Podcasts about farm bills

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Best podcasts about farm bills

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Latest podcast episodes about farm bills

UpNorthNews with Pat Kreitlow
A To-Do List for Politicians Who Care About Farmers. (Sept 20 – Hour 1)

UpNorthNews with Pat Kreitlow

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 44:05


Farmers from Wisconsin and across the country went to Washington, DC last week to tell Congress their priorities for a 2023 Farm Bill that will determine the health of the rural economy. Hans Breitenmoser from Lincoln County was among them and he outlines what needs to be done. Also: Michael Gableman mistakes obesity for a […]

Down to Earth: The Planet to Plate Podcast
Leveling the growing field

Down to Earth: The Planet to Plate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 37:36


If you're a small or mid-size farmer, it's nearly impossible to compete against giant food conglomerates. But fairer policy could help smaller farms to prosper, provide healthy food and thriving communities, and keep more profits for food producers––rather than executives and stockholders. Sarah Carden is a policy advocate with Farm Action, a group working to democratize the food system in the U.S. She's also a vegetable farmer, who knows first hand what the barriers are for small and mid-size growers who are forced to compete against giant corporations. She talks about the movement for a more fair and regenerative Farm Bill in 2023––and beyond.  

American Ag Network
Farm Bill Update

American Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 1:57


The current Farm Bill is set to expire next September, and farmers and ranchers are anxiously awaiting new legislation. Will Stafford, CHS Washington representative, discusses what the next Farm Bill could contain.

Adams on Agriculture
Farm Bill Update

Adams on Agriculture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 1:57


The current Farm Bill is set to expire next September, and farmers and ranchers are anxiously awaiting new legislation. Will Stafford, CHS Washington representative, discusses what the next Farm Bill could contain.

Inside Agriculture Podcasts
09-20-22 - Sen. John Hoeven on Farm Bill Roundtable. Keep Farm Safety in Mind During Harvest Season. Murky Future for Fuel Prices.

Inside Agriculture Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 3:00


Growing Harvest Ag Network
Afternoon Ag News, September 19, 2022: Senator John Hoeven hosts farm bill discussion in Fargo

Growing Harvest Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 2:36


Senator John Hoeven hosted a discussion with Senate Agriculture Committee Ranking Member John Boozman (R-Ark.). Hoeven, organized the meeting to allow North Dakota producers, commodity groups and other agri-businesses to provide input as negotiations begin on the next farm bill. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

California Ag Today
Where Does Wheat Fall in the Next Farm Bill?

California Ag Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022


As Congress prepares for the next Farm Bill, the National Association of Wheat Growers is out with their 2023 priorities.

Adams on Agriculture
AOA - September 16th, 2022

Adams on Agriculture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 52:55


Friday's AOA began with Kam Quarles, CEO of the National Potato Council, discussing the state of potato harvest and looked ahead to the needs of Specialty Crop producers in the '23 Farm Bill. Naomi Blohm, of Total Farm Marketing joined the show in segment 2 with a look at the strength in the dairy market. Josh Linville, VP of Fertilizer for StoneX provided an update on European nitrogen production and his expectations for fert demand in the '23 crop year. The show closed with John Johnson, Project Coordinator at Farmers for Soil Health, on how that organization will use it's $95M USDA Climate Smart Ag grant

Growing Harvest Ag Network
Morning Ag News, September 16, 2022: Congress prepares for the next Farm Bill

Growing Harvest Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 3:00


As Congress prepares for the next Farm Bill, the National Association of Wheat Growers is out with their priorities for the 2023 edition.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Climate Conversation
4.1 Colorado Cafeterias Serve Up a Healthy Meal Program for Kids and the Climate

The Climate Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 35:16


Welcome to season 4 of The Climate Conversation! We are heading back to school to learn about reducing cafeteria food waste with Food Policy Researcher Melissa Terry and representatives from the Boulder Valley School District and the Chef Ann Foundation in Colorado. Each day, the school district cooks over 15,000 fresh, cooked-from-scratch meals that kids actually want to eat. At the same time, they have also reduced their food waste by installing bulk milk dispensers, a salad bar, a composting system, and more. Dan and Emma speak with Mary Rochelle from the Boulder Valley School District and Laura Smith from the Chef Ann Foundation about how the district overhauled its school meals with the support of the Chef Ann Foundation, which which works with school systems around the country. Back to School Briefing: https://www.eesi.org/briefings/view/092822school Reducing Emissions by Reducing Food Waste Briefing: https://www.eesi.org/briefings/view/121021waste Resources on the 2023 Farm Bill: https://www.eesi.org/2023-farm-bill

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON
Land O'Lakes - Getting Farmers Paid For Practices And Sustainability

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 16:51


With another Farm Bill on the horizon, and more interest then ever on regenerative ag and sustainability - Land O'Lakes is launching a new program to help encourage farmers to enter that space. Leah Anderson, Vice President of Sales/New Markets for Winfield United, speaks with Pam Jahnke about the value farming practices brings to the table, and how they're constructing agreements that allow farmers some financial rewards.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hemp Legally Speaking
Axel Bernabe and the New York Model for Regulating Hemp

Hemp Legally Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 20:39


Hemp Industry Episode Resources:Host: Jonathan MillerGuest: Axel Bernabe, New York's Office of Cannabis Management Blog: Hemp Legally Speaking Hemp Industry questions covered in the episode: How did New York State approach regulating hemp cannabinoids vis a vis adult-use cannabis and industrial use hemp? What was New York's philosophy in developing a regulatory regime for CBD and other non-intoxicating hemp extracts? Why did New York allow hemp farmers to sell into the regulated cannabis market, and has it been successful? How does New York treat intoxicating compounds like Delta-8 THC, and how does the state anticipate drawing the line between non-intoxicating hemp and intoxicating adult-use cannabis? What's the future for hemp fiber in the Empire State?

Earthkeepers: A Circlewood Podcast on Creation Care and Spirituality
What Your Food Ate, with authors Dave Montgomery and Anne Biklé

Earthkeepers: A Circlewood Podcast on Creation Care and Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 50:48


In this episode, Forrest talks with Dave Montgomery and Anne Biklé about their new book,  What Your Food Ate: How to Heal Our Land and Reclaim Our Health. The authors aim to raise our awareness of the community of life in the soil beneath our feet—or more importantly, the soil on the farms that grow our food. They make a compelling case for changing the ways that food is grown so that the life of the soil is respected and cared for . . . and so that the food produced by healthier soil makes us healthier in turn.Guests: David Montgomery - author and geologist at the University of Washington  Anne Bikle - author and biologist & plant whisperer Book:WhatYour Food Ate: How to Heal Our Land and Reclaim Our HealthDirt book trilogy - Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations; The Hidden Half of Nature; Growing a Revolution Mentions: regenerative farming practices monoculture tillage mycorrhiza the three sisters - squash, beans & corn Farm Bill renewal in the US Earthkeepers' interview with Good Food Clubs Wangari Maathai - Kenyan woman - tree planting project; Nobel Peace Prize price of fertilizer skyrocketed in the last year Actions:  learn about your food - where was it grown, who grew it, how did they grow it? in farming communities - educate about regenerative farming practices and their benefits public policy - vote for elected officials who share your views on the benefits of regenerative practices  find others who care about how our food is produced, and dream up ways to make a difference together!Keywords: monoculture, industrial farming, Green Revolution, regenerative agriculture, regenerative farming, food cooperatives, soil fungus, organic, permaculture, soil ecology, no-till, young farmers, cover crop, crop rotation

RFD Today
RFD Today September 9

RFD Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 53:01


Friday's show features a visit with Sherrard FFA President Ryley Zippe. His chapter is hosting a field day south of the Quad Cities next week. We chat with Jonathan Coppess, who serves as the Director of the Gardner Ag Policy Program at the University of Illinois. He discusses the Inflation Reduction Act and Farm Bill. We visit with 17th District Congressional District candidate Esther Joy King. And Friday means Pigskin Pickins' with DeLoss, Jim & Rita.

Do By Friday
Fishing for Coupons

Do By Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 95:23


This week's challenge: try CBN.You can hear the after show and support Do By Friday on Patreon!----Edited by Quinn RoseEngineered by Cameron Bopp----Show LinksGigaverseBack to Work Episode 589: The Outgassing of Ancient WoodsApple's September 2022 Event: All The Small ThingsiPhone 14/Pro Impressions: Welcome to Dynamic Island! - YouTubeThe Rise and Fall of Getting Things Done | The New YorkerThe photo of classified documents at Mar-a-Lago, annotated - The Washington PostTampermonkey • HomePurfview/IMDb-Scout-ModBlot – A blogging platform with no interface.CBD vs CBN: What's the Difference?beeZbee CBD+CBN Gummies – Shop CBD KratomKanha Kanha NANO Galactic Grape Indica 100mg | WeedmapsHemp Production and the 2018 Farm Bill - 07/25/2019 | FDACoffee: The Greatest Addiction Ever - YouTubeNext week's challenge: create a blog just for you using Blot.

Economics For Business
Jared Wall: How a Courageous Entrepreneur Enters a Formative Market

Economics For Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022


How do new markets form? When consumers change their tastes and preferences and behaviors, how are the markets to serve them activated? The markets don't yet exist — entrepreneurial action is required to create them. The answer to the question, of course, is that entrepreneurs — real people taking the real business risk to initiate new business experiments — provide the new energy and new initiative to create markets where previously they didn't exist. Jared Wall is one of these creative entrepreneurs, and thchempspot.com is his creation. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights. Courageous entrepreneurs lead the way into new markets as they are still forming. Entrepreneurs bring the energy that opens new markets and new pathways to economic value. New markets can emerge as the result of changing consumer tastes and preferences, new channels or platforms, new forms of delivery, new technologies or a combination of several catalysts — but the energy, initiative and drive of the entrepreneur is always the necessary ingredient for the ultimate emergence of new value and new market arrangements. New discoveries and new innovations often provide the entrepreneur with market-opening mechanisms. Serving customers in new and different ways doesn't always require new products and services, but it is often the case that the discovery or invention of novel combinations can lead to innovation — that is, new and better experiences for customers that were previously unknown or unavailable or narrowly distributed. In the market for consumable cannabis products, there emerged a new THC variant called Delta 8 THC, a cannabinoid that offered both different product performance and different accessibility. The emergent new ingredient provided the pathway to a whole new market opportunity. Legislation and regulation are complications and barriers in formative markets, but often their ambiguity provides an opening for innovative entry. The courageous entrepreneurs who lead the way into formative markets often encounter legislative and regulatory barriers, since these are static drags on progress and innovation and never keep up with the changes in markets. At the same time, the regulatory thicket can sometimes be useful to the entrepreneur who can cut a new opening others can't imagine. In the market for consumable cannabis products, Delta 8 THC became such a new opening, which was cut when some content in a comprehensive congressional Farm Bill encouraged the commercialization of certain kinds of hemp, of which Delta 8 THC was one of the by-products. Legislators and policy authors can't think about the future the way entrepreneurs can, and they did not envision the future world of innovation they were unlocking. The regulatory maze is an aspect of legislation and regulation — but every maze has an exit path. Innovation in formative markets combines and compounds. Jared Wall launched thchempspot.com to offer Delta 8 THC experiences to consumers. Those who shop at the site find a lot more innovation than just this ingredient. There are multiple new consumable forms for varied experience delivery — gummies, chocolate bars, chewing gum, soft gels, and peanut brittle, among others. Where do these innovations come from? Not from the R&D labs of major corporations, that's for certain. They originate in the creative minds of imaginative entrepreneurs, and they take shape in their experiments and prototypes and willingness to try new things. Will they all be big successes? Of course not. But they will all generate feedback loops of acceptance or non-acceptance, reviews and ratings and experience sharing; they'll contribute to innovation as an ongoing cycle of learning. Society enjoys better choices because entrepreneurs unleash their creativity and don't hold back from experimental designs. Market infrastructure and market institutions can't always keep up with entrepreneurial change, but new supportive services quickly appear to lubricate frictions and provide institutional arbitrage. All commerce needs infrastructure such as payment systems and institutions such as banks, and market formation can sometimes move faster than infrastructure and institutions can adapt. Jared Wall had this experience — PayPal and major banks cut off services because thchempsot.com, while serving legitimate customers with legal products, was deemed a “high risk” business, outside their terms and conditions. Yet, in a quite inspirational way, business services emerge in these situations to navigate around the barriers of poorly adapted institutions. Jared found consultants who offer the service of connecting so-called “high risk” businesses with value-network partners willing to collaborate with them. Jared was quickly able to replace his payment system and banking infrastructure. There was a service interruption, but it was temporary. A new network of mediating services quickly formed to bypass institutional barriers. The creation and sharing of new information is a big part of the innovation equation. Jesus Huerta De SotoJesus Huerta De Soto; Socialism, Economic Calculation, and Entrepreneurship; 2010; Chapter 2, "Entrepreneurship". identifies the creation and sharing of new information as the central activity of entrepreneurs - informing customers of new products and services and new offerings and prices. Entrepreneurs are constantly creating, updating, and improving the information resources they make available to customers. High quality information enhances value. On thchempspot.com, Jared provides information in Q&A form, pull-down menus, and product descriptions. He's self-published an informative e-book that's free on the site, and he publishes an informative newsletter. We can sometimes feel unclear about the value of information, but in formative markets its importance is primary not secondary.

Heartland Stories
Marianne LeGreco: Communication and the Paths to Food Justice

Heartland Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 29:31


Dr. Marianne LeGreco is an Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director in the Department of Communications Studies at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. She is also the co-author of “Everybody Eats: Communication and the Paths to Food Justice” which was published in 2021. Tune in to learn more about: Marianne's inspiration for studying communications; The four legged stool of the food system; Food access and poverty; Her book “Everybody Eats: Communication and the Paths to Food Justice” and the question “who gets to bring the table?”; The nurturing of new leaders in food; The little food pantries and mobile food markets in neighborhoods; The Food Research and Active Center; Her thoughts on the 2023 Farm Bill.  To learn more about Dr. LeGreco, listen to her TEDxGreensboro talks Building Vibrant Food Systems and Vibrant Food Systems Redux.

DC Signal to Noise with Jim Wiesemeyer
Russia Sees Our Sanctions and Raises Us a Closed Pipeline

DC Signal to Noise with Jim Wiesemeyer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 30:52


Russia will not re-start the Nord Stream pipeline unless sanctions imposed for the invasion of Ukraine are lifted. Plus Chip Flory and Jim Wiesemeyer discuss the U.S. government's commitment to replenishing the SPR, aid to Ukraine vs. aid to parts of the U.S., future of the Farm Bill, and more.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mises Media
Jared Wall: How a Courageous Entrepreneur Enters a Formative Market

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022


How do new markets form? When consumers change their tastes and preferences and behaviors, how are the markets to serve them activated? The markets don't yet exist — entrepreneurial action is required to create them. The answer to the question, of course, is that entrepreneurs — real people taking the real business risk to initiate new business experiments — provide the new energy and new initiative to create markets where previously they didn't exist. Jared Wall is one of these creative entrepreneurs, and thchempspot.com is his creation. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights. Courageous entrepreneurs lead the way into new markets as they are still forming. Entrepreneurs bring the energy that opens new markets and new pathways to economic value. New markets can emerge as the result of changing consumer tastes and preferences, new channels or platforms, new forms of delivery, new technologies or a combination of several catalysts — but the energy, initiative and drive of the entrepreneur is always the necessary ingredient for the ultimate emergence of new value and new market arrangements. New discoveries and new innovations often provide the entrepreneur with market-opening mechanisms. Serving customers in new and different ways doesn't always require new products and services, but it is often the case that the discovery or invention of novel combinations can lead to innovation — that is, new and better experiences for customers that were previously unknown or unavailable or narrowly distributed. In the market for consumable cannabis products, there emerged a new THC variant called Delta 8 THC, a cannabinoid that offered both different product performance and different accessibility. The emergent new ingredient provided the pathway to a whole new market opportunity. Legislation and regulation are complications and barriers in formative markets, but often their ambiguity provides an opening for innovative entry. The courageous entrepreneurs who lead the way into formative markets often encounter legislative and regulatory barriers, since these are static drags on progress and innovation and never keep up with the changes in markets. At the same time, the regulatory thicket can sometimes be useful to the entrepreneur who can cut a new opening others can't imagine. In the market for consumable cannabis products, Delta 8 THC became such a new opening, which was cut when some content in a comprehensive congressional Farm Bill encouraged the commercialization of certain kinds of hemp, of which Delta 8 THC was one of the by-products. Legislators and policy authors can't think about the future the way entrepreneurs can, and they did not envision the future world of innovation they were unlocking. The regulatory maze is an aspect of legislation and regulation — but every maze has an exit path. Innovation in formative markets combines and compounds. Jared Wall launched thchempspot.com to offer Delta 8 THC experiences to consumers. Those who shop at the site find a lot more innovation than just this ingredient. There are multiple new consumable forms for varied experience delivery — gummies, chocolate bars, chewing gum, soft gels, and peanut brittle, among others. Where do these innovations come from? Not from the R&D labs of major corporations, that's for certain. They originate in the creative minds of imaginative entrepreneurs, and they take shape in their experiments and prototypes and willingness to try new things. Will they all be big successes? Of course not. But they will all generate feedback loops of acceptance or non-acceptance, reviews and ratings and experience sharing; they'll contribute to innovation as an ongoing cycle of learning. Society enjoys better choices because entrepreneurs unleash their creativity and don't hold back from experimental designs. Market infrastructure and market institutions can't always keep up with entrepreneurial change, but new supportive services quickly appear to lubricate frictions and provide institutional arbitrage. All commerce needs infrastructure such as payment systems and institutions such as banks, and market formation can sometimes move faster than infrastructure and institutions can adapt. Jared Wall had this experience — PayPal and major banks cut off services because thchempsot.com, while serving legitimate customers with legal products, was deemed a “high risk” business, outside their terms and conditions. Yet, in a quite inspirational way, business services emerge in these situations to navigate around the barriers of poorly adapted institutions. Jared found consultants who offer the service of connecting so-called “high risk” businesses with value-network partners willing to collaborate with them. Jared was quickly able to replace his payment system and banking infrastructure. There was a service interruption, but it was temporary. A new network of mediating services quickly formed to bypass institutional barriers. The creation and sharing of new information is a big part of the innovation equation. Jesus Huerta De SotoJesus Huerta De Soto; Socialism, Economic Calculation, and Entrepreneurship; 2010; Chapter 2, "Entrepreneurship". identifies the creation and sharing of new information as the central activity of entrepreneurs - informing customers of new products and services and new offerings and prices. Entrepreneurs are constantly creating, updating, and improving the information resources they make available to customers. High quality information enhances value. On thchempspot.com, Jared provides information in Q&A form, pull-down menus, and product descriptions. He's self-published an informative e-book that's free on the site, and he publishes an informative newsletter. We can sometimes feel unclear about the value of information, but in formative markets its importance is primary not secondary.

Interviews
Jared Wall: How a Courageous Entrepreneur Enters a Formative Market

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022


How do new markets form? When consumers change their tastes and preferences and behaviors, how are the markets to serve them activated? The markets don't yet exist — entrepreneurial action is required to create them. The answer to the question, of course, is that entrepreneurs — real people taking the real business risk to initiate new business experiments — provide the new energy and new initiative to create markets where previously they didn't exist. Jared Wall is one of these creative entrepreneurs, and thchempspot.com is his creation. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights. Courageous entrepreneurs lead the way into new markets as they are still forming. Entrepreneurs bring the energy that opens new markets and new pathways to economic value. New markets can emerge as the result of changing consumer tastes and preferences, new channels or platforms, new forms of delivery, new technologies or a combination of several catalysts — but the energy, initiative and drive of the entrepreneur is always the necessary ingredient for the ultimate emergence of new value and new market arrangements. New discoveries and new innovations often provide the entrepreneur with market-opening mechanisms. Serving customers in new and different ways doesn't always require new products and services, but it is often the case that the discovery or invention of novel combinations can lead to innovation — that is, new and better experiences for customers that were previously unknown or unavailable or narrowly distributed. In the market for consumable cannabis products, there emerged a new THC variant called Delta 8 THC, a cannabinoid that offered both different product performance and different accessibility. The emergent new ingredient provided the pathway to a whole new market opportunity. Legislation and regulation are complications and barriers in formative markets, but often their ambiguity provides an opening for innovative entry. The courageous entrepreneurs who lead the way into formative markets often encounter legislative and regulatory barriers, since these are static drags on progress and innovation and never keep up with the changes in markets. At the same time, the regulatory thicket can sometimes be useful to the entrepreneur who can cut a new opening others can't imagine. In the market for consumable cannabis products, Delta 8 THC became such a new opening, which was cut when some content in a comprehensive congressional Farm Bill encouraged the commercialization of certain kinds of hemp, of which Delta 8 THC was one of the by-products. Legislators and policy authors can't think about the future the way entrepreneurs can, and they did not envision the future world of innovation they were unlocking. The regulatory maze is an aspect of legislation and regulation — but every maze has an exit path. Innovation in formative markets combines and compounds. Jared Wall launched thchempspot.com to offer Delta 8 THC experiences to consumers. Those who shop at the site find a lot more innovation than just this ingredient. There are multiple new consumable forms for varied experience delivery — gummies, chocolate bars, chewing gum, soft gels, and peanut brittle, among others. Where do these innovations come from? Not from the R&D labs of major corporations, that's for certain. They originate in the creative minds of imaginative entrepreneurs, and they take shape in their experiments and prototypes and willingness to try new things. Will they all be big successes? Of course not. But they will all generate feedback loops of acceptance or non-acceptance, reviews and ratings and experience sharing; they'll contribute to innovation as an ongoing cycle of learning. Society enjoys better choices because entrepreneurs unleash their creativity and don't hold back from experimental designs. Market infrastructure and market institutions can't always keep up with entrepreneurial change, but new supportive services quickly appear to lubricate frictions and provide institutional arbitrage. All commerce needs infrastructure such as payment systems and institutions such as banks, and market formation can sometimes move faster than infrastructure and institutions can adapt. Jared Wall had this experience — PayPal and major banks cut off services because thchempsot.com, while serving legitimate customers with legal products, was deemed a “high risk” business, outside their terms and conditions. Yet, in a quite inspirational way, business services emerge in these situations to navigate around the barriers of poorly adapted institutions. Jared found consultants who offer the service of connecting so-called “high risk” businesses with value-network partners willing to collaborate with them. Jared was quickly able to replace his payment system and banking infrastructure. There was a service interruption, but it was temporary. A new network of mediating services quickly formed to bypass institutional barriers. The creation and sharing of new information is a big part of the innovation equation. Jesus Huerta De SotoJesus Huerta De Soto; Socialism, Economic Calculation, and Entrepreneurship; 2010; Chapter 2, "Entrepreneurship". identifies the creation and sharing of new information as the central activity of entrepreneurs - informing customers of new products and services and new offerings and prices. Entrepreneurs are constantly creating, updating, and improving the information resources they make available to customers. High quality information enhances value. On thchempspot.com, Jared provides information in Q&A form, pull-down menus, and product descriptions. He's self-published an informative e-book that's free on the site, and he publishes an informative newsletter. We can sometimes feel unclear about the value of information, but in formative markets its importance is primary not secondary.

Feedstuffs in Focus
Tackling food insecurity in uncertain times

Feedstuffs in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 12:39


Food insecurity is often a topic of discussion in agriculture, but often within the frame of how will the industry feed a growing population. But the sad reality is that food insecurity is a challenge right here at home, and a large percentage of the funding promulgated in the Farm Bill is dedicated to solving the complex challenge of helping farmers feed their fellow Americans.Lisa Hamler-Fugitt is Executive Director of the Ohio Association of Foodbanks, an organization representing Ohio's 12 Feeding America foodbanks and their 3,600 member hunger relief programs. Recently inducted into the Ohio Agriculture Hall of Fame, she is an advocate not only for the food insecure, but for farmers and the vital role they play in feeding all of us; she is often heard explaining, “We all have to eat.”Earlier this week her organization hosted a convening on the topic of the Farm Bill, bringing together people from farm organizations, state and federal government, food and hunger organizations, and industry and academia.The broad topic was how the next Farm Bill – the legislation that funds the U.S. Department of Agriculture and its many and diverse programs from commodities and conservation to nutrition and rural development – will shape the scope and nature of food insecurity in this country over the next 5 to 10 years. Feedstuffs broadcast editor Andy Vance moderated a panel at the event on tackling food insecurity in uncertain times, and spoke with Hamler-Fugitt about her unique perspective on the Farm Bill, and her concerns for the often tenuous coalition it takes to pass such a massive piece of legislation in a hyper-partisan environment.This episode is sponsored by United Animal Health, a leader in animal health and nutrition. You can learn more about United Animal Health and how they are working to advance animal science worldwide by visiting their website UnitedANH.com.

MyAgLife
9/2/2022 - MyAgLife Episode 133: Interview with Fresno County Farm Bureau CEO Ryan Jacobsen on 2023 Farm Bill Expectations

MyAgLife

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 18:42


Taylor Chalstrom sits down with Ryan Jacobsen, CEO of Fresno County Farm Bureau, to discuss the Bureau's recent Farm Bill session hosting and what ag industry members want to see in the Bill's next iteration.

Post Bulletin Minute
Today's Headlines: Jared Kushner has surgery for cancer after Mayo Clinic visit

Post Bulletin Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 6:08


Stories in this episode: Day in History: 1947: War hero Eisenhower arrives at Minnesota State Fair Jared Kushner has surgery for cancer after Mayo Clinic visit Food shelves, banks say Farm Bill is key to decreasing growing food insecurity Penz Automotive's Spring Valley location to move onto former Peterson Motors site Kingsland's Fly Guy: Kolling hopes to take Knights to new heights on football field The Post Bulletin is proud to be a part of the Trust Project. Learn more at thetrustproject.org.

The Leading Voices in Food
E179: Investing in Soil Regeneration for Human Health & Environmental Health

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 22:09


Today, we're speaking with geologist David Montgomery, co-author with Anne Bikle of a new book called "What Your Food Ate." Very interesting title. David is professor in the College of the Environment at the University of Washington and earlier had been awarded a MacArthur fellowship. You may already be familiar with him through his acclaimed book called "Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations." Dr. Montgomery has long argued that the root of good health begins with dirt, a factor that we ignore at our peril. Interview Summary   Well, I really admire your work, and this work in this area is so important. We've recorded a number of episodes around the issue of regenerative agriculture, and it's been impressive how much interest there is in this topic, which I think, only a few years ago, wasn't very well known to most people but now is becoming more part of the general discussion, which I see as a very positive development. Let's begin with your interest in dirt. So what is the condition of the Earth's dirt?   Well, sad to say, not very good in terms of our agricultural soils in particular. That's something as a geologist, that's what got me interested in soils is looking at the long history of human interaction with our landscapes and soils and ended up writing a history of farming about how it had degraded farmland around the world over the course of centuries. The short answer is that we have degraded something between about ¼ to 1/3, probably, of the world's potentially viable agricultural land to the point where it's not terribly useful for agriculture. The UN's 2015 Global State of the Soil report concluded we are losing about a third of a percent a year of our ability to grow food on this planet due to ongoing soil loss and degradation. So the physical erosion of the soil and the degradation of its fertility as manifests through the loss of soil organic matter. And, that 0.3% a year number doesn't sound like a big deal on a year to year basis. But think about that over the rest of this century, and it adds up to almost another 1/3 of the world's farmland taken out of production at a time when we really need all hands on deck or all acres on deck, as it may be, to feed the world as our population keeps growing. So, we face a fundamental challenge this century of how to sustain agriculture on a degrading resource base. Our other choice is to think about trying to improve, enhance and restore the soil. That is where regenerative agriculture comes in and where my interest has really grown beyond just looking at the sad experience of past civilizations that degraded their land. And to thinking about possible solutions that will allow humanity to continue intensive agriculture to feed the world well into the future.   So what are some of the factors that have driven the erosion and the degradation?   One of the biggest factors that contributed to the loss of topsoil in societies around the world was tillage, the act of plowing. That seems a little odd to hear at first because isn't that something that farmers do? It helps to provide weed control. It helps to prepare a seed bed for planting, but it also leaves the ground bear and vulnerable to erosion by water and wind until the next plants come in, whether it's a crop or whether it's weeds. If you leave the ground bare and vulnerable, you get the erosional situation like we saw in the Dust Bowl where great clouds of dust blew off the American Midwest when we plowed up the plains when the next drought came in. The same kind of thing happened in slower motion in societies in the past, mostly in response to rain rather than wind, but erosion that proceeded faster than the rebuilding of the soil gradually stripped off the top soil from regions around the world that people depended on to grow their food. And in the modern world, we can actually degrade soil faster with the combination of tillage, the over application of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers, which also contribute to decline in soil organic matter, and the concentration on monocultures can also reduce the release of exudates that plants produce and drip into the soils to feed microbes around their roots. That combination is all resulted in degradation of soil organic matter and the loss of topsoil, soil erosion in many parts of the world. So the very foundation, if you will, of modern conventional agriculture, intensive tillage, lots of agrichemical use, and monocultures has helped to undermine the native fertility of the farmland that future generations globally are going to depend on for their food. So one of the questions I've been wrestling with and how I got into looking at regenerative agriculture was how could that process be turned around? How could we actually sustain intensive farming and not degrade the land? Is it possible to actually engage in intensive farming that could improve the health of the world's soils? That started to turn me into an optimist when I ran into farmers, interviewed farmers, and studied their farms where they had indeed done that.   It is impressive to hear those stories. We've had a number of such farmers doing podcasts, and it's very inspiring to talk to them. So let's just take one piece of what you said, the use of tillage. You hear the term no-till farming. What does that mean? What does that look like?   - [David] Yeah, so that would be farming without plowing, and so the challenge is how do you get the seeds into the ground? How do you prepare a field for planting if you still have the remains of last year's crop on it, the so-called crop residue? Over the last century, people have invented new and different farm implements and machines, and there are no-till planters that can actually put seeds down into the soil in narrow little trenches that get good contact between the seed and the seed bed but don't require essentially inverting the soil. They don't rip it all up. They just disturb a little narrow slot to actually get seeds in the ground. What that also allows is keeping the residue from a prior crop as essentially a mulch. If you knock it down, if you kill any weeds that were there physically and knock them down, crimp their stems, you can convert them into mulch that can help keep moisture in the soil, but it also protects the soil from erosion. No-till farming is a way of farming that minimizes the physical disturbance of the soil, and you need different equipment to do it and a different mindset to do it, but it's very feasible to do, and there's lots of different ways to do it. Some farmers use a lot of herbicides to control their weeds in no till. That is the conventional way to do it, but there's others who are pioneering different techniques that don't require the use of a lot of herbicides to do no till. The basic idea of no till is to minimize the disturbance of the soil, and why is that important? Because it enhances the beneficial aspects of soil biology. It allows the natural soil ecology that really evolved in the last 450 million years since plants colonized the continents to work. Soil microbes have these partnerships that evolved between plants and life and the soil that are mutually beneficial. And if you disturb the soil physically, you disturb a lot of the fungal partners that crops are trying to invest in with some of their early growth.   I know the regenerative agriculture approach wasn't called this going back hundreds of years but been used by populations around the world, including Native Americans, but if we fast forward today, do you think that this holds promise for being done on a broad enough scale to really make a social difference?   Yes, I really do. What is different today is that in the past, these practices of crop rotations and of planting legumes in and amongst crops to get nitrogen into the soil, those are not new ideas. They have been traditional ideas in many societies around the world because they worked to help sustain the fertility of the soil. But, what I think we really have the opportunity to do now is to combine some of that ancient wisdom with the modern technology that allows us to do no till at scale. And, to minimize our use of not only physical disturbance from adopting no till but also to minimize the chemical disturbance that comes with the overuse of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers and pesticides. Combining the modern technology with ancient wisdom can allow us to basically expand the realm of regenerative practices to very large-scale farming because unless we all want to become farmers, we're not going to be able to do small-scale regenerative farming and feed the world. Even though most of the world's population is fed by small-scale farmers, those of us in the westernized world relying on very few people to feed very many of us. I've been on regenerative farms that are up to 20,000 acres in the US; big, large mechanized farms that have done an amazing job at rebuilding the fertility of their land. I've also been on very small-scale subsistence farms in equatorial West Africa that are regenerative that have done an amazing job at rebuilding the fertility of their land. Those three general principles of minimizing disturbance, growing cover crop, always keeping living roots in the ground to provide exudates to feed the microbes, and to grow a diversity of plants. That recipe is a combination of principles that different kinds of practices would need to be used on large farms or small farms or high tech farms and manual labor subsistence farms, but the general underlying philosophy of cultivating the beneficial life in the soil underpins all those. And that's how I tend to look at what I would call regenerative agriculture, are farming practices that are tailored to the size of the farm, the environment, the climate, the crops that farmers want to grow, the technology they have access to, but that prioritizes building the health of the soil as the foundation for the farm.   It's nice to hear such a positive outlook on this. You are painting the picture saying that it can be done. Do you think it can be done in a way that can compete cost wise with traditional approaches to farming?   Absolutely, and that was a big focus of what I wrote about in "Growing a Revolution." If you could tell a farmer that you could cut their fertilizer costs, cut their diesel costs, cut their pesticide costs as much as in half, they all start looking at you like going, "Yeah, tell me more. How would you do that?" That's one of the key attractions, I think, of regenerative agriculture. Once the soil is restored to a healthier state, you don't need as much fertilizer. You don't need as many pesticides, and you don't drive tractors around as much if you're doing no till. What are three of the biggest costs on modern farms in north America? Well, fertilizer, diesel, and pesticide. And so if you can teach farmers a different way of farming that starts with a different way of looking at the soil and adopting a different series of practices that allows them to harvest as much while spending less to do it, it's a recipe for a more profitable farm. And for what I've seen in the experience of the pioneering regenerative farmers that I've interviewed, once they've restored fertility to their land, their yields are comparable to, if not better than, their conventional neighbors, and their expenses are less. That's what started turning me into an optimist on this is I've seen a lot of growing interest in farming communities simply because farmers are pushed to the wall and looking for ways to cut costs.   That's so exciting to hear that, and then, of course, at some point government could subsidize these sort of approaches to make it even more cost effective because of the environmental benefits.   There are all kinds of add-ons in terms of benefits, less offsite nitrogen pollution, greater on-farm biodiversity, enhancements to rural economies, and also differences in what gets into the food that we grow that could potentially benefit human health.   I have a million questions to ask you. We've talked about the vitality and health of the soil. Let's talk about the vitality and health of what's being grown in the soil, that is the nutrient quality of the foods. In the book, you note that produces significantly less nutrient dense than in the past. How much is this true, and how less dense is it?   Yes. That's a great question. So one of the things we really delved into in "What Your Food Ate" because it is a central question to thinking about, well, does soil health mattered to human health? And the conclusion we came away with in diving into the peer reviewed literature and doing some of food testing of our own, was that there's three key areas where the nutrient density, shall we say, of food has suffered over the last half century. And that's in terms of mineral micronutrients, phytochemicals, and the fat profiles of our meat and dairy. So how does that work? Well, in terms of mineral micronutrients, a lot of plants partner with fungal communities in the soil to actually trade sugars and fats and proteins. Plants will drip those out of their roots to feed microbes in the soil in exchange for those microbes, particularly fungi, giving back things like zinc or copper or iron mined from the soil. It's literally an underground economy but where both partners benefit from the exchanges, and conventional agricultural practices disturb those relationships. We're not talking so much about the major nutrient composition of foods as much as the micronutrients. Plants have different gene pathways where if they're grown in very nitrogen-rich environments, they shut down their exudate production. So they stop feeding their microbial partners. Their microbial partners aren't on the job to give them the mineral micronutrients that they need and that turn out to be very important for our health, too, when we eat them. Plants also make what are known as phytochemicals in response greatly to environmental stimuli, some of which are microbes in the soil. And so the communities of life around their roots are actually key partners in terms of making things that we don't often consider nutrients in the nutritional sciences, but they're important for maintaining human health, things like antioxidants, anti-inflammatories. Those are examples of the functions phytochemicals can serve in our bodies, and our farming practices have disrupted them. How much they have disrupted them? There are studies that show differences on the orders of 50 to 100%, others that are more like 20%. Most of the studies and the testing that we did as well make it look like it's more like around 20%-ish. It's modest but very real differences in these compounds that the medical sciences have shown are fairly beneficial to promoting human health in our diets.   So can I assume from what you're saying that there's research now showing that if you use better soil practices a la regenerative agriculture, that the nutrient quality improves?   Yes, it's a nontrivial difference. And the other difference, even bigger, is looking at the ratio of the composition of fats in meat and dairy in terms of the omega-6 and omega-3 fats. To make a very simple generalization, omega-6 fats in our bodies are instrumental in initiating inflammation whereas omega-3 fats are instrumental in quelling or reducing inflammation. It turns out that what we get in terms of the fat composition in our meat and dairy products very much depends on what the cows ate that produce that meat and dairy. Cows that grazed leafy green plants, actually grazing out in a pasture, they eat a lot of omega-3s because that's what's in the leaves of plants because omega-3s are central to photosynthesis. Omega-6s are a very rich in seed sources. They serve different purposes in seeds. Cattle that are on a feed lot diet of seed-derived feeds are rich in omega-6s, and our diet has gone from having just a few more omega-6s than omega-3s in our diet 100 years ago. Now we're awash in omega-6s from that change in our meat and dairy and also the addition of seed oils to processed foods. That trade we write about in the book that translates through, we think, to essentially how so many of us are dealing with chronic maladies that are rooted in chronic inflammation.   Another way to really move this along might be for consumers to begin requesting products that are grown in such a way, and so I'm wondering about your opinion on whether a poll from consumers might help here. Do you think there could come a time when that would be the case?   I absolutely do, in fact. I just noticed in Anne and my own buying habits. So we started doing this research and learning what it was we did along the way, our buying habits have changed. So we're buying 100% grass fed meat and dairy when we can. We've tried to connect with farmers whose practices we really like in terms of the produce we can buy at farmer's markets here in Seattle where we live. Now the average consumer faces a challenge today in terms of what's labeled as what in a grocery store, but it's our hope that people will start thinking more about these connections, start asking questions, ask the produce manager at your store, "What are the farms doing that you're getting the produce from?" I could definitely see a world in the not too distant future where consumers may be armed with the ability to know what the analyses of different batches of produce coming in.   And I wonder if the first movement here might not be from institutions, that a school system or a hospital or the procurement part of a city or county government, if they made purchasing decisions based on nutrient quality and, of course, the practices used to grow the food could make a big difference.   I think that is a tremendous idea that I think could be very impactful, and I think you're right, that that could be where you might see some of the biggest pieces of movement. There is also been some corporations that have been interested in trying to move towards adopting and advertising that they have adopted regenerative sourcing in some of their ingredients. I really see three areas that need attention in terms of advancing regenerative agriculture. Consumer demand is one, as we have been discussing. The inherent farmers' incentives in terms of economics that we discussed earlier is another. The third is in terms of rethinking our agricultural subsidies and policies to actually reward farmers who are rebuilding the health and fertility of their land. Those who are reinvesting in the future of America, quite literally, instead of continuing to subsidize conventional practices that frankly degrade the fertility of the land and the ability of future generations to feed themselves. If we could get all three of those areas lined up working towards the same goal of making what we call regenerative agriculture today the conventional agriculture of tomorrow, that could literally change the world in the coming decades. It's not going to happen fast, but I think it's something that could be done over the course of two or three decades at a time when we really need the change.   Well, especially if the right research got done at the right time. For example, I could imagine going back to school systems. Let's say that a school system changes its buying practices and ends up buying more nutrient-dense foods and then proves that there are beneficial outcomes for the kids, like better performance in school and more attention and things like that. Then you could see a lot of adopters coming pretty quickly.   Yes, I would love to see a lot more research along those lines done. We tried to connect the dots in "What Your Food Ate" from soil health to crop health to animal health to human health, but there's a lot of space between those dots and a lot of work that needs to be done, but it's a very promising area and a new way to think about those connections.   Could we talk about livestock for another minute? You mentioned this earlier, and it sounds like there's a lot of promise using these techniques for livestock production. Most people think of plant production here, but livestock are really important as context as well. Are there places where livestock and plant-based agriculture are interacting with each other in this context?   Yes, some of the farmers I visited were reintegrating animal husbandry into their cropping operations and having their cattle graze off their cover crops and then manure their fields. I came from a position where I had long thought of cattle in particular as harmful to the land through gully formation and erosion from overgrazing. The farmers that I visited who have used cattle to rebuild the fertility of their soils were really grazing in a very different manner, in a different style that enhanced the fertility of their land as a result of reintegrating them. I think one of the big inadvertent mistakes of 20th century agriculture was essentially separating animal husbandry from cropping and encouraging farmers to specialize in one or the other. Now we have the perverse situation where we grow a whole lot of corn using practices that degrade the fertility of the land to feed cattle and feed lots who then are full of omega-6s that degrade our health when we eat them. It makes no sense in terms of large-scale agricultural policy unless you are thinking with the mid-20th century mindset of maximizing efficiency and industrializing and separating those corners of agriculture. What we inadvertently did is we broke some of the biological and ecological connections that helped keep the land fertile and that were result of the integration of animal husbandry and cropping practices. That's another example, I think, of the value of potentially reintegrating some elements of ancient wisdom with modern science to think about doing things a little differently.   Let me end with this question, and I want to see if I'm reading you right. It sounds like if you look at the world's situation with dirt agriculture, it is a pretty dire picture, getting worse quickly, and it could go really badly if nothing is done, but it also sounds like you're very optimistic. There is a lot we know about what can be done, a lot of it is being done, and the signs for the future are positive. Am I reading that right?   I am optimistic about this. I struggle with how much of that optimism is a choice rather than a logical extension of what I know. But I think we know enough now about techniques that can rebuild fertility of the land and restore it that it's feasible to see a path forward where we could do that at scale with very positive results that could also put a lot of carbon back in the world's agricultural soils, which would have ancillary climate benefits. It's not going to solve the climate problem. That's a fossil fuel issue primarily, but it could help. Back when I wrote "Dirt" in 2007, I think it was, there was hardly anybody talking about soil health and the long-term importance of reinvesting in the world's agricultural soils to rebuild their fertility, and now almost every farming conference I go to or get invited to speak at, that's one of the big topics of discussion among farmers. And there's now discussion at policy level in terms of the new Farm Bill that climate activists are interested in. There's a lot of very broad, I think, public support and interest coalescing around the idea that one of the smartest things we could do for the future of our own species and for the health of the planet is to reinvest in the health and the fertility of our agricultural soils.   Bio   David R. Montgomery is a Professor of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington. He studies the evolution of topography and the influence of geomorphological processes on ecological systems and human societies. He received his B.S. in geology at Stanford University (1984) and his Ph.D. in geomorphology from UC Berkeley (1991). Current research includes field projects in the Philippines, eastern Tibet, and the Pacific Northwest of North America. In 2008 Montgomery received a MacArthur Fellowship. His books, Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations, King of Fish, and The Rocks Don't Lie have all won the Washington State Book Award in General Nonfiction. Montgomery's Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life, was a finalist for the PEN/E.O. Wilson award for Literary Science Writing. His latest work with W. W. Norton, What Your Food Ate: How to Heal Our Land and Reclaim our Health, published in 2022.  

Farm City Newsday by AgNet West
AgNet News Hour, Tuesday, 08-30-22

Farm City Newsday by AgNet West

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 41:17


Get the latest agriculture news in today's AgNet News Hour, hosted by Danielle Leal. Today's show covers why the NCGA thinks California's new vehicle requirements are a missed opportunity, conservation incentives being a focal point in Farm Bill listening sessions, and working with industry members to mitigate Broomrape in tomatoes. Tune in to the show for these news stories, interviews, features and more.

Hemp Legally Speaking
Congressman Ed Perlmutter and the SAFE Banking Act

Hemp Legally Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 17:15


Hemp Industry Episode Resources:Host: Jonathan MillerGuest: Congressman Ed Perlmutter Blog: Hemp Legally SpeakingHemp Industry questions covered in the episode: What kinds of problems are hemp and cannabis businesses facing when it comes to banking and financial transactions? What is the SAFE Banking Act and how would it assist hemp and cannabis farmers and businesses? What are the special hemp provisions that were developed in conjunction with Congressman Andy Barr (R-KY) How does the legislation advantage small and minority-owned businesses? What are the prospects of passage of SAFE Banking and what can supporters do to help? 

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Friday, August 26, 2022 – The Menu: Farm Bill and tribal fisheries

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 56:25


The Farm Bill is a huge piece of legislation dealing with every aspect of agriculture and nutrition and it's set to be reauthorized in 2023. That's a chance for Native food advocates to insert critical policies, change old policies, and promote food sovereignty. Plus, tribes are getting a big funding boost from the Inflation Reduction Act with millions of dollars dedicated to Indigenous climate resilience and adaptation projects in tribal fisheries and hatcheries. Friday on Native America Calling, Andi Murphy serves up a new helping of “The Menu,” our regular roundup of the Indigenous food movement, with attorney Carly Griffith Hotvedt (Cherokee), associate director of the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative at the University of Arkansas School of Law and committee member of the Oklahoma state office for the Farm Service Agency; Alexander Ashley (Navajo), chef, owner, and operator of Bidii Chidi; and Michael Orcutt (Hupa), fisheries department director for the Hoopa Valley Tribe.

Farm and Ranch Report
Farm Bill-Funded Research Programs Critical for Agriculture

Farm and Ranch Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022


Research into little cherry virus is just one example of the need for these investments.

On Deck
On Deck - Tuesday, August 24, 2022

On Deck

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 8:40


WCBU's On Deck has everything you need to know to start your day for Wednesday, August 24th. You'll hear how a new federal investment in biofuels could impact how much you pay at the pump. Plus, hear about what may be included in the 2023 Farm Bill from U-S congresswoman Cheri Bustos.

AJ Daily
08-23-22 Latest episode on The Angus Conversation, an Angus Journal podcast; advice on what data points to collect during weaning; the latest cattle on feed inventory; and information about a farm bill listening session

AJ Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 5:26


Today's update includes the latest episode on The Angus Conversation, an Angus Journal podcast (https://www.angusjournal.net/podcast); advice on what data points to collect during weaning (https://www.angus.org/media/news/fullarticle?aiid=1152&lstitle=Weaning-and-Dam-Data%3A-What-to-Know); the latest cattle on feed inventory (https://www.dailylivestockreport.com/); and information about a farm bill listening session (https://agriculture.house.gov/news/email/show.aspx?ID=UM7R6EFIKRDWNUZOWZIRITMNRU). 

American Ag Network
A2 Milk, 2023 Farm Bill, AURI, and the Inflation Reduction Act with U.S. Senator Tina Smith and USDA Rural Development Under Secretary Xochitl Torres Small

American Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 5:19


We discussed the Senator's and Under Secretary's trip to Ten Finns Creamery in Menahga, MN. Topics of discussion include A2 milk, the upcoming farm bill, AURI, and the Inflation Reduction Act.

The Justice Podcast
The Crème de la Crème of Farm Bill Policy

The Justice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 25:49


Alan Bjerga, SVP of Communications at the National Milk Producers Federation, discusses the complexities of addressing concerns for dairy farmers across the country, both in the Farm Bill and through other policy. The 2023 Farm Bill will be Alan Bjerga's 5th Farm Bill, and he has been working in the agriculture industry his entire career. This podcast isn't financial, legal, or medical advice, but we do discuss how we might invest our resources in systems and policies for a healthier society. If you'd like to learn more about today's topic and other public policy issues, check out the website: TheJusticePodcast.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bobby-stroup/support

Coues 2 Moose
023: Dove Hunting in Yuma with Quail Forever Farm Bill Biologist Zaara Kidwai & AZGFD Wildlife Manager Yosie Hyink

Coues 2 Moose

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 58:03


In Arizona, the biggest state holiday following the Fourth of July is the Dove Opener on September First. While it's not an official holiday, it should be, as thousands of Arizonians & out of state hunters flock to the deserts to pursue Mourning, White-winged & Eurasian Collared Doves. With all this excitement, one place stands apart from Arizona for the sheer amount of Doves, and coincidingly, Dove Hunters. Yuma. Just saying it evokes thoughts of dove hunting to hunters across the southwest. Join me as I talk dove hunting in this Dove Mecca with staff from Quail Forever & AZGFD!

Cannabis Science Today
#31 Delta-8 THC Goes Rogue featuring Dr. Eric Leas, PhD MPH

Cannabis Science Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 49:36


You're probably already familiar with Delta-9 THC, which is the primary cannabinoid in the cannabis plant known for its psychoactive effects. But what's going on with Delta-8 THC? In this episode, Dr. Eric Leas, from the University of California San Diego's School of Public Health, discusses the differences between Delta-9 and Delta-8 THC and a loophole in the Farm Bill that has led to a growing, unregulated market for Delta-8. We discuss the risks associated with this market and he shares some ideas on revisiting regulations at the federal and state level to protect consumers.  Links: Interview with Eric Streenstra, the founder of Vote Hemp: https://diagonventures.com/cannabis/hemp-versus-cannabis/ NYT article on Delta-8:  https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/01/well/mind/delta-8-thc-marijuana.html Learn more about Dr. Eric Leas:  https://profiles.ucsd.edu/eric.leas

Agriculture Today
1252— KDA Secretary Beam and the 2022 Ag Growth Summit… Pests Spotted in Garden City and Ellsworth County

Agriculture Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 27:54


1252—2022 Ag Summit… Pests Spotted in Garden City and Ellsworth County KDA Secretary Mike Beam Sorghum Midge and Sorghum Aphid Spotted in Kansas Milk Lines   00:01:05—KDA Secretary Mike Beam— Secretary of the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Mike Beam, discusses the upcoming 2022 Ag Summit, drought conditions, the 2023 Farm Bill, and the role that he sees K-State playing in ensuring the future of agriculture in the state of Kansas and beyond 2022 Ag Growth Summit Website 00:12:08 —Sorghum Midge and Sorghum Aphid Spotted in Kansas — K-State Extension entomologist, Anthony Zukoff, and Midway District crop production agent, Craig Dinkel, cover two pests that they have recently come across in Garden City and Ellsworth County – sorghum midge and sorghum aphid  Sorghum Pest Management Guide 00:23:12—Milk Lines — We end with K-State dairy specialist, Mike Brouk, he covers methods to get through the upcoming forage season on this week's Milk Lines     Send comments, questions, or requests for copies of past programs to ksrenews@ksu.edu. Agriculture Today is a daily program featuring Kansas State University agricultural specialists and other experts examining ag issues facing Kansas and the nation. It is hosted by Samantha Bennett and distributed to radio stations throughout Kansas and as a daily podcast.   K‑State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well‑being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K‑State campus in Manhattan.

North American Ag Spotlight
Insight into the Next Farm Bill with Women in Agribusiness Summit Speaker Brooke Appleton of NCGA

North American Ag Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 23:51


This week Chrissy Wozniak gains some insight into the upcoming Farm Bill with Women in Agribusiness Summit Speaker Brooke Appleton Vice President of Public Policy for the National Corn Growers Association.The 11th annual Women in Agribusiness (WIA) Summit will take place this year September 26-28 in Dallas, Texas. The event is renowned for annually convening more than 800 of the country's female agribusiness decision-makers, and for building a year-round community of career-minded women. WIA initiatives have grown to include WIA Membership, WIA Career Connector, WIA Demeter Award of Excellence, Scholarships, and the WIA Today blog. The 2022 Women in Agribusiness Summit will feature nearly 40 industry expert speakers and cover topics such as supply chain disruption, the impact of the war in Ukraine, immigration challenges, price volatility in the ag market, and animal agriculture. It also will feature an update on what's to come for the 2023 Farm Bill, which will be covered by speaker Brooke Appleton of the National Corn Growers Association, who is today's guest.Brooke Appleton works in concert with the board and leadership to develop and implement the organization's policy priorities and manages all outreach to Congress, the administration, and government agencies.With close to two-decades of experience in Washington, Brooke has served in senior leadership roles at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, on Capitol Hill, and with some of the nation's leading commodity groups.Prior to heading NCGA's Washington office, Brooke served as chief of staff for the deputy secretary at USDA, managing the office's day-to-day operations and serving as the deputy secretary's lead advisor.She also served as a chief advisor on agricultural and environmental issues to Rep. Sam Graves (R-Missouri) as he chaired the House Small Business Committee. Prior to her committee work, Brooke served as an agricultural advisor in Graves' congressional office.Thanks to her upbringing on a multi-generation row crop and cattle farm in northwest Missouri, Brooke is able to couple her deep understanding of agriculture with her extensive knowledge of the policy process to effect change for America's corn growers.Brooke holds a B.A. in agribusiness management with a minor in international agriculture and political science from the University of Missouri-Columbia.Don't miss Brooke's presentation along with many other ag professionals live in Dallas at the Women In Agribusiness Summit September 26-28. Register at - https://agr.fyi/wia_register. For more information visit - https://wia.highquestevents.com/website/34360/The Women in Agribusiness (WIA) Summit annually convenes over 800 of the country's female agribusiness decision-makers. The 2022 WIA Summit, September 26-28 in Dallas, TX includes presentations from Cargill's Corporate Senior Vice President, Animal Health & Nutrition, Ruth Kimmelshue; Marco Orioli, VP of Global Grain & Processing for EMEA, CHS; and Brooke Appleton of the NCGA. Learn more at https://agr.fyi/wia_register. FIRA USA 18-20 OCT. 2022 (FRESNO-CA): The only 3-day event dedicated to the California and North America market for autonomous agriculture and agricultural robotics solutions.Learn More at https://agr.fyi/fira

Hemp Legally Speaking
Wendy Mosher and the "Value the Seed" Initiative

Hemp Legally Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 18:45


Hemp Industry Episode Resources:Host: Jonathan MillerGuest: Wendy Mosher, President & CEO of New West GeneticsBlog: Hemp Legally SpeakingHemp Industry questions covered in the episode: What challenges are U.S. hemp farmers facing when it comes to hemp seed varieties that when used result in "hot hemp" production? What is certified seed, and what's the difference with uncertified seed? What is the "Value the Seed" initiative and how would it provide regulatory relief to U.S. hemp farmers? What is the difference between "Value the Seed" and the "Fiber/Grain Exception" proposal that has been introduced as a competing initiative? 

The Bank Leader Link
Ag Banking Perspectives with ABA's Ed Elfmann, SVP of Agriculture & Rural Banking Policy

The Bank Leader Link

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 25:54


Ed touches on a multitude of ag-related topics including the Farm Bill, the ECORA Act, credit union and Farm Credit taxation hurdles, and much more. If you work with ag customers, this is a must-listen episode!

Cannabis Grand Rounds
Hemp Legalization and The Farm Bill

Cannabis Grand Rounds

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022


Human agriculture started about 10,000 years ago and hemp was most likely one of the first cultivated crops.Human agriculture started about 10,000 years ago and hemp was most likely one of the first cultivated crops. It is an extremely versatile crop with multiple uses back then and even more uses today.American farmers including our founding father George Washington grew hemp as a staple crop in the 1700's. But it only became legal in 2018 with the passing of that year's Farm Bill.So why did it take so long for the US to harness the power of hemp? Today we dive into the history of hemp and CBD.

Tractors And Troubadours
Ep. 39: AEM on building a rural workforce, CHIPS bill seen as boon for trades, soy checkoff projects, Farm Bill safety net, the music of Bobby Mackey

Tractors And Troubadours

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 53:37


On this episode, presented by Massey Ferguson and Hesston, Julie Davis, Senior Director of Workforce Development for the Association of Equipment Manufacturers discusses the importance of public-private partnerships in developing programs that foster workforce and economic development. Eric Dean, President of the International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Iron Workers, discusses the impact the CHIPS and Science Bill will have on his members. We also learn about the scope of projects to be funded by the Soy Checkoff program in 2023, and we hear from Kansas farmer Marieta Hauser about the impact the Farm Bill's safety net has on her family's farming operation. In this week's Meat Monitor segment, we learn about the strength of U.S. beef in South Korea, and in our Market Talk segment, Jesse Allen discusses the state of the commodities markets with the University of Minnesota's Ed Usset. Ray Bohacz talks about the importance of resilience when trying to troubleshoot farm equipment problems, and we take things back to the country with traditional country music star and legendary honky-tonk operator, Bobby Mackey. Timestamps Massey Ferguson advertisement: 0:00 Intro and news: 0:30 Goatlifeclothing.com advertisement: 6:42 Rural Strong and Massey Ferguson at Farm Progress promo: 7:02 Julie Davis, Association of Equipment Manufacturers: 7:51 Hesston advertisement: 20:06 Eric Dean, International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Iron Workers: 20:36 Ralph Lott, United Soybean Board: 30:58 Marieta Hauser, Kansas farmer/American Farm Bureau Federation: 32:48 Erin Borror, U.S. Meat Export Federation: 34:43 Jesse Allen, Market Talk: 38:13 Ray Bohacz, “Bushels and Cents”: 45:20 Massey Ferguson advertisement: 46:49 Bobby Mackey: 47:18

Critical Root Zone
Digging Deeper into the Cannabis Plant with Frederick Cawthon Episode 2 of 4

Critical Root Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 21:34


Digging Deeper into the Cannabis Plant with Frederick Cawthon Episode 2 of 4“We would not be a country without our farmers” -Frederick CawthonFrederick shares his personal connection with Cannabis and how he became the President of the Hemp Alliance of Tennessee! Maris and Fred get spiritual talking about how Cannabis HEALS with the many cannabinoids that we now know exist! They discuss the Farm Bill of 2023, the upcoming Hemp Expo in Nashville and the challenges of industrial farming vs sustainable, regenerative farming! Keep listening to get the full scope on the policy of the plant and the full spectrum of cannabinoids from Labcanna East's Sarah and Derek Besenius.LINKS:Instagram! @criticalrootzone @marisvibez @frederickcawthon Hemp Alliance of TN: https://www.yourhat.org/Southern Hemp Expo: https://www.southernhempexpo.com/Cannabinoid Wheel Chart  (google images) EPISODE CONTRIBUTORS: Maris Masellis: Host & CreatorPresident of the Hemp Alliance of Tennessee: Frederick CawthonSilver Johnson: Content CreationXPLR Studio Productions:  Erin Pennington & Stuart Deming

Edge of Cannabis Medicine
Ep.41 – FlowGardens Gorgeous CBD Flower w/Erich Maelzer & David Miller

Edge of Cannabis Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 46:47


Episode Notes This week I have the pleasure of bringing you Erich and David of FlowGardens, a Tennessee based company that is cultivating the widest variety and highest quality smokeable "hemp flower" I've ever come across. I use quotes because calling this hemp does not do it justice...this is potent, high quality cannabis. The flower they're growing is rich with terpenes, flavonoids, phytocannabinoids and all checks in under 0.3% THC. Best of all, it's all perfectly legal under the 2018 Farm Bill that allowed for "hemp" production and can be derived right to your home. We discuss: Tennessee laws, education and activism Cultivation practices - hydroponic vs soil Hunting for unique and quality phenotypes Exploring lesser known cannabinoids like CBC and CBG Runaway THC levels and the importance of cannabinoid balance Links Website - https://flowgardens.com Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/flowgardens420/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100064983035230 Reddit - https://www.reddit.com/r/CultoftheFranklin/ Find out more at http://edgeofcannabismedicine.com

Tennessee Home & Farm Radio
Farm Bill Perspectives, Part 1: Importance of the Safety Net

Tennessee Home & Farm Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 2:03


As lawmakers prepare to write the next farm bill, the American Farm Bureau Federation is sharing stories of its importance to agriculture. Micheal Clements shares more on how the safety net included in the farm bill keeps farmers farming. The post Farm Bill Perspectives, Part 1: Importance of the Safety Net appeared first on Tennessee Farm Bureau.

Alabama AgCast
Upcoming Farm Bill Conversation

Alabama AgCast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 17:31


Today marks a special anniversary of the Alabama AgCast. This is our 100th episode and we like to thank the Alabama Farmers Federation for continuing to guide this effort. We'd also like to thank our sponsor, Alabama Ag Credit, for their continued support of this podcast. And finally, we'd like to that you, the listener, for faithfully listening each week. Please share the Alabama AgCast with your family and friends.On today's episode, we travelled to Birmingham for the Federation's annual Farm and Land Expo. As a part of the Expo, several congressional staffers were invited to be a part of a listening session so that Alabama farmers could provide comments and learn more about what is coming for next year's Farm Bill in Congress. Mitt Walker, national affairs director, hosts a great conversation.Our wrap-up today is by William Green who gives us information about a program to help mitigate damage from wild pigs.As always, be sure to check out Alabama Ag Credit and Alabama Farmers Federation.

Beef Buzz with Ron Hays on RON (Radio Oklahoma Network)
OCA's Michael Kelsey says 2023 Farm Bill was the Main Focus of NCBA Summer Business Meeting in

Beef Buzz with Ron Hays on RON (Radio Oklahoma Network)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022


Senior Farm and Ranch Broadcaster, Ron Hays, talks about national policy issues pertaining to the cattle industry with the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association’s Executive Vice President, Michael Kelsey.

Beef Buzz with Ron Hays on RON (Radio Oklahoma Network)
OCA's Michael Kelsey says 2023 Farm Bill was Focus of NCBA Summer Business Meeting in Reno

Beef Buzz with Ron Hays on RON (Radio Oklahoma Network)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022


Senior Farm and Ranch Broadcaster, Ron Hays, talks about national policy issues pertaining to the cattle industry with the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association’s Executive Vice President, Michael Kelsey.

Texas Ag Today
Texas Ag Today - August 8, 2022

Texas Ag Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 23:20


There is a shortage of wheat seed this year. Texas High Plains wheat farmers need more rain as we get closer to planting the new crop. Corn harvest is winding down in Central Texas. Why does a Farm Bill matter to Texans? We'll have those stories and more on this episode of Texas Ag Today.

Texas Ag Today
Texas Ag Today - August 5, 2022

Texas Ag Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 23:20


The Farm Bill debate continues with a solid foundation to build on thanks to a former Texas congressman. Making the right decisions during what remains of this growing season is very important. Irrigation technology continues to help farmers save water. BRD is the greatest concern facing the cattle industry. We'll have those stories and more on this episode of Texas Ag Today.

Lancaster Farming Industrial Hemp Podcast
Congress Examines USDA Hemp Program

Lancaster Farming Industrial Hemp Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 51:01


Last week, the House Agriculture Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research held a hearing to examine the USDA Hemp Production Program. The subcommittee heard from a panel of producers, researchers, tribal members, and state ag commissioners that gave an overview of the hemp industry and offered insight toward the 2023 Farm Bill. Noting the absence of representatives from USDA and FDA, ranking member Jim Baird from Indiana said, “I do believe it is a missed opportunity that we don't hear from the federal agencies tasked with implementing provisions on hemp today.” On this week's podcast, we will listen to highlights from the hearing, including testimony from Colorado Ag Commissioner Kate Greenberg, who offers five recommendations for how Congress can provide support to federal agencies to allow for greater flexibility and improve state-run hemp programs. First on her list is removal of DEA requirements for testing labs. “Our state-of-the-art laboratory began the process of obtaining DEA certification in 2019. However, as of this hearing we still await their approval,” Greenberg said. All panel experts expressed the need for clarification from the FDA concerning the regulation and use of CBD. Also on this week's show, we check in with Lancaster County hemp farmer and cover crop coach Steve Groff, who this week used a sickle bar mower to cut 5 acres of hemp on his farm in Holtwood, Pennsylvania. Groff's hemp was direct-seeded in 15-inch rows, roughly 50 pounds per acre, into a cover crop of black oats and hairy vetch on May 18. The crop reached a height of 12 feet in 75 days and had not started to flower before being cut. He will rake the cut hemp into narrow swaths and turn it a few times, allowing the stalks to ret before baling with a New Holland wet baler. Lancaster Farming also talks to Morris Beegle, organizer of the fourth annual Southern Hemp Expo, taking place in Nashville Aug. 18-20. Learn More: Watch the Congressional Hearing https://www.lancasterfarming.com/farming/industrial_hemp/an-examination-of-the-usda-hemp-production-program/video_24fe545c-14d8-11ed-8f65-b7c948bba48f.html Watch Steve Groff Cutting Fiber at Cedar Meadow Farm https://www.lancasterfarming.com/community/videos/cutting-hemp-fiber-at-cedar-meadow-farm/video_b16f1980-14ce-11ed-acf3-fbdebeb1cdb1.html Southern Hemp Expo, Nashville, Tennessee, August 18-20, 2022 https://www.southernhempexpo.com/ Kings Agriseed's Field Day, August 16-17, 2022 https://kingsagriseeds.com/ Penn State's Twilight Hemp Walk August 16, 2022 https://extension.psu.edu/hemp-research-field-walk Thanks to our Sponsors All Walks Hemp Bedding https://allwalkspet.com/ IND HEMP https://www.indhemp.com/

American Compassion
4. Compromise and Concessions

American Compassion

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 56:35


Compromise is at the heart of almost every aspect of life. From what our family wants for dinner, to what subjects are taught in our schools, to what is included in, and left out of, congressional legislation. Yet, sometimes it seems like a “winner takes all” mentality is taking over. Many social media feeds, television shows, and podcasts glorify the winners and prompt accomplishment over compromise, and overwhelmingly our legislative process reflects this as well. In this atmosphere, it's hard to make progress toward a more comprehensive and effective safety net.   So far in our series on the American Safety Net, we've examined wealth and poverty at the turn of the last century. We talked about what it meant to be poor without a safety net, and where those in need found housing, food, work, and a sense of safety and well-being. We talked about the role of government, philanthropy, and charity and we met Frances Perkins, and Franklin Roosevelt, two people who were integral in the shaping of the first American safety net--The New Deal.   In our final episode of season 1, we explore what compromises were made in order to get the New Deal through. We talk about how a grand vision for universal healthcare was scrapped, how cradle-to-grave social security was whittled down, and how bending on certain elements of the safety net created generational loss that is felt to this day.    Yet, we also discuss how monumental the New Deal was to America. It stabilized an American economic system that was in freefall during the Great Depression; it put people back to work; it instilled faith in the American government, and it restored hope in a people who had been crushed by poor working conditions, poverty, starvation, and insecurity. And still, Frances Perkins glumly appraised the accomplishments as but a few, “practical, flat-footed first steps.”   Join hosts Rebecca McInroy and Michael Zapruder and guests, Erine Gray, H.W. Brands, Robin D.G. Kelley, Tom Philpott, Mike Konzcle, Willow Lung-Amam, Marshall Auerbach, Penny Coleman, and David Kennedy, as we explore this complicated and rich history and what it can teach us today.