Podcasts about Herpetology

Study of amphibians and reptiles

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Herpetology

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Best podcasts about Herpetology

Latest podcast episodes about Herpetology

Snake Talk
Rattlesnake Roundups (3 of 3): Dr. Bruce Means on the Eastern Diamond-backed Rattlesnake

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 81:56


Dr. Jenkins sits down with Dr. Bruce Means to talk about everything Eastern Diamond-backed Rattlesnake (EDB). They begin with a discussion of his time working at Tall Timbers and his early studies of the species. They then do a deep dive on the ecology of EDBs talking about their movement, habitats, breeding, diet, and life history. The ecology conversation transitions into how the roundups and broad scale habitat changes in the region have impacted EDB populations. They finish the episode by talking about Bruce's work in a remote region of South America which has been the recent focus of a National Geographic article and a Disney+ series.Check out Bruce's book.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.

Herpetological Highlights
128 Swampy Siren Songs

Herpetological Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 26:38


Sirens resemble a salamander crossed with an eel. We work out how these bizarre amphibians hunt, and talk about a siren species only recently discovered by science.  Become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/herphighlights Full reference list available here: http://www.herphighlights.podbean.com Main Paper References: Martin BT, Goodding DD, Ford NB, Placyk JS. 2013. Sensory Mediation of Foraging Behavior in the Western Lesser Siren (Siren intermedia nettingi). Journal of Herpetology 47:75–77. DOI: 10.1670/11-209. Species of the Bi-Week: Graham SP, Kline R, Steen DA, Kelehear C. 2018. Description of an extant salamander from the Gulf Coastal Plain of North America: The Reticulated Siren, Siren reticulata. PLOS ONE 13:e0207460. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0207460. Editing and Music: Podcast edited by Emmy – https://www.fiverr.com/emmyk10  Intro/outro – Treehouse by Ed Nelson Species Bi-week theme – Michael Timothy Other Music – The Passion HiFi, https://www.thepassionhifi.com

Snake Talk
60 | Rattlesnake Roundups (2 of 3): Daniel Sollenberger on the Whigham Roundup

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 69:34


Dr. Jenkins sits down with Daniel Sollenberger, state herpetologist for Georgia, to talk about rattlesnake roundups. They start off going over what Daniel's role is, as the state herpetologist. They transition into what roundups are and how they are typically structured in the Southeast. Chris and Daniel talk in detail about the Whigham roundup which was the last one in Georgia to transition to a wildlife festival. Finally, they talk about the status and management of venomous snakes in Georgia and potential approaches to improving their management in the state.Connect with Daniel at Georgia DNR.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.

Snake Talk
59 | Rattlesnake Roundups (1 of 3): John Jensen on the Transition to Wildlife Festivals

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 68:51 Very Popular


Dr. Jenkins sits down with John Jensen to talk about rattlesnake roundups.  They describe what roundups are and how they are typically structured in the Southeast.  John tells us about many of the projects he worked on during his time as the state herpetologist in Georgia.  Chris and John discuss the history of roundups in the region and about how the snake hunters collect snakes for the event.  Finally, they go in depth about the transition of the Claxton Roundup to a Wildlife Festival including the process, challenges, and how the transition did not greatly affect the attendees experience at the event.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.

Herpetological Highlights
123 Fantastic Mr Foxsnake

Herpetological Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 34:29


Foxsnakes are widely distributed and with an apparently tumultuous taxonomic history, but we can still take a look at the habitats they prefer and their ability to traverse fragmented landscapes. Become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/herphighlights Full reference list available here: http://www.herphighlights.podbean.com Main Paper References: Row JR, Blouin-Demers G, Lougheed SC. 2012. Movements and Habitat Use of Eastern Foxsnakes (Pantherophis gloydi) in Two Areas Varying in Size and Fragmentation. Journal of Herpetology 46:94–99. DOI: 10.1670/10-262. Other Mentioned Papers/Studies: Chambers EA, Hillis DM. 2019. The Multispecies Coalescent Over-splits Species in the Case of Geographically Widespread Taxa. Systematic Biology:syz042. DOI: 10.1093/sysbio/syz042. Conant, R. (1940). A new subspecies of the Fox Snake, Elaphe vulpina Baird and Girard. Herpetologica, 2(1), 1-14. Crother, B. I., White, M. E., Savage, J. M., Eckstut, M. E., Graham, M. R., & Gardner, D. W. (2011). A Reevaluation of the Status of the Foxsnakes Pantherophis gloydi Conant and P. vulpinus Baird and Girard (Lepidosauria). International Scholarly Research Notices, 2011. Other Links/Mentions: Eastern fox snake combat (mistitled): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogaXTO-XcKc Editing and Music: Podcast edited by Emmy – https://www.fiverr.com/emmyk10  Intro/outro – Treehouse by Ed Nelson Species Bi-week theme – Michael Timothy Other Music – The Passion HiFi, https://www.thepassionhifi.com

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 634 (8-15-22): Coyotes and Frogs Call Out on a Virginia Summer Night

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:33).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-12-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of August 15 and August 22, 2022. MUSIC – ~19 sec – instrumental. That's part of ‘To the Wild,” by the Virginia band The Steel Wheels.  It opens an episode about a chance hearing of two very different kinds of wild animals, and how they might be similar or different, including in relation to water.  Have a listen to their calls for about 20 seconds and see if you know these two types of animals.  And here's a hint: one's in a scientific family with, and the other rhymes with, dogs. SOUNDS  - ~21 sec. If you guessed coyotes and frogs, you're right!  You heard barks and other sounds from coyotes, along with calls of Gray Treefrogs.  This lucky recording on the night of July 5, 2022, in Blacksburg, got your Virginia Water Radio host exploring potential connections and contrasts between this terrestrial mammal in the dog family, and this partially aquatic amphibian.  Here are seven areas of note. 1.  Like other living things, both coyotes and frogs are largely made of water and require it for biological functions.  Unlike coyotes, frogs can absorb water through their naked skin, that is, skin without scales, feathers, or fur. 2.  As amphibians, Gray Treefrogs breed in water, which of course coyotes don't. 3.  Like other mammals, coyotes keep a constant body temperature, and they evaporate water through panting to cool themselves.  Frogs' body temperature fluctuates with the environment; having naked skin that's permeable to water, frogs are at risk of drying out if their habitat isn't moist. 4.  Coyotes and adult frogs both have lungs for exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide, but, in frogs, gas exchange also occurs across their skin. 5.  Both are notable for their sounds.  Coyotes use barks, howls, and other sounds to communicate to family members and to potential competitors, and frog males use calls to attract females, signal their presence to other males, and perhaps to startle away predators. 6.  These animals appear together in at least three Native American legends, including one from the Kalapuya people of Oregon, called “The Coyote and the Frog People.”  In this story, the coyote sneakily digs through a dam the frogs use to hold all of the world's water for themselves; this then creates all the rivers, lakes, and waterfalls and ends the frogs' water hoarding. And 7.  Both coyotes and Gray Treefrogs show remarkable adaptability to human environments.  Coyotes are noted for occupying habitats near humans, such as city and suburban parks.  Gray Treefrogs, meanwhile, can also be found in human spaces, such as in swimming pools or on house walls or decks.  One wildlife biologist consulted for this episode said that in his Virginia county coyotes seem to “saunter by houses like they own the place”; in the frog world, noted another biologist, Gray Treefrogs have a somewhat similar reputation. Thanks to several Virginia Tech faculty members for providing information for this episode.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use their music, and we close with about 30 more seconds of “To the Wild.” MUSIC - ~30 sec – Lyrics: “I'm gonna run to the wild.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Virginia Water Radio thanks Mark Ford, Kevin Hamed, and James Parkhurst, all in the Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, for contributing information to this episode. The Coyote and Gray Treefrog sounds heard in this episode were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on July 5, 2022, at approximately 10:15 p.m. “To the Wild,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the 2017 album “Wild As We Came Here,” used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at https://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 490, 9-16-19. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES (If not otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Coyote, photographed in Virginia Beach, Va., February 27, 2016.  Photo by Shawn Dash, made available on iNaturalist at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/13877118(as of August 15, 2022) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internbational.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/.Gray Treefrog on the deck of a residence in Blacksburg, Va., September 23, 2009.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT ANIMALS IN THIS EPISODE The following information is excerpted from “Coyote” and “Gray Treefrog” entries of the Virginia Department of Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources' (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries) “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  The Coyote entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?Menu=_.Taxonomy&bova=050125&version=19215; the Gray Treefrog entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?Menu=_.Taxonomy&bova=020007&version=19215. Coyote (Scientific name: Canis latrans) Occurrence“Coyotes are thought to have started being seen in the 1950's and the 1960's here in Virginia, particularly in the western part of the state, and they now have an established population throughout the state.  Current occurrence throughout the state is attributed to the steady eastward migration of this species, which is due to the elimination of other large carnivores, such as red wolves, from their former ranges and to coyotes being highly opportunistic feeders and thus are highly adaptable to many habitats.” Physical Description“The males are generally larger than the females...with a body length of 1.0-1.35 meters, and a tail length of 400 millimeters.  The coat color and texture shows geographic variation, but usually the coat color is a grey mixed with a reddish tint.  ...This species is generally smaller than the grey wolf.  ...The track (70mm by 60mm) is more elongated than the domestic dog but shorter than either the gray or red wolf.” Reproduction“Yearling males and females are capable of breeding.  The percentage of yearlings breeding is controlled by food supply.  Gestation lasts 63 days.  The mean litter size is 5.3 and is affected by population density and food supply.” Behavior“The home range size of the males is 20-42 kilometers (km), and for females 8-10 km.   The female home ranges do not overlap whereas male home ranges do.  The average daily travel is reported as 4.0 km, with dispersal movements of 160 km not uncommon.  Favorable den sites include brush-covered slopes, steep banks, thickets, hollow logs, and rock ledges.  The dens of other animals may be used.  ...Dens may be shared and used for more than one year. ...Coyotes use visual, auditory, olfactory and tactile signals for communications.  They eat mostly rodents and rabbits but also take berries fruits and carrion.  They are primarily nocturnal and their howls can be heard for miles.” Gray Treefrog (Scientific name: Hyla versicolor) Occurrence“In Virginia, this species is distributed in the mountains north of the New River drainage, in the Blue Ridge, and in the Piedmont.” Physical Description“This species is identical in appearance to Hyla chrysoscelis [Cope's Gray Treefrog] but they do not interbreed.  These two species can be distinguished by chromosome number and by male mating call. ...Both species are well camouflaged.  They are usually gray but coloration ranges from gray to whitish to brown to green dependent upon environment and activities.  There is a whitish mark beneath the eyes and a bright orange or yellow on the concealed surfaces of the hind legs.  The dorsal skin is warty.  This species ranges in length from 32 to 62 milllimeters (1.25-2.5 inches).” Reproduction“Males call between March and August.  ...Breeding generally occurs from March to June.  The female lays clumps of 10 to 40 eggs per group on the surface of shallow ditches, puddles, and ponds  ...Eggs typically hatch in 4 to 5 days, and metamorphosis occurs in 45 to 64 days.” Behavior“This species is not often seen on the ground or near the water's edge except during the breeding season.  It tends to forage while in small trees or shrubs near to or standing in water.  This species is an opportunistic feeder focusing primarily on larval Lepidoptera [butterflies and moths], Coleoptera [beetles], and other arthropods.” Limiting Factors“This species is fairly arboreal, foraging from trees and shrubs in the vicinity of water. ...In general, this species requires shallow ponds with fallen branches or herbaceous growth on the water's edge.” Aquatic/Terrestrial Associations“This species is typically associated with the following forest types: black willow, sweet gum-willow oak, white oak-red oak-black oak and mixed pine-hardwood.  They are frequently found in recently disturbed areas with shrub and herbaceous cover.” SOURCES Used for Audio Atlanta Coyote Project, “Coyote Activity Patterns, Ranges, and Vocalizations,” online at https://atlantacoyoteproject.org/coyote-activity-patterns-ranges-vocalizations/. Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, “Animal Fact Sheet: Coyote,” online at https://www.desertmuseum.org/kids/oz/long-fact-sheets/coyote.php. Burke Museum [Seattle, Wash.], “All About Amphibians,” online at https://www.burkemuseum.org/collections-and-research/biology/herpetology/all-about-amphibians/all-about-amphibians. Epic Ethics, “Coyote Returns Water from the Frog People—A Native Kalapuya Tale,” online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=six1kVQS_tw. First People of North America and Canada, “Native American Legends,” online at https://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/. Kevin Hamed, Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, personal communication, August 11, 2022. Richard W. Hill, Comparative Physiology of Animals: An Environmental Approach, Harper & Row, New York. 1976. Internet Sacred Text Archive, “The Coyote and the Frog,” identified as a Hopi contained in The Traditions of the Hopi, by H.R. Voth (1905), online at https://www.sacred-texts.com/nam/hopi/toth/toth065.htm. John D. Kleopfer and Chris S. Hobson, A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Bureau of Wildlife Resources Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries [now Department of Wildlife Resources], Richmond, Va., 2011. Lane Community College [Eugene, Ore.], “Kalapuya: Native Americans of the Willamette Valley, Oregon,” online at https://libraryguides.lanecc.edu/kalapuya. Miami [Fla.] Children's Museum, YouTube video (4 min./39 sec.) of “The Coyote and the Frog People,” celebrating Native American Heritage Month, November 3, 2020, online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9q4km_HDGeI. Brian R. Mitchell et al., “Information Content of Coyote Barks and Howls,” Bioacoustics: The International Journal of Animal Sound and its Recording, Vol. 15, pages 289–314 (2006); online (as a PDF) at https://www.uvm.edu/~bmitchel/Publications/Mitchell_Information_content.pdf. National Geographic, “Coyote,” undated, online at https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/facts/coyote. National Parks and Recreation Association, “Coyotes Have Moved into Parks Across the United States—Now What,” by Richard J. Dolesh, Parks & Recreation, April 6, 2018, online at https://www.nrpa.org/parks-recreation-magazine/2018/april/coyotes-have-moved-into-parks-across-the-united-states-now-what/. New Hampshire PBS, “NatureWorks/Gray Treefrog,” online at https://nhpbs.org/natureworks/graytreefrog.htm. Oregon Encyclopedia [Oregon Historical Society], “Kalapuyan Peoples,” by Henry Zenk, undated, online at https://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/kalapuyan_peoples/#.YvPg_RzMJPY. James Parkhurst, Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, personal communication, August 11, 2022. Roger Powell et al., Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston, Mass., 2016. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources [formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries],“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Coyote entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=050125&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19215; the Gray Treefrog entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020007&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19215. Ya-Native, “Coyote Takes Water From the Frog People—A Plains Legend,” online at

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Snake Talk
Bob Ashley, Snake Entrepreneur and founder of the Chiricahua Desert Museum

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 64:40


Dr. Jenkins sits down with Bob Ashley to talk about his life - he has found a unique path that has allowed him to pursue many different avenues relative to snakes.  They talk about a range of interests Bob has, including keeping and breeding snakes, collecting rare books and artifacts, and publishing.  Specifically, the discussion centers on Bob's transition from growing up in Michigan and breeding snakes to being the founder of the Chiricahua Desert Museum.  They also discuss Eco Publishing, the International Herpetological Symposium, and the North American Reptile Breeders Conference.Connect with Bob at the Chiricahua Desert Museum, the International Herpetological Symposium, or the North American Reptile Breeders Conference.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.

Herpetological Highlights
122 Volcano Lizards

Herpetological Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 24:12


Lizards can live in some tough environments, but does any lizard top the chubby Phymaturus living on the side of an active volcano? This episode we explore how they are coping with repeated ashfall events, as well as highlighting a newly described Phymaturus species. Become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/herphighlights Full reference list available here: http://www.herphighlights.podbean.com Main Paper References: Boretto JM, Cabezas-Cartes F, Kubisch EL, Sinervo B, Ibargüengoytía NR. 2014. Changes In Female Reproduction And Body Condition In An Endemic Lizard, Phymaturus spectabilis, Following The Puyehue Volcanic Ashfall Event. Herpetological Conservation and Biology:11. Species of the Bi-Week: Lobo F, Barrasso DA, Hibbard T, Quipildor M, Slodki D, Valdecantos S, Basso NG. 2021. Morphological and Genetic Divergence within the Phymaturus payuniae Clade (Iguania: Liolaemidae), with the Description of Two New Species. South American Journal of Herpetology 20:41. Other Mentioned Papers/Studies: Becker, L. A., Boretto, J. M., Cabezas-Cartes, F., Márquez, S., Kubisch, E., Scolaro, J. A., ... & Ibargüengoytía, N. R. (2019). An integrative approach to elucidate the taxonomic status of five species of Phymaturus Gravenhorst, 1837 (Squamata: Liolaemidae) from northwestern Patagonia, Argentina. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 185(1), 268-282. Cabezas-Cartes F, Kubisch EL, Ibargüengoytía NR. 2014. Consequences of volcanic ash deposition on the locomotor performance of the Phymaturus spectabilis lizard from Patagonia, Argentina: Effect Of Volcanic Ash In Locomotion Of Lizards. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Ecological Genetics and Physiology 321:164–172. DOI: 10.1002/jez.1846. Other Links/Mentions: Frog call of Boana faber from Rodrigo Dela Rosa – https://amphibiaweb.org/cgi/amphib_query?special=call&genus=Boana&species=faber Editing and Music: Podcast edited by Emmy – https://www.fiverr.com/emmyk10  Intro/outro – Treehouse by Ed Nelson Species Bi-week theme – Michael Timothy Other Music – The Passion HiFi, https://www.thepassionhifi.com

Herpetological Highlights
121 The Cheeky Startler

Herpetological Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 27:37


Toad headed agamas have a bonkers display - bright pink flaps which pop out of the sides of their head. It has long been assumed this serves as a warning to would-be predators, but does scientific evidence support this? Become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/herphighlights Full reference list available here: http://www.herphighlights.podbean.com Main Paper References: Row JR, Blouin-Demers G, Lougheed SC. 2012. Movements and Habitat Use of Eastern Foxsnakes (Pantherophis gloydi) in Two Areas Varying in Size and Fragmentation. Journal of Herpetology 46:94–99. DOI: 10.1670/10-262. Other Mentioned Papers/Studies: Chambers EA, Hillis DM. 2019. The Multispecies Coalescent Over-splits Species in the Case of Geographically Widespread Taxa. Systematic Biology:syz042. DOI: 10.1093/sysbio/syz042. Conant, R. (1940). A new subspecies of the Fox Snake, Elaphe vulpina Baird and Girard. Herpetologica, 2(1), 1-14. Crother, B. I., White, M. E., Savage, J. M., Eckstut, M. E., Graham, M. R., & Gardner, D. W. (2011). A Reevaluation of the Status of the Foxsnakes Pantherophis gloydi Conant and P. vulpinus Baird and Girard (Lepidosauria). International Scholarly Research Notices, 2011. Other Links/Mentions: Eastern fox snake combat (mistitled): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogaXTO-XcKc Editing and Music: Podcast edited by Emmy – https://www.fiverr.com/emmyk10  Intro/outro – Treehouse by Ed Nelson Species Bi-week theme – Michael Timothy Other Music – The Passion HiFi, https://www.thepassionhifi.com  

Snake Talk
Traveling to International Destinations to Snake Hunt with Rhett Stanberry

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 73:48 Very Popular


Dr. Jenkins sits down with Rhett Stanberry to talk about traveling to snake hunt and field herp. Learn about a range of topics including how to select a country, how to focus on regions within the country, how laws and regulations change from area to area, lodging and travel, visas, and how understanding the snakes' biology can help you plan. Also, listen in to the conversation about Rhett's most recent adventure to Panama.Connect with Rhett on YouTube.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.

Laboratoř
Ryby nemlčí už 150 milionů let. Jsou mezi nimi chrochtalové, kvákalové i bručouni

Laboratoř

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 25:26


Ryby se ani zdaleka nedají označit za němé, jak se traduje. Schopnost zvukové komunikace je pro ně tak důležitá, že ji různé skupiny v evoluci nezávisle na sobě objevily nejméně 33krát. Studii Cornellovy univerzity o tom zveřejnil odborný časopis Ichtyology and Herpetology.Všechny díly podcastu Laboratoř můžete pohodlně poslouchat v mobilní aplikaci mujRozhlas pro Android a iOS nebo na webu mujRozhlas.cz.

Snake Talk
Dr. Rick Shine on his new book, “So Many Snakes, So Little Time”

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 64:52 Very Popular


Dr. Jenkins has a conversation with Dr. Shine to talk about his newest book.  This autobiography goes through his fifty-plus year career studying snakes in Australia from his childhood, to conducting the first studies on Australian snakes in graduate school, to the multiple long-term studies he has worked on over the years.  Dr. Shine is one of the most accomplished Snake Biologists in the history of herpetology.  Join us as we hear him tell his story. Connect with Dr. Shine on the Macquarie University website.Preorder his autobiography “So Many Snakes, So Little Time.”Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 631 (7-4-22): Frogs and Fireworks

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:22).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-30-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of July 4 and July 11, 2022.  This is a repeat of a 2016 episode celebrating the July 4th holiday.  The episode features Virginia Tech master's degree graduate Kriddie Whitmore as a guest voice. SOUNDS - ~ 4 sec – Gray Treefrogs and fireworks. This week, for Independence Day episode, we drop in on a most unusual July 4th conversation: two Gray Treefrogs, surrounded by fireworks, are debating U.S. water history.  Sound unimaginable?  Well, just have a listen. SOUNDS - ~2 sec – Frogs and fireworks. Frog 1 – There those humans go again, shootin' off their fireworks and makin' it hard for us frogs to hear each other's calls!  What's all the ruckus about, anyway? Frog 2 - Why, it's July 4th!  They're celebrating this country's Declaration of Independence in 1776 from Great Britain.  I think it's cool—at least it's a break from hearing YOU guys calling every evening. Frog 1 – And just why are YOU so excited about the birthday of this big, bustling, human country?  Seems to me that it's been nothing but trouble for aquatic habitats and creatures like us since those first ships came over here from that Europe place.  Everywhere we try to hop, there's polluted rivers and lakes, lost wetlands and other habitats, and hot, dry pavement. Frog 2 – Well, yeah, you're right, partly.  This country's waters have had a pretty hard history.  And we amphibians have had the worst of it in some cases and places, with this permeable skin we have.  But you're forgetting about some positive things.  The humans' Congress passed the Clean Water Act in 1972, and a bunch other important acts, too.  And right here in this state, Virginia, the constitution says it's the Commonwealth's policy to protect its atmosphere, lands, and waters from pollution, impairment, or destruction. Frog 1 - Have all those things done any good? Frog 2 – Well, not always or everywhere.  Just in Virginia, hundreds of water bodies are impaired and need expensive clean-up programs.  For instance, I've got cousins living near that Chesapeake Bay, and they tell me every year it's some things good, other things fair, and still others needing a ton of work.  But many rivers and lakes certainly are in better shape than they were 40 or 50 years ago; the Potomac River's one example.  Those humans have many competing interests, so sometimes what they do isn't so good for water, or lands, or creatures like us. But other times, it is.  People have learned a lot over the years about using and managing natural resources more sustainably, and all kinds of people work hard trying to do that. Frog 1 - Yeah, I guess you're right.  You know, it's not easy being a frog, but I guess it's pretty tough being a person, too. Frog 2 – Now that's a pretty realistic call! SOUNDS - ~3 sec – fireworks.Frog 2  – Hey, there's the fireworks finale.  And that sounds like the Air Force Concert Band playing one of my favorites, “The Washington Post,” by John Philip Sousa.  Let's have a quick listen, then we better get back under cover.  All the humans will be coming back from the fireworks soon. Both frogs – Happy July 4th!MUSIC - ~ 14 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 323, 7-4-16, and Episode 427, 7-2-18. Virginia Water Radio thanks Kriddie Whitmore, a 2016 master's degree graduate in Forestry from Virginia Tech, for participating as the guest voice in this episode. Thanks also to Jennifer Gagnon, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, for reviewing a draft of the episode. This episode's frog and fireworks sounds were recorded Blacksburg, Va., around 9:30 p.m. on July 4, 2015. This episode's music was an excerpt of “The Washington Post,” written by John Philip Sousa in 1889, and performed here by the United States Air Force Concert Band on their 2001 album “I Am An American,” accessed online at http://www.allmusic.com/album/i-am-an-american-mw0002256231, as of 6-29-22.  Information about “The Washington Post” is available from the United States Marine Band, “Sousa-The Washington Post” (3:30 video), online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mxrh1CrMmTY; and “The President's Own/John Philip Sousa,” online at http://www.marineband.marines.mil/About/Our-History/John-Philip-Sousa/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE (Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) on the deck of a residence in Blacksburg, Va., Sep. 23, 2009. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT CONSERVATION IN THE VIRGINIA CONSTITUTION Following are the four sections of Article XI, “Conservation,” of the Virginia Constitution, as accessed at the Virginia Legislative Information System, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/constitution/article11/, on June 30, 2022.Section 1. Natural resources and historical sites of the Commonwealth.To the end that the people have clean air, pure water, and the use and enjoyment for recreation of adequate public lands, waters, and other natural resources, it shall be the policy of the Commonwealth to conserve, develop, and utilize its natural resources, its public lands, and its historical sites and buildings.  Further, it shall be the Commonwealth's policy to protect its atmosphere, lands, and waters from pollution, impairment, or destruction, for the benefit, enjoyment, and general welfare of the people of the Commonwealth. Section 2. Conservation and development of natural resources and historical sites. In the furtherance of such policy, the General Assembly may undertake the conservation, development, or utilization of lands or natural resources of the Commonwealth, the acquisition and protection of historical sites and buildings, and the protection of its atmosphere, lands, and waters from pollution, impairment, or destruction, by agencies of the Commonwealth or by the creation of public authorities, or by leases or other contracts with agencies of the United States, with other states, with units of government in the Commonwealth, or with private persons or corporations.  Notwithstanding the time limitations of the provisions of Article X, Section 7, of this Constitution, the Commonwealth may participate for any period of years in the cost of projects which shall be the subject of a joint undertaking between the Commonwealth and any agency of the United States or of other states. Section 3. Natural oyster beds. The natural oyster beds, rocks, and shoals in the waters of the Commonwealth shall not be leased, rented, or sold but shall be held in trust for the benefit of the people of the Commonwealth, subject to such regulations and restriction as the General Assembly may prescribe, but the General Assembly may, from time to time, define and determine such natural beds, rocks, or shoals by surveys or otherwise. Section 4. Right of the people to hunt, fish, and harvest game. The people have a right to hunt, fish, and harvest game, subject to such regulations and restrictions as the General Assembly may prescribe by general law.SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/; and “Slight improvements in Bay health and new economic data added in 2021 Chesapeake Bay Report Card,” June 7, 2022, news release, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/news/blog/slight_improvements_in_bay_health_and_new_economic_data_added_in_2021_chesa.Commonwealth of Virginia, Constitution of Virginia, “Article XI Conservation,” accessed online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/constitution/article11/. John D. Kleopfer and Chris S. Hobson, A Guide to the Frogs and Toad of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now Department of Wildlife Resources), Richmond, Va., 2011. Bernard S. Martof, et al., Amphibians and Reptiles of the Carolinas and Virginia, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1980. Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, “Water Quality Monitoring in the Potomac Estuary,” online at http://www.mwcog.org/environment/water/potomacestuary.asp.Thomas V. Cech, Principles of Water Resources: History, Development, Management, and Policy, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, N.Y., 2003.U.S. Environmental Protection Agency:“National Aquatic Resources Surveys,” online at https://www.epa.gov/national-aquatic-resource-surveys;“Summary of the Clean Water Act,” online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-clean-water-act.Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Water Quality Assessments/Integrated Report,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quality/assessments/integrated-report.Zygmunt J. B. Plater et al., Environmental Law and Policy: Nature, Law, and Society, West Publishing Co., St. Paul, Minn., 1998. For More Information about Amphibians in Virginia and Elsewhere AmphibiaWeb, https://amphibiaweb.org/index.html. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. J.C. Mitchell and K.K. Reay, Atlas of Amphibians and Reptiles in Virginia, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries/Richmond (1999); available online (as a PDF) at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/atlases/mitchell-atlas.pdf, courtesy of the Virginia Herpetological Society.  (Herpetology is the study of amphibians and reptiles.) Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“A Guide to Virginia's Frogs and Toads,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/frogs-and-toads/;“A Guide to the Salamanders of Virginia,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/salamanders/;“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/(the Gray Treefrog entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020007&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19173);“List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf;“Virginia is for Frogs,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/virginia-is-for-frogs/;“Wildlife Information,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/information/. Virginia Herpetological Society, “Frogs and Toads of Virginia,” online at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/frogs_and_toads_of_virginia.htm. For More Information about Federal Environmental and Natural Resources LawsCornell University Law School/Legal Information Institute:“Environmental Law,” online at https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/environmental_law; “Natural Resources,” online at https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/natural_resources. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “Laws and Regulations,” online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations.  The section for the Clean Water Act is online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-clean-water-act; the section for the Endangered Species Act is online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-endangered-species-act; the section for the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is online at https://www.epa.gov/nepa. For More Information about Virginia Natural Resources Laws Virginia Secretary of Natural Resources Web site, online at http://naturalresources.virginia.gov/.  See the “Agencies” link to access the various Virginia state agencies involved with resources regulation and management. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Amphibians” and “History” subject categories. Following is the link to another episode on Gray Treefrogs.Episode 528, 6-8-20. Following are links to other episodes done for July 4th. Episode 168, 7-1-13 – Water and the Revolutionary War.Episode 220, 6-30-14 – Water origins of Virginia Declaration signers.Episode 273, 7-6-15 – The Great Road on the Virginia Peninsula.FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and ProcessesK.7 – Plants and animals have basic needs and life processes.1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; human actions can affect the availability of natural resources; and reducing, reusing, and recycling are ways to conserve natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. Biology&

united states music relationships new york university game history president europe earth education college guide law water state zoom living land sound research society tech government management development national public congress environment political fish normal natural web dark va humans rain ocean animals laws policy principles washington post sons snow citizens agency stream constitution independence day richmond priority frogs plants biology native environmental bay dynamic grade bio conservation resource domestic fireworks great britain commonwealth index regulations processes menu pond signature virginia tech chapel hill arial agencies accent toad atlantic ocean life sciences natural resources govt general assembly declaration of independence carolinas revolutionary war slight compatibility forestry colorful msonormal ls times new roman sections aquatic environmental protection agency civics watershed zoology organisms freshwater reptiles chesapeake salamanders chesapeake bay minn taxonomy policymakers earth sciences shenandoah toads blacksburg acknowledgment amphibians cosgrove environmental law endangered species act north carolina press clean water act cambria math style definitions worddocument john wiley environmental quality stormwater virginia department saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent potomac river punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves environmental protection agency epa sols trackformatting lidthemeother x none lidthemeasian snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr msonormaltable latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup subsup undovr latentstylecount donotpromoteqf mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority qformat lsdexception locked semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal bmp united states history name title name normal name strong name emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis john philip sousa reay herpetology vus living systems grades k space systems plater united states marine band wildlife resources name e hyla cumberland gap name list light accent dark accent colorful accent name date name plain text name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful forest resources national environmental policy act nepa inland fisheries ben cosgrove michigan museum virginia secretary audio notes virginia constitution msobodytext tmdl 20image water center donotshowrevisions virginia standards
WCS Wild Audio
The Bronx Zoo is working to save some of the world's most threatened turtle species

WCS Wild Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 6:09


After serving as the Bronx Zoo's Curator of Herpetology for 11 years, Don Boyer retired this year. Before he left, WCS Wild Audio's Nat Moss toured the Bronx Zoo's Turtle Propagation Center with Don to discuss some of the highlights of his inspiring career and the Bronx Zoo's efforts to breed highly threatened turtle species and return them to the wild.

Lexman Artificial
Jed Buchwald on tome herpetology and Spoonful sibilancy

Lexman Artificial

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 3:30


Jed Buchwald, an expert in tome herpetology and Spoonful sibilancy, stops by to chat about the origins of both terms. Lexman is fascinated by Jed's knowledge and finds an interesting way to spice up the conversation by bringing in Spoonful sibilancy as a topic of discussion.

The Anthropo Scene Podcast
Ambidisastrous

The Anthropo Scene Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 66:21


We see a repeating pattern in the study of invasive species, where an invasive plant or animal is, well… invasive and even disastrous in one area, and endangered in their native ecosystem. And though it is a common pattern, it doesn't cease to be interesting! Join us today while we take a dive into Tiger Salamanders (Ambystoma Sp.). As both an endangered and invasive salamander. The Anthropo Scene is an independent project by young ecologists who are passionate about sharing interesting information surrounding the complicated story of introduced and invasive species around the world. If you would like to sponsor an episode, suggest a future topic and/or collaboration, find us on Instagram at @Anthropo_scene_podcast, facebook, or send us an email at anthroposcenepodcast@gmail.com.Support us via Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/Anthropo_SceneFollow us on Instagram and FacebookMusic credits from Adobe Stock: Transition by Anthony Earls Particle Emission by Silver MapleInterested in starting a podcast? Buzzsprout is a great hosting site with easy tools to help you succeed in your podcast journey. Help support us by using our affiliate link to start your own buzzsprout account - https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1688260 Support the show

Snake Talk
Everything Gila Monsters with Dr. Beck

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 75:29 Very Popular


Dr. Jenkins sits down with Dr. Daniel Beck to discuss ecology and natural history of Gila Monsters.  They cover everything from the origins of the name, their distribution, habitat needs, reproduction and much more.  They also touch on the closely related Beaded Lizards and chat about rattlesnakes.  Dr. Beck finishes with an incredible story about camping in Gila Monster country.Connect with Dr. Beck at Central Washington University.Here is Dr. Beck's book, Biology of Gila Monsters and Beaded Lizards.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.

Mama Says Namaste Podcast
Snakes, Unschooling, and Fear of the Unknown (GUEST EPISODE 255)

Mama Says Namaste Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 26:11


I was that mother who said I'd "never" have a snake in my home. And here we are, five snakes in, and I'm singing a different tune. What are your children interested in that has warranted an immediate shutdown from you? Is it based on a true fear, or simply what is unknown? This week Nathan and I invited our 15-year-old daughter, Clara, to join us and educate us a bit on snakes and moving past our fears to continue learning throughout our lives. 

Trap Talk With MJ Podcast
#199 KEITH McPEEK | BOELENS PYTHON | EMERALD TREE BOA | HERPETOLOGY | TRAP TALK WITH MJ

Trap Talk With MJ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 120:00


#BOELENSPYTHON #EMERALDTREEBOA #COOLESTREPTILEPODCASTINTHEWORLDJOIN TRAP TALK PATRON FAMILY: https://bit.ly/311x4gxSUBSCRIBE TO TRAP TALK w/ MJ PODCAST: https://bit.ly/39kZBkZSUBSCRIBE TO TRAP TALK CLIPS:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA40BzRi5eeTRPmwY6XSdVASUBSCRIBE TO THE SNAKE TRAP SESSION VLOGS:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKxLByAE_Kt06XayYFOxHqQLIMITED EDITION TRAP TALK POCKET TEES:thesnaketrapsessions@gmail.comNOBODY'S SAFE SESSIONS w/ SNAKES & THE FAT MANhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LzqOeHMaA2wMORPH MARKET STORE: https://www.morphmarket.com/stores/exoticscartal/SUPPORT USARK: https://usark.org/memberships/Follow On Instagram: Trap Talk Podcast https://bit.ly/2WLXL7w MJExoticsCartal https://bit.ly/3hthAZuUnfiltered Reptiles Podcast https://bit.ly/3eSqAFMSubscribe to Unfiltered Reptiles Podcast: https://bit.ly/2WM11jsListen On Apple:Trap Talk With MJ https://bit.ly/2CVW9Bd Unfiltered Reptiles Podcast https://bit.ly/3jySnhV Listen On Spotify:Trap Talk With MJ https://bit.ly/2WMcKOO Unfiltered Reptiles Podcast https://bit.ly/2ZQ2JCbTRAP TALK w/ MJ BROUGHT TO YOU BY:COLD BLOODED CAFEhttps://www.instagram.com/coldbloodedcafe/ALWAYS EVOLVING PYTHONS https://www.instagram.com/alwaysevolvingpythons/FREEDOM BREEDERhttps://www.freedombreeder.com/SIMS CONTAINER https://www.instagram.com/simcontainer/FOCUS CUBED HABITAT https://www.instagram.com/focuscubedhabitats/MARC BAILEY REPTILES https://www.morphmarket.com/stores/marcbailey/STEWART DESGIN https://www.instagram.com/sdidentity/WELCOME TO TRAP TALK WITH MJ PODCAST. THIS ISN'T YOUR TYPICAL REPTILE PODCAST. THERE WILL BE SMOKING, DRINKING, CUSSING & MAD DISCUSSION ON ANYTHING REPTILE RELATED. WE'LL ALSO HAVE DISCUSSION OF EVERYDAY LIFE. I APPRECIATE ALL THE LOVE AND SUPPORT & LOOKING FORWARD TO BRINGING SOME REAL ONES TO THE TABLE.

Snake Talk
Tiger Rattlesnakes to King Cobras with Dr. Matt Goode

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 69:15 Very Popular


Dr. Jenkins sits down with Dr. Matt Goode to talk about research on venomous reptiles. They cover everything from the movement of Prairie Rattlesnakes, the impact of development on Tiger Rattlesnakes and Gila Monsters, to Natural History of King Cobras. Dr. Goode finishes with a story of surgery on a King Cobra in unusual circumstances.Connect with Dr. Goode at The University of Arizona.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.

The Goulet Pencast
Episode 47: YSTUDIO, Brass Herpetology & Industry Prognostication

The Goulet Pencast

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 132:50 Very Popular


The YSTUDIO Classic gets a spotlight! Brian gets pressed on his indecisiveness while "creating" his own ink and Drew gets confused by herpetology. Also covered are Vac Filler fixes, famous fountain pen users, a Noodler's update, and more! Listen to The Goulet Pencast here: https://gouletpencast.fireside.fm/ SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/GP-YTsubscribe LINKS TO PRODUCTS FEATURED: Nib Chameleon Sticker: https://www.gouletpens.com/products/goulet-sticker-nib-chameleon?utmmedium=social&utmsource=youtube&utmcampaign=g0qSaVXHz0 Edison Collier Azure Skies: https://www.gouletpens.com/products/edison-collier-fountain-pen-azure-skies?utmmedium=social&utmsource=youtube&utmcampaign=g0qSaVXHz0 Pineider Arman Black Aluminum: https://www.gouletpens.com/products/pineider-homage-to-arman-fountain-pen-black-aluminum-limited-edition Esterbrook Sea Turtle Pen Holder: https://www.gouletpens.com/products/esterbrook-patience-tortoise-pen-holder?utmmedium=social&utmsource=youtube&utmcampaign=g0qSaVXHz0 YSTUDIO Classic Revolve: https://www.gouletpens.com/collections/ystudio-classic-fountain-pens?utmmedium=social&utmsource=youtube&utmcampaign=g0qSaVXHz0 TIMESTAMPS: 0:00:00 Intro 0:01:33 Feedback 0:11:32 New Stuff! 0:21:34 Q&A 0:21:53 If you were to design an ink, what would it be? 0:34:31 How to fix Vac Fillers that stop writing? 0:45:20 Best pens with replacement nibs? 0:57:07 Who are some famous fountain pen users? 1:04:31 What do you think is the future of fountain pens? 1:18:18 Tip of the Week 1:24:56 Pen Spotlight 1:35:11 What's Happening? 2:08:01 Comp-nay Updates 2:08:41 Wrap Up ABOUT GOULET PENS: Brian & Rachel Goulet started The Goulet Pen Company in 2009 and you can see the evolution of our mom and pop into a full-blown company through this channel. We run a dedicated online store with fountain pens, ink, paper, and other fine writing accessories. Our goal with this channel is to provide fountain pen fans at all levels of experience with comprehensive product reviews, round ups, and how-to videos to answer all the fountain pen questions you may have. Shop at https://www.gouletpens.com. FOLLOW US: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gouletpens/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheGouletPenCompany Twitter: https://twitter.com/gouletpens Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/gouletpens/ Sign up for Emails: http://shop.gouletpens.com/newsletter Blog: https://blog.gouletpens.com/

Snake Talk
Indigo Season Update with Ben Stegenga

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 57:01 Very Popular


Dr. Jenkins sits down with Ben Stegenga who coordinates rare species inventory and monitoring in the Longleaf Savannas for The Orianne Society.  Dr. Jenkins starts off the episode with an update on some exciting changes to the program structure at The Orianne Society, talks about their new website and a current campaign.  Ben and Chris discuss the results from this season's indigo snake monitoring, including how many sites where indigos were found, how many snakes in total were detected, as well as some information on Eastern Diamond-backed Rattlesnakes and Pine Snakes.  Finally, they take some time to discuss some of the other projects Ben is working on including a Spotted Turtle monitoring project and an effort to document snake diversity in one of the best remaining examples of Longleaf Pine habitat. Connect with Ben on Instagram.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society website.Shop Snake Talk merch.

Science Friday
How The Brain Deals With Grief, Listening To Noisy Fish Sounds. May 6, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 46:53 Very Popular


How Grief Rewires The Brain Being a human can be a wonderful thing. We're social creatures, craving strong bonds with family and friends. Those relationships can be the most rewarding parts of life. But having strong relationships also means the possibility of experiencing loss. Grief is one of the hardest things people go through in life. Those who have lost a loved one know the feeling of overwhelming sadness and heartache that seems to well up from the very depths of the body. To understand why we feel the way we do when we grieve, the logical place to turn is to the source of our emotions: the brain. A new book explores the neuroscience behind this profound human experience. Ira speaks to Mary-Frances O'Connor, author of The Grieving Brain: The Surprising Science of How We Learn from Love and Loss, a neuroscientist, about adjusting to life after loss. This segment originally aired on February 11, 2022.   Fish Make More Noise Than You Think One of the most famous films of undersea explorer Jacques Cousteau was titled The Silent World. But when you actually stop and listen to the fishes, the world beneath the waves is a surprisingly noisy place. In a recent study published in the journal Ichthyology & Herpetology, researchers report that as many of two-thirds of the ray-finned fish families either are known to make sounds, or at least have the physical capability to do so. Some fish use specialized muscles around their buoyancy-modulating swim bladders to make noise. Others might blow bubbles out their mouths, or, in the case of herring, out their rear ends, producing “fish farts.” Still other species use ridges on their bodies to make noises similar to the way crickets do, grind their teeth, or snap a tendon to sound off. The noises serve a variety of purposes, from calling for a mate to warning off an adversary. Aaron Rice, principal ecologist in the K. Lisa Yang Center for Conservation Bioacoustics at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in Ithaca, walks Ira through some of the unusual sounds produced by known fish around the world—and some mystery noises that they know are produced by fish, but have yet to identify. This segment originally aired on February 18, 2022.   Transcripts for these segments are available on sciencefriday.com.

Snake Talk
Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation: Founding and Growth

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 67:34


Connect with our partners at Southeast PARC or PARC.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.

Beaver State Podcast
Beaver State Podcast: Salamander stories with Chris Cousins

Beaver State Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 54:50 Very Popular


Herpetology is the study of amphibians and reptiles, and herping is the practice of going out to find amphibians and reptiles, Chris Cousins explains in this episode of the podcast. Cousins is a PhD candidate at Oregon State University, where he focuses much of his attention on some of Oregon's most elusive salamander species. Cousins shares a lot of his adventures on his Instagram and sat down to talk with us about what it's like to make a life out of studying reptiles and amphibians. 

Snake Talk
Watershed Conservation with the Black Warrior Riverkeeper

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 67:57 Very Popular


Dr. Jenkins sits down with Nelson Brooke, the Black Warrior Riverkeeper, to talk about conservation in Alabama.  They discuss the amazing topographic and biological diversity that few people realize characterizes Alabama.  Chris and Nelson dive into the Black Warrior Watershed and its values and threats.  They talk about how two rare endemic species are holding on in the watershed.  Finally, they discuss what the job of a Riverkeeper is, and the approaches they take to watershed conservation.  They finish the podcast with a discussion of the Waterkeepers Alliance and how this type of work is being implemented around the world. Connect with Nelson on Facebook, Instagram, or at Black Warrior River.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.

Snake Talk
Dr. Burghardt on Human Fear of Snakes and Snake Cognition

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 67:46


Dr. Jenkins sits down with Dr. Gordon Burghardt to discuss some of the most asked questions about snakes.Dr. Burghardt has been conducting research at the intersection of psychology and herpetology since the 1960s.They start with a discussion on human fear of snakes - more specifically, if we are born with this fear, or if it is learned as we develop.  Chris and Gordon also dive into snake cognition touching on topics such chemoreception and self-recognition. Connect with Gordon at University of Tennessee Knoxville.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 620 (3-14-22): Calling All Virginia Chorus Frogs

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:45).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 3-11-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of March 14, 2022.  This is a revised version of an episode from March 2019. SOUNDS – ~5 sec. This week, that raspy call opens an episode about several species of small frogs that share a common group name but differ in sound and distribution.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to two species recorded simultaneously, and see if you know the name of this frog group.  And here's a hint: to get the key word, gather a lot of harmonious singers, or skip over a song's verses.  SOUNDS  - ~10 sec. If you guessed chorus frogs, you're right!  You heard the creaky call of Mountain Chorus Frogsalong with the single notes of Spring Peepers, two of seven chorus frog species in Virginia.  The other five are the Little Grass Frog and four more species with “chorus frog” in their name: Brimley's, New Jersey, Southern, and Upland chorus frogs.  As a group, they're noted for their choruses of calling males advertising for mates in breeding season.  Those calls vary among the species in pitch, tone, and how quickly sounds are repeated.  The species also differ in their distribution in Virginia: Spring Peepers occur statewide, and Upland Chorus Frogs are found in much of the state, but the other five occupy narrower ranges in the Commonwealth. The Mountain Chorus Frog, which is found from Pennsylvania to Mississippi, including southwestern Virginia, is getting special scientific attention.  Since 2019, scientists Kevin Hamed, at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, and Wally Smith, at the University of Virginia's College at Wise, have led a project to learn more about the species' distribution.  Collaborating with the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), they're inviting Virginia citizens, especially K-12 students, to look and listen for this species and to submit information on any observations.  The project's Web site notes that Mountain Chorus Frog's breeding activity is mostly from February to April, but may continue into June; they'll call during the day as well as at night; and places to hear them—which is more likely than seeing them—include wet ditches, flooded fields, mountain seeps and springs, tire ruts, and furrows in plowed fields. To learn more about this project, to submit Mountain Chorus Frog observations, or to request a classroom visit by the researchers, go online to mtchorusfrog.fishwild.vt.edu, or call Kevin Hamed at (540) 231-1887. Thanks to the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources and to Lang Elliott for permission to use this week's sounds, from A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia.  We close with a medley of calls from the seven chorus frogs found in Virginia, in alphabetical order.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if you can recall their names, mentioned earlier in this episode.  Good luck! SOUNDS - ~ 23 sec – Brimley's Chorus Frog, Little Grass Frog, Mountain Chorus Frog, New Jersey Chorus Frog, Southern Chorus Frog, Spring Peeper, Upland Chorus Frog. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 464, 3-18-19. The frog sounds in this episode were from “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads” CD, copyright 2008 by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources) and Lang Elliott/NatureSoundStudio, used with permission.   The CD accompanies A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries; as of March 14, 2022, that publication is no longer available at Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources online store, https://www.shopdwr.com/.  For more information, contact the Department at P.O. Box 90778, Henrico, VA 23228-0778; phone: (804) 367-1000 (VTDD); main Web page is https://dwr.virginia.gov/; to send e-mail, visit https://dwr.virginia.gov/contact/. Lang Elliott's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Thanks to the following people for their help with this episode: Carola Haas, Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Blacksburg; John Kleopfer, Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources; Kevin Hamed, Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Blacksburg;Wally Smith, University of Virginia's College at Wise. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Project flyer being used for the Mountain Chorus Frog monitoring initiative being conducted in 2022 by the University of Virginia's College at Wise, Virginia Tech, and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. Flyer accessed at https://www.mtchorusfrog.fishwild.vt.edu, 3/11/22.A chorus frog (species not identified) in Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia. Photo made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov, accessed 3-14-22; specific URL for the photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12030/rec/1.Below are Virginia county occurrence maps for the seven chorus frog species found in Virginia, all from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/, accessed 3/15/22.SOURCES Used for Audio AmphibiaWeb, https://amphibiaweb.org/index.html. John D. Kleopfer and Chris S. Hobson, A Guide to the Frogs and Toad of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries [now Department of Wildlife Resources], Richmond, Va., 2011. Bernard S. Martof, et al., Amphibians and Reptiles of the Carolinas and Virginia, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1980. J.C. Mitchell and K.K. Reay, Atlas of Amphibians and Reptiles in Virginia, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries/Richmond (1999); available online (as a PDF) at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/atlases/mitchell-atlas.pdf, courtesy of the Virginia Herpetological Society.  (Herpetology refers to the study of amphibians and reptiles.) Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Wildlife Information,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/information/.  Information for the seven chorus frogs found in Virginia is at the following links:Brimley's Chorus Frog;Little Grass Frog;Mountain Chorus Frog;New Jersey Chorus Frog;Southern Chorus Frog;Spring Peeper;Upland Chorus Frog. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Virginia Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  This site has detailed information on life history, distribution, habitat, and other aspects of species.  The information specifically for the seven chorus frogs found in Virginia is at the following links:Brimley's Chorus Frog;Little Grass Frog;Mountain Chorus Frog;New Jersey Chorus Frog;Southern Chorus Frog;Spring Peeper;Upland Chorus Frog. Virginia Herpetological Society, “Frogs and Toads of Virginia,” online at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/frogs_and_toads_of_virginia.htm. Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, “Mountain Chorus Frog,” online at https://www.mtchorusfrog.fishwild.vt.edu/.  This is the Web site for the Mountain Chorus Frog monitoring initiative being under taken by Virginia Tech, the University of Virginia's College at Wise, and the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources. For More Information about Frogs or Other Amphibians U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative, online at https://armi.usgs.gov/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “A Guide to the Salamanders of Virginia,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/salamanders/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “A Guide to Virginia's Frogs and Toads,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/frogs-and-toads/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Virginia is for Frogs,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/virginia-is-for-frogs/. Sarah Wade, “UVa-Wise team hunts for amphibians in SW Va.'s high-altitude wetlands,” Bristol Herald-Courier, July 4, 2021.  This article describes research in 2021 by Wally Smith, at the University of Virginia's College at Wise, who is one of the researchers in the Mountain Chorus Frog project noted in this episode's audio. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Amphibians” subject category. Following is the link to another episode on an amphibian monitoring project:Episode 357, 2-27-17 – on the Eastern Spadefoot.  Following are links to other episodes focusing on frog species in the chorus frog group:Brimley's Chorus Frog – Episode 563, 2-8-21;Little Grass Frog – Episode 509, 1-27-20;Spring Peeper– Episode 570, 3-29-21; Episode 618, 2-28-22.