Podcasts about National Weather Service

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Best podcasts about National Weather Service

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Latest podcast episodes about National Weather Service

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 597 (10-4-21): Anticipating Frost as Fall Settles In

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:08).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-1-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 4, 2021.  This week, we pause our series of episodes on water connections to the human body, to revisit an episode from fall 2017 that explores one of the hallmarks of the autumn season. MUSIC – ~ 11 sec – instrumental.Following the astronomical start of fall on September 22, this episode features a fiddle tune named for a water-related weather event that will mark a meteorological fall turning point when it occurs across the Commonwealth in October or November.  Have a listen to the music for about 25 more seconds. MUSIC - ~26 sec – instrumental. You've been listening to part of “Cold Frosty Morn',” performed here by the western Virginia band New Standard.  One of the consequences of fall's arrival is frost in the mornings and, eventually, a significant enough freeze to end of the growing season, when temperatures fall to about 28 degrees Fahrenheit or below.  That temperature typically occurs for the first time each fall in mid-to-late October in western Virginia, early-to-mid November east of the Blue Ridge, and mid-to-late November in some Virginia coastal areas.  Those predicted periods are based on historical records through 2010; the typical frost and freeze dates may be shifting as Virginia experiences climate change.Generally, frost forms when water vapor in the air contacts plants, windows, cars, or other solid surfaces that are at or below water's freezing point of 32 degrees Fahrenheit.  Some specific kinds of frost include radiationfrost, occurring when surface objects are cooled by radiating their heat; advection frost, occurring when surfaces are cooled by winds; and rime, a dense type of frost that forms when super-cooled liquid water in fog or clouds contacts solid surfaces, such as trees, radio towers, or ships on winter seas. Frost may seem far away on Virginia's often mild, early October days.   But to paraphrase a comment about truth from the poem “Birches,” by RobertFrost, frost-producing weather will soon break in with all of its matter-of-fact. Thanks to New Standard for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 10 more seconds of “Cold Frosty Morn'.” MUSIC - ~12 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode repeats and replaces Episode 387, 9-25-17. The performance of “Cold Frosty Morn'” heard here is copyright by New Standard, from the 2016 album “Bluegrass,” used with permission. More information about New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 501, 12-2-19. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Maps showing frost/freeze dates in the continental United States, based on data from 1980 to 2010.  Upper map: ranges of earliest dates of first 32°F freeze; middle map: range of median dates of first 32°F freeze; lower map: range of median dates of first 28°F freeze.  Images from the National Weather Service/Northern Indiana Forecast Office, “Frost and Freeze Information,” online at http://www.weather.gov/iwx/fallfrostinfo, accessed 10-4-21. SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION Deborah Byrd, “Equinox Sun is Over Earth's Equator on September 22,” EarthSky, Sept. 22, 2021. Robert Frost, The Poetry of Robert Frost, Edward Connery Lathem, ed., Holt, Rineheart and Winston, New York, 1969.  The quote to which this episode refers, from “Birches” on page 121, is the following: “But I was going to say when Truth broke inWith all her matter of fact about the ice storm….” Kenneth G. Libbrecht, “Guide to Frost,” online at http://www.its.caltech.edu/~atomic/snowcrystals/frost/frost.htm. National Weather Service, “Ice Storms,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/winter-ice-frost.National Geographic Society, “Frost,” online at https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/frost/. National Geographic Society, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” online at https://www.nationalgeographic.org/media/rime-ancient-mariner/. National Weather Service, Baltimore/Washington Forecast Office, “Watch/Warning/Advisory Definitions,” online at https://www.weather.gov/lwx/WarningsDefined. Isaac W. Park et al., “Advancing frost dates have reduced frost risk among most North American angiosperms since 1980,” Global Change Biology 2021, 27: pages 165–176, accessed online at https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15380. Sarah Vogelsong, “Autumn's first frost is falling later. For farmers, the consequences are wide-ranging,” Virginia Mercury, Nov. 3, 2020. WeatherOnline, “Rime,” online at http://www.weatheronline.co.uk/reports/wxfacts/Rime.htm. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). See particularly the “Science” and “Weather” subject categories. Following are links to some other episodes on frozen or freezing precipitation.Freezing rain, sleet, and snow – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Hail – Episode 362, 4-3-17.Ice – Episode 403, 1-15-18;  Episode 404, 1-22-18; Episode 406, 2-5-18; Episode 556, 12-21-20.Snow – Episode 300, 1-25-16; Episode 407, 2-12-18. Following are links to some other episodes related to fall. Fall migratory birds – Episode 183, 10-14-13; Episode 281, 9-14-15; Episode 335, 9-26-16.Tree colors and changes in fall – Episode 285, 10/9/15. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties.2.3 – Matter can exist in different phases. Grades K-5: Earth and Space SystemsK.9 – There are patterns in nature.1.7 – There are weather and seasonal changes; including that changes in temperature, light, and precipitation affect plants and animals, including humans.2.6 – There are different types of weather on Earth.2.7 – Weather patterns and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and their surroundings.4.4 – Weather conditions and climate effects on ecosystems and can be predicted. Grade 66.3 – There is a relationship between the sun, Earth, and the moon. Key ideas include6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.7 – Air has properties and the Earth's atmosphere has structure and is dynamic. Life ScienceLS.8 – Change in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time. Earth ScienceES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations.ES.12 – The Earth's weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun's energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

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But it is Rocket Science
Episode 41 Solar Storms: How Worried Should You Be? - BIIRS Season 3

But it is Rocket Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 38:33


How worried should you be about a Solar Storm hitting Earth? What is a Solar Storm anyway? Tune in to our latest episode to find out! We have Merch!! https://www.butitisrocketscience.com/shop Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/biirs Find us on social media! Instagram: butitisrocketscience Twitter: butitisRS Facebook: But it is Rocket Science Anna's Sources: Gary, Prof. Dale E. “Astrophysics I: Lecture #23.” New Jersey Institute of Technology , web.njit.edu/~gary/320/Lecture23.html. “How Likely Is Another Carrington Event?: Earth.” EarthSky, 30 Sept. 2020, earthsky.org/space/how-likely-space-super-storms-solar-flares-carrington-event/. “Lead.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 25 Sept. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead. Moriña, David, et al. “Probability Estimation of a Carrington-like Geomagnetic Storm.” Nature News, Nature Publishing Group, 20 Feb. 2019, www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-38918-8. Newman, Lily Hay. “A Bad Solar Storm Could Cause an 'Internet Apocalypse'.” Wired, Conde Nast, 26 Aug. 2021, www.wired.com/story/solar-storm-internet-apocalypse-undersea-cables/. Riley, Pete. “On the Probability of Occurrence of Extreme Space Weather Events.” National Academies , 7 Oct. 2014, On the Probability of Occurrence of Extreme Space Weather Events. “Solar Storm.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 15 Sept. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_storm. “Sunspots and Solar Flares.” NASA, NASA, 22 July 2021, spaceplace.nasa.gov/solar-activity. US Department of Commerce, NOAA. “The Sun and Sunspots.” National Weather Service, NOAA's National Weather Service, 7 Aug. 2020, www.weather.gov/fsd/sunspots. Ventana al Conocimiento (Knowledge Window) Scientific journalism Estimated reading time Time 3 to read, et al. “When Will the next Solar Superstorm Occur?” OpenMind, 18 Sept. 2019, www.bbvaopenmind.com/en/science/environment/when-will-the-next-solar-superstorm-occur/. Henna's Sources: “Carrington Event.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 10 Sept. 2021, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrington_Event. Chapman, S. C., et al. “Using the Index over the Last 14 Solar Cycles to CHARACTERIZE EXTREME Geomagnetic Activity.” Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 47, no. 3, 2020, https://doi.org/10.1029/2019gl086524. Evan Gough, Universe Today. “Destructive Solar Storms Usually Hit Earth Every 25 Years or so, Say Scientists.” ScienceAlert, https://www.sciencealert.com/destructive-super-solar-storms-usually-hit-us-four-times-a-century. Geographics. The Carrington Event, Youtube, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgV1rwMY4yg&ab_channel=Geographics. “Geomagnetic Storm.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 11 Sept. 2021, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geomagnetic_storm. Klein, Christopher. “A Perfect SOLAR Superstorm: The 1859 Carrington Event.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 14 Mar. 2012, https://www.history.com/news/a-perfect-solar-superstorm-the-1859-carrington-event. Solar Storms, Kurzgesagt, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHHSSJDJ4oo&ab_channel=Kurzgesagt%E2%80%93InaNutshell. Music from filmmusic.io "Tyrant" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) License: CC BY (creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

My Favorite Detective Stories
Dan Padavona | My Favorite Detective Stories Episode 137

My Favorite Detective Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 57:31


Today's episode is brought to you by John's full series of crime thrillers available right now. You can get them through Amazon here: https://www.amazon.com/John-A.-Hoda/e/B00BGPXBMM%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share  You can also sign up for the newsletter at http://www.JohnHoda.com to get a free copy of John's new novella Liberty City Nights.Thriller and horror author Dan Padavona grew up in Cortland, New York, outside the beautiful Finger Lakes, where he earned degrees from SUNY Cortland and SUNY Oneonta. He entered the National Weather Service in 1994 and later became a forecaster for NOAA. After publishing Storberry in 2014, Dan fell in love with writing and authored nine additional titles by the end of 2017. Bram Stoker Award winner and legendary horror author Brian Keene called Dan “one of the most exciting writers to burst upon the scene in quite some time.”His works are currently being produced for audio books and foreign translations. He's a supporter of Scares That Care and regularly donates to cancer research. Dan loves animals, especially his dogs and Russian tortoise.When he's not writing, Dan enjoys photography, biking, weight lifting, and storm chasing. Dan has videotaped tornadoes from New York to Oklahoma and Texas, and was nearly swept up by a strong twister outside Sweetwater, Texas. A self-proclaimed ice cream and gelato lover, Dan admits to spending too much time in the gym, compensating for his questionable nutritional decisions.Dan Padavona is the author of The Wolf Lake series, The Darkwater Cove series, The Scarlett Bell series, and Dark Vanishings, finalist for eFestival of Word's 2016 Indie Novel of the Year award. Storberry, his vampire horror debut, reached #1 on the Amazon Horror and Occult charts in May 2016.https://www.danpadavona.com/ Thank you for listening. If you have a moment to spare please leave a rating or comment on Apple Podcasts as that will help us expand the circle around our campfire. If you have any questions please feel to reach out to me via my website http://www.johnhoda.com Subscribe now to ensure you catch next weeks episode of How to Rocket Your PI Business PodcastApple Podcasts:https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/how-to-rocket-your-pi-business-podcast/id1507578980Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/3XyqgbdrlWbBpnTBYvFYDk?si=kT_29qTMQSWvdeIZOXWRFg

This Date in Weather History
1926: Category 4 Hurricane hits South Florida

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 4:35


By September, 1926, the population of Dade County and the City of Miami had blossomed to well over 100,000; more than doubling from the census figure of 42,753 in 1920 - construction was everywhere. New buildings were constantly starting on Miami Beach, which had been built across Biscayne Bay on a series of barrier islands, bulldozed from their mangrove beginnings. Most of the new residents were unfamiliar with tropical storms and hurricanes. According to the National Weather Service, On September 11, 1926 a few ships in the central Atlantic reported on a tropical system moving west. It passed north of the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico on the 14th, 15th, and 16th, avoiding normal channels of Caribbean information. In those days before satellite pictures and reconnaissance aircraft, the hurricane remained somewhat of a mystery, with only a few ship reports to tell of its existence. As late as the morning of September 17, less than 24 hours before the category 4 storm's effects would begin in South Florida, no warnings had been issued. At noon, the Miami Weather Bureau Office was authorized to post storm warnings. When barometric pressure began to fall rapidly around 11 PM the night of September 17, hurricane warnings were issued.  The eye of the hurricane passed over downtown Miami and parts of Cocoanut Grove and South Miami around 6:30 AM on September 18. The residents of the city, unfamiliar with hurricanes, thought the storm was over and emerged from their places of refuge out into the city streets. People even began returning to the mainland from Miami Beach. The lull lasted only about 35 minutes, during which the streets became crowded with people. The worst part of the hurricane, with onshore southeasterly winds bringing a 10-foot storm surge onto Miami Beach and the barrier islands, began around 7 AM and continued the rest of the morning. At the height of the storm surge, the water from the Atlantic extended all the way across Miami Beach and Biscayne Bay and into the City of Miami for several blocks. On October 9, well after the hurricane, the Red Cross reported that 372 persons had died in the storm and over 6,000 persons were injured. Damages in 1926 dollars were estimated at $105 million, which would be more than $164 billion in 2021 dollars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Louisiana Considered Podcast
Louisiana Considered: Trash Collection Yet To Resume In New Orleans, How Infrastructure Changes After A Major Storm, NWS Satellite Moving Closer To Baton Rouge, Late City

Louisiana Considered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 24:29


Adam Vos hosted this Thursday's episode of Louisiana Considered. WWNO City Hall Reporter Ryan Nelsenreports on the growing amount of garbage stacking up on New Orleans' streets in the wake of Hurricane Ida, which interrupted standard garbage collection in the city. In an interview aired yesterday during WBUR's Here and Now, host Tonya Mosleyasks Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy Environmental Law Professor Jim Blackburnto explain how Texas' environmental infrastructure developed after Hurricane Harvey devastated the region in 2017. NWS New Orleans Warning Coordination Meteorologist Lauren Nash tells us how a National Weather Service satellite will be moving from Slidell to Hammond to more accurately predict major weather events in the Baton Rouge area. In an excerpt from The Reading Life's Bookmark, host Susan Larsoninterviews author Robert Olen Butlerabout his latest novel, “Late City.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WeatherBrains
WeatherBrains 817: Do Not Press The Red Button

WeatherBrains

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 112:42


Tonight's Guest WeatherBrain has worked for NOAA for nearly 18 years, with most of that time being with the National Weather Service in various roles.  Her current acting role is the Acting Deputy Director for the National Weather Service Office of Organizational Excellence.  She has a Bachelor's in Meteorology from Penn State and a Masters in Science Technology Studies from Virginia Tech and is pursuing a Certification in Facilitation from Georgetown University.  Andrea Bleistine, welcome!  Our Second Guest WeatherBrain has worked for the National Weather Service for over 30 years.  She spent 15 years at the National Hurricane Center in Miami as a Hurricane Specialist.  She has a Bachelor's in Meteorology, a Master's in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography, and a MBA in Technology Management.  Her current role is Director of the National Weather Service Office of Dissemination.

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
Cold Biased Thermometer at the Albany Airport

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 7:45


Hugh Johnson is a retired meteorologist, formerly with the National Weather Service in Albany. He spoke with HMM hosts Andrea Cunliffe and Mark Dunlea about the thermometer that the National Weather Service continues to use at the Albany Airport which is about 2.5 degrees too low.

NTD News Today
Lawmaker Defies Biden Admin's Afghan Evacuation Account; Ex-Guantanamo Detainees Now Taliban Leaders

NTD News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 44:07


NTD News Today—9/8/2021 1. Biden on Taliban's Relations With China 2. Lawmaker Defies Biden Admin's Account 3. Taliban Name New Afghan Government 4. Fmr Guantanamo Detainees Now Taliban Leaders 5. Hearing for Alleged 9/11 Plotters Resumes 6. China Is Biggest Security Threat: Ex-DHS Head 7. FDNY Commissioner Remembers NY's Bravest 8. Daughter Remembers FDNY Father 9. More Dead From 9/11 Illnesses Than Attacks 10. Manchin Only Backs $1T of $3.5T Spending Plan 11. States to Decide on Ended Jobless Aid: WH 12. Poll: Are Biden, CDC Clear on Covid-19 Plans? 13. Louisiana's Recovery Continues After Ida 14. Colorado Shooter Mental Evaluation Slows Case 15. Candidate Found Dead Weeks After Ending Bid 16. Powerful Quake Shakes Southwest Mexico 17. National Weather Service's Director to Retire 18. Tesla Car Cam Catches Man Faking Hit and Run 19. U.S. Funded Virus Research in Wuhan: Report 20. HK Police Arrest 4 Organisers of Tiananmen Vigil 21. Gene Test Linked to CCP Army Sold to World 22. Scientist: Pandemic Came Weeks Before Warning 23. Indonesia: At Least 41 Killed in Prison Fire 24. Trial Begins Over Paris Terrorist Attack 25. Salvador's Bitcoin Rollout Met With Protests 26. UK Experiences Vet Shortage 27. Big Ben Gets a Makeover With Blue Hands 28. Derek Jeter Prepares to Enter Hall of Fame 29. Raw Honey: A Natural Sweetener With Health Benefits 30. City Uses Lego to Explain Annual Budget

Weather Geeks
50 Years of Service

Weather Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 43:41


Guest: Dr. Louis W. UccelliniAfter an incredible career that has spanned more than 50 years, the Director of the National Weather Service, Dr. Louis Uccellini, has announced he will be retiring on January 1, 2022. As one of our most esteemed returning guests, we are honored to have this opportunity to speak with Dr. Uccellini and recollect the countless contributions he has made to the weather and climate enterprise. Throughout his career, he has been a dedicated public servant, an innovative leader at the highest levels of NOAA and the National Weather Service, and led the charge in having the United States become a Weather-Ready Nation. His legacy will have lasting impacts on the field of meteorology, and today, we're excited to celebrate his accomplishments and discuss what's next for him. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Best of News Talk 590 WVLK AM

Kruser talks to John Gordon from the National Weather Service about the aftermath of hurricane Ida.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Science Moab
Monsoons and Flash Flooding

Science Moab

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 17:56


Monsoons in the desert southwest rely on a seasonal wind shift to occur. They don't always materialize. When they come, though, the drastic change in weather and rainfall amounts can often lead to flash floods in a sun-parched desert. We talk with Megan Stackhouse from the National Weather Service in Grand Junction, CO. We talk about the difficulty in predicting rainfall and flooding in arid environments with so much topographic variation.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
August 30, 2021: A fire update and more on Afghanistan with John Rothmann

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 41:38


The National Weather Service issued a red flag warning on Monday for the northern Sierra Nevada and the southern Cascades, meaning that extremely dry conditions and wind gusts of up to 35 miles per hour were likely to cause wildfires to spread in the mountains. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Best of News Talk 590 WVLK AM

John Gordon from the National Weather Service joins Larry with an update on hurricane Ida.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

World News Tonight with David Muir
Full Episode: Saturday, August 28, 2021

World News Tonight with David Muir

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 21:07


Hurricane Ida rapidly gains strength over the warm waters of the Gulf Coast with over six million Americans said to be in the path of the "extremely dangerous category 4" storm. The National Weather Service warning some places may be uninhabitable for weeks or possibly even months. President Biden warns another attack in Afghanistan over the next 24-36 hours is "highly likely." This, as the U.S. releases the names of the 13 fallen marines who were killed in a suicide attack in Kabul earlier this week. Thousands of Afghan refugees arrive at Ramstein Air Force Base in Germany. And the raging wildfire threatening Lake Tahoe.

Heart & Home
Ep. 98: News Roundup Week of 8/23/21

Heart & Home

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 24:55


The U.S. FDA this week gave full approval for the Pfizer vaccine for those 16 and older. It had been approved for emergency use. It's the first vaccine fully licensed and found to be 91% effective. 85 million Americans are eligible that have not received a shot. ———- The civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson, 79, and his wife Jaqueline, 77, remained hospitalized this week in Chicago after testing positive for COVID-19. Jesse Jackson, 79, is vaccinated but his wife is not. ——— The “Homecoming Concert” in New York City's Central Park was canceled because of dangerous weather as Hurricane Henri approached the Northeast last Saturday. The five-hour concert, intended to celebrate New York City's recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, was about halfway through when the weather became an issue. Henri made landfall Sunday near Westerly, Rhode Island, about 12:15 p.m. EDT with sustained winds of 60 miles an hour. Henri weakened as it moved slowly along the Eastern U.S., bringing heavy rain. The slow-rolling system drenched the Northeast with rain. Beach towns from the Hamptons on Long Island to Cape Cod in Massachusetts were spared the worst of the potential damage Sunday. Another storm, Ida, is expected to make landfall in Louisiana Sunday as a Category 4 hurricane on the same date Hurricane Katrina hit Louisiana as a devastating Category 3 storm 16 years ago. The Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi coasts are under storm surge warnings, and Louisiana's coast is now under a hurricane warning, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm will move into the Gulf of Mexico Saturday. -------- Catastrophic flooding in middle Tennessee left at least 21 people dead and 20 are missing after the rural area was hit with record rainfall Friday into Saturday morning. A preliminary rainfall total of 17.02 inches was measured at McEwen, Tennessee, Saturday, which would break the all-time 24-hour rainfall record for the state of Tennessee, according to the National Weather Service. The old record was 13.06 inches, recorded in Milan on Sept. 13, 1982. ——————- On Sunday, the Pentagon enlisted the help of six U.S. airlines to evacuate Americans and Afghan partners. Then , a suicide bomber and gunmen attacked crowds of Afghans flocking to Kabul's airport, transforming a scene of desperation into one of horror in the waning days of an airlift for those fleeing the Taliban takeover. At least 90 Afghans and 13 U.S. troops were killed. U.S. officials said another 18 service members were wounded. At least 170 Afghans were wounded in the attack. Two British nationals and the child of another British national also were killed in the bombing. ——— Kathy Hochul became the first female governor of New York on Tuesday, inheriting immense challenges as she takes over an administration facing criticism for inaction during Andrew Cuomo's distracted final months in office. ———- After months of debate over the legality of banning evictions nationwide, the Supreme Court had the final say and shut down President Joe Biden's eviction moratorium on Thursday in a 6-3 vote. ——— Today marks the 58th anniversary of the historic March on Washington, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech in front of the Lincoln Memorial on the National Mall on August 28, 1963. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sabah-fakhoury/message

This Date in Weather History
1990: The Plainfield Tornado

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 4:53


The 1990 Plainfield tornado was a devastating tornado that occurred on the afternoon of Tuesday, August 28, 1990. The violent tornado killed 29 people and injured 353. It is the only F5 tornado ever recorded in August and the only F5 tornado to strike the Chicago area. Between 3:15 p.m. and 3:45 p.m. CDT on August 28th, 1990, a violent F5 tornado ripped through Kendall and Will counties. The tornado left a 16.4 miles-long damage which ranged from 600 yards to a half a mile in width. An estimated total of $160 million dollars in damages was added up with a total of 470 homes destroyed and 1000 damaged. Before the Enhanced Fujita Scale was put in use in 2007, the tornado damage was assessed by using the Fujita Scale. On the Fujita Scale, an F5 tornado has estimated wind speeds of 261-318 mph and is defined as having incredible damage in which strong frame houses can be leveled and swept off of foundations, automobile-sized objects can be lifted up into the air, and trees are usually debarked. The Plainfield tornado was the first ever tornado greater than an F3 rating, since records began in 1950, to occur during the month of August in the state of Illinois. It was the second killer tornado since 1950 to occur during the month of August in Illinois. 31 years later this tornado remains the only F5/EF5 rated tornado documented in the United States during the month of August. The tornado had low clouds and rain surrounding it, making it difficult to see. Because of this, no known photographs or videos of this tornado exist. The tornado approached from the northwest; most tornadoes approach from the southwest. Because of these factors and others there was little or no warning. Wikipedia reports that: “In the months following the tornado, the National Weather Service was heavily criticized for providing no warning of the approaching tornado. The NOAA Disaster Survey Report was highly critical of the forecast process within the Chicago office as well as coordination with local spotter networks and the preparedness of these groups. Prior to 1990, the National Weather Service in Chicago was responsible for providing forecasts for the entire state of Illinois. As the Chicago office was overwhelmed with its workload, no warnings were issued by the office until 2:32 p.m. – nearly an hour after the first tornado was sighted southeast of Rockford. A second severe thunderstorm warning was issued almost an hour later at 3:23 p.m., but this provided no indication that a tornado was on the ground and did not mention the area where the tornado had tracked. No tornado warning was issued until after the tornado lifted.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Growing Harvest Ag Network
Morning Ag News, August 27, 2021: National Weather Service's outlook through the end of August

Growing Harvest Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 2:56


USDA meteorologist, Brad Rippey, has the National Weather Service's outlook for the end of August, into the beginning of September. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Carolina Weather Group
August 17, 2021: North Carolina flooding, tornadoes from Fred [Ep. 378]

Carolina Weather Group

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 47:47


At least 5 people are confirmed dead after Tropical Depression Fred brought devasting flooding to western North Carolina. No place was harder hit than Haywood County, where floodwaters engulfed towns like Canton. On Wednesday, North Carolina Roy Cooper returned to the western North Carolina mountains to visit residents and businesses in Haywood and Buncombe counties. Looking back at the historic event, we're joined by Jason Boyer, Chief Meteorologist for WLOS in Asheville, and Chris Mulcahy, a meteorologist from WCNC Charlotte. Jason Boyer introduces us to a fundraising effort to help the people of Haywood County, North Carolina, who experienced flooding in places along the Pigeon River such as Cruso and Canton. Donate to the United Way and WLOS' Hope for Haywood Chris Mulcahy takes us inside a National Weather Service storm survey that confirmed an EF-1 tornado in parts of Iredell and Alexander counties. See Chris' full story More from the Carolina Weather Group: WATCH THIS EPISODE ON YOUTUBE WATCH THE CAROLINA WEATHER NET: Live, streaming every day for free SUPPORT US ON PATREON VISIT OUR WEBSITE --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/carolinaweather/message

Growing Harvest Ag Network
Afternoon Ag News, August 19, 2021: Weather forecast through the end of August

Growing Harvest Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 2:30


USDA meteorologist, Brad Rippey, has the National Weather Service's outlook for the nation that goes right up against the end of August. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Carolina Weather Group
North Carolina flooding emergency [Ep. 377]

Carolina Weather Group

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 32:25


A State of Emergency is in effect after Tropical Depression Fred brought devastating flooding to the western North Carolina mountains Tuesday. Dozens of people remain unaccounted for in Haywood County after flash flooding. On Tuesday evening, the National Weather Service issued a Flash Flood Emergency for the county as life-threatening flooding was occurring along the Pigeon River. Canton, North Carolina was underwater as the Pigeon River rose to nearly 20 feet. On Wednesday, the National Weather Service began storm surveys across both North Carolina and South Carolina. Their initial findings support the discovery of EF-1 tornadoes across the Carolinas on Tuesday. The Carolina Weather Group is providing an initial recap of the severe weather, the full extent of which is still yet unknown. WATCH THIS EPISODE ON YOUTUBE SUPPORT US ON PATREON VISIT OUR WEBSITE --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/carolinaweather/message

Carolina Weather Group
Fred to bring flash flooding, tornadoes to the Carolinas (SPECIAL REPORT)

Carolina Weather Group

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 39:37


#weather #fred #severeweather Fred, a tropical storm that made landfall in Florida Monday, is bringing with it rich, tropical moisture that will produce flash flooding and severe weather, including damaging winds and tornadoes, in North Carolina and South Carolina Tuesday. Rainfall rates could be as intense as 1 to 2 inches an hour, with total rainfall amounts between 5 and 10 inches possible. There will be a risk of flash flooding, including landslides. The National Weather Service's Weather Prediction Center is calling for a "moderate" risk of flashing flooding Tuesday in western North Carolina and upstate South Carolina. Locations include, but are not limited to, Asheville, Greeville, Spartanburg, and Clemson. The Storm Prediction Center has outlined locations including Charlotte, Statesville, Hickory, Boone, Blowing Rock, Greenboro, Winston-Salem, Asheville, Anderson, Greenville, Spartanburg, and more in a Slight Risk, which is a tier 2 out of 5 for the possibility of severe weather. Storms could produce damaging winds, hail, and isolated tornadoes. Meanwhile the National Hurricane Center is continuing to track Fred: 1. Through Tuesday, heavy rainfall may lead to considerable flash, urban, small stream, and isolated river flooding impacts across portions of the Florida Big Bend and Panhandle. By the middle of the week as Fred lifts north and inland, heavy rainfall and flooding will impact the southern and central Appalachians, the Piedmont of the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic. Landslides are possible across the mountains of North Carolina and Blue Ridge Escarpment on Tuesday. 2. Dangerous storm surge inundation is ongoing along portions of the coast of the Florida Panhandle and the Florida Big Bend region. 3. Tropical storm conditions will continue along the coastline within the warning area over the next few hours and will continue to spread farther inland later today and tonight across portions of the Florida Panhandle, southwestern Georgia, and southeastern Alabama. SUPPORT US ON PATREON VISIT OUR WEBSITE WATCH US ON YOUTUBE --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/carolinaweather/message

The Guy Gordon Show
Megan Varcie ~ The Guy Gordon Show

The Guy Gordon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 3:58


August 12, 2021 ~ Megan Varcie, Meteorologist at the National Weather Service in White Lake, talks with Chris Renwick about the storm weather we've had this summer.

Home Space and Reason
Episode 64 | Wildfires threatening our homes

Home Space and Reason

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 24:30


This episode is Part 1 of 2; relevant to every single homeowner. Forested or suburban, on a large lot or small, no one is immune to fire amidst global warming and its onslaught of drought combined with high winds.  This is a story about the Paradise, California fire from a firefighters' perspective with special guest Jim Broshears. This includes some steps we can take to protect our own homes and apps for documenting it's contents. . Join the ALL POSITIVE Home Space and Reason community: ~ Join the private Facebook group for conversations & sharing about your home space and reason.  All the product links and photos you hear about within the podcast live here.  ~ Follow me on Instagram  ~ Follow me on Facebook  ~ Follow my boards on Pinterest  ~ Follow me on Twitter  ~ Follow me on TikTok  ~ My Home Functionality Coaching & Real Estate Website www.SpaceAndReason.com  Sources & Reference———————————————- 1. Everything Is Unprecedented. Welcome To Your Hotter Earth / article by NPR. 2. National Weather Service. 3. Link to the list of Home Inventory apps  Legal Disclosure: Kristina Browning is a licensed Realtor in the State of Oregon with 503 Properties. “Home Functionality Coach” and "Create a Home that Thrives" are registered Trademarks of Kristina Browning.

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go
Man threatens deputies with explosives, firearms during eviction

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 5:19


Also happening today, the National Weather Service confirms at least six tornadoes touched down in the Chicago area last night; it was a year ago today the Chicago area and the Midwest dealt with a monster storm system; a bond hearing is scheduled today for the two brothers charged in the shooting death of Chicago police officer Ella French; and much more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

LiveWell Talk On...
Derecho: One Year Later

LiveWell Talk On...

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 7:16


On August 10, 2020 a derecho swept through the United States leaving a trail of destruction behind. Cedar Rapids, Iowa was hit hardest with top wind speeds estimated at 140 mph by the National Weather Service. St. Luke's Hospital sustained significant damage, as did much of Eastern Iowa. Today, as we mark the one-year anniversary, our team reflects on the storm and how far we have come since then - a catastrophic event within a pandemic.Featured St. Luke's Team Members Include (in order of appearance):B.J. Schreckengast, Manager, Plant OperationsMary Klinger, President, St. Luke's FoundationScott Kallemeyn, Director, Facilities Planning and OperationsKelli Johnson, Supervisor, Inpatient RehabilitationAimee Traugh, Regional Director, Care ManagementMichelle Niermann, President and CEO, UnityPoint Health - Cedar RapidsWatch the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2ToJHdHb6g 

DMPL Podcast
Terry Swails, Author of 'Derecho 911'

DMPL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 26:16


On the one-year anniversary of the derecho that ripped through Iowa, meteorologist Terry Swails joins the DMPL Podcast to talk about Swails' newest book, Derecho 911. During the podcast, Swails recalls the events of that day and discusses what makes derechos so hard to predict. He also talks about the aftermath, including the damage, how communities came together, and what steps the National Weather Service is taking in the future to ensure people are as prepared as possible for sudden severe weather events. Check out Derecho 911 from the library Other Terry Swails books

The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado Sun Daily Sun-Up: The Colorado Fourteeners Initiative; Captain John N. Macomb reaches Mesa Verde

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 12:35


Good Morning, Colorado, you're listening to the Daily Sun-Up with the Colorado Sun. It's Monday August 9th.   Today - A group called the Colorado Fourteeners Initiative is keeping track of the tens of thousands of people who climb the state's most popular routes. They're also hoping to enhance safety for climbers and help protect the peaks.   Before we begin we'd like to thank our sponsors at Rocky Mountain Immigrant Advocacy Network. Rocky Mountain Immigrant Advocacy Network fights for justice by providing free immigration legal services to individuals, children, and families in Colorado. Join them on Thursday, August 19th, for their annual Immigrant Liberty Awards, celebrating immigrants and advocates in our community. The event is virtual and free to attend. (www.rmian.org/ila)   Before we begin, let's go back in time with some Colorado history adapted from historian Derek R Everett's book “Colorado Day by Day”:   Today we're going back to August 9th, 1859 when Captain John N. Macomb's US Army expedition skirted the northern flank of Mesa Verde. They were searching for a route to connect New Mexico and Utah Territories. Why? Because the federal government and Mormon settlers were clashing over authority in Utah and the army sought new avenues to enter the territory.    Now, our feature story.    Colorado is blessed with more than 50 peaks rising at least 14,000 feet above sea level. And many Coloradans are motivated by the idea they should risk the thin air and steep slopes to climb as many of those fourteeners as they can. A group called the Colorado Fourteeners Initiative is keeping track of the tens of thousands of people who climb the most popular routes every year. They are also trying to build better paths up the steepest slopes so that visitors don't love the mountains to death, as they have in other popular parts of the state. The Colorado Sun's Jennifer Brown trekked up high on Mount Elbert, the tallest fourteener in the state, to meet with the trail builders and find out what it takes to protect our most majestic peaks.    You can read more from Jennifer Brown about building better paths up Colorado's tallest mountains at Coloradosun.com   Thanks for listening. Finally, here are a few stories you should know about today:   New economic data has economists concluding that Colorado is now in full recovery. New business filings were up in the first half of the year. Colorado's labor force participation is third-highest in the nation and our gross domestic product growth was the fifth fastest, according to the state's quarterly economic update. Not all the news was rosy. Weekly wages are up about 4.7% and that suggests a labor shortage. The 6.2% unemployment rate, which is higher than the 5.4% for the nation as a whole, also is troubling. Economists also are worried about the high cost of housing. A minimum-wage worker now must work 72 hours a week to afford a fair market one-bedroom apartment in Colorado.   Smoke from wildfires in northern California made the air quality in Denver the worst among large cities in the world on Saturday, according to IQAir, which tracks air pollution in real time. The National Weather Service in Boulder says fire smoke will persist at least until Monday afternoon at levels that could be dangerous for people with respiratory problems or who are sensitive to smoke.   Passengers on a Greyhound bus had to be rescued from 23 miles up a forest service road on Friday night. The Garfield County Sheriff's office says the bus attempted to get around the closure of I-70 in Glenwood Canyon closure by driving up Coffee Pot Springs Road, a dirt road typically used by 4-wheel drives and A-T-Vs to reach wilderness areas in the White River National Forest. The bus was stopped when a hole was ripped in its oil pan. The 21 passengers spent about five hours stranded. For more information on all of these stories, visit our website, www.coloradosun.com. Now, a quick message from our editor. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WGTD's The Morning Show with Greg Berg
8/6/21 Tim Halbach, National Weather Service

WGTD's The Morning Show with Greg Berg

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 48:26


Tim Halbach, a meteorologist with the the National Weather Service's Milwaukee bureau, takes us behind the scenes of the NWS - and explains some of the challenges involved in tracking and predicting severe weather.

Carolina Weather Group
These new thunderstorm alerts are coming to your phone [Ep. 375]

Carolina Weather Group

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 29:24


Starting this week, the National Weather Service will be issuing a new tier of Severe Thunderstorm Warnings that will automatically be delivered to your cell phone. Severe thunderstorms capable of producing 80 mph winds or baseball-sized hail will now be categorized as "destructive," a classification that will prompt the Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) to sound on your phone if you are near the storm. The WEA functionality already delivers severe weather alerts to your phone for all tornado warnings and select flash flood warnings. The change is a part of a multi-year effort by the National Weather Service to simplify their severe weather hazards and make them more assemble. This week to help understand the change, we're looking back at part of an interview with Trisha Palmer, the Warning Coordination Meteorologist at the National Weather Service Office in Greenville-Spartanburg, South Carolina. See the full interview: https://youtu.be/2oycYpg6VEs See our 2019 interview about the NWS Hazard Simplification Project: https://youtu.be/jdSVhXr9G_A Prepare for the hurricane season: https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane SUPPORT US ON PATREON: https://patreon.com/carolinaweathergroup VISIT OUR WEBSITE: https://carolinaweathergroup.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/carolinaweather/message

KUOW Newsroom
Rain is on Seattle's horizon 'just in the nick of time'

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 2:07


We've got a shot this week at ending our current dry spell. We've gone nearly 50 days without any measurable rain, but Meteorologist Maddie Kristell at the National Weather Service of Seattle says there may be some good news ahead.

The Anchor Point Podcast
Incident Meteorologist Sean Luchs

The Anchor Point Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 87:37


Wildland fire behavior is obviously directly impacted by the weather - So, today on the show, we discuss the ins and outs of fire weather, and get to better understand the incredibly important role of and Incident Meteorologist...Sean Luchs is a meteorologist for the National Weather Service at the Houston/Galveston WeatherForecast Office. Despite living in a location known for its torrential rainfall and flooding, he is also a partof the NWS Incident Meteorologist, or IMET, program. These forecasters volunteer to provide onsiteweather support to Incident Management Teams at wildland fires and other incidents across thecountry. He is also an air resource advisor, tasked with providing forecasts of smoke impacts tofirefighters and the public.Before joining the National Weather Service, Sean earned Bachelor's and Master's degrees inMeteorology from the University of Oklahoma. After finishing his education, he joined the Florida ForestService as the State Fire Meteorologist. In addition to wildland fires, Sean has provided weather supportfor major hurricanes, industrial accidents, and has assisted the Spaceflight Meteorology Group at NASA'sJohnson Space Center. Outside of work, Sean enjoys spending time with his family, often learning morethan he ever thought he could know about Godzilla and other kaiju from his young son.To find out more about fire/incident meteorology, hit up Sean on his socials here:Instagram = https://www.instagram.com/luchslikerain/Twitter = https://twitter.com/luchslikerainNow, FILL OUT YOUR WEATHER OBS!!You know the drill...Stay safe, stay savage...Enjoy!..........................Updates!EXCLUSIVE MERCH AVAILABLE!https://anchorpointpodcast.com/store..........................Sponsors:The Anchor Point Podcast is supported by the following wonderful folks...Mystery RanchNeed badass packs? Then look no further than Mystery Ranch!https://www.mysteryranch.comHotshot BreweryWanna pick up our Anchor Point Podcast merch or need killer coffee? Hit up Hotshot Brewery!!!https://www.hotshotbrewing.comThe Smokey GenerationWanna get some history and knowledge on Wildland Fire? Hit up The Smokey Generation!http://wildfire-experience.orgNot a sponsor of The Anchor Point Podcast, but a great organization:The Wildland Firefighter FoundationAnd, as always, please consider supporting this great nonprofit organization - The Wildland Firefighter Foundation!https://wffoundation.org

Only in OK Show
Egg It On Cafe

Only in OK Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 36:20


On today's episode of the Only in OK Show, we discuss our recent visit to Egg It On Cafe in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma.   Egg It On Cafe is known for mouthwatering breakfast classics and delicious lunch options served in a cozy atmosphere in Broken Arrow. From healthy options to the most decadent breakfast foods, this place will blow your mind.   Broken Arrow is a city located in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma, primarily in Tulsa County, with a portion in western Wagoner County. It is the largest suburb of Tulsa, and the fourth-largest city in the state.   We also discussed The Daily Oklahoman, OU, The National Weather Service and NOAA.    Check out our sponsor for this episode - MasterThreads   #TravelOK #onlyinokshow #Oklahoma #MadeinOklahoma #oklaproud #itunes #podcast #okherewego #traveloklahoma #Attraction #breakfast  #restaurant #twister #NOAA #OU #BA

The Kansas City Star Daily Flash Briefing
The Kansas City Star daily briefing — Friday, July 30, 2021

The Kansas City Star Daily Flash Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 4:52


The top headlines from The Kansas City Star on Friday, July 30th, 2021, including all University of Missouri campuses will require masks in class this fall, regardless of vaccination status, the National Weather Service in Kansas City has issued an excessive heat warning for the Kansas City metropolitan area and surrounding counties, the Johnson County Board of Commissioners is expected to vote next week on whether to issue a new countywide mask mandate and ESPN responds to Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby's cease-and-desist letter.

The Gazette Daily News Podcast
Gazette Daily News Briefing, July 29

The Gazette Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 4:09


This is Stephen Schmidt from the Gazette digital news desk and I'm here with your update for Thursday, July 29. Another sunny, hot day Thursday, with the wind picking up slightly. According to the National Weather Service, it should be mostly sunny in the Cedar Rapids area with a high near 92 degrees. A wind of 10 mph could gust as high as 20 mph. Storms and thunderstorms may arrive on Friday and Saturday, but this far out predictions tend to be less accurate. Gov. Kim Reynolds on Wednesday again urged Iowans to get vaccinated as the best defense against COVID-19 and its variants, but expressed frustration with changing federal mask guidelines she said are “counterproductive” in conveying a consistent message. Speaking to reporters, the governor said she has not seen data to support new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommending that even vaccinated people who live in communities with elevated transmission rates again wear masks indoors. Mhttps://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#county-view (any — but not all — counties in Iowa are rated as having substantial or high rates of virus transmission.) According to state data released Wednesday, Iowa has seen an average of 308 new COVID-19 cases a day over the last week — the highest it has been in over two months. CDC data indicates nearly half of Iowa's 99 counties are facing substantial or high COVID-19 spread. Over a million people are expected to attend the Iowa State Fair next month, where there are no mask or vaccine requirements. The Iowa Board of Regents unanimously approved tuition increases Wednesday for students at Iowa's three state universities, citing the need to maintain quality, affordable and accessible education despite stagnant state funding. Starting this fall, Iowa resident undergraduate students at the University of Iowa and Iowa State University will pay 3.5 percent more in tuition and resident and non-resident undergrads at the University of Northern Iowa will pay 1.5 percent more, according the final vote on tuition increases. The Board of Regents also voted Wednesday to name the field at Kinnick Stadium after Duke Slater.  Slater was a tackle for Iowa from 1918 to 1921, leading the Hawkeyes to a conference title and a mythical national championship in his final year. He was the first Black student-athlete in school history to earn All-America honors. He later earned a UI law degree while playing in the NFL and became one of Chicago's first Black judges. Slater, who died at 67 in 1966, was recently inducted into the https://www.profootballhof.com/players/duke-slater/ (Pro Football Hall of Fame) as a member of its 2020 centennial class and already had been named to the National Iowa Varsity Club Hall of Fame and Iowa Sports Hall of Fame. In 1951, he was the first Black player inducted into the National Football Foundation's College Hall of Fame. The city of Cedar Rapids is asking residents to help select a new city flag as a symbol of community pride. Residents may view four flag designs and read the symbolism descriptions before ranking their top choices at https://www.cedar-rapids.org/discover_cedar_rapids/city_flag/index.php (cityofcr.com/cityflag) through Aug. 31. The option residents rank highest will become the new official city flag. I can't really describe the flags to you very well in this medium, except that all 4 designs are blue, green, and white; all of them have a single star; and all were vetted by members of the North American Vexillological Association.  The city's old flag design became the source of negative attention after podcaster Roman Mars featured it as an example of what not to do in flag design in his TED talk on the aforementioned topic. With the Iowa football season rapidly approaching, there will be more Hawkeye news to come soon. If you want to have the latest football insights emailed directly to you, sign up for Leah Vann's exclusive weekly Talkin' Hawks newsletter... Support this podcast

The Gazette Daily News Podcast
Gazette Daily News Briefing, July 28

The Gazette Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 4:22


This is Stephen Schmidt from the Gazette digital news desk and I'm here with your update for Wednesday, July 28. Wednesday is set to be the hottest day in an already hot week. According to the National Weather Service, it should be mostly sunny and hot, with a high near 96 degrees in the Cedar Rapids area. Heat index values could reach as high as 105. Wednesday night it will stay mostly clear, with a low around 76 degrees.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed course Tuesday on masking guidelines, recommending that even vaccinated people return to wearing them indoors in parts of the country — including some counties in Iowa — where the Delta variant of the coronavirus is fueling surges. Citing new information about the variant's ability to spread among vaccinated people, the CDC also recommended indoor masks for all teachers, staff, students and visitors at K-12 schools nationwide, regardless of vaccination status and regardless of the rate of community spread. Republican Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds rejected the guidance soon after it was issued, criticizing the Democratic Biden administration for confusing and unnecessary messages. "The Biden Administration's new COVID-19 guidance telling fully vaccinated Iowans to now wear masks is not only counterproductive to our vaccination efforts, but also not grounded in reality or common sense," Reynolds said in a statement. She did not explain how asking people to wear a mask discourages vaccinations. But she added she was concerned the federal guidance could result in mask mandates for schools. Reynolds signed a law in May that prohibits local officials from requiring masks be worn in schools or businesses. Iowa ranks lower than the national average when it comes to the rate of vaccinations, with about 47 percent of the population, or 1.47 million Iowans, fully vaccinated. Like many states, vaccination interest here has stagnated. After twice voting to support a controversial housing development proposed near Hickory Hill Park, the Iowa City Council reversed course Tuesday night and rejected a rezoning that would have allowed homes and a senior living center and added land to the park. A reversal on the third consideration of the Hickory Trail Estates development came after council members heard and read an onslaught of opposition to the project, although it had been scaled back from its initial proposal. Council members heard an hour of public comment from residents Tuesday evening, with all who spoke aside from the developer in opposition. The project was proposed by developer Joseph Clark, Nelson Development and Axiom Consultants. Residents have cited concerns that the development's proximity to the park would disrupt the ecosystem and aesthetics of the park. Hickory Trail Estates was to include 41 lots of single-family housing and a senior living facility, and add 14 acres to the nearby Hickory Hill Park. A mine resistant ambush protected vehicle, shared by Johnson County law enforcement agencies, will remain an option for the Iowa City Police Department, for the moment, as the Iowa City Council considers alternatives to the armored transport vehicle. The vehicle, known as an MRAP, was purchased by the Johnson County Sheriff's Office in 2014. Residents have decried the use of the vehicle, saying its use is unnecessary and a needless militarization of the police. Local law enforcement has pushed back, saying that they need an armored vehicle option to help protect officers in dangerous situations. The Johnson County Board of Supervisors has also https://www.press-citizen.com/story/news/local/eastern-iowa/2021/06/16/mrap-johnson-county-considers-getting-rid-military-police-vehicle-mine-resistant-ambush-protection/7686785002/ (directed Johnson County Sheriff Brad Kunkel) to consider an alternative option to the MRAP. The council asked city staff to communicate with the county government on their plans for exploring an alternative option, and... Support this podcast

The Gazette Daily News Podcast
Gazette Daily News Briefing, July 27

The Gazette Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 3:20


This is Stephen Schmidt from the Gazette digital news desk and I'm here with your update for Tuesday, July 27. Tuesday's weather will fit the mold for most of this week: sunny, humid, and hot. According to the National Weather Service we can expect a high of 94 degrees in the Cedar Rapids area with sunny skies. The sky will remain clear Tuesday evening, with a low of 73 degrees. After more than a half-year of decline, the number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in Iowa has been increasing in recent weeks despite widespread availability of a vaccine. With large public gatherings such as RAGBRAI and the Iowa State Fair looming — and another school year set to start in roughly two months — public health officials are expressing concern that the trend could worsen. Their message echoes in unison: If you have not already, get the COVID-19 vaccine. Nearly all new hospitalizations from COVID-19 — more than 97 percent nationwide — are of unvaccinated individuals, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After a good start, Iowa's vaccination efforts have stalled in recent months, lingering at 55 percent for those age 12 and older. The emergence of the COVID-19 Delta variant has added to public health officials' consternation. The new variant appears to be even more transmissible than the original virus, and appears to be having a greater impact on young people. Linn County Public Health is offering $50 Walmart gift cards to residents receiving the COVID-19 vaccine at walk-in clinics taking place this week. Public health officials are offering the COVID-19 vaccine to eligible residents aged 12 years and older at five Cedar Rapids Community School District schools through Friday. The gift card offer one of the first major incentive programs offered locally since the shots became widely available earlier this year. All occupants safely escaped a North Liberty fire on Sunday. According to a city news release, the North Liberty Fire Department was called to a fire at 2:13 p.m. Sunday at 1557 Burr Dr. Authorities said neighbors had discovered a fire outside of the home and alerted the residents. Crews knocked down the fire, which sped through the eaves and into the attic of the townhouse. It was brought under control within 26 minutes of firefighters arriving on scene. A cat was also rescued. Iowa announced contract extensions for nine of its head coaches on Monday. The nine coaches receiving contract extensions were men's basketball coach Fran McCaffery, wrestling coach Tom Brands, women's basketball coach Lisa Bluder, soccer coach Dave Dilanni, field hockey coach Lisa Cellucci, softball coach Renee Gillispie, baseball coach Rick Heller, women's golf coach Megan Menzel and women's tennis coach Sasha Schmid. With the Iowa football season rapidly approaching, there will be more Hawkeye news to come soon. If you want to have the latest football insights emailed directly to you, sign up for Leah Vann's exclusive weekly Talkin' Hawks newsletter at thegazette.com/hawks Be sure to subscribe to The Gazette Daily news podcast, or just tell your Amazon https://www.thegazette.com/topic?eid=121774&ename=Alexa&lang=en (Alexa) enabled device to “enable The Gazette Daily News skill" so you can get your daily briefing by simply saying “Alexa, what's the news? If you prefer podcasts, you can also find us on iTunes or wherever else you find your Podcasts. Support this podcast

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio
Smoky Haze From Western Wildfires Blankets Mass., Causes False Alarms

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 0:44


WBZ's Shari Small spoke to a National Weather Service meteorologist about the blanket of smoky haze that drifted into Massachusetts on Monday.

Kansas City's Northeast Newscast
194: National Weather Service

Kansas City's Northeast Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2021 31:55


On this week's episode of the Northeast Newscast, Lead Forecaster Jared Leighton joins us from the National Weather Service in Kansas City, Mo. We discuss how to prepare your household for severe weather, the different terms they use to inform residents of risks, and why he moved from sunny California to monitor weather in the Midwest. 

In the Moment
In The Moment: Science-Based Parenting Strategies, And The National HS Rodeo

In the Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 57:02


Drought conditions are worsening in South Dakota with 72 percent of the state experiencing moderate drought . National Weather Service hydrologist Mike Gillispie joins us for an update. SDPB's Lee Strubinger report on state lawmakers interested in reviewing and restricting curriculum taught in South Dakota schools. The efforts are the latest volley in the battle over how educators address the nation's history and diversity. Many parents strive to raise happy, healthy children. They also don't want their children to be bullies, liars, or racists. We talk with author Melinda Wenner Moyer about science-based strategies to raise compassionate, world-changing kids. Her book is called "How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes," published by G.P. Putnam's Sons. This weekend marks the final performances in the 50th anniversary season of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Pageant in DeSmet. We highlight the event with a brief look at its history and this weekend's forecast. For today's South Dakota Home

This Date in Weather History
1977: Devasting flash flood strikes Johnstown, PA

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 3:58


On July 20, 1977 a flash flood devastated Johnstown, Pennsylvania, killing 84 people and causing millions of dollars in damages. This flood happened 88 years after the Horrible Flood of 1889 that was one of the worst weather-related disasters in US history that killed more than 2,000 people. Johnstown sits in a deep valley, hard against the Conemaugh river. In that earlier flood, the dams in the Conemaugh Valley failed, bringing disaster to Johnstown and as fate would have it the combination of the weather and those human made dams would once again bring catastrophe. The flood occurred when an extraordinary amount of rain came down in the Conemaugh Valley in a short period of time. Nearly 12 inches were measured in 10 hours. The National Weather Service later estimated that this amount of rain in that location should happen less than once every 1,000 years. Dams started bursting upstream from Johnstown. The largest dam that burst was at Laurel Run. This 10-year-old earthen dam held back 100 million gallons of water. Despite having a 42-foot-high spillway, the dam failed and the resulting flood devastated the town of Tanneryville. Five other dams in the area also burst, releasing another 30 million gallons of water. The failure of the dams was a shock. Johnstown had constructed an entire system designed to completely eliminate the flood risk after the devasting flood of 1889 and a destructive flood in 1936. Many safely measures were in place along with inspections. Still, the dams were no match for the thunderstorm that stalled over the area on July 20. In addition to the 84 people who lost their lives to the flood, $300 million or more than $1.2 Billion in 2021 dollars in damages were suffered and hundreds of people lost their homes. President Carter declared the region a federal disaster area and the National Guard was sent to assist in the relief efforts. Despite millions spent to rehabilitate the Johnstown area, the economy never recovered. The city's population decreased nearly 15 percent in the aftermath of the flood, as people moved away. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

This Date in Weather History
1993: Mississipi River rises to 46' and floods St. Louis, MO

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 3:47


Over the course of a three-month period in the summer of 1993, a slow-moving and historic flooding disaster unfolded across the midwestern United States, leaving economic ramifications that would be felt for years to come. Over 17 million acres were flooded across nine states across the Midwest during the summer of 1993, starting in June and lasting through August. This is an area larger than the entire state of West Virginia. “The magnitude and severity of this flood event was simply overwhelming, and it ranks as one of the greatest natural disasters ever to hit the United States,” said Lee Larson, chief at the Hydrologic Research Laboratory. This long-duration river flooding caused hundreds of levees failures, 50 fatalities and an estimated $15 billion in damages. While the worst of the flooding occurred in the summer of 1993, impacts across the region lasted for years. Of the 17 million acres that were flooded, a majority was being used as farmland. This had a long-term impact on the industry as some of the land was not able to be used again for farming for several years after flood waters had receded. Shipping and transportation industries were also severely impacted during the height of the flooding. Barge traffic on the Missouri and Mississippi rivers was stopped for nearly two months. The inability for ships and barges to navigate the waters of these major waterways resulted in an economic loss of $2 million per day, according to the National Weather Service. High water also rendered some bridges that spanned across the Mississippi River unusable for weeks, disrupting travel across the region. In some cases, this meant taking a detour of over 100 miles just to make it to the other side of a flooded river. The historic flooding was not caused by one single rainfall event, but rather an extended period of above-normal rainfall across the same region. The stage was set in 1992 with a wet fall which resulted in above-normal soil moisture and reservoir levels in the Missouri and Upper Mississippi river basins. The wet autumn was followed by above-average snowfall during the winter. When all of this snow melted in the spring, it left the ground across the region saturated and prone to flooding. The focus of the flooding on July 19, 1993 was St Louis Mo, where the Mississippi river rose to 46.8 feet at were flood stage is only 30'. It was the high-water mark in St Louis and flooding extended from the Gateway Arch to the suburbs. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Pokescience
Weathering The Storm

Pokescience

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 61:27


We bring an expert from the National Weather Service to discuss weather, climate, and the dangers of letting children control the weather with wild animals. NWS website: https://www.weather.gov/ Shirts: pokescience.threadless.com/ Youtube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCrrXBG8Dju6HRr8bU4-3YkQ Patreon: www.patreon.com/pokescience Twitter: twitter.com/pokemonscience Facebook: www.facebook.com/PokeScience-154569195131952/ Discord: discord.gg/EmGhjqxRKf

Here First
Thursday, July 15th, 2021

Here First

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021


The National Weather Service will send survey teams to at least four counties today, after several dozen tornadoes were reported across the state Wednesday afternoon and evening. A judge has delayed today's scheduled sentencing of the man accused of killing Mollie Tibbetts in 2018. And, it's the first day on the job for the University of Iowa's new president.

Podcast – The Children's Hour

This week on The Children's Hour, we are joined by Laura Paskus, a climate change and drought author, and environmental journalist with New Mexico PBS. She released a book, At the Precipice: New Mexico's Changing Climate, in September 2020 that discusses how climate change affects the state. Join us as we learn about drought, climate change and what we can do about it. We also talk with meteorologist Daniel Porter from the National Weather Service in Albuquerque about the recent heatwave that brought new weather patterns to parts of world unaccustomed to extreme heat. Then the kids in the Extinction Diaries tell us about women African rangers who are saving species from extinction and arresting poachers without firing a single shot. We're learning about our changing climate this week, and all of it is mixed with excellent music.  Drying Out Playlist titleartistalbumdurationlabel How Bout Now?Tito PuenteWhere in the World Is Carmen Sandiego EP04:39 2020 Shakariki Records, Inc. Mayim, Mayim (Water, Water)Cathy Fink, Marci Marxer & Brave ComboAll Wound Up! A Family Music Party03:16Rounder Records Hot Nights (feat. Pat Sansone)Gustafer YellowgoldBrighter Side01:48 2017 Apple-Eye Productions Common Scents (Instrumental)Secret Agent 23 Skidoo & Asheville SymphonyThe Beat Bach Symphonies01:05 2021 Underground Playground Records This DroughtScience Rap Academysingle02:46McFadden The Cactus SongBayou SecoUse It Again!03:11Ken Keppeler and Jeanie McLerie How Far Is a Lightyear (Solar System Song) [Instrumental]Claudia Robin GunnHow Far is a Lightyear - Single01:20 2020 Claudia Robin Gunn RainCaspar BabypantsBeatles Baby!02:31 2015 Aurora Elephant Music WallowKetsaGoodnight Sunlight00:28Ketsa - FMA LowbrowBlue Dot SessionsIntent02:36Blue Dot Sessions SummertimeStreet musiciansingle02:57The Children's Hour Inc. Mtoto Mzuri (feat. Ahadi)Jabali AfrikaAll One Tribe03:56 2021 Aya World Productions Hot SauceSecret Agent 23 SkidooMake Believers02:56 2012 Joel Sullivan

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Sweltering temperatures in Pacific Northwest dredge up fears of wildfires

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 6:07


The Pacific Northwest is facing a third straight day with record-setting triple digit temperatures. The National Weather Service estimates the heat to be up to 30 degrees higher than normal. The heat wave is straining power capacity in the region and forcing people to find relief where they can. Scientists believe human-driven climate change may be a contributor. Stephanie Sy reports from Oregon. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Seattle Now
It's hot

Seattle Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 10:46


This weekend was hot, historically hot. We talk to Seattleites battling the heat and get an update from the National Weather Service.Have something to add to this story? Get in touch! Send us a voice memo or email to seattlenow@kuow.org.

Science Moab
Weather in the Arid Southwest

Science Moab

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 20:28


When puffy white clouds appear in the sky above a hot arid landscape, one may wonder “where is that moisture coming from?”. The desert southwest is unique in many ways and the weather patterns are no exception. We talk about weather with Tony Merriman, meteorologist and outreach coordinator from the National Weather Service office in Flagstaff, AZ. We discuss the large and small scale factors that contribute to the aridity and the (hopefully) moisture we have here on the Colorado Plateau.

Weather Geeks
Lightning Safety Awareness Week

Weather Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 35:10


Guest: John Jensenius Introduction:When thunder roars, go indoors… You've all probably heard the saying, and I'm sure many of you have had your own close calls with this fearsome flash. This week is Lightning Safety Awareness Week, and today, we're talking to the person who created this annual event! John Jensenius has spent his career keeping people safe as a meteorologist in the National Weather Service, and one of his legacies has been his work to educate and protect people from the dangers of lightning. Each year, lightning kills 49 people on average, so we'll talk about the ways you can stay safe and even debunk some myths about lightning that may be putting you at risk. Now let's begin what is sure to be an electric discussion!Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

World News Tonight with David Muir
Full Episode: Monday, June 21, 2021

World News Tonight with David Muir

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 23:32


Severe storms moving through the Northeast, producing damaging winds, hail and possible tornadoes. The National Weather Service has confirmed an EF-3 tornado touched down outside of Chicago. The COVID Delta variant now seen in at least 47 states as health officials warn it could soon become the dominant strain in the country. The major ruling from the Supreme Court involving the NCAA and student athletes. The new hardline President of Iran speaks about possible attempts to revive the U.S./Iran Nuclear Deal and if he would meet with President Biden. And how several big store retailers are competing with Amazon's Prime Day.