Podcasts about Glacier

Persistent body of ice that is moving under its own weight

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Best podcasts about Glacier

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Latest podcast episodes about Glacier

The Dolewite Podcast
How To Help The Glaciers with Anita Sanchez

The Dolewite Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 16:51


Anita Sanchez's award-winning books sing the praises of unloved plants and animals, and of the unusual, often ignored wild places of the world: dandelions, poison ivy, spiders, mud puddles, and glaciers. Years of field work and teaching outdoor classes have given her firsthand experience introducing students to the wonders of nature. Her latest work, MELTDOWN:Discover Earth's Irreplaceable Glaciers & Learn What You Can Do to Save Them is available now

Deck The Hallmark
Ashley Newbrough (Love in Glacier National - Hallmark Channel - 2023)

Deck The Hallmark

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 45:20


See Ashley in her new movie "Love in Glacier National: A National Park Romance" airing January 28, 2023 on Hallmark ChannelWatch on Philo! - Philo.tv/DTH

Hallmarkies Podcast
Director Christie Will Wolf Interview #2 (LOVE IN GLACIER NATIONAL)

Hallmarkies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 44:00


Today we have director Christie Will Wolf on the podcast to talk about her career and new movie Love in Glacier National: A National Park Romance Follow Christie on twitter https://twitter.com/christie_will?lang=en Follow Christie on instagram https://www.instagram.com/christiewillwolf/ For our first interview with Christie https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/pdst.fm/e/traffic.megaphone.fm/ADV5807871988.mp3 For all of our interviews https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=th52RX04G9c&list=PLXv4sBF3mPUA_0JZ2r5fxhTRE_-RChCj5 Follow Rachel on twitter twitter.com/rachel_reviews Join us over on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/hallmarkies Check out our merch: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/hallmarkies Send us your feedback at feedback@hallmarkiespodcast.com Follow Rachel's blog at http://rachelsreviews.net Follow Rachel's Reviews on youtube https://www.youtube.com/c/rachelsreviews Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

La Terre au carré
L'hiver dans les Alpes 3/5 : Glacier, ainsi fond, fond, fond...

La Terre au carré

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 54:11


durée : 00:54:11 - La Terre au carré - par : Mathieu Vidard - Depuis le milieu du XXème siècle, la fonte des glaciers a été observée sur les glaciers des Alpes. Quels sont les effets de ce réchauffement climatique sur les glaciers et leur écosystème ? - réalisé par : Valérie AYESTARAY

Holidays to Switzerland Travel Podcast
Journey across Switzerland on the Glacier Express

Holidays to Switzerland Travel Podcast

Play Episode Play 51 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 40:33


In this episode, we are joined by Gabriele Aberle from Matterhorn Gotthard Railway. Gabi walks us through all the details travellers should know about the world-famous Glacier Express train journey. This journey features breathtaking panoramic views and is a bucket list trip for many visitors to Switzerland.  Do you dream of riding aboard the Glacier Express? Listen now to learn about:The world famous Glacier Express train journeyWhy you should take the journeyThe main highlights along the routeWhat to expect on board the trainThe different classes available on the Glacier ExpressInformation about the train tickets and seat reservationsTravelling with young children.Taking luggage onboard the Glacier ExpressFor further information and the full show notes from this episode, visit https://holidaystoswitzerland.com/episode64>> Visit our shop for helpful Switzerland travel guides and resources.Connect with us:WebsiteInstagramFacebook groupNewsletterThis podcast is sponsored by Switzerland Tourism. #ineedswitzerland

Backpacker Radio
#185 | Patricia Cameron on Being Assaulted in a Trail Town, Her PCT LASH, and Living on a Glacier in Alaska

Backpacker Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 101:43


In today's episode of Backpacker Radio presented by The Trek, we are once again joined by Patricia Cameron. We catch up on all that she's been up to since our last interview, including a NOLS mountaineering leadership course in Alaska, a 2022 LASH on the PCT, and a hiker trash prom hosted by her organization, Blackpackers. Patricia also shares a distressing story of her being the victim of a hate crime during her PCT hike in Lone Pine, California, in which she caught the entire encounter on video. We play the audio from this incident, get Patricia's take on exactly what went down, some of her thoughts on the risk and reception of being a hiker of color through these rural towns, and despite this incident, why she has no plans to stop long-distance backpacking anytime soon. A warning to listeners that the audio from this video is triggering, but I do believe that it's important for everyone in the community to hear this and get a sense of the depressing reality that still persists for many of our fellow hikers. We wrap the show with a few reasons why a flip-flop thru-hike might be the way to go on the AT, a triple crown of non-dog pets, a superb listener poop story, and more. Enlightened Equipment: Use code “TREKPOD10” for 10% off Enlightened Equipment's Stock Revelation Quilt or Torrid Jacket at enlightenedequipment.com. Organifi: Use code “BACKPACKER” for 20% off at organifi.com/backpacker. Gossamer Gear: Use code “TAKELESSTREKMORE” for 15% off at gossamergear.com.  [divider] Interview with Patricia Cameron Blackpacker's Website Patricia's Twitter Patricia's Instagram Blackpackers Instagram Time stamps & Questions 00:06:50 - QOTD: Would you take 5 years off your life to talk back and forth with your dog for one hour? 00:11:45 - Reminders: subscribe to the Trek newsletter for news about the Badger Sponsorship 00:12:20 - Introducing Patricia 00:13:14 - What have you been up to since March of 2021? 00:14:54 - What does a person do on a glacier for 2 weeks? 00:18:41 - What inspired you to take the class and learn these winter skills? 00:20:03 - How does a day on a glacier compare to a day of backpacking? 00:22:02 - What skill were you most excited to learn? 00:24:35 - How did you transition from Alaska to Kennedy Meadows? 00:25:30 - Tell us about starting on the PCT 00:26:40 - Discussion about cold soaking and food planning 00:28:33 - What made the PCT harder than you were expecting? 00:33:27 - Tell us about hiking after injuring your leg. 00:35:11 - Did you consider getting off trail? 00:36:01 - Tell us about the incident that happened in Lone Pine. 00:40:25 - *Trigger warning: Audio clip starts* 00:41:22 - *Trigger warning: Audio clip ends* 00:42:30 - Were you scared at that moment? 00:42:45 - Were you more or less scared going back to trail after that? 00:45:38 - Tell us more about Nicole and Girls Fight Back 00:46:43 - Is there a part of you that feels vindicated by capturing the incident on video? 00:50:18 - What will it take for you to feel safe going to Lone Pine? 00:53:48 - What do you want the listener to take away from hearing this? 00:56:48 - How did the incident impact the rest of your hike, particularly in trail towns? 01:00:30 - Any parting messages related to this? 01:01:04 - Where did your LASH end? 01:03:30 - Discussion about Amtrak ride from Truckee to Denver 01:06:00 - Discussion about the Tahoe Rim Trail 01:08:20 - Would you recommend the TRT to others? 01:10:00 - Tell us about your Good Morning America interview 01:14:15 - Discussion about public speaking 01:15:40 - Tell us about Hiker Trash Prom 01:17:48 - What's coming up for Blackpackers in 2023? 01:20:00 - Thank you! SEGMENTS Trek Propaganda 6 Reasons a Flip-Flop Thru-Hike of the Appalachian Trail Is the Right Way To Go by Richard “Crossword” Guenther That's all, Folks. by MG Hibionada Triple Crown of non-dog pets Mail Bag 5 Star Review [divider] Check out our sound guy @paulyboyshallcross. Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes (and please leave us a review)!  Find us on Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. Support us on Patreon to get bonus content. Advertise on Backpacker Radio Follow The Trek, Chaunce, Badger, and Trail Correspondents on Instagram. Follow The Trek and Chaunce on YouTube. Follow Backpacker Radio on Tik Tok.  A super big thank you to our Chuck Norris Award winner(s) from Patreon: Andrew, Austen McDaniel, Austin Ford, Brad & Blair (Thirteen Adventures), Brent Stenberg, Christopher Marshburn, Dayne, Greg McDaniel, Kristina Diaz, Matt Soukup, Mike Poisel, Patrick Cianciolo, Paul Packman Sealy, Sawyer Products, and Tracy “Trigger” Fawns. A big thank you to our Cinnamon Connection Champions from Patreon: Dcnerdlet, Jacob Northrup, Jeff LaFranier, Keith Dobie Jr, Liz Seger, and Peter.

Dragnet
Ranger Bill - Glacier Cave-In

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 29:36


The Sim Cafe~
The Sim Cafe~ Interview with William N. Martin

The Sim Cafe~

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 28:54 Transcription Available


Bill Martin has had simultaneous careers in the Electric Utility Industry and in Medicine. Electrical utility Experience:CUSP certified with T&D endorsement, 20 years experience in distribution and transmission as a Lineman/ Line Foreman. 9 years as an area Line Supervisor responsible for distribution and transmission projects Saranac Lake region. Lead for storm restoration for 9 years, 100-mile territory 17 substations. 2-3 years experience as a project manager, managing distribution cable make-ready projects and Live Line Bare Hand and Hot Stick Transmission Projects, Safety Director. His experience and education in medicine include being; Registered Nurse, Nationally Registered Paramedic, 22 years flying as a Flight Paramedic now Flight Nurse /Paramedic, Diploma in Mountain Medicine, Expedition Medicine, Crevasse Rescue Training on Mt Rainier, high angle and low angle medical rescue, Instructor Trainer for National Ski Patrol, currently a Ski Area gondola evacuation team member, PSIA Level 3 Instructor. Expeditions to Mt Kenya, Kilimanjaro, and Everest Base Camp. Ice Climber, Back Country Skier, Fixed Wing Pilot, Speaker, Trainer, Writer. Bill managed multiple different jobs and volunteer responsibilities, simultaneously. Bill has been an ACLS and PALS Instructor and has 20+ years as a Paramedic CIC (course instructor coordinator). He is trained in avalanche rescue and in Crevasse Rescue for Glacier travel. Currently promoting the 3Ps. Practice Primes Proficiency.Core Belief: “When we are helping others become the best version of themselves, we are being the best version of ourselves.”Life is an adventure!Think Project Website: https://www.thinkprojectllc.com/aboutSim VS website:   http://www.simvs.com 

Il était une fois l'entrepreneur
Cédric Grolet : toujours se battre pour réussir - Ep 1

Il était une fois l'entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 15:23


Cédric Grolet est devenu le pâtissier le plus connu de France en moins 10 ans. Pourtant son histoire n'a pas été simple, il a dû se battre à chaque instant de son parcours. Cédric est né en 1985 dans la Loire au fin fond de la France. Sa maman est mère au foyer et son père est chauffeur routier. Mais c'est son grand-père qui l'influence le plus, son grand-père qui tient un restaurant à côté. Très vite, il déteste l'école… et ce qu'il aime, ce sont les activités manuelles. Il découvre la cuisine et la pâtisserie avec son grand-père et surtout la valeur travail. Tous les étés, il bosse. À 14 ans, il se découvre une passion pour la pâtisserie avec un fraisier. Puis il fait un stage dans une boulangerie…il adore. Commence alors une formation en pâtisserie pâtissier-chocolatier-glacier à Puy-en-Velay en 2002 puis son Brevet technique des métiers à l'École nationale supérieure de la pâtisserie en 2004. Mais Cédric est une bête à concours. Il devient meilleur apprenti d'Auvergne puis 2e meilleur ouvrier de France. Son ambition est encore plus grande et monte à Paris en 2006… où personne ne le veut sauf Fauchon. Sous la houlette de Benoit Couvrand et Christophe Adam, il se forme. En 5 ans, il apprend tout avec eux et monte. Il s'occupe du Laboratoire et va à Pékin former les nouveaux pâtissiers de Fauchon. Un jour, pourtant, après 2 échecs à des concours, il décide de tout arrêter… il veut intégrer les meilleurs. Il rejoint les cuisines du Meurice en 2011, recruté par Camille Lesecq et Yannick Alléno qui partent peu de temps après. Cédric devient chef pâtissier malgré l'opposition de toute l'équipe sur place. Le remplaçant de Yannick Alléno ne veut pas entendre parler de Cédric… Alain Ducasse veut amener son propre chef pâtissier, un nouveau défi pour Cédric. Notes Merci à mon sponsor pour son soutien, CyberGhost VPN. Pour bénéficier de l'offre que j'ai négocié pour vous:Cliquez ici ==> https://www.cyberghostvpn.com/LaurentBrouat Pour retrouver toutes les notes de l'épisode: => https://inspire-media.fr/cedric-grolet-toujours-se-battre-pour-reussir-ep-1/

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Federalist Society's Teleforum: Courthouse Steps Oral Argument: Glacier Northwest, Inc. v. International Brotherhood of Teamsters

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023


The U.S. Supreme Court appears ready to clarify when and under what circumstances federal labor law preempts state tort claims for strike-related misconduct. Next week, it will hear oral arguments in Glacier Northwest, Inc. v. International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local No. 174, a case involving the intentional destruction of an employer's property. The employer, Glacier […]

Cast of Many Things
[MGTA] 98 - Hive of Impending Doom

Cast of Many Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 69:16


Well here we go again Misfits! Back in Greenspire with so many things to do, comin at you, and... well... Just listen in and see where this goes!    Chat up the gang on social media on Twitter:  Patrick as the DM - https://twitter.com/professorpfm Matt as Resdyn - https://twitter.com/longfellow_matt Nate as Lindon Longfeather - https://twitter.com/natescottjones Otto as Aetrias Coilbone - https://twitter.com/humanwreckages Tyler as Elias - https://twitter.com/TylerScowcroft  Misfits Guide to Adventuring https://twitter.com/misfits_guide   Podcast Group: CastOfManyThings - https://twitter.com/castomanythings   Email: castofmanythings@gmail.com   Check out Heidi over on her Twitch!!!  https://www.twitch.tv/heidispn Podcast art by https://twitter.com/YourDarlingSon Editing by https://twitter.com/humanwreckages Too Cool by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4534-too-cool License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Immersed by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/3900-immersed License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Relent by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4274-relent License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Midnight Tale by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4710-midnight-tale License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Babylon by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3406-babylon License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Perspectives by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4207-perspectives License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Touching Moments One - Pulse by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4537-touching-moments-one---pulse License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Touching Moments Four - Melody by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4536-touching-moments-four---melody License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Brittle Rille by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3460-brittle-rille License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Glacier by SalmonLikeTheFish Link: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/SalmonLikeTheFish/Music_for_the_Sleepy_Traveler/03_-_Glacier License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/   Mesmerize by Kevin MacLeod  Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4994-mesmerize  License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Respect by Alpha Hydrae Link: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Alpha_Hydrae/Peace_Love_Respect_Overdrive/Alpha_Hydrae_-_Alpha_Hydrae_-_Peace_Love_Respect_Overdrive_-_08_Respect License: https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/  

Audio Arguendo
U.S. Supreme Court Glacier Northwest v. Int'l Brotherhood of Teamsters, Case No. 21-1449

Audio Arguendo

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 Very Popular


Federalism: Does the National Labor Relations Act impliedly preempt a state tort claim against a union for intentionally destroying an employer's property in the course of a labor dispute? - Argued: Tue, 10 Jan 2023 17:27:24 EDT

Teleforum
Courthouse Steps Oral Argument: Glacier Northwest, Inc. v. International Brotherhood of Teamsters

Teleforum

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 32:00


The U.S. Supreme Court appears ready to clarify when and under what circumstances federal labor law preempts state tort claims for strike-related misconduct. Next week, it will hear oral arguments in Glacier Northwest, Inc. v. International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local No. 174, a case involving the intentional destruction of an employer's property. The employer, Glacier Northwest, manufactures ready-mix concrete. Ready-mix concrete hardens quickly and must be poured on the same day it's mixed. In August 2017, a union representing Glacier's employees called a sudden strike. The union allegedly timed the strike so that concrete would be left to harden in Glacier's trucks. Predictably, the concrete was ruined, and Glacier sued the union for damages. But state courts rejected the suit. They held that the suit was preempted by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) because (a) the union's conduct was arguably protected by federal law, and (b) the conduct fell outside an existing exception for intentional-tort claims because it involved no violence or “outrageous conduct.”On January 10, the Supreme Court will hear arguments on both of those conclusions. The central issue for the Court is whether the NLRA preempts intentional tort claims except when they're accompanied by violence or outrageous conduct. The union argues that the state courts got it right: violence or outrageous conduct is necessary. Glacier, on the other hand, argues that violence or outrageous conduct has never been required. In fact, the Supreme Court itself has long recognized that intentional property destruction is unprotected and falls outside the NLRA's preemptive reach.Regardless of who wins that argument, the resulting decision will likely clarify the scope of NLRA preemption. And potentially, it will offer guidance on the bounds of acceptable strike-related conduct.Join Alex MacDonald the afternoon of the oral arguments to stay informed on one of the most important cases currently before the Supreme Court. The webinar will be held on January 10 at 4:00 PM ET. Sign up today to reserve your spot.Featuring:--Alex MacDonald, Director, Future of Work and Labor Law, Instacart

Oral Arguments for the Supreme Court of the United States
Glacier Northwest, Inc. v. Int'l Brotherhood of Teamsters

Oral Arguments for the Supreme Court of the United States

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 73:51


Glacier Northwest, Inc. v. Int'l Brotherhood of Teamsters

U.S. Supreme Court Oral Arguments
Glacier Northwest, Inc. v. International Brotherhood of Teamsters

U.S. Supreme Court Oral Arguments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 86:00


A case in which the Court will decide whether the National Labor Relations Act preempts a state-court lawsuit against a union for intentionally destroying an employer's property during a labor dispute.

Dad Sofa
Go Norske

Dad Sofa

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 8:08


Photo byKaroline VargdalonUnsplashThe Norsemanhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixQWxEwml5gTinned Fermented Fishhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kY-QDBUpzts

StarTalk Radio
Slippery Science: The Physics of Ice

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 52:35 Very Popular


What makes ice slippery? Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Chuck Nice and Gary O'Reilly uncover the complex physics of ice and cool facts we're still learning about it with physicist and author, Laurie Winkless. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/slippery-science-the-physics-of-ice/Photo Credit: Sharon Mollerus, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

We're No Dam Experts
Episode 108: Glacier's 2023 Reservation System

We're No Dam Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 66:35


Glacier National Park has released its 2023 reservation system. To visit the Crown of the Continent you'll not only need a park pass, but also a reservation. Rebecca and Shannon (attempt) to break down all the details and tell you what you need to know to plan your trip! Check out Glacier National Park's website for the latest construction updates: https://www.nps.gov/glac/index.htm Be sure to check out our social media channels and website for more information: https://visitgreatfallsmontana.org/

A Moment of Science
Seafloor mapping and a melting glacier

A Moment of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 2:00


Why is a melting glacier such a cause for concern? Today's A Moment of Science looks closer at the research.

Hakai Magazine Audio Edition
How We Came to Know and Fear the Doomsday Glacier

Hakai Magazine Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 29:05


by Marissa Grunes • It's the world's most vulnerable glacier and key to the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, yet we're only now getting to know Thwaites Glacier. What took us so long? The original story, along with photos and video, can be found on hakaimagazine.com.

America's National Parks Podcast
2023 National Park Entry Reservations, New Funding for Parks, and More

America's National Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 11:38 Very Popular


In this month's national park news, we share some changes to timed-entry reservation programs at Glacier, Yosemite, Arches, Zion, and Rocky Mountain National Parks. Plus, there's some new funding for parks, and what destinations might become national parks in 2023.

Fiction Lab
PREMIERE: Vice City - Whispering Glacier [Huinali Recordings]

Fiction Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 5:19


The Jeju-Island-based record label Huinali Recordings finishes the year with a bang, an 18-track various artist compilation named Mirinae. Mirinae, which means Milky Way in Jeju Island dialect, gathers the musical journeys from some of our favorite producers worldwide, exploring the depths of ambient, downtempo, techno, and beyond. 'Whispering Glacier' by a talented Taiwan-based producer, Vice City, is our final premiere of 2022. Oslated and Siamese Twins affiliate created a hypnotic music escapade with a cosmic, tribal vibe that resembles an intergalactic cruise and searches for a new life in faraway galaxies. 'Whispering Glacier', and the rest of the Mirinae compilation, is coming out on December 30 via Huinali Recordings. write up by https://soundcloud.com/gilleswasserman https://soundcloud.com/vicecitybeats https://www.facebook.com/vicecity2013 https://www.instagram.com/vicecitybeats https://ra.co/dj/vicecity https://soundcloud.com/huinalidub https://huinalidub.bandcamp.com https://formaviva.com/huinali-recordings www.itsdelayed.com www.instagram.com/_itsdelayed_ www.facebook.com/itsdelayed

Anchorage Daily News
A wilderness guide stumbles upon Alaska's northernmost glacier

Anchorage Daily News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 5:58


a wilderness guide stumbled upon Alaska's northernmost glacier; Many Alaskans may no longer be able to send their prescriptions to Fred Meyer; Major oil prospect on federal land in Alaska hanging in the balance; Two Anchorage Assembly members are leaving their terms

Love and Nonsense
Hallmark's New Year New Movies Preview! The Wedding Veil Trilogy, A Dog Lover's Guide to Dating, Love in Glacier National, and Family History Mysteries

Love and Nonsense

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 21:20


Stephanie and Kerrie are Previewing Hallmark Movies for New Movies New Year in January! Hallmark Channel: Jan 1 - The Dog Lover's Guide to Dating - Rebecca Dalton and Corey Sevier Jan 7 - The Wedding Veil Expectations - Lacey Chabert and Kevin McGarry Jan 14 - The Wedding Veil Inspiration - Autumn Reese and Paolo BernadiniJan 21 - The Wedding Veil Journey - Alison Sweeney and Victor Webster Jan 28 - Love in Glacier National: A National Park Romance - Ashley Newbrough and Stephen Hussar Jan 15 - The Way Home (tv series premiere) - Chyler Leigh, Andie MacDowell, Sadie Laflamme-Snow, and Evan WilliamsHallmark Movies & Mysteries: Jan 8 - Family History Mysteries: Buried Past - Janel Parrish and Niall MatterBe sure not to miss the fun over on Instagram (and Facebook)!Instagram: @loveandnonsensepodcast Facebook: Love and Nonsense Podcast

Wandering Ways
#00123 - New Year and New Adventures

Wandering Ways

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 54:05


This week the lads do a little review of their year, and look into the future a little bit. They discuss Glacier, Redwoods, small trips, big trips, and even give out some New Year's Resolutions. Get your hands on some Wandering Ways Apparel at teespring.com/stores/wandering-ways Check out our instagram for the pictures discussed and more stories @Wandering_Ways_Podcast Love the podcast or want to be a possible guest email us at wanderingwayspodcast@gmail.com or quartzlakeproduction@gmail.com Check out even more Quartz Lake and Wandering Ways fun at https://linktr.ee/WanderingWays Sponsors: Check out Blue Ribbon Nets https://blueribbonnets.net/ and use the code Rugaru10 for 10% off Check out the Little Shell Tribe Store https://shopls574.com/shop/ and use the code Wanderingways to get a discount

Monte & The Pharaoh
Monte and The Pharaoh Present WCW Glacier

Monte & The Pharaoh

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 84:27


Monte and The Pharaoh Present WCW Glacier

Voices of VR Podcast – Designing for Virtual Reality
#1154: Visualizing Melting Glaciers in 360 Video Story in “Once a Glacier” + Mixing Motion Capture Dance and Indigenous Poetry

Voices of VR Podcast – Designing for Virtual Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 36:58


Once a Glacier is a 360 video that visualizes the before and after a glacier melts over the course of a single human life time. Director Jiabao then expanded this piece as a part of a live motion capture dance performance that showed at The ONX + DocLab MoCap Stage at IDFA 2022. I interviewed her at IDFA to talk about the evolution of this project, working with indigenous poet Joan Naviyuk Kane, recording sounds of a melting glacier, and how she wanted to juxtapose geological time with the time of a human lifespan to bring more ecological awareness to the changing world around us.

Page One Podcast
Ep. 21: Catherine Raven: Fox & I

Page One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 48:34


Page One, produced and hosted by author Holly Lynn Payne, celebrates the craft that goes into writing the first sentence, first paragraph and first page of your favorite books. The first page is often the most rewritten page of any book because it has to work so hard to do so much—hook the reader. We interview master storytellers on the struggles and stories behind the first page of their books.About the guest author:Dr. Catherine Raven is a former national park ranger at Glacier, Mount Rainier, North Cascades, Voyageurs, and Yellowstone national parks. She earned a PhD in biology from Montana State University, holds degrees in zoology and botany from the University of Montana, and is a member of American Mensa and Sigma Xi (which I had to look up and discovered translates to Companions in Zealous Research.) Her natural history essays have appeared in American Scientist, Journal of American Mensa, and Montana Magazine. About the host:Holly Lynn Payne is an award-winning novelist and writing coach, and the former CEO and founder of Booxby, a startup built to help authors succeed. She is the author of four historical fiction novels, and her debut novel, The Virgin's Knot,was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers book. Her books have been published in eleven countries and translated into nine languages. She recently finished her first YA crossover novel inspired by her nephew with Down syndrome and her love of Shel Silverstein's poetry. She lives in Marin County with her daughter and enjoys mountain biking, surfing and hiking with her dog. To learn more about her books and private writing coaching services, please visit hollylynnpayne.com.If you have a first page you'd like to submit to the Page One Podcast, please do so here.As an author and writing coach, I know that the first page of any book has to work so hard to do so much—hook the reader. So I thought to ask your favorite master storytellers how they do their magic to hook YOU. After the first few episodes, it occurred to me that maybe someone listening might be curious how their first page sits with an audience, so I'm opening up Page One to any writer who wants to submit the first page of a book they're currently writing. If your page is chosen, you'll be invited onto the show to read it and get live feedback from one of Page One's master storytellers. Page One exists to inspire, celebrate and promote the work of both well-known and unknown creative talent.  You can listen to Page One on Apple podcasts, Spotify, Pandora, Stitcher and all your favorite podcast players. Hear past episodes.To get updates, inspiration, and writing tips from the world's master storytellers, follow me @hollylynnpayne onFacebook, Twitter, Goodreads, and Instagram.Until then, be well and keep reading!

Hunting Matters
Tony A. Schoonen

Hunting Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 41:15


Tony A. Schoonen is the Chief Executive Officer of the Boone and Crockett Club. Tony was born and raised in Butte, Montana. He grew up working on the Big Hole river for his father's guide service, first shuttling vehicles and later as a river guide, putting himself through college. He and a couple of buddies started a production company, Stoney-Wolf Productions, and produced the first ever video on elk hunting. The company expanded rapidly, eventually producing 2,000 programs filmed on five continents. The subject matter ranged from hunting and angling to documentaries and youth education. Tony later worked with The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, developing a corporate partners program and eventually becoming the Vice President of Marketing and Communications. In 2004, several of Tony's friends on the Board of Directors for Wonders of Wildlife, including John L. Morris, asked Tony to move to Springfield and help out with the museum and aquarium. Tony had a passion for Wonders of Wildlife since it was built in 2001, telling the story of conservation, providing a historical home for the American hunter and angler, and engaging and educating young people in and about the great outdoors. Tony served as Executive Director of the museum until he transitioned to the Boone and Crockett Club where he served as Chief of Staff and later the Chief Executive Officer. The Boone and Crockett Club is the nation's oldest conservation organization. Founded in 1887 by Theodore Roosevelt and George Bird Grinnell, the Boone and Crockett Club helped to establish the principles of wildlife and habitat conservation, hunter ethics, as well as many of the institutions, expert agencies, science, and funding mechanisms for conservation. Its contributions include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone, and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the framework for modern game laws. Tony and his wife Jennifer are the proud parents of two girls. Tony hunts and fishes as much as time allows and includes his family whenever possible. All enjoy the great outdoors and share the same passion for wildlife and wild places.

KGMI News/Talk 790 - Podcasts
Lifestyle Lookout: Mount Baker Ski Area, Glacier, and Nooksack Salmon Enhancement

KGMI News/Talk 790 - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 5:53


KGMI's Dianna Hawryluk and Adam Smith talk about the Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association, the Mount Baker Ski Area, and taking a relaxing winter staycation in the Glacier area.

AJ Longreads
The Indian soldier who vanished on a glacier 38 years ago

AJ Longreads

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 18:51


As the climate crisis causes water levels to plummet, riverbeds to dry and glaciers to melt, artefacts like old warships, an ancient city, a mosque, 'hunger stones' and human remains have emerged. The body of an Indian soldier was found on Siachen Glacier. His widow always hoped he would ‘come home someday'. This story is part of “Climate artefacts”, a mini-series telling the stories behind the people, places and objects that have been discovered due to drought and warming temperatures. Written by Rifat Fareed. Read by Mohita Namjoshi.

Connections with Evan Dawson
Journalist David Brown on his journey to the "Doomsday Glacier"

Connections with Evan Dawson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 51:47


In the first hour of "Connections with Evan Dawson" on Friday, December 9, 2022, journalist David Brown discusses what he learned during his trip to the "Doomsday Glacier."

The Ski Podcast
163: Ski Boot Fitting at Profeet, La Plagne's glacier & protecting your skin

The Ski Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 47:25


In Episode 163 Iain has his ski boots fitted at Profeet, we discuss how to protect your skin when skiing and look at La Plagne glacier lift changes. Iain was joined by Jen Tsang from La Plagne and regular guest and equipment expert Al Morgan from SkiKitInfo.com and down the line by Michelle Baker from Melanoma Fund and Tim Fawke from Snowsport England.   SHOW NOTES Jen last appeared on the snow in Episode 99 Al skied in Obertauern in Austria The Ski Podcast is sponsored by Les 3 Vallées - the largest ski area in the world Patrick Thorne is author of 'Around the World in 50 Pistes' and appeared on the show in Episode 162  Les 3 Vallées once had 220 lifts, but now it's only 160 – as they are bigger and faster, with an uplift capacity of 300,000 skiers/snowboarders per hour Chris Moran from Intersport Ski Hire reported from the opening weekend in Courchevel (3:40) Dave Burrows from SnowPros Ski School was in Cervinia, Italy (5:30) Keith Webb reported from Kaprun, Austria (7:10) Betony Garner was skiing in Courmayeur, Italy (9:20) Michelle Baker is the CEO of the Melanoma Fund about their new snowsports campaign (10:15) Tim Fawke is the CEO of Snowsport England La Plagne are making changes to the Bellecote glacier (18:20) Find out about the Flocon Vert accreditation from Mountain Riders (22:40) Six more resorts were awarded the Flocon Vert last month (23:15) After a lot of discussion with Al, Iain chose the Atomic Hawx Prime XTD 130 CT GW for his new boots (24:45) Al explains about GripWalk soles in ski boots (26:50) Iain went to Profeet in Fulham to have his new boots fitted and custom insoles made (28:00) Master bootfitter Sam Jones looked after Iain (29:30) Sam also fitted the Carv device, which Iain will be testing in Val Thorens later this month (36:30) The choice of sock material (merino, silk, manmade) depends on individual physiology and budget (38:30)    Feedback Please send your feedback about the show to us on social @theskipodcast or by email theskipodcast@gmail.com Thanks to all our following at Snowheads and your comments about our Ski Boot Special (Episode 161) MikePow: "Great episode. Essential listening" boredsurfin: "Excellent episode" BobinCH: "Colin is hilarious and super knowledgeable" Layne: "Another great episode - keep up the good work" Miranda Slater contacted us via Facebook: "I'm a great fan of your Podcast and love to  listen when you drop new episodes. Thanks for all your insightful interviews."   Don't forget that there are over 160 episodes to catch up with. 153 of these were listened to in the last week (only the PyeongChang Winter Olympic specials missed out).    If you enjoy the show, there's two things you can do to help:    1) Give us a review on Apple Podcasts  2) Buy me a Coffee at buymeacoffee.com/theskipodcast    You can follow me@skipedia and the podcast @theskipodcast

Army of Smarkness
WCW World War 3 1997

Army of Smarkness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 87:26


This week, the guys review WCW World War 3 1997. The business is on fire in 1997. WCW has WWF on the ropes and is in the midst of its biggest storyline ever. World War 3 features such classics as the Faces of Fear vs. Glacier and Ernest Miller, Mongo McMichael vs. Alex Wright, and of course the classic Battle Royal! Also, some dudes named Rey Mysterio and Eddie Guerrero had a decent match, I guess. 3 Rings. 1 Winner. You do the math. It's WCW World War 3 1997! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/army-of-smarkness/support

Drop The Coconut
Drop the Coconut- Mandy and Cliff Brown

Drop The Coconut

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 39:07


Hello everyone! My name is Roi Perets, and I am in San Diego with my husband, Ron Thurston.We left New York City four months ago to live in an airstream, travel across the US to discover this beautiful country, and rediscover ourselves.It had been a while since I recorded a podcast- we crossed many states and cities since Glacier in Montana, and I needed time to think rather than speak.That changed when we met Mandy and Cliff Brown in Malibu, California. We were scheduled to be in the same campground in San Diego a couple of weeks later, and as we reconnected over dinner, I found thoughtful and articulate partners to chat with about our journey.Follow Ron and me on our journey across the US-@dropthecoconut and @retailpride on InstagramAnd the Brown family on their incredible journey:@routedownfam on InstagramAnd their website: routedownfam.comIf our conversations spark something within you, or you have a "Drop the Coconut" moment that you would like to share, I would love to hear from you!I hope you enjoy it and thank you for jumping on our coconut wagon today!Roi

Raw is Nitro Podcast
WWF Raw Vs WCW Nitro Sept 23 1996

Raw is Nitro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 44:49


A new champion, a new NWO member and another Glacier banger. JR is on fire about being fired and Giant wears a suit.

Les Baladeurs
Extrait EP60 — Au pied du glacier, avec Camille Etienne

Les Baladeurs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 3:22


Pour clôturer la saison 5 des Baladeurs en beauté, et vous donner envie d'écouter ou de réécouter ses aventures et mésaventures en pleine nature, voici une sélection de 6 extraits choisis parmi les derniers récits. Dans ce bonus de l'épisode 60, Camille Etienne nous emmène en Islande pour nous faire prendre conscience de la fonte de ces glaciers.  En 2020, la militante écologique Camille Étienne décide d'embarquer sur un voilier pour rejoindre l'Islande et documenter la fonte de ses glaciers. Elle découvre alors la dure vie à bord, les quarts de nuit glacials, les remontrances du capitaine et la ténacité du mal de mer. Si après l'orage, l'équipage trouve de nouveaux repères, à son arrivée à Reykjavík, les glaciologues n'ont pas de bonnes nouvelles à annoncer…

Backpacker Radio
#177 | Elise "SOS" Ott and Josh "Kid" Gribble on Their CDT Thru-Hike and Terminus Engagement

Backpacker Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 159:14


In today's episode of Backpacker Radio presented by The Trek, we are joined by our long lost former intern turned Production Assistant who ABANDONED the podcast to go for a silly little hike, called thru-hiking the CDT, Elise "SOS" Ott alongside her fiancé, Josh "Kid" Gribble.  This is a Sunday morning interview, which of course means mimosas are involved, setting the mood perfectly to learn all about Elise and Josh's adventures on the CDT. We chat in depth about their epic proposal (spoiler alert), the highs and lows of their trek, we get a thorough primer of fly fishing, especially in the context of backpacking, and much more. It goes without saying, but this is a fun conversation amongst pals and if you disagree you are wrong. We wrap the show with a triple crown of spices, our top food buzzwords, and some details of the Holiday Hiker Meetup Extravaganza that we're hosting on December 10th in Golden (head to our Instagram to get the full deets). RTIC Outdoors: Shop at rticoutdoors.com. Organifi: Use code “backpacker” for 20% off at organifi.com/backpacker. Enlightened Equipment: Use code “trekit20” for a 2 day head start to 20% off and free shipping on November 3 and November 17 at enlightenedequipment.com. Gossamer Gear: Use code “takelesstrekmore” for 15% off at gossamergear.com.  [divider] Interview with Elise & Josh Elise's Instagram Elise's Youtube Josh's Instagram Time stamps & Questions 00:05:24 - QOTD: What are your food buzzwords? 00:14:28 - Reminders: Hiker Meetup, Saturday December 10! 00:15:34 - More Reminders: Badger Sponsorship launching in January - sign up for The Trek's newsletter! 00:16:20 - Introducing Elise & Josh 00:17:08 - The engagement story 00:19:00 - The engagement story actually starts 00:31:16 - How did Josh get the ring size? 00:33:02 - Discussion about trail runners 00:35:22 - Who's taking whose last name? 00:37:20 - What is Zach's wedding advice? 00:40:14 - What are your honeymoon ideas? 00:43:37 - Elise's trail resume & BPR resume 00:46:41 - Josh's trail resume 00:47:35 - Josh's trail name story 00:51:44 - Tell us about fly-fishing on the CDT. 00:55:28 - What are the appropriate questions to ask people who fish? 00:58:27 - Tell us about the rod you used. 00:59:21 - Tell us about backcountry fishing gear. 01:02:09 - What's the difference between fly fishing and regular fishing? 01:07:50 - Floating versus sinking bait 01:10:01 - What's the appeal of fishing? 01:13:25 - Are there certain fish that are notorious? 01:15:44 - Do you have any universal backcountry fishing truths? 01:16:44 - Tell us about bait and flies. 01:21:40 - How do you gut and cook a fish in the backcountry? 01:28:03 - Do different types of trout taste different? 01:30:12 - Tell us about the fires in New Mexico. 01:44:42 - Tell us about the National Forest fire closure and getting to Colorado. 01:47:50 - Tell us about hiking through the snow in the San Juans. 01:55:12 - Did you ever consider skipping the snow section? 01:57:02 - Did you seriously consider quitting the trail? 01:58:33 - Discussion about cow/grizzly closure in Glacier 01:59:20 - Quadzilla's quads 02:00:46 - Discussion about grizzlies on the CDT 02:07:43 - What thoughts about gear did you take away from the trail? 02:14:19 - How does the CDT compare to the PCT and AT? 02:15:49 - Josh, what are the best and worst things about hiking with Elise? 02:17:45 - Elise, what are the best and worst things about hiking with Josh? 02:19:30 - Can you give us some impromptu trail related vows? 02:20:49 - How did your pre-trail anxieties live up to your expectations? SEGMENTS Triple Crown of spices 5 Star Reviews [divider] Check out our sound guy @paulyboyshallcross. Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes (and please leave us a review)!  Find us on Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. Support us on Patreon to get bonus content. Advertise on Backpacker Radio Follow The Trek, Chaunce, Badger, and Trail Correspondents on Instagram. Follow The Trek and Chaunce on YouTube. Follow Backpacker Radio on Tik Tok.  A super big thank you to our Chuck Norris Award winner(s) from Patreon: Andrew, Austen McDaniel, Jason Lawrence, Christopher Marshburn, Sawyer Products, Brad and Blair (Thirteen Adventures), Patrick Cianciolo, Paul Packman Sealy, Matt Soukup, Jason Snailer, Greg Mac,  Tracy “Trigger” Fawns, Mike Poisel, and Kristina Diaz. A big thank you to our Cinnamon Connection Champions from Patreon: Liz Seger, Cynthia Voth, Emily Brown, Dcnerdlet, Jeff LaFranier, Peter Ellenberg, Jacob Northrup, Peter Leven.

National Parks Traveler Podcast
National Parks Traveler Audio Postcard From The Parks | "Glacier"

National Parks Traveler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 14:20


There are places in the National Park System that take your breath away. Places such as Glacier National Park, along the shoreline of Avalanche Lake, or atop Logan Pass staring down valley along with the mountain goats. If you've been here, you'll never forget the experience. Husband-wife duo Laurie Raveis & Dennis Kole capture their experiences in "Glacier" in their upcoming 2023 album "In the Moment."

Off The Chain
We Go Off The Chain With The Show's Youngest Guest!

Off The Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 58:00


Winifred “Winnie” or “Freddie” Bush was born in North Dakota and is now a 6 ¾ year old who lives in Michigan. She has been writing stories for two years. Her first work in progress, a comic book, was a story that she lost and forgot what it was about. Her second work in progress, a short story, is about a girl named Glacier where the parents question if she is really their daughter because she is “different” from them. Winifred currently spends her days watching YouTube, drawing, writing, and eating ice when the snow comes outside. Winifred was a special cohost on a past episode, but now is our youngest special guest! You can catch Winifred live on Off The Chain on 22 November 2022 at 8 pm EST to hear her thoughts on questions submitted by other indie artists and friends of the family. Tune in and listen to the perspective of a future creative indie child!

Midnight Train Podcast
Stonehenge. (Merlin Totally Rode A Glacier)

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 129:06


Yep! We're talking about the mysterious STONEHENGE! Monolithic, glorious and... what the hell is it? Did aliens create a musical instrument? Is it a gateway to the center of hell? Is it Mother Earth's "special spot"? Let's discuss! Subscribe to Patreon for bonus content and find all things The Midnight Train Podcast at www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com  Thanks for listening!

Today, Explained
An inconvenient glacier

Today, Explained

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 27:06


While the world's leaders are meeting at COP27 to discuss climate change, Antarctica's massive Thwaites Glacier is melting. The world's coastlines face catastrophic consequences. Rolling Stone's Jeff Goodell went to see it with his own eyes. This episode was produced by Avishay Artsy, fact-checked by Laura Bullard, engineered by Paul Robert Mounsey, and edited by Matt Collette and Sean Rameswaram, who also hosted. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained Support Today, Explained by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Techno Music - Techno Live Sets Podcast
Glacier 3towzan by Furzy Pan

Techno Music - Techno Live Sets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 62:03


Subscribe to listen to Techno music, Tech House music, Deep House, Acid Techno, and Minimal Techno for FREE.

The Ski Podcast
161: The Ski Boot Special (How to choose ski boots, custom insoles, boot fitting)

The Ski Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 60:24


Episode 161 is a Ski Boot Special: we look at types of ski boot; how to choose a ski boot; whether you should have them fitted or moulded; plus some of the gadgets that work with them.   Iain was joined by the ski boot experts Colin Martin from Solutions4Feet and regular equipment expert Al Morgan from SkiKitInfo.com.  SHOW NOTES Colin skied at Kuhtai on the SIGB Ski Test  Listen to Al talking about the Ski Test in Episode 91  TSP is sponsored by Les 3 Vallées - the largest ski area in the world  Val Thorens is celebrating its 50th anniversary this winter You can now book holidays to Les 3 Vallées directly via their their website  World Cup races in Solden and Zermatt were cancelled  Mia Brookes took 9th and Kirsty Muir 7th in the Big Air in Chur  Listen to our interview with Mia Brookes in Episode 158 https://www.youtube.com/shorts/RMQJmpiBnhw Robin Shah reported on his first turns in Verbier, which as he predicted opened last weekend https://twitter.com/skipedia/status/1590343660310495233 Dave Burrows from Snow Pros Ski School reported from Glacier 3000  The Warren Miller film tour ‘Daymaker' starts later this month  Iain is hosting the Brighton screening on Friday 02 December https://twitter.com/theskipodcast/status/1585952522459648001  Love this quote: “Like a wand in Harry Potter, the ski boot chooses your foot” Touring boots cost more because a patent has to be paid to Dynastar every time Iain had his custom insoles created for him at Profeet  Go for thin ski socks, recommended brands include Falke, Teko and Smartwool  Don't buy your ski boots on the basis of colour: “They're tools not jewels”  Iain spoke to Professor Henrik Bjursten about his new VPECS innovation The Carv device fits into your ski boot and gives feedback on your ski technique, visually via the app or in audio via Bluetooth Ted Ligety is their new ambassador (and can give you ski advice!) Feedback  Please send us your feedback on social @theskipodcast or email theskipodcast@gmail.com Chris Exall:  “Hope you don't mind a minor correction [re Episode 101]. Though they were often referred to as ‘parablocks', but in fact they were called ‘parablacks'. The reason was that the inventor was called Gunther Schwartz. They were partly to stop skiers crossing 'the sharp ends' but they were widely used in World Cup speed events because they had the effect of dampening the ski and filtering out vibration. Marker developed their own version which had a weight suspended by springs, it was intended as a more active 'suspension' for ski racers, though the thing weighed a ton. The earliest ones were simply plastic boxes but the last version was a spring loaded coat hanger wire affair which stopped your tips crossing but folded flat if you tried to uncross them”   BobinCH (snowheads): "Gethin on Solden in October [Episode 159] was an interesting listen" Richard_Sideways (snowheads): "Nice podcast as usual" Elements.biz: "Super interesting conversations [in Episode 160]. Thanks for the ongoing sustainability focus" Gareth Harvey: "Thanks for the snowboard episode" Judy Mathews: "Really enjoying your podcast. I have only just come across it recently & wish I did some time ago, but I have plenty to catch up on when driving or running." As Judy says there are over 160 episodes to catch up with. We'd love to hear how you listen to the podcast - commuting, in the gym, or at work. If you enjoy the show, why not review us as it helps other people find us. We have 88 reviews on Apple Podcasts, 74 are 5-star reviews - and if you leave a comment we'll read it out on the next episode. You can follow me @skipedia and the podcast @theskipodcast

Healing Dreams Project
Viviana's Glacier Dream

Healing Dreams Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 53:12


Hosts Billie Ortiz and Dr. Royce Fitts and producer, Viviana Guzman explore Viviana's "Glacier" dream, the beauty of "Glacier Speeds" and the value of obstacles. Visit the Dreamwork Tool Kit We invite you to call the “dream hotline” where you can leave a question or a snippet of a dream on the voice mail and we will consider featuring your call on an upcoming episode. Just call 720-573-9195 (Please note that it's a landline so it takes five rings before the voice mail picks up) Royce Fitts Billie Ortiz Viviana Guzman Dream Music from Viviana's Song of the Whale album available on all streaming platforms. Exploring projective dreamwork for your health and wholeness!

Ö1 Report from Austria
UN Glacier Report+Ukraine+Israel+US Biden+Pope-Bahrain

Ö1 Report from Austria

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 2:11


Holidays to Switzerland Travel Podcast
Engelberg and Mt. Titlis - Home of glacier adventures and incredible views

Holidays to Switzerland Travel Podcast

Play Episode Play 49 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 32:26


In this episode, Carolyn is joined by Peter Niederberger who has lived most of his life in a majestic Swiss town called Engelberg. Peter fell in love with his beautiful surroundings at a young age and he joins us today to tell us about the many things to see and do in Engelberg and its home mountain, Mt. Titlis.  If you'd love to explore the beauty of central Switzerland's mountains,  glaciers and lakes, Engelberg is the ideal destination to visit.Listen now to learn:Things to do at Engelberg and Mt. TitlisHow to get to there and prepare for your tripHow long to allow for an excursion to Mt. TitlisWhy should you visit Mount TitlisOperating dates of Mt. Titlis cablewayUseful tips for planning a visit to Mt. TitlisBest spots for skiing and secret tips from PeterFor further information and the full Show Notes from this episode, visit https://holidaystoswitzerland.com/episode58 >> Visit our shop for helpful Switzerland travel guides and resources.Connect with us:Website InstagramFacebook group |This podcast is sponsored by Switzerland Tourism. #ineedswitzerland

Screaming in the Cloud
The Infinite Possibilities of Amazon S3 with Kevin Miller

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 33:17


About KevinKevin Miller is currently the global General Manager for Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), an object storage service that offers industry-leading scalability, data availability, security, and performance. Prior to this role, Kevin has had multiple leadership roles within AWS, including as the General Manager for Amazon S3 Glacier, Director of Engineering for AWS Virtual Private Cloud, and engineering leader for AWS Virtual Private Network and AWS Direct Connect. Kevin was also Technical Advisor to the Senior Vice President for AWS Utility Computing. Kevin is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University with a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science.Links Referenced: snark.cloud/shirt: https://snark.cloud/shirt aws.amazon.com/s3: https://aws.amazon.com/s3 TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is brought to us in part by our friends at Datadog. Datadog is a SaaS monitoring and security platform that enables full-stack observability for modern infrastructure and applications at every scale. Datadog enables teams to see everything: dashboarding, alerting, application performance monitoring, infrastructure monitoring, UX monitoring, security monitoring, dog logos, and log management, in one tightly integrated platform. With 600-plus out-of-the-box integrations with technologies including all major cloud providers, databases, and web servers, Datadog allows you to aggregate all your data into one platform for seamless correlation, allowing teams to troubleshoot and collaborate together in one place, preventing downtime and enhancing performance and reliability. Get started with a free 14-day trial by visiting datadoghq.com/screaminginthecloud, and get a free t-shirt after installing the agent.Corey: Managing shards. Maintenance windows. Overprovisioning. ElastiCache bills. I know, I know. It's a spooky season and you're already shaking. It's time for caching to be simpler. Momento Serverless Cache lets you forget the backend to focus on good code and great user experiences. With true autoscaling and a pay-per-use pricing model, it makes caching easy. No matter your cloud provider, get going for free at gomomento.co/screaming. That's GO M-O-M-E-N-T-O dot co slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Right now, as I record this, we have just kicked off our annual charity t-shirt fundraiser. This year's shirt showcases S3 as the eighth wonder of the world. And here to either defend or argue the point—we're not quite sure yet—is Kevin Miller, AWS's vice president and general manager for Amazon S3. Kevin, thank you for agreeing to suffer the slings and arrows that are no doubt going to be interpreted, misinterpreted, et cetera, for the next half hour or so.Kevin: Oh, Corey, thanks for having me. And happy to do that, and really flattered for you to be thinking about S3 in this way. So more than happy to chat with you.Corey: It's absolutely one of those services that is foundational to the cloud. It was the first AWS service that was put into general availability, although the beta folks are going to argue back and forth about no, no, that was SQS instead. I feel like now that Mai-Lan handles both SQS and S3 as part of her portfolio, she is now the final arbiter of that. I'm sure that's an argument for a future day. But it's impossible to imagine cloud without S3.Kevin: I definitely think that's true. It's hard to imagine cloud, actually, with many of our foundational services, including SQS, of course, but we are—yes, we were the first generally available service with S3. And pretty happy with our anniversary being Pi Day, 3/14.Corey: I'm also curious, your own personal trajectory has been not necessarily what folks would expect. You were the general manager of Amazon Glacier, and now you're the general manager and vice president of S3. So, I've got to ask, because there are conflicting reports on this depending upon what angle you look at, are Glacier and S3 the same thing?Kevin: Yes, I was the general manager for S3 Glacier prior to coming over to S3 proper, and the answer is no, they are not the same thing. We certainly have a number of technologies where we're able to use those technologies both on S3 and Glacier, but there are certainly a number of things that are very distinct about Glacier and give us that ability to hit the ultra-low price points that we do for Glacier Deep Archive being as low as $1 per terabyte-month. And so, that definitely—there's a lot of actual ingenuity up and down the stack, from hardware to software, everywhere in between, to really achieve that with Glacier. But then there's other spots where S3 and Glacier have very similar needs, and then, of course, today many customers use Glacier through S3 as a storage class in S3, and so that's a great way to do that. So, there's definitely a lot of shared code, but certainly, when you get into it, there's [unintelligible 00:04:59] to both of them.Corey: I ran a number of obnoxiously detailed financial analyses, and they all came away with, unless you have a very specific very nuanced understanding of your data lifecycle and/or it is less than 30 or 60 days depending upon a variety of different things, the default S3 storage class you should be using for virtually anything is Intelligent Tiering. That is my purely economic analysis of it. Do you agree with that? Disagree with that? And again, I understand that all of these storage classes are like your children, and I am inviting you to tell me which one of them is your favorite, but I'm absolutely prepared to do that.Kevin: Well, we love Intelligent Tiering because it is very simple; customers are able to automatically save money using Intelligent Tiering for data that's not being frequently accessed. And actually, since we launched it a few years ago, we've already saved customers more than $250 million using Intelligent Tiering. So, I would say today, it is our default recommendation in almost every case. I think that the cases where we would recommend another storage class as the primary storage class tend to be specific to the use case where—and particularly for use cases where customers really have a good understanding of the access patterns. And we saw some customers do for their certain dataset, they know that it's going to be heavily accessed for a fixed period of time, or this data is actually for archival, it'll never be accessed, or very rarely if ever access, just maybe in an emergency.And those kinds of use cases, I think actually, customers are probably best to choose one of the specific storage classes where they're, sort of, paying that the lower cost from day one. But again, I would say for the vast majority of cases that we see, the data access patterns are unpredictable and customers like the flexibility of being able to very quickly retrieve the data if they decide they need to use it. But in many cases, they'll save a lot of money as the data is not being accessed, and so, Intelligent Tiering is a great choice for those cases.Corey: I would take it a step further and say that even when customers believe that they are going to be doing a deeper analysis and they have a better understanding of their data flow patterns than Intelligent Tiering would, in practice, I see that they rarely do anything about it. It's one of those things where they're like, “Oh, yeah, we're going to set up our own lifecycle policies real soon now,” whereas, just switch it over to Intelligent Tiering and never think about it again. People's time is worth so much more than the infrastructure they're working on in almost every case. It doesn't seem to make a whole lot of sense unless you have a very intentioned, very urgent reason to go and do that stuff by hand in most cases.Kevin: Yeah, that's right. I think I agree with you, Corey. And certainly, that is the recommendation we lead with customers.Corey: In previous years, our charity t-shirt has focused on other areas of AWS, and one of them was based upon a joke that I've been telling for a while now, which is that the best database in the world is Route 53 and storing TXT records inside of it. I don't know if I ever mentioned this to you or not, but the first iteration of that joke was featuring around S3. The challenge that I had with it is that S3 Select is absolutely a thing where you can query S3 with SQL which I don't see people doing anymore because Athena is the easier, more, shall we say, well-articulated version of all of that. And no, no, that joke doesn't work because it's actually true. You can use S3 as a database. Does that statement fill you with dread? Regret? Am I misunderstanding something? Or are you effectively running a giant subversive database?Kevin: Well, I think that certainly when most customers think about a database, they think about a collection of technology that's applied for given problems, and so I wouldn't count S3 as providing the whole range of functionality that would really make up a database. But I think that certainly a lot of the primitives and S3 Select as a great example of a primitive are available in S3. And we're looking at adding, you know, additional primitives going forward to make it possible to, you know, to build a database around S3. And as you see, other AWS services have done that in many ways. For example, obviously with Amazon Redshift having a lot of capability now to just directly access and use data in S3 and make that a super seamless so that you can then run data warehousing type queries on top of S3 and on top of your other datasets.So, I certainly think it's a great building block. And one other thing I would actually just say that you may not know, Corey, is that one of the things over the last couple of years we've been doing a lot more with S3 is actually working to directly contribute improvements to open-source connector software that uses S3, to make available automatically some of the performance improvements that can be achieved either using both the AWS SDK, and also using things like S3 Select. So, we started with a few of those things with Select; you're going to see more of that coming, most likely. And some of that, again, the idea there as you may not even necessarily know you're using Select, but when we can identify that it will improve performance, we're looking to be able to contribute those kinds of improvements directly—or we are contributing those directly to those open-source packages. So, one thing I would definitely recommend customers and developers do is have a capability of sort of keeping that software up-to-date because although it might seem like those are sort of one-and-done kind of software integrations, there's actually almost continuous improvement now going on, and around things like that capability, and then others we come out with.Corey: What surprised me is just how broadly S3 has been adopted by a wide variety of different clients' software packages out there. Back when I was running production environments in anger, I distinctly remember in one Ubuntu environment, we wound up installing a specific package that was designed to teach apt how to retrieve packages and its updates from S3, which was awesome. I don't see that anymore, just because it seems that it is so easy to do it now, just with the native features that S3 offers, as well as an awful lot of software under the hood has learned to directly recognize S3 as its own thing, and can react accordingly.Kevin: And just do the right thing. Exactly. No, we certainly see a lot of that. So that's, you know—I mean, obviously making that simple for end customers to use and achieve what they're trying to do, that's the whole goal.Corey: It's always odd to me when I'm talking to one of my clients who is looking to understand and optimize their AWS bill to see outliers in either direction when it comes to S3 itself. When they're driving large S3 bills as in a majority of their spend, it's, okay, that is very interesting. Let's dive into that. But almost more interesting to me is when it is effectively not being used at all. When, oh, we're doing everything with EBS volumes or EFS.And again, those are fine services. I don't have any particular problem with them anymore, but the problem I have is that the cloud long ago took what amounts to an economic vote. There's a tax savings for storing data in an object store the way that you—and by extension, most of your competitors—wind up pricing this, versus the idea of on a volume basis where you have to pre-provision things, you don't get any form of durability that extends beyond the availability zone boundary. It just becomes an awful lot of, “Well, you could do it this way. But it gets really expensive really quickly.”It just feels wild to me that there is that level of variance between S3 just sort of raw storage basis, economically, as well as then just the, frankly, ridiculous levels of durability and availability that you offer on top of that. How did you get there? Was the service just mispriced at the beginning? Like oh, we dropped to zero and probably should have put that in there somewhere.Kevin: Well, no, I wouldn't call it mispriced. I think that the S3 came about when we took a—we spent a lot of time looking at the architecture for storage systems, and knowing that we wanted a system that would provide the durability that comes with having three completely independent data centers and the elasticity and capability where, you know, customers don't have to provision the amount of storage they want, they can simply put data and the system keeps growing. And they can also delete data and stop paying for that storage when they're not using it. And so, just all of that investment and sort of looking at that architecture holistically led us down the path to where we are with S3.And we've definitely talked about this. In fact, in Peter's keynote at re:Invent last year, we talked a little bit about how the system is designed under the hood, and one of the thing you realize is that S3 gets a lot of the benefits that we do by just the overall scale. The fact that it is—I think the stat is that at this point more than 10,000 customers have data that's stored on more than a million hard drives in S3. And that's how you get the scale and the capability to do is through massive parallelization. Where customers that are, you know, I would say building more traditional architectures, those are inherently typically much more siloed architectures with a relatively small-scale overall, and it ends up with a lot of resource that's provisioned at small-scale in sort of small chunks with each resource, that you never get to that scale where you can start to take advantage of the some is more than the greater of the parts.And so, I think that's what the recognition was when we started out building S3. And then, of course, we offer that as an API on top of that, where customers can consume whatever they want. That is, I think, where S3, at the scale it operates, is able to do certain things, including on the economics, that are very difficult or even impossible to do at a much smaller scale.Corey: One of the more egregious clown-shoe statements that I hear from time to time has been when people will come to me and say, “We've built a competitor to S3.” And my response is always one of those, “Oh, this should be good.” Because when people say that, they generally tend to be focusing on one or maybe two dimensions that doesn't work for a particular use case as well as it could. “Okay, what was your story around why this should be compared to S3?” “Well, it's an object store. It has full S3 API compatibility.” “Does it really because I have to say, there are times where I'm not entirely convinced that S3 itself has full compatibility with the way that its API has been documented.”And there's an awful lot of magic that goes into this too. “Okay, great. You're running an S3 competitor. Great. How many buildings does it live in?” Like, “Well, we have a problem with the s at the end of that word.” It's, “Okay, great. If it fits on my desk, it is not a viable S3 competitor. If it fits in a single zip code, it is probably not a viable S3 competitor.” Now, can it be an object store? Absolutely. Does it provide a new interface to some existing data someone might have? Sure why not. But I think that, oh, it's S3 compatible, is something that gets tossed around far too lightly by folks who don't really understand what it is that drives S3 and makes it special.Kevin: Yeah, I mean, I would say certainly, there's a number of other implementations of the S3 API, and frankly we're flattered that customers recognize and our competitors and others recognize the simplicity of the API and go about implementing it. But to your point, I think that there's a lot more; it's not just about the API, it's really around everything surrounding S3 from, as you mentioned, the fact that the data in S3 is stored in three independent availability zones, all of which that are separated by kilometers from each other, and the resilience, the automatic failover, and the ability to withstand an unlikely impact to one of those facilities, as well as the scalability, and you know, the fact that we put a lot of time and effort into making sure that the service continues scaling with our customers need. And so, I think there's a lot more that goes into what is S3. And oftentimes just in a straight-up comparison, it's sort of purely based on just the APIs and generally a small set of APIs, in addition to those intangibles around—or not intangibles, but all of the ‘-ilities,' right, the elasticity and the durability, and so forth that I just talked about. In addition to all that also, you know, certainly what we're seeing for customers is as they get into the petabyte and tens of petabytes, hundreds of petabytes scale, their need for the services that we provide to manage that storage, whether it's lifecycle and replication, or things like our batch operations to help update and to maintain all the storage, those become really essential to customers wrapping their arms around it, as well as visibility, things like Storage Lens to understand, what storage do I have? Who's using it? How is it being used?And those are all things that we provide to help customers manage at scale. And certainly, you know, oftentimes when I see claims around S3 compatibility, a lot of those advanced features are nowhere to be seen.Corey: I also want to call out that a few years ago, Mai-Lan got on stage and talked about how, to my recollection, you folks have effectively rebuilt S3 under the hood into I think it was 235 distinct microservices at the time. There will not be a quiz on numbers later, I'm assuming. But what was wild to me about that is having done that for services that are orders of magnitude less complex, it absolutely is like changing the engine on a car without ever slowing down on the highway. Customers didn't know that any of this was happening until she got on stage and announced it. That is wild to me. I would have said before this happened that there was no way that would have been possible except it clearly was. I have to ask, how did you do that in the broad sense?Kevin: Well, it's true. A lot of the underlying infrastructure that's been part of S3, both hardware and software is, you know, you wouldn't—if someone from S3 in 2006 came and looked at the system today, they would probably be very disoriented in terms of understanding what was there because so much of it has changed. To answer your question, the long and short of it is a lot of testing. In fact, a lot of novel testing most recently, particularly with the use of formal logic and what we call automated reasoning. It's also something we've talked a fair bit about in re:Invent.And that is essentially where you prove the correctness of certain algorithms. And we've used that to spot some very interesting, the one-in-a-trillion type cases that S3 scale happens regularly, that you have to be ready for and you have to know how the system reacts, even in all those cases. I mean, I think one of our engineers did some calculations that, you know, the number of potential states for S3, sort of, exceeds the number of atoms in the universe or something so crazy. But yet, using methods like automated reasoning, we can test that state space, we can understand what the system will do, and have a lot of confidence as we begin to swap, you know, pieces of the system.And of course, nothing in S3 scale happens instantly. It's all, you know, I would say that for a typical engineering effort within S3, there's a certain amount of effort, obviously, in making the change or in preparing the new software, writing the new software and testing it, but there's almost an equal amount of time that goes into, okay, and what is the process for migrating from System A to System B, and that happens over a timescale of months, if not years, in some cases. And so, there's just a lot of diligence that goes into not just the new systems, but also the process of, you know, literally, how do I swap that engine on the system. So, you know, it's a lot of really hard working engineers that spent a lot of time working through these details every day.Corey: I still view S3 through the lens of it is one of the easiest ways in the world to wind up building a static web server because you basically stuff the website files into a bucket and then you check a box. So, it feels on some level though, that it is about as accurate as saying that S3 is a database. It can be used or misused or pressed into service in a whole bunch of different use cases. What have you seen from customers that has, I guess, taught you something you didn't expect to learn about your own service?Kevin: Oh, I'd say we have those [laugh]  meetings pretty regularly when customers build their workloads and have unique patterns to it, whether it's the type of data they're retrieving and the access pattern on the data. You know, for example, some customers will make heavy use of our ability to do [ranged gets 00:22:47] on files and [unintelligible 00:22:48] objects. And that's pretty good capability, but that can be one where that's very much dependent on the type of file, right, certain files have structure, as far as you know, a header or footer, and that data is being accessed in a certain order. Oftentimes, those may also be multi-part objects, and so making use of the multi-part features to upload different chunks of a file in parallel. And you know, also certainly when customers get into things like our batch operations capability where they can literally write a Lambda function and do what they want, you know, we've seen some pretty interesting use cases where customers are running large-scale operations across, you know, billions, sometimes tens of billions of objects, and this can be pretty interesting as far as what they're able to do with them.So, for something is sort of what you might—you know, as simple and basics, in some sense, of GET and PUT API, just all the capability around it ends up being pretty interesting as far as how customers apply it and the different workloads they run on it.Corey: So, if you squint hard enough, what I'm hearing you tell me is that I can view all of this as, “Oh, yeah. S3 is also compute.” And it feels like that as a fast-track to getting a question wrong on one of the certification exams. But I have to ask, from your point of view, is S3 storage? And whether it's yes or no, what gets you excited about the space that it's in?Kevin: Yeah well, I would say S3 is not compute, but we have some great compute services that are very well integrated with S3, which excites me as well as we have things like S3 Object Lambda, where we actually handle that integration with Lambda. So, you're writing Lambda functions, we're executing them on the GET path. And so, that's a pretty exciting feature for me. But you know, to sort of take a step back, what excites me is I think that customers around the world, in every industry, are really starting to recognize the value of data and data at large scale. You know, I think that actually many customers in the world have terabytes or more of data that sort of flows through their fingers every day that they don't even realize.And so, as customers realize what data they have, and they can capture and then start to analyze and make ultimately make better business decisions that really help drive their top line or help them reduce costs, improve costs on whether it's manufacturing or, you know, other things that they're doing. That's what really excites me is seeing those customers take the raw capability and then apply it to really just to transform how they not just how their business works, but even how they think about the business. Because in many cases, transformation is not just a technical transformation, it's people and cultural transformation inside these organizations. And that's pretty cool to see as it unfolds.Corey: One of the more interesting things that I've seen customers misunderstand, on some level, has been a number of S3 releases that focus around, “Oh, this is for your data lake.” And I've asked customers about that. “So, what's your data lake strategy?” “Well, we don't have one of those.” “You have, like, eight petabytes and climbing in S3? What do you call that?” It's like, “Oh, yeah, that's just a bunch of buckets we dump things into. Some are logs of our assets and the rest.” It's—Kevin: Right.Corey: Yeah, it feels like no one thinks of themselves as having anything remotely resembling a structured place for all of the data that accumulates at a company.Kevin: Mm-hm.Corey: There is an evolution of people learning that oh, yeah, this is in fact, what it is that we're doing, and this thing that they're talking about does apply to us. But it almost feels like a customer communication challenge, just because, I don't know about you, but with my legacy AWS account, I have dozens of buckets in there that I don't remember what the heck they're for. Fortunately, you folks don't charge by the bucket, so I can smile, nod, remain blissfully ignorant, but it does make me wonder from time to time.Kevin: Yeah, no, I think that what you hear there is actually pretty consistent with what the reality is for a lot of customers, which is in distributed organizations, I think that's bound to happen, you have different teams that are working to solve problems, and they are collecting data to analyze, they're creating result datasets and they're storing those datasets. And then, of course, priorities can shift, and you know, and there's not necessarily the day-to-day management around data that we might think would be expected. I feel [we 00:26:56] sort of drew an architecture on a whiteboard. And so, I think that's the reality we are in. And we will be in, largely forever.I mean, I think that at a smaller-scale, that's been happening for years. So, I think that, one, I think that there's a lot of capability just being in the cloud. At the very least, you can now start to wrap your arms around it, right, where used to be that it wasn't even possible to understand what all that data was because there's no way to centrally inventory it well. In AWS with S3, with inventory reports, you can get a list of all your storage and we are going to continue to add capability to help customers get their arms around what they have, first off; understand how it's being used—that's where things like Storage Lens really play a big role in understanding exactly what data is being accessed and not. We're definitely listening to customers carefully around this, and I think when you think about broader data management story, I think that's a place that we're spending a lot of time thinking right now about how do we help customers get their arms around it, make sure that they know what's the categorization of certain data, do I have some PII lurking here that I need to be very mindful of?And then how do I get to a world where I'm—you know, I won't say that it's ever going to look like the perfect whiteboard picture you might draw on the wall. I don't think that's really ever achievable, but I think certainly getting to a point where customers have a real solid understanding of what data they have and that the right controls are in place around all that data, yeah, I think that's directionally where I see us heading.Corey: As you look around how far the service has come, it feels like, on some level, that there were some, I guess, I don't want to say missteps, but things that you learned as you went along. Like, back when the service was in beta, for example, there was no per-request charge. To my understanding that was changed, in part because people were trying to use it as a file system, and wow, that suddenly caused a tremendous amount of load on some of the underlying systems. You originally launched with a BitTorrent endpoint as an option so that people could download through peer-to-peer approaches for large datasets and turned out that wasn't really the way the internet evolved, either. And I'm curious, if you were to have to somehow build this off from scratch, are there any other significant changes you would make in how the service was presented to customers in how people talked about it in the early days? Effectively given a mulligan, what would you do differently?Kevin: Well, I don't know, Corey, I mean, just given where it's grown to in macro terms, you know, I definitely would be worried taking a mulligan, you know, that I [laugh] would change the sort of the overarching trajectory. Certainly, I think there's a few features here and there where, for whatever reason, it was exciting at the time and really spoke to what customers at the time were thinking, but over time, you know, sort of quickly those needs move to something a little bit different. And, you know, like you said things like the BitTorrent support is one where, at some level, it seems like a great technical architecture for the internet, but certainly not something that we've seen dominate in the way things are done. Instead, you know, we've largely kind of have a world where there's a lot of caching layers, but it still ends up being largely client-server kind of connections. So, I don't think I would do a—I certainly wouldn't do a mulligan on any of the major functionality, and I think, you know, there's a few things in the details where obviously, we've learned what really works in the end. I think we learned that we wanted bucket names to really strictly conform to rules for DNS encoding. So, that was the change that was made at some point. And we would tweak that, but no major changes, certainly.Corey: One subject of some debate while we were designing this year's charity t-shirt—which, incidentally, if you're listening to this, you can pick up for yourself at snark.cloud/shirt—was the is S3 itself dependent upon S3? Because we know that every other service out there is as well, but it is interesting to come up with an idea of, “Oh, yeah. We're going to launch a whole new isolated region of S3 without S3 to lean on.” That feels like it's an almost impossible bootstrapping problem.Kevin: Well, S3 is not dependent on S3 to come up, and it's certainly a critical dependency tree that we look at and we track and make sure that we'd like to have an acyclic graph as we look at dependencies.Corey: That is such a sophisticated way to say what I learned the hard way when I was significantly younger and working in production environments: don't put the DNS servers needed to boot the hypervisor into VMs that require a working hypervisor. It's one of those oh, yeah, in hindsight, that makes perfect sense, but you learn it right after that knowledge really would have been useful.Kevin: Yeah, absolutely. And one of the terms we use for that, as well as is the idea of static stability, or that's one of the techniques that can really help with isolating a dependency is what we call static stability. We actually have an article about that in the Amazon Builder Library, which there's actually a bunch of really good articles in there from very experienced operations-focused engineers in AWS. So, static stability is one of those key techniques, but other techniques—I mean, just pure minimization of dependencies is one. And so, we were very, very thoughtful about that, particularly for that core layer.I mean, you know, when you talk about S3 with 200-plus microservices, or 235-plus microservices, I would say not all of those services are critical for every single request. Certainly, a small subset of those are required for every request, and then other services actually help manage and scale the kind of that inner core of services. And so, we look at dependencies on a service by service basis to really make sure that inner core is as minimized as possible. And then the outer layers can start to take some dependencies once you have that basic functionality up.Corey: I really want to thank you for being as generous with your time as you have been. If people want to learn more about you and about S3 itself, where should they go—after buying a t-shirt, of course.Kevin: Well, certainly buy the t-shirt. First, I love the t-shirts and the charity that you work with to do that. Obviously, for S3, it's aws.amazon.com/s3. And you can actually learn more about me. I have some YouTube videos, so you can search for me on YouTube and kind of get a sense of myself.Corey: We will put links to that into the show notes, of course. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Kevin: Absolutely. Yeah. Glad to spend some time. Thanks for the questions, Corey.Corey: Kevin Miller, vice president and general manager for Amazon S3. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry, ignorant comment talking about how your S3 compatible service is going to blow everyone's socks off when it fails.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The KGEZ Good Morning Show
My Glacier Village Founder and Board Chair Jenn Prunty 10-18-22.

The KGEZ Good Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 18:21


My Glacier Village Founder and Board Chair Jenn Prunty connected with John Hendricks and Robin Mitchell during the KGEZ Good Morning Show Glacier Bank Community Conversation on Tuesday, October 18th, 2022 to remark on the upcoming  "Sip And Sample Autumn Stroll."

The Elevated Life
Ep. 103 What We Learned Getting Out of Our Routine & Traveling 5,000 Miles

The Elevated Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 43:21


When was the last time you got out of your daily routine and did something different? We're baaack in full podcast mode and excited to bring you some new wisdom after our 5,000 miles long road trip up to Montana to see Yellowstone and Glacier. After getting ourselves out of our comfort zone and the hustle of city life, we're back with even more renewed wisdom for you. In this episode of The Elevated Life, we're sharing "What We Learned Getting Out of Our Routine & Traveling 5,000 Miles" so you can change the way you think and challenge yourself in an exciting way. If you want to get out of your environment and bring new change, listen to this episode! Tune in to hear: How our road trip began from Texas up to Montana The biggest lessons we learned while traveling to somewhere new 3 different ways to bring about new ways of thinking The importance of the mindset you choose when in difficult situations Learn more about The Elevated Life Club: https://theelevatedlifeclub.com/ Follow us on social:  BRIT http://www.brittneycarmichael.com  http://www.instagram.com/theworldbybrit  http://www.facebook.com/theworldbybrit CHRIS http://www.heyitscarmichael.com  http://www.instagram.com/heyitscarmichael http://www.facebook.com/heyitscarmichael