Podcasts about ethnicity

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Socially defined category of people who identify with each other

  • 1,124PODCASTS
  • 1,841EPISODES
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  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about ethnicity

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Latest podcast episodes about ethnicity

The Health Disparities Podcast
Health Law & Policy Roundtable: Health Equity Priorities in 2022

The Health Disparities Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 30:31


Recorded at the Movement is Life Caucus, our panel of health law thought leaders continue their discussion about the shaping of American law to reduce health disparities and protect human dignity.  Featuring Frank McClellan, JD, LLM, Law Professor Emeritus from Temple University and author of “Healthcare and Human Dignity”; D. Deone Powell, ESQ, from HIV and primary care organization Philadelphia FIGHT; Cara McClellan, JD, from The NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund; and caucus keynote speaker Daniel Dawes, JD, from Morehouse School of Medicine, author of “150 Years of ObamaCare” and “The Political Determinants of Health.”

House of Modern History
Die Konstruktion von Whiteness – Einwanderung in die USA

House of Modern History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 42:44


Im Einwanderungsgesetz (Naturalization Law) von 1790 wurde festgeschrieben, dass freie weiße Menschen in die Vereinigten Staaten einreisen dürfen und auch die Staatsbürgerschaft bekommen konnten. Doch das war nicht so inklusiv, wie es erscheinen mag auf den ersten Blick. Wer gilt wann als weiß und wer nicht? darüber sprechen wir in der Folge anhand der Migration in die USA. In der zweiten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts kommen aufgrund von unterschiedlichen Geschehnisse auf dem europäischen Kontinent viele irische und Deutsche Migrant:innen. Konflikte aus der Metropole werden mit in die "neue Welt genommen". Und so wird versucht die Iren als nicht ganz so weiß und eine eigene "race" zu beschreiben: sie waren Kelten im Vergleich zu den Briten, die zu den Anglo-Sachsen gehörten. Als dann die aber Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts viele Migrant:innen aus beispielsweise Osteuropa und Italien kamen hat sich die Stellung der Iren verändert. Hier wird dann versucht wissenschaftlich zu beweisen, dass diese neuen Migrant:innen einer anderen "race" angehören, was bestimmte Charakteristika implizierte. Die Stellung der irischen Immigrierten ändert sich. Diese wissenschaftlichen Abhandlungen werden dann immer mehr und daraus ergibt sich dann der wissenschaftliche Zwei der Eugenik. In den 1920er/1930er Jahren wird dann ein neuer Begriff für weiß eingeführt: Kaukasisch. Dieser soll wissenschaftlich fundierte Erkenntnisse suggerieren. Was dies genau beutetet erfahrt ihr in der Folge. Wer Gast sein möchte, Fragen oder Feedback hat, kann dieses gerne an houseofmodernhistory@gmail.com oder auf Twitter an @houseofModHist richten. Literatur: Bayor, Ronald H. (ed): Race and Ethnicity in America. A Concise History. New York: Columbia University Press, 2003. Bell, Duncan: Dreamworlds of Race: Empire and the Utopian Destiny of Anglo-America. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2020. Boas, Franz: Race, Language, and Culture. 1910. Bolden, Tonya: Searching for Sarah Rector: The Richest Black Girl in America. Abrams, 2014. de Gobineau, Joseph Arthur: Versuch über die Ungleichheit der Menschenrassen. 1853-1855. Etzemüller, Thomas: Henning von Rittersdorf: Das Deutsche Schicksal. Erinnerung eines Rasseanthropologens. Bielefeld: transcript Verlag, 2021. Gardner, Martha Mabie: Working on White Womanhood: White Working Women in the San Francisco Anti-Chinese Movement, 1877-1890. Journal of Social History Vol 33 No 1, 1999, pp. 73-95. Gover, Angela R; Harper, Shannon B. & Langton, Lynn: Anti-Asian Hate Crime During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Exploring the Reproduction of Inequality. American Journal of Criminal Justice Vol 45, 2020, pp. 647-667. Jacobson, Matthew Frye: Lecture: Whiteness and the Normative American Citizen, 2014: https://youtu.be/r_WbWd4fw4g Jacobson, Matthew Frye: Whiteness of a different color: European immigrants and the alchemy of race Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1998. Jew, Victor: “Chinese Demons”: The Violent Articulation of Chinese Otherness and Interracial Sexuality in the U.S. Midwest, 1885-1889. Journal of Social History Vol 73, No 2, 2003, pp. 389-410. Lepore, Jill: These Truths. A History of the United States. New York & London: W. W. Norton & Company, 2019. Painter, Nell Irvin: The History of White People. New York, 2010. Ripley, Z. William: The Races of Europe. New York: D. Appleton and Co., 1899. Whitman, James Q.: Hitlers amerikanisches Vorbild: Wie die USA die Rassengesetze der Nationalsozialisten inspirierten. C. H. Beck, 2018.

The Michael Sartain Podcast
Tawny Jordan - The Michael Sartain Podcast

The Michael Sartain Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 96:05


Tawny Jordan (IG: @TawnyJordan) has been featured in FHM, MAXIM and Sports Illustrated. She was a cover model for Playboy Philippines. She is a ring girl for Corona Boxing and a featured model for Fashion Nova & Yandy. Tawny is also the owner of Bella Model Managment. Learn more about Michael's Men of Action Mentoring Program: https://go.moamentoring.com/i/2 Subscribe on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/MichaelSartain Listen on Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-sartain-podcast/id1579791157 Listen on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/2faAYwvDD9Bvkpwv6umlPO?si=8Q3ak9HnSlKjuChsTXr6YQ&dl_branch=1 Filmed at Sticky Paws Studios: https://m.youtube.com/channel/UComrBVcqGLDs3Ue-yWAft8w 0:00 Intro 0:30 Where the fuck has Tawny been? 1:14 Break up 1:52 Growing up in Peoria Illinois 3:50 Decided to move to Chicago 5:14 Modeling mentor 7:56 Ethnicity 8:54 Full Time Model In Las Vegas 10:42 The first time I met Tawny 12:43 Las Vegas bikini competitions 17:09 Rehab was fucking crazy 18:38 Wet Republic Hot 100 final 21:51 *Winning the $25,000 23:08 *90 million people watching Mayweather versus McGregor 26:58 Offered a job at Hakkasan Group? 27:55 Winning the rehab bikini invitational 30:40 Only person to win both competitions in the same year 32:07 Girls getting married after the competition 33:03 Tawny Jordan breaks up with you 33:47 Tawny Jordan's type 36:27 Red flags that you missed 38:03 I don't think people can change 38:53 Don't like fuck boys 41:02 *You posted your boyfriend 44:20 He doesn't have social media 44:59 Paradise Challenge Jamaica 46:59 *Paradise Challenge Ibiza 50:51 Traveling for photo shoots 54:12 Favorite place to travel 55:12 Favorite Photographer 56:09 Don't have an OnlyFans 58:02 Does traveling get in the way of a relationship? 59:18 Jealousy 1:01:36 Dating an Instagram model 1:03:04 Work week, Real estate, modeling agency 1:04:12 Getting mugged in Chicago 1:08:12 They always come back to Vegas 1:09:12 The perfect situation for Tawny Jordan 1:15:07 Modeling agency 1:15:54 Different types of models in Las Vegas 1:18:09 Changes on social media 1:18:57 I think TikTok engagement is fake 1:21:34 Buying blue checkmarks in followers on Instagram 1:22:33 Mass reporting on Instagram 1:24:12 Crypto influencers and pump and dump schemes 1:26:48 Monogamy 1:27:57 Diversity in sexual preferences 1:29:40 *Controlling the population 1:30:19 Tawny could change a fuck boy 1:32:01 Serial monogamist 1:34:26 Outro

The Takeaway
Conversations on Identity and Politics in 2021-12-31

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 46:43


Janai Nelson Janai Nelson, Associate Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund joins us to discuss the banning of books that teach a truthful version of history, and how she will lead the NAACP LDF in Spring of 2022 after the departure of current president, Sherrilyn Ifill.  Arab Americans Are 'White' On The Census. But Should They Be? In the fall of 2021, Boston mayoral candidate Annissa Essaibi George, like many other Arab Americans, chose to identify publicly as a person of color. But the thing is Arab Americans are considered “white” on government forms. That means Arab Americans and people from the Middle East...who descend from countries that span Africa and Asia...are left out of a process that decides the political map, federal funding and medical research. For decades, Arab American organizations have pushed the federal government to adjust official forms to stop what they say is erasure. But the question is, what is a person of color - and are Arab Americans a part of the group? Sarah Gualtieri, historian and professor of American studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California (USC) and Maya Berry, executive director at the Arab American Institute, join The Takeaway to discuss more.  Asian Americans Secure Historic Political Wins Across The Country A report from Politico in 2021 revealed that elected officials from the Asian American and Pacific Islander community were the LEAST represented demographic in American politics, making up less than ONE percent of all people who hold office. But that's starting to change. In fact, this November was a historic election cycle for AAPI communities across the country. Asian Americans will serve for the first time as Mayor in Boston and Cincinnati. 5 Asian Americans were elected to New York's city council this year. Jane Junn, professor at University of Southern California and Arun Venugopal, Race and Justice Reporter at WNYC, join The Takeaway to discuss more.   

The Takeaway
Conversations on Identity and Politics in 2021-12-31

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 46:43


Janai Nelson Janai Nelson, Associate Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund joins us to discuss the banning of books that teach a truthful version of history, and how she will lead the NAACP LDF in Spring of 2022 after the departure of current president, Sherrilyn Ifill.  Arab Americans Are 'White' On The Census. But Should They Be? In the fall of 2021, Boston mayoral candidate Annissa Essaibi George, like many other Arab Americans, chose to identify publicly as a person of color. But the thing is Arab Americans are considered “white” on government forms. That means Arab Americans and people from the Middle East...who descend from countries that span Africa and Asia...are left out of a process that decides the political map, federal funding and medical research. For decades, Arab American organizations have pushed the federal government to adjust official forms to stop what they say is erasure. But the question is, what is a person of color - and are Arab Americans a part of the group? Sarah Gualtieri, historian and professor of American studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California (USC) and Maya Berry, executive director at the Arab American Institute, join The Takeaway to discuss more.  Asian Americans Secure Historic Political Wins Across The Country A report from Politico in 2021 revealed that elected officials from the Asian American and Pacific Islander community were the LEAST represented demographic in American politics, making up less than ONE percent of all people who hold office. But that's starting to change. In fact, this November was a historic election cycle for AAPI communities across the country. Asian Americans will serve for the first time as Mayor in Boston and Cincinnati. 5 Asian Americans were elected to New York's city council this year. Jane Junn, professor at University of Southern California and Arun Venugopal, Race and Justice Reporter at WNYC, join The Takeaway to discuss more.   

Otomí
Episode 18: Harvard Final Project

Otomí

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 40:24


After a thrilling first semester at Harvard, I would like to share my final project for one of my seminar classes, Ethnicity, Migration, and Rights 146: Migration and the U.S. Empire. I loved this class, and I found it fitting that I conclude this course with a podcast episode. This is the raw footage of the podcast episode that I submitted as a final project.The episode is about the history of the Mexican-American War, the manner in which it is depicted by the United States, and how it has impacted images of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans in our contemporary world.

New England Journal of Medicine Interviews
NEJM Interview: Dr. Jennifer Lucero on aversive racism as a contributor to structural racism in academic medicine.

New England Journal of Medicine Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 10:53


Jennifer Lucero is an associate professor and the associate dean for admissions at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Stephen Morrissey, the interviewer, is the Executive Managing Editor of the Journal. C.L. Chen and Others. Calling Out Aversive Racism in Academic Medicine. N Engl J Med 2021;385:2499-2501.

The Health Disparities Podcast
Profiles in Health Equity: Calvin Johnson, MD, MPH.

The Health Disparities Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 48:41


Dr. Calvin Johnson, MD, MPH, has built his varied career at the intersections of medicine, data science, and public health. This episode explores a wide range of topics related to health equity in a fascinating discussion, including the historical significance of Morehouse School, the importance and vulnerability of safety net hospitals, addressing the enduring issue of limited access to care for some populations, and the importance of data analysis and proactive information dissemination for problem solving and crisis management.

Life Matters - Separate stories podcast
'I didn't know I was brown until a school friend pointed it out'

Life Matters - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 9:55


Huda Hayek is Lebanese Australian. When she was growing up her culture was not represented in books or media, and at her school she was the only one who ate falafel rolls for lunch. A journalist and primary teacher, Huda has written her first book. It's for children age 9 to thirteen, and it's called 'Huda and Me'.

Sociologists Talking Real Sh*t
Guns, Vigilantism, and Racism; more American than Apple Pie!

Sociologists Talking Real Sh*t

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 72:19


Join Dr. David Embrick and me as we discuss the Rittenhouse and Ahmaud Abery cases, vigilantes, masculinity, and guns.  In other words, it's an All-American podcast! Dr. David G. Embrick holds a joint position as Associate Professor in the Sociology Department and African Studies Institute at the University of Connecticut. Prior to UConn, he spent a decade at Loyola University Chicago as faculty in the Sociology Department. He received his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University in 2006.  He is a former American Sociological Association Minority Fellow; Past-President of the Southwestern Sociological Association; current Vice President of the Society for the Study of Social Problems; and current President of the Association for Humanist Sociology.  In addition, Dr. Embrick serves as the Founding Co-Editor of Sociology of Race and Ethnicity; Founding Book Series Editor of Sociology of Diversity, with Bristol University Press; and Founding Book Series Co-Editor of Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, with Georgia University Press.Dr. Embrick's research has centered largely on the impact of contemporary forms of racism on people of color.  While most of his research is one what he has labeled “diversity ideology” and inequalities in the business world, he has published on race and education, racial microaggressions, the impact of schools-welfare-and prisons on people of color, and issues of sex discrimination. Dr. Embrick has published in a number of journals including American Behavioral Scientist, Critical Sociology, Race and Society, Sex Roles, Social Problems, Sociological Forum, and Symbolic Interaction, among others. He has been invited to give talks and workshops on diversity; racism in the workplace; racism and space; racial microaggressions; and various issues of academic professionalism in over 125 venues, both academic and public.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Columnist Michael Cohen and Professor Melissa Michelson

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 82:59


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more All this month and next I will be promoting GiveWell.org and I hope you will consider sending them a donation. They will match new donors up to $250! Please go to GiveWell.org/StandUp Get your holiday gifts from one of the sponsors of the show! GetQuip.com/STANDUP Indeed.com/STANDUP and start a store or shop at Shopify.com/Standup 23 mins Michael A. Cohen is a regular contributor for The Boston Globe on national politics and foreign affairs. He is also the author of “American Maelstrom: The 1968 Election and the Politics of Division.” Michael has written for dozens of news outlets, including as a columnist for the Guardian and Foreign Policy and he is the US Political Correspondent for the London Observer. He previously worked as a speechwriter at the US State Department and has been a lecturer at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Stand Up subscribers get a discount on Michael's new newsletter!   46 mins Dr. Melissa R. Michelson is an accomplished teacher, scholar, and leader in her profession. Originally from the island of Alameda, California, she now bicycles to work at Menlo College in Atherton, California, where she is Dean of Arts & Sciences and Professor of Political Science. Dr. Michelson is also a founding Executive Committee member of WomenAlsoKnowStuff and past president of the American Political Science Association Latino Caucus and of the American Political Science Association LGBT Caucus. She is a past visiting faculty fellow of the Stanford University Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, and is currently co-editor of the journal Politics, Groups, and Identities. Dr. Michelson frequently speaks at public events and to the media, including a Menlo TedX talk in 2019 and as the long-time election night analyst at Peninsula Television. She is a frequent source for news stories about Latinx politics, LGBTQ politics, and California politics, including national outlets like the New York Times, USA Today, and the Wall Street Journal, as well as international media. She enjoys speaking to students outside of the classroom, including as a guest speaker in political science classes and to student audiences at the high school and college levels interested in how to be allies to the LGBTQ community. Dr. Michelson is a nationally recognized expert in Latinx voter mobilization and LGBTQ politics. Her academic work is solidly based in activist scholarship. Whether the focus is on members of the Latinx, LGBTQ, or other marginalized groups, she uses her research to motivate greater equality and justice for all. Dr. Michelson went to graduate school to become a teacher and delights in leading classroom discussions, but also to write books that might make a difference, inspired by her undergraduate professor at Columbia University, Dr. Charles V. Hamilton. She went on to earn a PhD from Yale University and has since written seven books and dozens of journal articles and book chapters. Dr. Michelson's current projects include ongoing research on how best to motivate Black and Latinx citizens to vote, how drag performers can increase voter turnout, how to reduce prejudice against members of the LGBTQ community , and many other smaller projects. More than a quarter century after completing her PhD, she is still excited by new research ideas and eager to dive into new literatures to learn more. GetQuip.com/STANDUP Indeed.com/STANDUP and start a store or shop at Shopify.com/Standup   Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe   Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page  

ReConsider
Meta-Trans: Gender, Ethnicity/Race, and Transitioning between Them

ReConsider

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 38:05


Become a Patreon and Support ReConsider!This is probably going to get me a lot of flak but I realized that I'd be shying away from a commitment to challenge how we think about stuff if I didn't talk about this out of fear.Disclaimer:I actually have a very underdeveloped political position on transgenderism and generally just stay out of it, the way I do about abortiton (but for different reasons--with abortion I am just morally conflicted), and I tend to default to, “you do you” and thus away from restrictions on what people can do with their genderI have a number of delightful friends who are trans and my emotional position is that I feel very supportive and loving of them and their transition seems to “make sense” to my gut in some deep way that being transracial doesn't really seem to make quite so much sense… but I couldn't explain to a martian why I think this.The way we argue about trans stuff is totally unproductive and drives me battyConfession: I cannot for the life of me understand why being transgender is totally a real thing that is 100% cool and being transracial or transethnic is totally not a real thing and is 0% cool. I have honestly put years of thought into this and talked with a ton of people about it (both people who feel like they have a good answer to the difference and those that don't) and I have gotten NOWHERE.But I want to do better than just throwing up my hands, I want to provide my own framework of thought here.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/reconsiderpodcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
How Long Ago Was the Past? - DIRT 168

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 100:34


When does “The Past” start, and how far back does it go? How long did it take people to get places in the past? How do we attempt to hold the vastness of time and geography in our minds? Not well, especially in an audio medium, but we're excited to blow your minds. Links The Greatest Animal War (Nautilus) The last slave ship survivor and her descendants identified (National Geographic) How Far Can A Horse Travel In A Day? (8 Facts) (Deep Hollow Ranch) RGS-IBG Expedition Handbook (Royal Geographical Society) Speed Under Sail of Ancient Ships (Transactions of the American Philological Association) An Ordinary Ship and Its Stories of Early Globalism: World Travel, Mass Production, and Art in the Global Middle Ages (Journal of Medieval Worlds) Royal Road (Livius.org) ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World (Stanford University) Modeling Ancient Population Structures and Movement in Linguistics (Annual Review of Anthropology) Convergent geographic patterns between grizzly bear population genetic structure and Indigenous language groups in coastal British Columbia, Canada (Ecology and Society) Human mobility and innovation spreading in ancient times: a stochastic agent-based simulation approach (EPJ Data Service) Optimising human community sizes (Evolution and Human Behavior) Size of human groups during the Paleolithic and the evolutionary significance of increased group size (Behavioral and Brain Sciences) The Oaxaca Barrio in Teotihuacan: Mortuary Customs and Ethnicity in Mesoamerica's Greatest Metropolis (Southern Illinois University Carbondale) Contact Email the Dirt Podcast: thedirtpodcast@gmail.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

The Dirt Podcast
How Long Ago Was the Past? - Ep 168

The Dirt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 100:34


When does “The Past” start, and how far back does it go? How long did it take people to get places in the past? How do we attempt to hold the vastness of time and geography in our minds? Not well, especially in an audio medium, but we're excited to blow your minds. Links The Greatest Animal War (Nautilus) The last slave ship survivor and her descendants identified (National Geographic) How Far Can A Horse Travel In A Day? (8 Facts) (Deep Hollow Ranch) RGS-IBG Expedition Handbook (Royal Geographical Society) Speed Under Sail of Ancient Ships (Transactions of the American Philological Association) An Ordinary Ship and Its Stories of Early Globalism: World Travel, Mass Production, and Art in the Global Middle Ages (Journal of Medieval Worlds) Royal Road (Livius.org) ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World (Stanford University) Modeling Ancient Population Structures and Movement in Linguistics (Annual Review of Anthropology) Convergent geographic patterns between grizzly bear population genetic structure and Indigenous language groups in coastal British Columbia, Canada (Ecology and Society) Human mobility and innovation spreading in ancient times: a stochastic agent-based simulation approach (EPJ Data Service) Optimising human community sizes (Evolution and Human Behavior) Size of human groups during the Paleolithic and the evolutionary significance of increased group size (Behavioral and Brain Sciences) The Oaxaca Barrio in Teotihuacan: Mortuary Customs and Ethnicity in Mesoamerica's Greatest Metropolis (Southern Illinois University Carbondale) Contact Email the Dirt Podcast: thedirtpodcast@gmail.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

The Daily Objective
Race, Gender, "Ethnicity", and West Side Story - TDO 397 | Robert & Amy Nasir

The Daily Objective

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 41:01


New Books in Food
Vivian Nun Halloran, "The Immigrant Kitchen: Food, Ethnicity, and Diaspora" (Ohio State UP, 2016)

New Books in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 23:51


In The Immigrant Kitchen: Food, Ethnicity, and Diaspora (Ohio State UP, 2016), Vivian Nun Halloran examines food memoirs by immigrants and their descendants and reveals how their treatment of food deeply embeds concerns about immigrant identity in the United States. Halloran argues that by offering a glimpse into the authors' domestic lives through discussions of homemade food, these memoirs demystify the processes of immigration, assimilation, acculturation, and expatriation--ultimately examining what it means to live as naturalized citizens of the United States. Having grown up hearing about their parents' often fraught experiences of immigration, these authors examine the emotional toll these stories took and how such stories continue to affect their view of themselves as Americans. Halloran covers a wide swathe of immigrant food memoirs, moving seamlessly between works by authors such as Austin Clarke, Madhur Jaffrey, Kim Sun e, Diana Abu-Jaber, Eduardo Machado, Colette Rossant, Maya Angelou, and Jonathan Safran Foer. The Immigrant Kitchen describes how these memoirs function as a complex and engaging mass media genre that caters to multiple reading constituencies. Specifically, they entertain readers with personal anecdotes and recollections, teach new culinary skills through recipes, share insight into different cultural mores through ethnographic and reportorial discussions of life in other countries, and attest to the impact that an individual's legal immigration into the United States continues to have down through the generations of his or her American-born families. Vivian Nun Halloran is professor of English at Indiana University Bloomington. She is a Caribbeanist by training, and a literary food studies scholar by vocation. She is the author of Exhibiting Slavery and is currently working on her next book that examines those moments when Americans of Caribbean descent address themselves to the American people to share the lessons of their immigrant upbringing. She is also working on two digital humanities projects. Twitter: @HalloranVivian Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/food

New Books in Sociology
Vivian Nun Halloran, "The Immigrant Kitchen: Food, Ethnicity, and Diaspora" (Ohio State UP, 2016)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 23:51


In The Immigrant Kitchen: Food, Ethnicity, and Diaspora (Ohio State UP, 2016), Vivian Nun Halloran examines food memoirs by immigrants and their descendants and reveals how their treatment of food deeply embeds concerns about immigrant identity in the United States. Halloran argues that by offering a glimpse into the authors' domestic lives through discussions of homemade food, these memoirs demystify the processes of immigration, assimilation, acculturation, and expatriation--ultimately examining what it means to live as naturalized citizens of the United States. Having grown up hearing about their parents' often fraught experiences of immigration, these authors examine the emotional toll these stories took and how such stories continue to affect their view of themselves as Americans. Halloran covers a wide swathe of immigrant food memoirs, moving seamlessly between works by authors such as Austin Clarke, Madhur Jaffrey, Kim Sun e, Diana Abu-Jaber, Eduardo Machado, Colette Rossant, Maya Angelou, and Jonathan Safran Foer. The Immigrant Kitchen describes how these memoirs function as a complex and engaging mass media genre that caters to multiple reading constituencies. Specifically, they entertain readers with personal anecdotes and recollections, teach new culinary skills through recipes, share insight into different cultural mores through ethnographic and reportorial discussions of life in other countries, and attest to the impact that an individual's legal immigration into the United States continues to have down through the generations of his or her American-born families. Vivian Nun Halloran is professor of English at Indiana University Bloomington. She is a Caribbeanist by training, and a literary food studies scholar by vocation. She is the author of Exhibiting Slavery and is currently working on her next book that examines those moments when Americans of Caribbean descent address themselves to the American people to share the lessons of their immigrant upbringing. She is also working on two digital humanities projects. Twitter: @HalloranVivian Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Popular Culture
Vivian Nun Halloran, "The Immigrant Kitchen: Food, Ethnicity, and Diaspora" (Ohio State UP, 2016)

New Books in Popular Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 23:51


In The Immigrant Kitchen: Food, Ethnicity, and Diaspora (Ohio State UP, 2016), Vivian Nun Halloran examines food memoirs by immigrants and their descendants and reveals how their treatment of food deeply embeds concerns about immigrant identity in the United States. Halloran argues that by offering a glimpse into the authors' domestic lives through discussions of homemade food, these memoirs demystify the processes of immigration, assimilation, acculturation, and expatriation--ultimately examining what it means to live as naturalized citizens of the United States. Having grown up hearing about their parents' often fraught experiences of immigration, these authors examine the emotional toll these stories took and how such stories continue to affect their view of themselves as Americans. Halloran covers a wide swathe of immigrant food memoirs, moving seamlessly between works by authors such as Austin Clarke, Madhur Jaffrey, Kim Sun e, Diana Abu-Jaber, Eduardo Machado, Colette Rossant, Maya Angelou, and Jonathan Safran Foer. The Immigrant Kitchen describes how these memoirs function as a complex and engaging mass media genre that caters to multiple reading constituencies. Specifically, they entertain readers with personal anecdotes and recollections, teach new culinary skills through recipes, share insight into different cultural mores through ethnographic and reportorial discussions of life in other countries, and attest to the impact that an individual's legal immigration into the United States continues to have down through the generations of his or her American-born families. Vivian Nun Halloran is professor of English at Indiana University Bloomington. She is a Caribbeanist by training, and a literary food studies scholar by vocation. She is the author of Exhibiting Slavery and is currently working on her next book that examines those moments when Americans of Caribbean descent address themselves to the American people to share the lessons of their immigrant upbringing. She is also working on two digital humanities projects. Twitter: @HalloranVivian Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/popular-culture

New Books in American Studies
Vivian Nun Halloran, "The Immigrant Kitchen: Food, Ethnicity, and Diaspora" (Ohio State UP, 2016)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 23:51


In The Immigrant Kitchen: Food, Ethnicity, and Diaspora (Ohio State UP, 2016), Vivian Nun Halloran examines food memoirs by immigrants and their descendants and reveals how their treatment of food deeply embeds concerns about immigrant identity in the United States. Halloran argues that by offering a glimpse into the authors' domestic lives through discussions of homemade food, these memoirs demystify the processes of immigration, assimilation, acculturation, and expatriation--ultimately examining what it means to live as naturalized citizens of the United States. Having grown up hearing about their parents' often fraught experiences of immigration, these authors examine the emotional toll these stories took and how such stories continue to affect their view of themselves as Americans. Halloran covers a wide swathe of immigrant food memoirs, moving seamlessly between works by authors such as Austin Clarke, Madhur Jaffrey, Kim Sun e, Diana Abu-Jaber, Eduardo Machado, Colette Rossant, Maya Angelou, and Jonathan Safran Foer. The Immigrant Kitchen describes how these memoirs function as a complex and engaging mass media genre that caters to multiple reading constituencies. Specifically, they entertain readers with personal anecdotes and recollections, teach new culinary skills through recipes, share insight into different cultural mores through ethnographic and reportorial discussions of life in other countries, and attest to the impact that an individual's legal immigration into the United States continues to have down through the generations of his or her American-born families. Vivian Nun Halloran is professor of English at Indiana University Bloomington. She is a Caribbeanist by training, and a literary food studies scholar by vocation. She is the author of Exhibiting Slavery and is currently working on her next book that examines those moments when Americans of Caribbean descent address themselves to the American people to share the lessons of their immigrant upbringing. She is also working on two digital humanities projects. Twitter: @HalloranVivian Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Vivian Nun Halloran, "The Immigrant Kitchen: Food, Ethnicity, and Diaspora" (Ohio State UP, 2016)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 23:51


In The Immigrant Kitchen: Food, Ethnicity, and Diaspora (Ohio State UP, 2016), Vivian Nun Halloran examines food memoirs by immigrants and their descendants and reveals how their treatment of food deeply embeds concerns about immigrant identity in the United States. Halloran argues that by offering a glimpse into the authors' domestic lives through discussions of homemade food, these memoirs demystify the processes of immigration, assimilation, acculturation, and expatriation--ultimately examining what it means to live as naturalized citizens of the United States. Having grown up hearing about their parents' often fraught experiences of immigration, these authors examine the emotional toll these stories took and how such stories continue to affect their view of themselves as Americans. Halloran covers a wide swathe of immigrant food memoirs, moving seamlessly between works by authors such as Austin Clarke, Madhur Jaffrey, Kim Sun e, Diana Abu-Jaber, Eduardo Machado, Colette Rossant, Maya Angelou, and Jonathan Safran Foer. The Immigrant Kitchen describes how these memoirs function as a complex and engaging mass media genre that caters to multiple reading constituencies. Specifically, they entertain readers with personal anecdotes and recollections, teach new culinary skills through recipes, share insight into different cultural mores through ethnographic and reportorial discussions of life in other countries, and attest to the impact that an individual's legal immigration into the United States continues to have down through the generations of his or her American-born families. Vivian Nun Halloran is professor of English at Indiana University Bloomington. She is a Caribbeanist by training, and a literary food studies scholar by vocation. She is the author of Exhibiting Slavery and is currently working on her next book that examines those moments when Americans of Caribbean descent address themselves to the American people to share the lessons of their immigrant upbringing. She is also working on two digital humanities projects. Twitter: @HalloranVivian Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Politics Done Right
Dr. Manuel Pastor examines Democrats loss of Latinos to Trump. Republican Party has become a cult.

Politics Done Right

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 57:55


YEP! GOP Operative: Trump revealed Republican Party as comfortable being an autocratic movement: The Lincoln Project Senior Advisor Stuart Stevens could not be clearer as he makes a very important point. Congressman Jim Clyburn in an earlier clip pointed out that the Republican Party, the party of his parents was now a cult. He said that the party turned itself over to Trump. Chuck Todd gives Republican Senator Dr. Roger Marshall rope to look like an ideological fool: Chuck Todd gave this Senator, a purported doctor, enough rope to hang himself. A doctor that refuses to see the science is a clear and present danger. He did a reasonably good job exposing the doctor, who seemed to have forgotten his oath. Report: Elon Musk is a parasite who built his company on government money he wants to deny everyone else: Fareed Zakaria did a piece on Elon Musk that clarifies that the billionaire is a proud parasite that wants to deny them the opportunities he got. Time's Person Of The Year is Elon Musk. Are you kidding? Republican Liz Cheney slams GOP colleagues & leader: We as Republicans used to be unified on this: Liz Cheney did not hold back as she slammed Trump Chief of Staff Meadows and Minority Leader McCarthy have it. She gave the reasons why Trump Chief of Staff Meadows must be held criminally in contempt of congress for not testifying about the January 6 attempted coup, the insurrection. Manuel Pastor, USC Professor of Sociology discusses the Latino vote: Donald Trump did better with Latinos than expected. USC Professor Dr. Manuel Pastor predicted that. Today he explains what happened and what Democrats must do if they are to keep the Latino electorate Dr. Manuel Pastor is a Distinguished Professor of Sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. --- If you like what we do please do the following! Most Independent Media outlets continue to struggle to raise the funds they need to operate much like the smaller outlets like Politics Done Right SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel here. LIKE our Facebook Page here. Share our blogs, podcasts, and videos. Get our books here. Become a YouTube PDR Posse Member here. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/support

Politics Done Right
Manuel Pastor, USC Professor of Sociology discusses the Latino vote

Politics Done Right

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 26:01


Donald Trump did better with Latinos than expected. USC Professor Dr. Manuel Pastor predicted that. Today he explains what happened and what Democrats must do if they are to keep the Latino electorate. Dr. Manuel Pastor is a Distinguished Professor of Sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. He currently directs the Equity Research Institute at USC. Pastor holds an economics Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and is the inaugural holder of the Turpanjian Chair in Civil Society and Social Change at USC.--- If you like what we do please do the following! Most Independent Media outlets continue to struggle to raise the funds they need to operate much like the smaller outlets like Politics Done Right SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel here. LIKE our Facebook Page here. Share our blogs, podcasts, and videos. Get our books here. Become a YouTube PDR Posse Member here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Patreon here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Facebook here. Consider providing a contribution here. Please consider supporting our GoFundMe equipment fund here. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/support

The Health Disparities Podcast
Healthcare for the homeless, featuring Kelly Bruno, CEO National Health Foundation.

The Health Disparities Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 44:31


Kelly Bruno, President & CEO of the National Health Foundation joins us to discuss healthcare for the homeless. California has a disproportionate share of the nation's homeless population, approximately 161,000 of the total homeless population of 580,000. The National Health Foundation, a California-based organization focused on recuperative care in Los Angeles and Ventura counties, offers medical respite care programs as an equitable pathway to health and housing for people experiencing homelessness. It's an approach that can mitigate some social determinants and barriers to care and build community in the process.

Pitchfork Economics with Nick Hanauer
Moving beyond racial liberalism (with Kyle Strickland)

Pitchfork Economics with Nick Hanauer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 28:28


How can we center the role of race in our economic policy and in our politics in a way that will drive real change? Kyle Strickland, the deputy director of race and democracy at the Roosevelt Institute, explains how our leaders have fallen under the sway of racial liberalism, which focuses solely on disavowing personal bigotry and overt discrimination. In order to realize true racial and economic justice, he argues we should move beyond racial liberalism and toward a greater understanding of the systemic injustices built into our political and economic systems. Kyle Strickland is the Deputy Director of Race and Democracy at the Roosevelt Institute. He is also the Senior Legal Analyst at the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race & Ethnicity and the Director of My Brother's Keeper Ohio.  Twitter: @kstrickland_ A New Paradigm for Justice and Democracy: https://rooseveltinstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/RI_A-New-Paradigm-for-Justice-and-Democracy_Report_202111-1.pdf  Website: http://pitchforkeconomics.com/ Twitter: @PitchforkEcon Instagram: @pitchforkeconomics Nick's twitter: @NickHanauer

Latina Work in Progress
Ep. 13: REL3152 Final Project Analysis on the film "Get Out"

Latina Work in Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 18:45


This is the final project submission for REL3152: Race, Religion, and Ethnicity for Maria Pamela Acosta and Shaun Johnson. Thank you Professor Burnside for an amazing semester and such a creative option for our final. You were our favorite professor this semester

Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN)
Racial Disparities in Pediatric Kidney Transplantation

Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 3:08


Dr. Jill Krissberg, Mr. Matthew Kaufmann, and Dr. Abanti Chaudhuri summarize the findings of their article "Racial Disparities in Pediatric Kidney Transplantation under the new Kidney Allocation System in the United States," on behalf of their colleagues.

Deconstructing Disney
Oliver & Company

Deconstructing Disney

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 64:40


Episode SummaryOnce upon a time in New York City, a movie about dogs brought up a lot of questions about class, race, and gender. Erin revisits one of her favorite childhood films in this episode about Oliver & Company (1988), while Rachel remains steadfast in her stance that the lone kitten is the only good part. Episode BibliographyAbramovitz, M., & Hopkins, T. (1983). Reaganomics and the welfare state. The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare, 10(4), 563-578. Bailey, B. (2017). Greetings and compliments or street harassment? Competing evaluations of street remarks in a recorded collection. Discourse & Society, 28(4), 353-373Barnd, N. B. (2013). White Man's Best Friend: Race and Privilege in Oliver and Company. In Diversity in Disney Films: Critical Essays on Race, Ethnicity, Gender, Sexuality and Disability (pp. 67-82). McFarland, Inc. Biography.com Editors. (2020, March 4). Charles Dickens Biography. Biography.  https://www.biography.com/writer/charles-dickensFleming, P.C. (2016). Dickens, Disney, Oliver, and Company: Adaptation in a corporate media age. Children's Literature Association Quarterly 41(2), 182-198. doi:10.1353/chq.2016.0025.John, C. (1988, November 13). FILM; 'Oliver & Company' Gives Dickens A Disney Twist urban scene from an appropriate rooftop. New York Times, 22.Lohnes, K. (2020, May 5). Oliver Twist. Encyclopedia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/topic/Oliver-Twist-novel-by-DickensNess, M. (2015, November 19). Production Changes: Disney's Oliver and Company. Tor.com. Retrieved October 21, 2021, from https://www.tor.com/2015/11/19/production-changes-disneys-oliver-and-company/Noyer, J. (2009, February 2). Once Upon A Time In New York City: Oliver & Company's Composer J.A.C. Redford! Animated Views. Retrieved October 10, 2021, from https://animatedviews.com/2009/oliver-co-composer-jac-redford/Noyer, J. (2009, February 3). Once Upon A Time In New York City: Oliver & Company's Director George Scribner! Animated Views. Retrieved October 10, 2021, from https://animatedviews.com/2009/once-upon-a-time-in-new-york-city-oliver-companys-director-george-scribner/Oliver & Company. (n.d.). Wikipedia. Retrieved October 10, 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_%26_CompanyOliver & Company. (n.d.). IMDb. Retrieved October 21, 2021, from https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0095776/?ref_=m_ttfc_ttThe Opportunity Agenda. (2021). Narrative shift: From the War on Poverty to “ending welfare as we know it.” The Opportunity Agenda. https://www.opportunityagenda.org/shifting-narrative/narrative-shift-war-povertyPeterson, W.C. (1988). The macroeconomic legacy of Reaganomics. Journal of Economic Issues, 22(1), 1-16. Schettino, F., & Khan, H.A. (2020). Income polarization in the USA: What happened to the middle class in the last few decades? Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, 53, 149-161.Scribner, G. (Director). (1988). Oliver & Company [Film]. Walt Disney Feature Animation.Vera-Gray, F. (2016). Men's stranger intrusions: Rethinking street harassment. Women's Studies International Forum, 58(September-October), 9-17. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wsif.2016.04.001Wegner, R., Antonia, A., Pierce, J., Pegram, S.E., & Woerner, J. (2015). Sexual assault perpetrators' justifications for their actions: Relationships to rape supportive attitudes, incident characteristics, and future perpetration. Violence Against Women, 21(8), 1018-1037. doi: 10.1177/1077801215589380

The Church At Pecan Creek
Enmity Not Ethnicity

The Church At Pecan Creek

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 64:00


Session Three of -Assessing Today's Culture Through a Biblical Worldview- Conference

Science Friction - ABC RN
The Lost Family - how DNA testing is upending our lives

Science Friction - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 26:08


Death Panel
One Million w/ Justin Feldman (12/02/21)

Death Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 76:50


Justin Feldman joins us to discuss how the narrative on covid has largely dropped enduring racial and economic disparities in deaths, and a certain milestone we've probably crossed due to underreporting. We also discuss his recent study in JAMA showing that if everyone had died at the same rate as college-educated white people in the first year of the pandemic 71% fewer people of color would have died. Justin Feldman is an epidemiologist of social inequality and state violence and a Health & Human Rights Fellow at the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard. You can follow him on Twitter @jfeldman_epi As always, support Death Panel at www.patreon.com/deathpanelpod new Death Panel merch here (patrons get a discount code): www.deathpanel.net/merch join our Discord here: discord.com/invite/3KjKbB2 Referenced in this episode: Justin's study, "Variation in COVID-19 Mortality in the US by Race and Ethnicity and Educational Attainment" in JAMA: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2786466 Justin's piece for Slate, "All the Ways That “1 in 5,000 per Day” Breakthrough Infection Stat Is Nonsense": https://slate.com/technology/2021/09/breakthrough-infections-one-in-five-thousand-nonsense.html

The Meaning of Catholic
The English Catholic Soul pt. I: Ethnicity, Anglicanism, and Our Lady's Dowry

The Meaning of Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


Access Patron-Only Shows and join the Guild MUSIC: “Almighty and Everlasting God” by Orlando Gibbons performed by The VOCES8 Scholars June 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q74dwLTMOh0 Please donate to Voces8 here Primordial lights from Dr. Plineo Vendee Radio King’s College Chapel, Cambridge – an outstanding example of Perpendicular Gothic: https://www.sararawlinson.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/NIK6619_s.jpg https://cambridgephotographyweek.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/sara.jpg https://files.structurae.net/files/photos/1/112243/000029.jpg https://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/03/16/69/3166947_d6903bd0.jpg — Buy the Books: https://www.meaningofcatholic.com/ourladyofvictorypress/ […]

New Books in Asian American Studies
Pascale Joassart-Marcelli, "The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification" (U Washington Press, 2021)

New Books in Asian American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 42:34


White middle-class eaters are increasingly venturing into historically segregated urban neighborhoods in search of "authentic" eating in restaurants run by-and originally catering to-immigrants and people of color. What does a growing white interest in these foods mean for historically immigrant neighborhoods and communities of color? What role does foodie culture play in gentrification? In The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification (U Washington Press, 2021), Pascale Joassart-Marcelli sheds light on food gentrification and the emotional, cultural, economic, and physical displacement it produces. She explores three neighborhoods of San Diego, California where "authentic" ethnic food attracts growing numbers of affluent white consumers, while the black and brown people who make this food continue to struggle with economic insecurity and food apartheid.  Drawing on rich interviews with the locals who work, live, cook, and eat in these contested landscapes, Joassart-Marcelli maps the shift of foodscapes from serving the needs of long-time minoritized residents to pleasing the tastes of younger, wealthier, and whiter newcomers. She also shows how food becomes a powerful force behind gastrodevelopment, an urban development strategy built around food gentrification. Joassart-Marcelli highlights the ways in which immigrants and people of color are resisting gentrification and simultaneously fighting for food sovereignty. Ultimately, the work offers valuable lessons for cities all over the country where food projects are transforming neighborhoods at the expense of the communities they claim to uplift and celebrate. The book reveals the negative consequences of foodies' contemporary love affair with ethnic and presumably authentic food on the urban neighborhoods where such food has long been a source of livelihood, sustenance, resistance, and belonging. Doing so, it engages critically with the concept of cosmopolitanism and points out the limitations of consumer-centered food-based cross-cultural encounters that celebrate racial and ethnic difference without acknowledging the material consequences of historical and ongoing exclusion, dispossession, and displacement Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/asian-american-studies

New Books in Latino Studies
Pascale Joassart-Marcelli, "The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification" (U Washington Press, 2021)

New Books in Latino Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 42:34


White middle-class eaters are increasingly venturing into historically segregated urban neighborhoods in search of "authentic" eating in restaurants run by-and originally catering to-immigrants and people of color. What does a growing white interest in these foods mean for historically immigrant neighborhoods and communities of color? What role does foodie culture play in gentrification? In The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification (U Washington Press, 2021), Pascale Joassart-Marcelli sheds light on food gentrification and the emotional, cultural, economic, and physical displacement it produces. She explores three neighborhoods of San Diego, California where "authentic" ethnic food attracts growing numbers of affluent white consumers, while the black and brown people who make this food continue to struggle with economic insecurity and food apartheid.  Drawing on rich interviews with the locals who work, live, cook, and eat in these contested landscapes, Joassart-Marcelli maps the shift of foodscapes from serving the needs of long-time minoritized residents to pleasing the tastes of younger, wealthier, and whiter newcomers. She also shows how food becomes a powerful force behind gastrodevelopment, an urban development strategy built around food gentrification. Joassart-Marcelli highlights the ways in which immigrants and people of color are resisting gentrification and simultaneously fighting for food sovereignty. Ultimately, the work offers valuable lessons for cities all over the country where food projects are transforming neighborhoods at the expense of the communities they claim to uplift and celebrate. The book reveals the negative consequences of foodies' contemporary love affair with ethnic and presumably authentic food on the urban neighborhoods where such food has long been a source of livelihood, sustenance, resistance, and belonging. Doing so, it engages critically with the concept of cosmopolitanism and points out the limitations of consumer-centered food-based cross-cultural encounters that celebrate racial and ethnic difference without acknowledging the material consequences of historical and ongoing exclusion, dispossession, and displacement Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latino-studies

New Books in the American West
Pascale Joassart-Marcelli, "The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification" (U Washington Press, 2021)

New Books in the American West

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 42:34


White middle-class eaters are increasingly venturing into historically segregated urban neighborhoods in search of "authentic" eating in restaurants run by-and originally catering to-immigrants and people of color. What does a growing white interest in these foods mean for historically immigrant neighborhoods and communities of color? What role does foodie culture play in gentrification? In The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification (U Washington Press, 2021), Pascale Joassart-Marcelli sheds light on food gentrification and the emotional, cultural, economic, and physical displacement it produces. She explores three neighborhoods of San Diego, California where "authentic" ethnic food attracts growing numbers of affluent white consumers, while the black and brown people who make this food continue to struggle with economic insecurity and food apartheid.  Drawing on rich interviews with the locals who work, live, cook, and eat in these contested landscapes, Joassart-Marcelli maps the shift of foodscapes from serving the needs of long-time minoritized residents to pleasing the tastes of younger, wealthier, and whiter newcomers. She also shows how food becomes a powerful force behind gastrodevelopment, an urban development strategy built around food gentrification. Joassart-Marcelli highlights the ways in which immigrants and people of color are resisting gentrification and simultaneously fighting for food sovereignty. Ultimately, the work offers valuable lessons for cities all over the country where food projects are transforming neighborhoods at the expense of the communities they claim to uplift and celebrate. The book reveals the negative consequences of foodies' contemporary love affair with ethnic and presumably authentic food on the urban neighborhoods where such food has long been a source of livelihood, sustenance, resistance, and belonging. Doing so, it engages critically with the concept of cosmopolitanism and points out the limitations of consumer-centered food-based cross-cultural encounters that celebrate racial and ethnic difference without acknowledging the material consequences of historical and ongoing exclusion, dispossession, and displacement Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-west

New Books in Sociology
Pascale Joassart-Marcelli, "The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification" (U Washington Press, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 42:34


White middle-class eaters are increasingly venturing into historically segregated urban neighborhoods in search of "authentic" eating in restaurants run by-and originally catering to-immigrants and people of color. What does a growing white interest in these foods mean for historically immigrant neighborhoods and communities of color? What role does foodie culture play in gentrification? In The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification (U Washington Press, 2021), Pascale Joassart-Marcelli sheds light on food gentrification and the emotional, cultural, economic, and physical displacement it produces. She explores three neighborhoods of San Diego, California where "authentic" ethnic food attracts growing numbers of affluent white consumers, while the black and brown people who make this food continue to struggle with economic insecurity and food apartheid.  Drawing on rich interviews with the locals who work, live, cook, and eat in these contested landscapes, Joassart-Marcelli maps the shift of foodscapes from serving the needs of long-time minoritized residents to pleasing the tastes of younger, wealthier, and whiter newcomers. She also shows how food becomes a powerful force behind gastrodevelopment, an urban development strategy built around food gentrification. Joassart-Marcelli highlights the ways in which immigrants and people of color are resisting gentrification and simultaneously fighting for food sovereignty. Ultimately, the work offers valuable lessons for cities all over the country where food projects are transforming neighborhoods at the expense of the communities they claim to uplift and celebrate. The book reveals the negative consequences of foodies' contemporary love affair with ethnic and presumably authentic food on the urban neighborhoods where such food has long been a source of livelihood, sustenance, resistance, and belonging. Doing so, it engages critically with the concept of cosmopolitanism and points out the limitations of consumer-centered food-based cross-cultural encounters that celebrate racial and ethnic difference without acknowledging the material consequences of historical and ongoing exclusion, dispossession, and displacement Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

Daily Devos with Pastor Joe Focht
A Holy Ethnicity - 1 Peter 2:9

Daily Devos with Pastor Joe Focht

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


2:9 But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light;

New Books in American Studies
Pascale Joassart-Marcelli, "The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification" (U Washington Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 42:34


White middle-class eaters are increasingly venturing into historically segregated urban neighborhoods in search of "authentic" eating in restaurants run by-and originally catering to-immigrants and people of color. What does a growing white interest in these foods mean for historically immigrant neighborhoods and communities of color? What role does foodie culture play in gentrification? In The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification (U Washington Press, 2021), Pascale Joassart-Marcelli sheds light on food gentrification and the emotional, cultural, economic, and physical displacement it produces. She explores three neighborhoods of San Diego, California where "authentic" ethnic food attracts growing numbers of affluent white consumers, while the black and brown people who make this food continue to struggle with economic insecurity and food apartheid.  Drawing on rich interviews with the locals who work, live, cook, and eat in these contested landscapes, Joassart-Marcelli maps the shift of foodscapes from serving the needs of long-time minoritized residents to pleasing the tastes of younger, wealthier, and whiter newcomers. She also shows how food becomes a powerful force behind gastrodevelopment, an urban development strategy built around food gentrification. Joassart-Marcelli highlights the ways in which immigrants and people of color are resisting gentrification and simultaneously fighting for food sovereignty. Ultimately, the work offers valuable lessons for cities all over the country where food projects are transforming neighborhoods at the expense of the communities they claim to uplift and celebrate. The book reveals the negative consequences of foodies' contemporary love affair with ethnic and presumably authentic food on the urban neighborhoods where such food has long been a source of livelihood, sustenance, resistance, and belonging. Doing so, it engages critically with the concept of cosmopolitanism and points out the limitations of consumer-centered food-based cross-cultural encounters that celebrate racial and ethnic difference without acknowledging the material consequences of historical and ongoing exclusion, dispossession, and displacement Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Pascale Joassart-Marcelli, "The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification" (U Washington Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 42:34


White middle-class eaters are increasingly venturing into historically segregated urban neighborhoods in search of "authentic" eating in restaurants run by-and originally catering to-immigrants and people of color. What does a growing white interest in these foods mean for historically immigrant neighborhoods and communities of color? What role does foodie culture play in gentrification? In The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification (U Washington Press, 2021), Pascale Joassart-Marcelli sheds light on food gentrification and the emotional, cultural, economic, and physical displacement it produces. She explores three neighborhoods of San Diego, California where "authentic" ethnic food attracts growing numbers of affluent white consumers, while the black and brown people who make this food continue to struggle with economic insecurity and food apartheid.  Drawing on rich interviews with the locals who work, live, cook, and eat in these contested landscapes, Joassart-Marcelli maps the shift of foodscapes from serving the needs of long-time minoritized residents to pleasing the tastes of younger, wealthier, and whiter newcomers. She also shows how food becomes a powerful force behind gastrodevelopment, an urban development strategy built around food gentrification. Joassart-Marcelli highlights the ways in which immigrants and people of color are resisting gentrification and simultaneously fighting for food sovereignty. Ultimately, the work offers valuable lessons for cities all over the country where food projects are transforming neighborhoods at the expense of the communities they claim to uplift and celebrate. The book reveals the negative consequences of foodies' contemporary love affair with ethnic and presumably authentic food on the urban neighborhoods where such food has long been a source of livelihood, sustenance, resistance, and belonging. Doing so, it engages critically with the concept of cosmopolitanism and points out the limitations of consumer-centered food-based cross-cultural encounters that celebrate racial and ethnic difference without acknowledging the material consequences of historical and ongoing exclusion, dispossession, and displacement Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Geography
Pascale Joassart-Marcelli, "The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification" (U Washington Press, 2021)

New Books in Geography

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 42:34


White middle-class eaters are increasingly venturing into historically segregated urban neighborhoods in search of "authentic" eating in restaurants run by-and originally catering to-immigrants and people of color. What does a growing white interest in these foods mean for historically immigrant neighborhoods and communities of color? What role does foodie culture play in gentrification? In The Sixteen-Dollar Taco: Contested Geographies of Food, Ethnicity, and Gentrification (U Washington Press, 2021), Pascale Joassart-Marcelli sheds light on food gentrification and the emotional, cultural, economic, and physical displacement it produces. She explores three neighborhoods of San Diego, California where "authentic" ethnic food attracts growing numbers of affluent white consumers, while the black and brown people who make this food continue to struggle with economic insecurity and food apartheid.  Drawing on rich interviews with the locals who work, live, cook, and eat in these contested landscapes, Joassart-Marcelli maps the shift of foodscapes from serving the needs of long-time minoritized residents to pleasing the tastes of younger, wealthier, and whiter newcomers. She also shows how food becomes a powerful force behind gastrodevelopment, an urban development strategy built around food gentrification. Joassart-Marcelli highlights the ways in which immigrants and people of color are resisting gentrification and simultaneously fighting for food sovereignty. Ultimately, the work offers valuable lessons for cities all over the country where food projects are transforming neighborhoods at the expense of the communities they claim to uplift and celebrate. The book reveals the negative consequences of foodies' contemporary love affair with ethnic and presumably authentic food on the urban neighborhoods where such food has long been a source of livelihood, sustenance, resistance, and belonging. Doing so, it engages critically with the concept of cosmopolitanism and points out the limitations of consumer-centered food-based cross-cultural encounters that celebrate racial and ethnic difference without acknowledging the material consequences of historical and ongoing exclusion, dispossession, and displacement Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

Status/الوضع
Gender activism, Arab women, and COVID-19

Status/الوضع

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 24:56


Host Katty Alhayek speaks with Dr. Sahar Mohamed Khamis about her research interests and current projects. The interview focuses on Khamis's work on gender activism, the gender digital gap, and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Arab women. -- Dr. Sahar Khamis is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication and an Affiliate Professor in the Department of Women's Studies and the Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is an expert on Arab and Muslim media, and the former Head of the Mass Communication Department at Qatar University. Dr. Khamis holds a Ph.D. in Mass Media and Cultural Studies from the University of Manchester in England. She is a former Mellon Islamic Studies Initiative Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago. She is the co-author of the books: Islam Dot Com: Contemporary Islamic Discourses in Cyberspace (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009) and Egyptian Revolution 2.0: Political Blogging, Civic Engagement and Citizen Journalism (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013). She is the co-editor of the book: Arab Women's Activism and Socio-Political Transformation: Unfinished Gendered Revolutions (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018).

Exactly Amara
Red Table Talk: The Estefans - Black & Latin: Racism Within

Exactly Amara

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 40:02


Hey, Exactly Amara fans! Since you love this podcast, we think you might like this one as well. No topic is off-limits for Gloria Estefan, her daughter Emily Estefan and her niece Lili Estefan as these three generations bring their own opinions and life experiences to the iconic Red Table. Take a seat at the Estefans table by listening to the Red Table Talk: The Estefans podcast.   About this Episode The Red Table gets heated as the Estefans discuss colorism within the Latin community. 1 in 4 Hispanics identifies as Afro-Latino and many face discrimination from both their Black and Latin sides. Queer Eye's Karamo Brown speaks candidly about how he grappled to accept his Cuban roots as a Black man, while singer and TV star, Amara La Negra, reveals how she experienced racism on the set of a popular television show. Plus, we break down the difference between Race and Ethnicity. Listen and subscribe to Red Table Talk: The Estefans wherever you get your podcasts! https://www.iheart.com/podcast/1119-red-table-talk-the-estefa-86014254/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The History of China
#227 - Ming 17: The Cao Qin Rebellion

The History of China

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 43:34


Emperor Yingzong is back on his throne thanks to the conspirators loyal to him. Only they turn out to be not so much loyal to "him," as they are to the idea that they should have more and more power. It all culminates with yet another coup d'etat..真讨厌...Time Period Covered:1457-1464 CEMajor Historical Figures:Emperor Yingzong (Zhu Qizhen) [r. 1435-1449, 1457-1464]Crown Prince Zhu Jianshen [b. 1448]Yu Qian, Minister of War [d. 1457]Xu Yuzhen, Earl of Wugong [?]Shi Heng, Duke of Zhongguo [d. 1459]Cao Zhixiang, Director of Ceremonies [d. 1461]Grand Secretary Li XianImperial Guard Commander Lu Gao [d. 1461]General Cao Qin [d. 1461]General Shi Biao [?]General Sun TangGeneral Ma AngGeneral Wu JinGeneral Wu CongCommander Ma LiangCommissioner Wanzhe TuliangVice Commissioner-in-Chief Esen TemurWorks Cited:Qi, Dongfang. “Funerary Perception and Ritual Institution of Imperial Tang” in Kaogu Xuebao (tr. Lee Yun-kuen).Robinson, David M. “Politics, Force and Ethnicity in Ming China: Mongols and the Abortive Coup of 1461” in The Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, Vol. 59, No. 1.Stutton, Donald S. “Death Rites and Chinese Culture: Standardization and Variation in Ming and Qing Times” in Modern China, Vol. 33, No. 1.Twitchett, Denis & Tilemann Grimm. "The Cheng-t'ung, Ching-t'ai, and T'ien-shun reigns, 1436-1464" in The Cambridge History of China, Vol. 7: The Ming Dynasty, 1368-1644, Part I.Waldron, Arthur. The Great Wall of China: From History to Myth. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

whatisTWS
Episode 229 - It's All Fun and Games

whatisTWS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 29:56


Smoking out the window is highly addictive. I find an equally offensive alternative to Guess the Ethnicity and Chef Elise finds something she's not good at. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podtrac - https://analytics.podtrac.com/privacy-policy-gdrp

Grounded with Dinée Dorame
Episode 40 - Rosalie Fish (Cowlitz & Muckleshoot), Activist & Student-Athlete at the University of Washington

Grounded with Dinée Dorame

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 68:15


“Running for survival is not political. [Saying] ‘Stop killing Native women' is not political. Representing myself as an Indigenous person is not political.” Rosalie Fish (Cowlitz & Muckleshoot) is an activist and student-athlete running Division I Track/Cross-Country at the University of Washington. After a successful run at the junior college level running for Iowa Central CC, she joined the 2021-22 UW Track and Cross-Country recruiting class. She was the first member of her tribe to sign a National Letter of Intent for college athletics. Rosalie is well-known for her advocacy work in bringing awareness to the Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, & Two-Spirit+ epidemic. She gained global attention in 2019 when she followed in the footsteps of Jordan Marie Brings Three White Horses Daniel by painting a red handprint over her face during competition the WA state track meet and running honor of her missing relatives. In this conversation, we talk about what her experiences as a Native student-athlete, and particularly a runner, have been like since high school. We also talk about her training, life as an athlete at the Division I level, and goals for the future.   In This Episode: “‘When I run about it, people will notice': Rosalie Fish runs for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women,” by Dave Trimmer, SeattleTimes.com, June 7, 2019. “Rosalie Fish Is Taking Her Activism for MMIW to the University of Washington,” by Taylor Dutch, RunnersWorld.com, April 8, 2021. We Need to Talk on CBS: Rosalie Fish is a Beacon of Hope Wings of America Grounded Pod Episode 1 – Jordan Marie Daniel “Jordan Marie Daniel ran and prayed for 26 #MMIW names at 26.2 mile Boston Marathon,” by Vincent Schilling, com, April 23, 2019. Urban Indian Health Institute – Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women & Girls 2018 Report The Way of the Househusband on Netflix   Follow Rosalie Fish: Instagram: @rosaliefishx   Follow Grounded Pod: Instagram: @groundedpod Twitter: @groundedpod Facebook: facebook.com/groundedpodwithdinee   Subscribe, Listen, & Review on: Spotify | Apple Podcasts | Soundcloud | Stitcher   Music by Jacob Shije (Santa Clara Pueblo, NM). This podcast was made possible through the Tracksmith Fellowship Program.

ALL MARINE RADIO - Podcasts
THE ALL MARINE RADIO HOUR: General Berger told NPR “The Marine Corps is reinventing itself to reflect America” — what is the USMC’s racial & ethnic makeup today and what is the problem?

ALL MARINE RADIO - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 90:41


NPR article & interview:  The Marine Corps is reinventing itself to reflect America, says top general REPORT:  Marine Corps by Gender, Race and Ethnicity, Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity STUDY:  Ground Combat Element Integrated Task Force Experimental Assessment Report              

The Research Like a Pro Genealogy Podcast
RLP 175: RLPDNA Study Group 4 - Locality Research and Ethnicity

The Research Like a Pro Genealogy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 36:28


Today's episode of Research Like a Pro is about Diana's Dillard project. For the RLP with DNA study group, she is exploring the possibility that a cluster of DNA matches from her second cousin's network graph are related through Cynthia Dillard's parents. The MRCA of the cluster appears to be Elijah Dillard. In this assignment, Diana studied Elijah Dillard's timeline and chose two places to learn more about and create a locality guide - Macon County and Pike County. She also studied the ethnicity results of Victor and his matches, comparing their AncestryDNA communities.  Links RLP with DNA Study Group Part 4: Locality Research and Ethnicity https://familylocket.com/rlp-with-dna-study-group-part-4-locality-research-and-ethnicity/ RLP 172: RLPDNA Study Group 1 – Assess and Analyze https://familylocket.com/rlp-172-rlpdna-study-group-1-assess-and-analyze/ Research Like a Pro Resources Research Like a Pro: A Genealogist's Guide book by Diana Elder with Nicole Dyer on Amazon.com - https://amzn.to/2x0ku3d Research Like a Pro eCourse - independent study course -  https://familylocket.com/product/research-like-a-pro-e-course/ RLP Study Group - upcoming group and email notification list - https://familylocket.com/services/research-like-a-pro-study-group/ Research Like a Pro with DNA Resources Research Like a Pro with DNA: A Genealogist's Guide to Finding and Confirming Ancestors with DNA Evidence book by Diana Elder, Nicole Dyer, and Robin Wirthlin - https://amzn.to/3gn0hKx Research Like a Pro with DNA eCourse - independent study course -  https://familylocket.com/product/research-like-a-pro-with-dna-ecourse/ RLP with DNA Study Group - upcoming group and email notification list - https://familylocket.com/services/research-like-a-pro-with-dna-study-group/ Thank you Thanks for listening! We hope that you will share your thoughts about our podcast and help us out by doing the following: Share an honest review on iTunes or Stitcher. You can easily write a review with Stitcher, without creating an account. Just scroll to the bottom of the page and click "write a review." You simply provide a nickname and an email address that will not be published. We value your feedback and your ratings really help this podcast reach others. If you leave a review, we will read it on the podcast and answer any questions that you bring up in your review. Thank you! Leave a comment in the comment or question in the comment section below. Share the episode on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, or your favorite podcast app. Sign up for our newsletter to receive notifications of new episodes - https://familylocket.com/sign-up/ Check out this list of genealogy podcasts from Feedspot: Top 20 Genealogy Podcasts - https://blog.feedspot.com/genealogy_podcasts/

The Takeaway
Thirteen Republicans Voted for the Infrastructure Bill. Now They're Facing Backlash. 2021-11-12

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 44:19


Thirteen Republicans Voted for the Infrastructure Bill. Now They're Facing Backlash. After months of back and forth in Congress, the House of Representatives passed the Senate version of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act last Friday. The $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill now goes to President Biden's desk, where he's expected to sign it into law. The passage of the bill was ultimately a bipartisan effort, with 13 Republicans voting “yes” alongside their Democratic counterparts in the House.For those 13 Republicans, the days since the vote haven't been the easiest. They're facing backlash from fellow Republicans, including former president Donald Trump who said they should be “ashamed of themselves” for “helping the Democrats.” Arab Americans Are 'White' On The Census. But Should They Be? Boston mayoral candidate Annissa Essaibi George, like many other Arab Americans, chose to identify publicly as a person of color. But the thing is, Arab Americans are considered “white” on government forms. We spoke with historian and professor of American studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California (USC) Sarah Gualtieri and Maya Berry, the executive director at the Arab American Institute.  Redistricting and Voting Rights Redistricting is underway in many states, and as lawmakers draw new political lines for their state and congressional seats, it could leave masses of voters without a voice in their elections. The Takeaway looks at redistricting and voting rights with Ari Berman, senior reporter at Mother Jones covering voting rights. Ari, always great to have you here. For segment transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

The Ezra Klein Show
The stories soul food tells

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 51:19


Vox's Jamil Smith talks with Caroline Randall Williams, academic, poet, and co-author (with her mother, Alice Randall) of Soul Food Love. They discuss the ways in which the African American culinary tradition is interpreted, how to tell stories through cooking, and why what we cook and eat is inextricably bound up with who we are. Host: Jamil Smith (@JamilSmith), Senior Correspondent, Vox Guest: Caroline Randall Williams (@caroranwill), author; writer-in-residence of Medicine, Health, and Society, Vanderbilt University References:  "You Want a Confederate Monument? My Body Is a Confederate Monument" by Caroline Randall Williams (New York Times; June 26, 2020) Soul Food Love: Healthy Recipes Inspired by One Hundred Years of Cooking in a Black Family by Alice Randall and Caroline Randall Williams (Clarkson Potter; 2015) High on the Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America, dir. by Roger Ross Williams, Yoruba Richen, and Jonathan Clasberry (Netflix; 2021) "Race, Ethnicity, Expressive Authenticity: Can White People Sing the Blues?" by Joel Rudinow (Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 52 (1); 1994) Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app. Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts This episode was made by:  Producer: Erikk Geannikis Editor: Amy Drozdowska Engineer: Paul Robert Mounsey Vox Audio Fellow: Victoria Dominguez Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Grounded with Dinée Dorame
Episode 39 - Emma Zimmerman, Writer, Journalist, & Host of the Social Sport Podcast

Grounded with Dinée Dorame

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 64:25


“As I grow as a writer and a journalist, I am constantly just trying to listen and learn from new perspectives. Never put something off as a topic that you ‘know about' or that you've done work on…always be open to learning more and listening more.” Emma Zimmerman is a Brooklyn-based writer, journalist, and podcast host. Her work primarily explores topics of women in endurance sports, sport and social change, and environmental justice. Emma's Social Sport podcast, which is part of the CITIUS MAG Podcast Network, “features conversations with endurance athletes of all types committed to fostering social change.” Her writing has appeared in Taproot Magazine, Runner's World, Trail Runner, and more. Emma ran Cross Country and Track & Field at Grinnell College, where she also earned her BA in Political Science and Environmental Studies. She is currently pursuing her MFA in Creative Nonfiction Writing at New York University. In this conversation, Emma offers listeners a writing prompt to get your creativity flowing in the outdoors and we hear about how she's used writing as a tool for social change.   In This Episode: Social Sport, a Citius Mag Podcast Social Sport Ep. 53 – Dinée Dorame on Living Her Values as a Navajo Woman in Sports Media “How Dinée Dorame Is Building A Deeper Understanding Of Running Culture,' by Emma Zimmerman, Trail Runner Magazine, July 14, 2021 The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson Ted Lasso on Apple TV+ The Mamas & the Papas Paul Simon   Follow Emma Zimmerman & Social Sport Podcast: Instagram (Emma): @emma_zimmerman Twitter (Emma): @emmamzimm Instagram (Social Sport): @socialsportpod http://www.emmamzimmerman.com/   Follow Grounded Pod: Instagram: @groundedpod Twitter: @groundedpod Facebook: facebook.com/groundedpodwithdinee   Subscribe, Listen, & Review on: Spotify | Apple Podcasts | Soundcloud | Stitcher   Music by Jacob Shije (Santa Clara Pueblo, NM). This podcast was made possible through the Tracksmith Fellowship Program.

Red Table Talk
Black & Latin: Racism Within (Red Table Talk: The Estefans)

Red Table Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 40:02


The Red Table gets heated as the Estefans discuss colorism within the Latin community. 1 in 4 Hispanics identifies as Afro-Latino and many face discrimination from both their Black and Latin sides. Queer Eye's Karamo Brown speaks candidly about how he grappled to accept his Cuban roots as a Black man, while singer and TV star, Amara La Negra, reveals how she experienced racism on the set of a popular television show. Plus, we break down the difference between Race and Ethnicity. For more Red Table Talk the Estefans visit: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/red-table-talk-the-estefans-86014254/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com