection in a close viral relative to find out how long natural immunity can be expected to last without any help. An enterprising fellow in Melbourne came up with a way to help those who want to avoid getting vaccinated but enjoy all the benefits therein. He's selling a fake arm online. The idea is you put it in a coat sleeve and hide your real arm inside the coat. Helpful instructions are to remember to wince and pretend there's some pain when the needle goes in. It's not known how many of these have sold, especially since most vaccine shot givers know what a real arm feels like. In the United States cases were down 25%, deaths are down 13%, and hospitalizations are down 18% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,503,806 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: New Hampshire 50%, Vermont 36%, Maine 27%, Rhode Island 19%, and Colorado, Michigan, and Alaska 15%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Goshen, WY. Boundary, ID. Humboldt, NV. Bethel Census Area, AK. Carbon, WY. Nome Census Area, AK. Stark, ND. Inyo, CA. Fremont, WY. And Park, MT. There have been at least 735,930 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 70.7%, and Connecticut and Rhode Island at 70.1%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia unchanged at 40.9%, Idaho at 43.1%, and Wyoming at 43.3%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 57.2%. The five countries with the highest current infection reproduction rate are Czechia, Hungary, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Poland. Globally, cases were down 2% and deaths were down 4% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since October 22. There are 18,015,968 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The U.K. 39,962. Russia 35,660. Turkey 24,792. Ukraine 20,791. And the United States 17,580. There have been at least 4,947,878 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide.... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Capital Allocators
Paula Volent – Star Endowment Manager's Next Act at Rockefeller University (Capital Allocators, EP.219)

Capital Allocators

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 39:30


Paula Volent is the recently named Chief Investment Officer for Rockefeller University's $2.5 billion endowment. Paula previously oversaw Bowdoin College's endowment for twenty years as it grew from $450 million to $2 billion during her tenure and generated returns at the very top of the industry. Bowdoin's Investment Committee Chair, Stan Druckenmiller, describes Paula as an innovative, outside-of-the-box thinker, an aggressive risk taker, and a workaholic whose passion is unlike anyone he has ever seen. Paula is also one of my oldest friends in the business from our time crossing paths at Yale in the mid ‘90s. Our conversation covers Paula's unique career path from art conservation to endowment management and the transferable lessons she learned along the way. In the process, we discuss her approach at Bowdoin and plans for Rockefeller University. Learn More Subscribe: Apple | Spotify | Google Follow Ted on Twitter at @tseides or LinkedIn Subscribe to the mailing list Read the transcripts

A Second Opinion with Senator Bill Frist, M.D.
149 - Dr. Emily Wang, Yale Professor of Medicine, on Mass Incarceration's Impact on Individual & Community Health

A Second Opinion with Senator Bill Frist, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 69:19


Dr. Emily Wang is a professor in the Yale School of Medicine and directs Yale's new SEICHE Center for Health and Justice, which works to stimulate community transformation by identifying the legal, policy, and practice levers that can improve the health of individuals and communities impacted by mass incarceration.  Today with Dr. Wang, we're covering a topic we've never touched on in A Second Opinion: the effect of mass incarceration on individual and community health.  It's an issue that's overlooked and ignored by our traditional healthcare systems – yet so many are impacted: half of Americans have family members who have been incarcerated.  Dr. Wang's expertise on this issue will have you rethinking our approaches to jail, prison, and healthcare.  To read more about what doctors, health system leaders and policymakers can do to support decarceration, Dr. Wang recommends: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2773226.  For a general review on mass incarceration: https://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/lancet/PIIS0140-6736(17)30259-3.pdf.  Additional information on the Transitions Clinic Network: Website: https://transitionsclinic.org/ NPR article: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/12/05/499775644/helping-ex-inmates-stay-out-of-the-er-brings-multiple-benefits   NY Times article: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/29/health/ex-prisoners-health-california.html

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast
The Hero on a Mission

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 11:40


Nothing is as compelling as a hero on a mission.It is so easy to 'drift' through life.Especially for teens. Middle school and high school is a 24/7, 365days/year battle to not be embarrassed. That means trying to fit in.But that is also a ticket to high anxiety and insecurity, and low self-efficacy. Some people choose a different path. Normal, everyday teens can become truly great. What makes them great? They choose a mission. When a core value of yours is violated, choose to step up and lead the charge to improve the world by righting that wrong. Nothing is as compelling as a hero on a mission. Not only can you begin to make your community better now (instead of waiting until you are older), but it is the mission that makes you great. 

This Week in Intelligent Investing
Positioning for Longevity in the Investment World | End of Decades-Long Bull Market in Bonds?

This Week in Intelligent Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 55:40


In this episode, co-hosts Elliot Turner, Phil Ordway, and John Mihaljevic discuss (i) positioning for longevity in the investment world; and (ii) whether we are near the end of the decades-long bull market in bonds. Enjoy the conversation!   About the Co-Hosts: Elliot Turner is a co-founder and Managing Partner, CIO at RGA Investment Advisors, LLC. RGA Investment Advisors runs a long-term, low turnover, growth at a reasonable price investment strategy seeking out global opportunities. Elliot focuses on discovering and analyzing long-term, high quality investment opportunities and strategic portfolio management. Prior to joining RGA, Elliot managed portfolios at at AustinWeston Asset Management LLC, Chimera Securities and T3 Capital. Elliot holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation as well as a Juris Doctor from Brooklyn Law School.. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University where he double majored in Political Science and Philosophy. Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department. John Mihaljevic leads MOI Global and serves as managing editor of The Manual of Ideas. He managed a private partnership, Mihaljevic Partners LP, from 2005-2016. John is a winner of the Value Investors Club's prize for best investment idea. He is a trained capital allocator, having studied under Yale University Chief Investment Officer David Swensen and served as Research Assistant to Nobel Laureate James Tobin. John holds a BA in Economics, summa cum laude, from Yale and is a CFA charterholder.   The content of this podcast is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any security in any jurisdiction. The content is distributed for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice or a recommendation to sell or buy any security or other investment, or undertake any investment strategy. There are no warranties, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness, or results obtained from any information set forth on this podcast. The podcast participants and their affiliates may have positions in and may, from time to time, make purchases or sales of the securities or other investments discussed or evaluated on this podcast.

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture
Julian Reid / Musical Spiritual Hotel: Rest, Hospitality, and Sacred Music

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 46:02


Julian Reid explores the way music and scripture can come together to create a sacred space. Extending metaphors of music as architecture and dwelling and spiritual experience as a river, the jazz pianist, producer, writer, and performer explains a recent project of his, "Notes of Rest," combining African-American spirituals with classical hymns for an experience of spiritual hospitality, gratitude, and proclamation of the Gospel into the full spectrum of human experience, in all its pain, frustration, frenzy, stillness, and joy. Throughout the conversation you'll hear Julian play along to accompany his points; he also graciously provided beautiful meditative interludes, much like the kind you'd experience in one of his "Notes of Rest" sessions. Interview by Matt Croasmun.Show NotesClick here to learn more about Julian Reid's "Notes of Rest"Introduction: Evan Rosa"God has given us music so that above all it can lead us upwards. Music unites all qualities: it can exalt us, divert us, cheer us up, or break the hardest of hearts with the softest of its melancholy tones. But its principal task is to lead our thoughts to higher things, to elevate, even to make us tremble… The musical art often speaks in sounds more penetrating than the words of poetry, and takes hold of the most hidden crevices of the heart… Song elevates our being and leads us to the good and the true. If, however, music serves only as a diversion or as a kind of vain ostentation it is sinful and harmful." (Friedrich Nietzsche at 14 years old; see Friedrich Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography by Julian Young; h/t Brain Pickings)Bringing together music and scriptureEngendering wonder and trust as a seedbed for a life of faithCreating space, the architecture that music createsWeekly liturgical practicesThe ends and uses of music in sacred spacesLiving in a tent, motel—a musical spiritual hotelScripture is like a cathedral or museum.Performance: "Thank You, Lord"Gratitude—the way we enter into hospitality, "what it means to be hosted by God"Hotel art—the artwork invites and calms rather than jarring and provokingCuriosity vs calmnessInvoking a different kind of responseSanitizing the PsalmsPerformance: "Give Me Jesus"Speaking to different registersAimed at an encounter with the living GodGraceProclamation: music and preachingTaking risks over the pulpitKarl Barth: "God tempts the church through God's absence."Kerygma: "proclamation"Performance: "Lord, Hear My Prayer" (Taize)Word and WaterThe metaphor of water utilized in "Notes of Rest"Black musical idiomsFinding the use of Contemporary Christian Music (CCM)Balm in GileadThe Hymns of Isaac Watts, colonizing, historical contextCombining musical genealogiesBraxton Shelly's Healing for the SoulImaginative fuel from the mysticsCistercian monastics: worshipping in silence and solitude; "a long-standing faith"Performance: "Lord, Hear My Prayer / Give Me Jesus" (Medley)Introduction (Evan Rosa)One of the most gripping and influential philosophers of the last 200 years once wrote:"God has given us music so that above all it can lead us upwards. Music unites all qualities: it can exalt us, divert us, cheer us up, or break the hardest of hearts with the softest of its melancholy tones. But its principal task is to lead our thoughts to higher things, to elevate, even to make us tremble… The musical art often speaks in sounds more penetrating than the words of poetry, and takes hold of the most hidden crevices of the heart… Song elevates our being and leads us to the good and the true. If, however, music serves only as a diversion or as a kind of vain ostentation it is sinful and harmful."That Friedrich Nietzsche, written when he was 14 years old.There is plenty of "vain ostentation" in popular music today, and certainly not excluding the music played in church.But the unitive depth and invitation into transcendence that music offers us of course pairs beautifully with scripture. And whatever else might have changed in Nietzsche's thinking, even at the end of his life in Twilight of the Idols, he suggested that "Without music life would be a mistake. The German imagines even God as a songster." And I say: Well, not just the German, but the human.In today's episode, Matt Croasmun welcomes Julian Reid, jazz pianist and producer, writer, and performer (not to mention Yale and Emory educated). You can hear his hip-hop infused jazz project The JuJu Exchange on episode 26 of For the Life of the World, when Julian joined us to talk about How Jazz Teaches us Faith and Justice. Today, Matt and Julian explore the way music and scripture can come together to create a sacred space. Extending metaphors of music as architecture and dwelling and spiritual experience as a river, Julian explains a recent project of his, "Notes of Rest," combining African-American spirituals with classical hymns for an experience of spiritual hospitality, gratitude, and proclamation of the Gospel into the full spectrum of human experience, in all its pain, frustration, frenzy, stillness, and joy.Throughout the conversation you'll hear Julian play along to accompany his points; he also graciously provided beautiful meditative interludes, much like the kind you'd experience in one of his "Notes of Rest" sessions.Thanks for listening.About Julian ReidJulian Reid is a Chicago-based jazz pianist and producer, writer, and performer (B.A. Yale University / M.Div. Emory University). The JuJu Exchange is a musical partnership also featuring Nico Segal (trumpet, Chance the Rapper; The Social Experiment) and Everett Reid—exploring creativity, justice, and the human experience through their hip-hop infused jazz. Their new 5-song project is called The Eternal Boombox. Julian's latest project is "Notes of Rest"—a spiritual mini-retreat that places meditations from the Bible on a bed of music, cultivating rest, contemplation, and creativity in all who will hear Jesus' call.Production NotesThis podcast featured musician Julian Reid and biblical scholar Matt CroasmunEdited and Produced by Evan RosaHosted by Evan RosaProduction Assistance by Martin Chan, Nathan Jowers, Natalie Lam, and Logan LedmanA Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/aboutSupport For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture: https://faith.yale.edu/give

Valley Beit Midrash
Torah with the Way of the Land: The Legacy of German Judaism

Valley Beit Midrash

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 59:53


A virtual event presentation by Professor Paul Franks ABOUT THE EVENT: What is the legacy of German Judaism, and what can it still offer us today? German Judaism began with Moses Mendelssohn's controversial German translation of the Humash in 1783, and ended with the Nazi pogrom of November 1938. The best known slogan of the Torah-true wing of German Judaism is “Torah im derekh erets” (“Torah with the way of the land”). But this slogan is often misunderstood as nothing more than an educational philosophy that came in one flavor. In fact, it is an ideal of humanity articulated, in several competing versions, in the context of the quest for Jewish civil rights. The German-Jewish tradition raises vital questions that remain relevant today: What is the mission of Jews within civil society? What makes a Jewish community Jewish? What role should Jews play within the ongoing struggle for social justice and civil rights? ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Paul Franks is the Robert F. and Patricia Ross Weis Professor of Philosophy and Judaic Studies at Yale University. He was educated at Gateshead Yeshiva; Balliol College, Oxford; and Harvard University. Before arriving at Yale in 2011, he was the inaugural holder of the Jerahmiel S. and Carole S. Grafstein Chair in Jewish Philosophy at the University of Toronto. He has also taught at University of Michigan, Indiana University Bloomington, University of Notre Dame, and University of Chicago, and he has given shiurim at synagogues and Jewish community centers throughout Britain, Israel, and North America. Paul works at the intersection of the Jewish and German philosophical traditions, specializing in Kantian and post-Kantian metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of the humanities and social sciences. He is the translator and annotator, with Michael L. Morgan, of Franz Rosenzweig, Philosophical and Theological Writings (Hackett, 2000); and he is the author of All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism (Harvard, 2005), as well as over fifty academic articles. He is currently writing, with his collaborator Morgan, an ambitious survey that will reveal the dynamic interaction between Jewish philosophy and modern European philosophy from Luria to Levinas, and he is also working on a monograph on Kant's metaphysical and epistemological legacy. -- DONATE: www.bit.ly/1NmpbsP​​​​​​​ For podcasts of VBM lectures, GO HERE: www.valleybeitmidrash.org/learning-library/ www.facebook.com/valleybeitmi...​ Become a member today, starting at just $18 per month! Click the link to see our membership options: www.valleybeitmidrash.org/become-a-member/

80,000 Hours Podcast with Rob Wiblin
#114 - Maha Rehman on working with governments to rapidly deliver masks to millions of people

80,000 Hours Podcast with Rob Wiblin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 102:54


It's hard to believe, but until recently there had never been a large field trial that addressed these simple and obvious questions: 1. When ordinary people wear face masks, does it actually reduce the spread of respiratory diseases? 2. And if so, how do you get people to wear masks more often? It turns out the first question is remarkably challenging to answer, but it's well worth doing nonetheless. Among other reasons, the first good trial of this prompted Maha Rehman - Policy Director at the Mahbub Ul Haq Research Centre - as well as a range of others to immediately use the findings to help tens of millions of people across South Asia, even before the results were public. Links to learn more, summary and full transcript. The groundbreaking Bangladesh RCT that inspired her to take action found that: * A 30% increase in mask wearing reduced total infections by 10%. * The effect was more pronounced for surgical masks compared to cloth masks (plus ~50% effectiveness). * Mask wearing also led to an increase in social distancing. * Of all the incentives tested, the only thing that impacted mask wearing was their colour (people preferred blue over green, and red over purple!). The research was done by social scientists at Yale, Berkeley, and Stanford, among others. It applied a program they called 'NORM' in half of 600 villages in which about 350,000 people lived. NORM has four components, which the researchers expected would work well for the general public: N: no-cost distribution O: offering information R: reinforcing the message and the information in the field M: modeling Basically you make sure a community has enough masks and you tell them why it's important to wear them. You also reinforce the message periodically in markets and mosques, and via role models and promoters in the community itself. Tipped off that these positive findings were on the way, Maha took this program and rushed to put it into action in Lahore, Pakistan, a city with a population of about 13 million, before the Delta variant could sweep through the region. Maha had already been doing a lot of data work on COVID policy over the past year, and that allowed her to quickly reach out to the relevant stakeholders ? getting them interested and excited. Governments aren't exactly known for being super innovative, but in March and April Lahore was going through a very deadly third wave of COVID ? so the commissioner quickly jumped on this approach, providing an endorsement as well as resources. Together with the original researchers, Maha and her team at LUMS collected baseline data that allowed them to map the mask-wearing rate in every part of Lahore, in both markets and mosques. And then based on that data, they adapted the original rural-focused model to a very different urban setting. The scale of this project was daunting, and in today's episode Maha tells Rob all about the day-to-day experiences and stresses required to actually make it happen ? including challenges like sending out 24 million masks to cover all of Lahore. They also discuss: * The challenges of data collection in this context * Disasters and emergencies she had to respond to in the middle of the project * What she learned from working closely with the Lahore Commissioner's Office * How to get governments to provide you with large amounts of data for your research * How she adapted from a more academic role to a 'getting stuff done' role * How to reduce waste in government procurement * And much more Get this episode by subscribing to our podcast on the world's most pressing problems and how to solve them: type 80,000 Hours into your p

Ricochet Podcast
E567. The Fight For Freedom of Speech

Ricochet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 84:05


No, silence isn’t violence; it’s just that here at Ricochet, we’d like to hear what you’ve got to say. As is our wont, we’ve got a few freethinkers to join Rob and James this week – unfortunately Peter is away. First up is Matthew Continetti of The Washington Free Beacon. He’s here to talk about the bewildering politics in a time of competing counter-cultures where both sides think they’re losing. Next up, Nathan Harden, author of Sex and God at Yale, who in 2012 foresaw how political correctness was suffocating education. More recently, his work at Real Clear Politics has highlighted the literally-dumbfounding phenomenon of self-censorship on campuses. Is the death of free speech inevitable? You’ll have to listen to find out! And on that note: Rob and James chat about Dave Chappelle’s latest brush with the many “theys”; banter some about both sides-ism, and find common ground on the value of occasionally shutting up – if only for a few moments. Music from this week’s podcast: Fight The Power by Public Enemy

The Story Collider
Hazards: Stories about encountering danger in the field

The Story Collider

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 28:25


Part 1: In his early twenties, Jonathan Feakins goes above and beyond for his job as a West Nile virus mosquito technician Part 2: While working as a coral reef biologist in Panama in 1989, Nancy Knowlton and her young daughter are taken into the custody of the Panamanian military when the U.S. invades. Jonathan Feakins is just some nerd who has tried to spend his life wandering strange places, reading obscure books, doing weird science, petting adorable animals, fighting the good fight, and having wonderful friends. He somehow has a species of earthworm named after him, and once got kicked out of an all-you-can-eat restaurant (for eating all he could eat). He first learned the power of a good story from his grandmother, as she regaled him with tales about her childhood pet crocodile (whose name was Baby), or about the time she (accidentally) cleared out a biker bar with a Swazi bible student named Enoch. You can learn more about his questionable life choices at bookwormcity.com. Nancy Knowlton has been a scientist with the Smithsonian since 1984 and is now a scientist emerita, first in Panama and most recently at the National Museum of Natural History in DC. She's also been a professor at Yale and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, where she founded the Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation. Her work on coral reefs has taken her literally around the world, and she has spent so much time underwater that she long ago lost count of the hours. She has been a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the author of Citizens of the Sea, and was the Editor-in-Chief of the Ocean Portal website. Despite the glut of bad news these days, you can find her @seacitizens talking about #OceanOptimism and #EarthOptimism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Boundless Body Radio
War and Redemption with Dr. Larry Dewey! 179

Boundless Body Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 59:39


Dr. Larry Dewey is the former Chief of Psychiatry at the Boise, Idaho Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the former Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Washington School of Medicine! He has worked with combat veterans and their families in outpatient clinics, support and therapy groups, specialized treatment programs, and inpatient units for 34 years! Veterans treated have included those involved in WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm, Bosnia and Kosovo, and most recently Afghanistan and Iraq. Prior to beginning his clinical career with the US Department of Veterans Affairs, Dr. Dewey graduated from Harvard Medical School in 1979 and completed his psychiatric fellowship and residency training at Yale in 1983. He is the author of the book War and Redemption: Treatment and Recovery in Combat-related Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. He currently lives in Daybreak, Utah, my own neighborhood, which is precisely how and where we met! But don't move here, it's awful, nothing to see here. Check out Bozeman, MT. :)Find Dr. Dewey's work at-Amazon- War and Redemption: Treatment and Recovery in Combat-related Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

10% Happier with Dan Harris
How to Stay Focused in Meditation | Bonus Meditation with Anushka Fernandopulle

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 6:20


Regather your attention with this short meditation. Afterwards, you can use that newfound focus to make progress on whatever matters most.About Anushka Fernandopulle:Anushka teaches meditation, works as an organizational consultant, and does leadership coaching with individuals and teams. She has practiced meditation for over 25 years, including four years in full-time intensive training in monasteries and retreat centers in the US, India, and Sri Lanka.Her work is informed by a BA in anthropology/religion from Harvard University, an MBA from Yale focused on leadership and organizational behavior, and certification in coaching from the Coaches Training Institute.To find this meditation in the Ten Percent Happier app, you can search for “Gathering Focus,” or click here: https://10percenthappier.app.link/content?meditation=c71121c5-1b01-4e6b-babb-a43ce5f568b3. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Casting Through Ancient Greece
Interview: Bronze Age Collapse with Prof. Eric H Cline

Casting Through Ancient Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 86:01


**Give Away details**To coincide with this episode release I will be running a giveaway where I will be offering up 2 copies of Eric Cline's Book, 1177 BC the Year Civilisation Collapsed, where winners will be drawn on the 1st of November 2021. 1 copy I will be offering as a general giveaway, where all you need to do to go into the draw is to promote Casting Through Ancient Greece in some way on Twitter or Facebook, this could be retweeting or sharing the episode with a comment or posting about the show in general in some other way, get creative. Just make sure to tag casting through ancient Greece into the post so I don't miss it. For the second copy I will be giving this away to one of my Patreon members, all you need to do to be eligible for this draw is to be a member of Casting Through Ancient Greece on Patreon before names are drawn on the 1st of November. So good luck everyone and the winners will be contacted and posted up on social media once drawn.Bronze Age Collapse with Prof. Eric Cline:The Bronze Age Collapse would see a number of Great civilisations disappear from the Aegean and Near east. For thousands of years the events around this period have remained somewhat mysterious. We would hear echoes of this period in the myths and poems told by the Greeks, as well as accounts in biblical texts.With the onset of archaeological discoveries in the 19th century of our time some of the mystery began to be lifted, seeing these tales having some historical context to them. As the discipline of Archaeology developed more evidence of the late Bronze Age has come to light, helping historians paint more credible theories.In this episode I talk to Prof. Eric Cline about the discipline of archaeology and his book 1177 BC where he talks about the late Bronze Age world and the Collapse it would suffer. He details the various evidence that has shown itself in the historical record to help us understand what was happing during this world changing period of time.  Eric H. Cline is Professor of Classics, History, and Anthropology, the former Chair of the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and the current Director of the Capitol Archaeological Institute at George Washington University, in Washington DC. A National Geographic Explorer, NEH Public Scholar, Getty Scholar, and Fulbright Scholar with degrees from Dartmouth, Yale, and the University of Pennsylvania, he is an active field archaeologist with more than 30 seasons of excavation and survey experience in Israel, Egypt, Jordan, Cyprus, Greece, Crete, and the United States, including ten seasons at Megiddo (1994-2014), where he served as co-director before retiring from the project in 2014, and another ten seasons at Tel Kabri, where he currently serves as Co-Director. He is the author or editor of 20 books and nearly 100 articles; translations of his books have appeared in nineteen different languages.Links:Twitter @digkabriAuthor Page on AmazonBooks:1177 BC: The Year Civilisation Collapsed Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/castingthroughancientgreece)

How Long Gone
252. - Kelefa Sanneh

How Long Gone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 70:49


Kelefa Sanneh is a journalist and music critic from New York. From 2000 to 2008, he wrote for the New York Times, and he's been on staff at The New Yorker since then. His new book Major Labels is out now. We had the pleasure of chatting with him about our show in Austin, some talent updates for our NY show, being an old fashioned author who doesn't make bucket hats, Connecticut hardcore, his parents both teaching at Yale, when anarchy stops being fun, hip hop as a transgressive art form, tiny desk concerts, the evolution of dance music from the hated form of disco to the hated form of progressive house, the problem with being genre-less, music's bygone rituals of scarcity, and why just being interesting isn't enough. twitter.com/donetodeath twitter.com/themjeans --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/howlonggone/support

Mother of Reinvention
Leaning on Faith Through Life Transitions with Episcopal Priest Sarah Condon

Mother of Reinvention

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 52:07


No matter what your specific religious beliefs are - or whether you have any defined beliefs at all - there is undoubtedly something comforting and essential about finding a sense of purpose, meaning, and wisdom outside of yourself. As someone who grew up in the Christian church, grew away from faith and found myself fumbling back in my 40s, I know how tricky and fraught this dance can be, so I was excited to have this conversation with Episcopal priest, podcaster, writer and mom Sarah Condon. Sarah talks honestly about what it's like to be a female spiritual leader, her work as the chaplain of Rice University, and how she sees women in transitional periods of life leaning into - and sometimes, temporarily away from - their spirituality. She also talks movingly about the recent tragic loss of her parents and how her faith has buoyed her through. Featured Sponsor Elevate your shoe game with cute styles + amazing comfort. I am in love with the Nana Retro Sneaker in a variety of colors. Get free shipping when you use code MOR at vionicshoes.com. About Sarah Sarah Condon is an Episcopal priest living and working in Houston, Texas. She also serves as the Episcopal chaplain to Rice University. She went to University of Mississippi, and then Yale for Divinity School. She is married to the Reverend Josh Condon, and have two children, Neil and Annie. Sarah is an associate editor of the Mockingbird Blog, author of Churchy: The Real Life Adventures of a Wife, Mom, and Priest, and co-host of The Mockingcast. Episode Links Find out more about Sarah's ministries here.Purchase Sarah's book, Churchy.Read Sarah's blog posts and essays at the Mockinbird Blog.Meagan mentions the book Liturgy of the Ordinary by Tish Harrison Warren.Be sure to catch up on all of the episodes of Mother of Reinvention. ( *Featured photo by Karen Walrond )

Inside Lacrosse Podcasts
10/21 The Source: Fallball Thoughts with Foy and Kinnear

Inside Lacrosse Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 47:02


Mid-way through the 2021 Fall All-Access Tour, IL's Terry Foy and Matt Kinnear discuss their visits to about a dozen top men's DI programs. They start by discussing the Ivy League teams — because those are the ones that haven't played in more than a year — and their visits to Penn and Yale and thoughts from Princeton's scrimmage this week. They discuss the other teams they've seen, including Virginia, Johns Hopkins, Loyola, Georgetown, Delaware, Villanova, Drexel, Towson, Richmond, Lehigh and Saint Joe's.

The Sports-Casters
Season 11 Episode 22- Katie Baker, Jeff Agrest

The Sports-Casters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 128:08


Steve interviews Katie Baker(00:11:39) from The Ringer. Katie is back to talk about all of the different things she writes about at Ringer, including hockey, television, and movies. Before that, Steve and Katie look back to a piece she wrote for Grantland about Yale winning the Frozen Four. Also, Katie and Steve debate the end of a League of Their Own, talk about Katie's transition from Goldman Sachs analyst to sports writer, and spend a few minutes comparing the work at Ringer to the work at Grantland (RIP). Also, Jeff Agrest(01:07:53) from the Chicago Sun-Times joins us to talk about sports media. First, Jeff and Steve talk about the NHL's debut on TNT and ESPN. They also look back at the NHL's time on NBC. Next the guys go over a bunch of sports media headlines. Finally, Jeff and Steve discuss the Chicago Sun-Times and the legacy of Roger Ebert. Steve starts the show with discussion of the baseball playoffs. The book club has two new books and a strong maybe. The show ends with one last thing about how Steve loves Halloween much more as a dad than he did as a kid. For more information follow the podcast on twitter @sports_casters Email: thesportscasters@gmail.com

True Crime Creepers
The Murder of Annie Le

True Crime Creepers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 57:05


Annie Le disappeared on September 8, 2009, 5 days before she was to marry her college sweetheart. She left her apartment that morning to head to the Yale campus where she was doing research as part of work towards a doctorate in Pharmacology, but when she never arrived home that night, her worried roommate called the police. Police conducted a search and were able to find Annie on the surveillance cameras walking into the research lab, but they couldn't find her anywhere on the cameras leaving the building, and she wasn't found inside the building. It was like Annie Le had simply vanished. Sources:ArticlesCBS News | Annie Le's Fiance Mourns Yale Student's Murder (Ryan Smith)The New York Times | Report on Yale Murder OutlinesSuspicions (James Barron and Alison Leigh Cowan)The Hartford Courant | Affidavit Describes Evidence, RaymondClark's Movements (Alaine Griffin) Academic | The Murder of Annie Le The New Haven Independent | Annie Le Warrant: BloodyBoots Read “Ray-C” (Melissa Bailey and Paul Bass)The Trentonian | Yale Suspect Played Softball on Day BodyWas FoundABC News | Annie Le's Person of Interest Had Scratches onChest, Arms, Back ( Sharyn Alfonsi, Lee Ferran and Russell Goldman)The Hartford Courant | Records Show Raymond Clark III WasLast To See Annie Le Alive, Source Says (Dave Altimari, Alaine Griffin, andJosh Kovner)Gawker | What We Know About Raymond J. Clark III(Hamilton Nolan)The Yale Alumni Magazine | The death of Annie Le (CaroleBass)Yale Daily News | Searching for Raymond Clark III (Everett Rosenfeld)ABC Chicago | Yale Killing Suspect Plans to Plead GuiltyNY Daily News | DNA Shows Annie Le's Blood on Yale LabTech Raymond Clark Boots; Green Pen clue Eyed: Investigators (Michael Daly) VideosInvestigation Discovery | See No Evil Season 6 - Episode 14: Cold FeetYouTube | Friends of the University of New Haven Library:Prof. Dadio - "Murder at Yale, the Annie Le Story"  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/truecrimecreepers)

Kate Dalley Radio
102021 SmallPox; Space Cadets; Supply Chain; Yale; Ranchers; Headlines With Susan

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 46:57


102021 SmallPox; Space Cadets; Supply Chain; Yale; Ranchers; Headlines With Susan by Kate Dalley

LA af
LAAF 111 102021 - Yale is Made of Fine Stones

LA af

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 63:11


Grace is on fire today as she lambasts Woody Allen, Jimmy, and the founding fathers. Jimmy barely survives the onslaught but manages to yell a bunch about Shatner and "Covid is Real" guy. You know the guy. Plus history, news and celebrity gossip, all on todays LA.AF. Support us on Patreon at www.patreon.com/laaf

Conversations with Tyler
Stanley McChrystal on the Military, Leadership, and Risk

Conversations with Tyler

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 53:57


Stan McChrystal has spent a long career considering questions of risk, leadership, and the role of America's military, having risen through the Army's ranks ultimately to take command of all US and NATO forces in Afghanistan, a force representing 150,000 troops from 45 countries. Retiring as a four-star general in 2010, he has gone on to lecture at Yale and launched the McChrystal Group, where he taps that experience to help organizations build stronger teams and devise winning strategies. His latest book, which he tells Tyler will be his last, is called Risk: A User's Guide. He joined Tyler to discuss whether we've gotten better or worse at analyzing risk, the dangerous urge among policymakers to oversimplify the past, why being a good military commander is about more than winning battlefield victories, why we're underestimating the risk that China will invade Taiwan, how to maintain a long view of history, what set Henry Kissinger apart, the usefulness of war games, how well we understand China and Russia, why there haven't been any major attacks on US soil since 9/11, the danger of a “soldier class” in America, his take on wokeness and the military, what's needed to have women as truly senior commanders in the armed forces, why officers with bad experiences should still be considered for promotion, how to address extremists in the military, why he supports a draft, the most interesting class he took at West Point, how to care for disabled veterans, his advice to enlisted soldiers on writing a will, the most emotionally difficult part and greatest joys of his military career, the prospect of drone assassinations, what he eats for his only meal of the day, why he's done writing books, and more. Visit our website: https://conversationswithtyler.com Email: cowenconvos@mercatus.gmu.edu Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cowenconvos Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/cowenconvos/ Follow Tyler on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tylercowen Follow Stanley on Twitter: https://twitter.com/StanMcChrystal Like us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/cowenconvos Subscribe to our Newsletter: https://go.mercatus.org/l/278272/2017-09-19/g4ms Thumbnail photo credit: Leading Authorities, Inc.

New Books in Environmental Studies
Eunice Blavascunas, "Foresters, Borders, and Bark Beetles: The Future of Europe's Last Primeval Forest" (Indiana UP, 2020)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:37


In Foresters, Borders, and Bark Beetles: The Future of Europe's Last Primeval Forest (Indiana University Press, 2020), Eunice Blavascunas provides an intimate ethnographic account of Białowieża, Europe's last primeval forest. At Poland's easternmost border with Belarus, the deep past of ancient oaks, woodland bison, and thousands of species of insects and fungi collides with authoritarian and communist histories. Foresters, biologists, environmentalists, and locals project the ancient Białowieża Forest as a series of competing icons in struggles over memory, land, and economy, which are also struggles about whether to log or preserve the woodland; whether and how to celebrate the mixed ethnic Polish/Belarusian peasant past; and whether to align this eastern outpost with ultra-right Polish politics, neighboring Belarus, or the European Union. Drawing on more than twenty years of research, Blavascunas untangles complex conflicts between protection and use by examining which forest pasts are celebrated, which fester, and which have been altered in the tumultuous decades following the collapse of communism. Piotr H. Kosicki is Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of Catholics on the Barricades (Yale, 2018) and editor, among others, of Political Exile in the Global Twentieth Century (with Wolfram Kaiser). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books Network
Eunice Blavascunas, "Foresters, Borders, and Bark Beetles: The Future of Europe's Last Primeval Forest" (Indiana UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:37


In Foresters, Borders, and Bark Beetles: The Future of Europe's Last Primeval Forest (Indiana University Press, 2020), Eunice Blavascunas provides an intimate ethnographic account of Białowieża, Europe's last primeval forest. At Poland's easternmost border with Belarus, the deep past of ancient oaks, woodland bison, and thousands of species of insects and fungi collides with authoritarian and communist histories. Foresters, biologists, environmentalists, and locals project the ancient Białowieża Forest as a series of competing icons in struggles over memory, land, and economy, which are also struggles about whether to log or preserve the woodland; whether and how to celebrate the mixed ethnic Polish/Belarusian peasant past; and whether to align this eastern outpost with ultra-right Polish politics, neighboring Belarus, or the European Union. Drawing on more than twenty years of research, Blavascunas untangles complex conflicts between protection and use by examining which forest pasts are celebrated, which fester, and which have been altered in the tumultuous decades following the collapse of communism. Piotr H. Kosicki is Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of Catholics on the Barricades (Yale, 2018) and editor, among others, of Political Exile in the Global Twentieth Century (with Wolfram Kaiser). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Eunice Blavascunas, "Foresters, Borders, and Bark Beetles: The Future of Europe's Last Primeval Forest" (Indiana UP, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:37


In Foresters, Borders, and Bark Beetles: The Future of Europe's Last Primeval Forest (Indiana University Press, 2020), Eunice Blavascunas provides an intimate ethnographic account of Białowieża, Europe's last primeval forest. At Poland's easternmost border with Belarus, the deep past of ancient oaks, woodland bison, and thousands of species of insects and fungi collides with authoritarian and communist histories. Foresters, biologists, environmentalists, and locals project the ancient Białowieża Forest as a series of competing icons in struggles over memory, land, and economy, which are also struggles about whether to log or preserve the woodland; whether and how to celebrate the mixed ethnic Polish/Belarusian peasant past; and whether to align this eastern outpost with ultra-right Polish politics, neighboring Belarus, or the European Union. Drawing on more than twenty years of research, Blavascunas untangles complex conflicts between protection and use by examining which forest pasts are celebrated, which fester, and which have been altered in the tumultuous decades following the collapse of communism. Piotr H. Kosicki is Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of Catholics on the Barricades (Yale, 2018) and editor, among others, of Political Exile in the Global Twentieth Century (with Wolfram Kaiser). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

The Blonde Files Podcast
Prejuvination, Surgery Trends & Consumer Restraint with Dr. Lara Devgan

The Blonde Files Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 56:02


In this episode I'm talking to Dr. Lara Devgan, a Yale-educated, Johns Hopkins Medical School-instructed, and Columbia/ New York Presbyterian Hospital-trained plastic & reconstructive surgeon. We discuss why restraint is so important when it comes to cosmetic surgery or minimally invasive interventions; where she thinks beauty standards and surgery trends are headed; the concept of “pre-juvenation” and doing procedures younger to avoid more complex surgery in the future; why doing surgery too young can be a mistake; what specific things to do in 20's and 30's to age gracefully; the beauty of aging and so much more.    www.Headspace.com/BLONDE for a free month trial of the full meditation library. www.Curology.com/BLONDE for your free 30 day trial, you just pay $5 for shipping. www.Justthrivehealth.com with code Blonde to save 15% site-wide. www.helloned.com/BLONDE for 15% off plus a free De-Stress Blend Sample on every order over $40.   Produced by Dear Media

Electrify This!
Now We're Cooking With...Electricity!

Electrify This!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:12


Once considered a status symbol, gas stoves have become a popular choice for amateur and professional chefs alike. More than a third of U.S. households cook with gas and 50% of single-family homes now feature gas stoves. Yet, when it comes to climate stability, air quality, and our health, gas stoves have serious impacts. Gas stoves emit the same fumes found in car exhaust, and gas consumption in buildings is a significant contributor to climate change. But it is possible to cook dinner without cooking the planet: 60% of U.S. households are already using electricity to cook and newer induction technologies are gaining popularity. Still, market and policy changes are needed to make electricity the preferred choice. This episode features a pediatrician, a professional chef, and a real estate agent discussing the perils of gas stoves and the pioneering movement to clean up our kitchens.Guests:Dr. Lisa Patel is a pediatrician and an advocate for children's health priorities. She was the co-chair for the American Academy of Pediatrics Advocacy Committee, California Chapter, co-founder the Climate and Health task force, and Director for the pediatric resident's Community Pediatrics and Child Advocacy Rotation. Today she is the Co-Director for Stanford's Climate, Health, and Equity Task Force at the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research. She holds degrees from Stanford, Yale, and John Hopkins University. Chef Rachelle Boucher is a national cooking appliance trainer, private chef, influencer and event expert with 20+ years of experience. She's worked as a private chef for celebrities and athletes, a corporate chef, and a home appliance expert and consultant with Monark Home, Sub-Zero & Wolf, and Miele. Today, Rachelle's new venture “Kitchens to Life”  focuses on kitchen electrification for performance, people and planet. Annie Trujillo is a real estate agent with Keller Williams Real Estate, based in Salt Lake City. In 2020 she was the third individual agent in her office and made the Top 500 Realtors in Utah list. Previously, Annie had an illustrious ten-year career working as a mountain guide, leading expeditions in remote areas from Greenland to Alaska. She holds a degree from San Francisco State University. Must-Read Resources:Kitchens to Life | Yale Appliance Induction Cooking Buying Guide & Yale Appliance Electric Cooking Buying GuideGas Stoves: Health and Air Quality Impacts and Solutions, RMI We need to talk about your gas stove, your health and climate change, NPRHow the Fossil Fuel Industry Convinced Americans to Love Gas Stoves, Mother Jones

The Accidental Entrepreneur
Shirag Shemmassian - Academic Consulting

The Accidental Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 54:37


Dr. Shirag Shemmassian is the Founder of Shemmassian Academic Consulting and one of the world's foremost experts on medical school admissions, college admissions, and graduate school admissions. For nearly 20 years, he and his team have helped thousands of students get into medical school and top colleges using his systematic and proprietary approach. For more information: College admissions How to approach extracurriculars for college admissions Guidance following the test-optional movement Medical school admissions What are the best pre med majors? Building a strong extracurricular profile for medical school Dr. Shemmassian received his B.S. in Human Development from Cornell University. Despite graduating with a 3.9 GPA as a pre med student, Dr. Shemmassian's interests in mental health led him to complete his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at UCLA. Throughout his education and beyond, Dr. Shemmassian successfully guided students into top colleges, medical schools, and graduate programs, and has found his professional calling in helping others achieve their educational and career goals. Dr. Shemmassian's admissions expertise has been featured in various media outlets, including The Washington Post and Business Insider. Moreover, he has been invited to speak at Yale, Stanford, UC Berkeley, and other prestigious institutions about various aspects of the admissions process. In addition to listening to the episode, you can watch a video of their discussion on our YouTube Channel.  And be sure to subscribe to support the podcast! For general information about the podcast, send an email to info@beinhakerlaw.com To follow Mitch and the podcast, go to linktr.ee/beinhakerlaw. You can subscribe and listen to episodes on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music and most other directories. Please review us whenever possible and thanks for your continued support! Sponsorships and paid guest appearances are available. Connect with us by email or on social media. The Accidental Entrepreneur is brought to you by Beinhaker Law, a boutique business & estates legal practice in Clark, NJ. To learn about shared outside general counsel services and how to better protect your business, visit https://beinhakerlaw.com/fractional-gen-counsel/ Please support our affiliate sponsors (https://beinhakerlaw.com/podcast-affiliates/). Also be sure to visit our new podcast store (https://beinhakerlaw.com/podcast-store/) to purchase affiliate services, guest merchandise and even podcast merchandise.  Yes, we have merch! Digital Accelerant - the digital business card that generates leads. Get a custom branded digital card with information and links to all your social media, email and other information. Text LAW to 21000 to connect with us and request more details. Fetch Internet. Fetch Pro is an app that creates a secure and high-speed mobile internet connection for laptops and desktop computers. Printify - the on-demand print shop to create your own merchandise without cost or the need to house inventory. The Accidental Entrepreneur is a trademark of Mitchell C. Beinhaker. Copyright 2018-2021. All rights reserved.

365 Stories I Want To Tell You Before We Both Die

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Stories of Impact
Happiness and Human Flourishing with Laurie Santos and Arthur C. Brooks

Stories of Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 24:41


Today, we hear about human happiness from two of the world's foremost researchers on the subject: Dr. Laurie Santos and Dr. Arthur Brooks. Dr. Santos hosts The Happiness Lab, a podcast “that will forever alter the way you think about happiness.” She's also a Professor of Psychology at Yale University and teacher of one of the most popular classes ever in Yale history: The Happiness Class, which tries to give students the keys to happiness and satisfaction. Dr. Brooks is a Harvard professor, social scientist, prolific bestselling author, and columnist at The Atlantic. Learn more: Laurie Santos The Happiness Lab podcast Arthur C. Brooks   Subscribe to Stories of Impact wherever you listen to podcasts Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube Comments, questions and suggestions info@storiesofimpact.org Supported by Templeton World Charity Foundation

Crossing the Line with M. William Phelps
What Happened to Annie Le? Crime Scene Investigator Peter Valentin Revisits the Case

Crossing the Line with M. William Phelps

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 45:23


Days before her wedding, 24-year-old grad student Annie Le was seen entering her research lab on the Yale campus–and was never seen again. What really happened the day Annie Le disappeared? Connecticut State Police Crime Scene Investigator Peter Valentin joins the show to retrace the steps he took upon arrival, the subtle clues that helped break the case, and the surprising way he found the body. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Nunc Podcast
030 - Inside Private Schools (Part 2)

Nunc Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 52:58


2% of students attend independent schools (private schools not funded by the government but charge fees to attend) and make up about 30% of students attending the nations most prestigious schools like Harvard, Princeton, and Yale. What sets private schools apart from public schools? Caroline and Jason have taught at some of the top private schools in the US. They share their teaching methods and heart for teaching.Watch the interview on our Youtube channel!Follow us

The SHIFT Show
Must Hear Advice for NCAA Gymnasts and Coaches To Have Their Best Competition Season

The SHIFT Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 90:24


This week on the podcast I am extremely excited to share a lecture I gave to Yale Gymnastics Team, where I was asked to speak to them about how to best prepare for preseason. We talked a lot about workload management, getting better recovery, sleep, and different tools and strategies for stress and class management. Anyone who's a gymnast and is trying to balance a busy life on top of the competitive season, this is really important for you to hear. Implementing some of these strategies could make a huge difference to your gymnastics and feeling mentally and emotionally more capable of handling the challenges of season.

Quiz and Hers
S14 E2 - Quiz Fight at the Okay Podcast

Quiz and Hers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 61:57


Howdy, trivia fans! This week, Hallie takes us on a trivia-tinged trip to the Old West, full of shootouts, saloons, and some serious stumpers! We also shoot off discussions a classic film, a lesser-known American artist, and some history you've definitely forgotten since school!2:18: Q1 (Music): The Louisiana Purchase, which opened up much of America to westward expansion, also included small portions of which 2 Canadian provinces, north of Montana and North Dakota?12:57: Q2 (Everything Else): Although his cousin was the founder of America's oldest gunmaker and the rest of his family fought in most of the American Wars, what man chose instead to study art at Yale and later became one of the main artists known for painting images of the Old West?24:03: Q3 (Sports & Games): What shooting sport uses pistols and is based on the glamorized art of gunslingers of the Old West, although they use blanks or wax bullets?36:56: Q4 (Movies & TV): What 1969 Western film is about outlaws who run away to Bolivia after executing several train robberies in the Wyoming area?51:26: Q6 (Arts & Literature): What Fortune 500 company, whose logo is a gladiator, got the first contract for a transcontinental stage line to carry mail from Missouri to California and then got into financial services in the money order business?Theme music: "Thinking it Over" by Lee Rosevere, licensed under CC BY 2.0E-Mail: quizandhers@gmail.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/quizandhers/Twitter: https://twitter.com/quizandhersInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/quizandhers/The List Game Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-list-game/id1291797303Moxie/Your Brain on Facts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/your-brain-on-facts/id1347915211