Podcasts about Glacier

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Persistent body of ice that is moving under its own weight

  • 756PODCASTS
  • 1,123EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 12, 2022LATEST
Glacier

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Latest podcast episodes about Glacier

Net Worth It
S5E19-Half Dome Mental Breakdown: Warrior moments: Yosemite

Net Worth It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 13:52


In this episode: Story: My Eshet Chayil breakdown, Glacier point road, Sentinel Dome, no internet or phone and the lodge that saved me. Verse: Proverbs 31:25 She is clothed with strength and dignity; she can laugh at the days to come. Lesson: How can we learn to laugh during our breaking points and look around for help?

Net Worth It
S5E11-Going to the Sun Road in a car and spirit, Glacier National Park, Montana

Net Worth It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 18:28


In this episode: Chayil: “company” Definition: Company: the fact or condition of being with another or others, especially in a way that provides friendship and enjoyment. Story: The triple continental divide, rope trail at the top of Glacier, inspirational visitors, relationship capital and why money matters for Christians Verse: 2 Chron 9:1 - And when the queen of Sheba heard of the fame of Solomon, she came to prove Solomon with hard questions at Jerusalem, with a very great company (chayil), and camels that bare spices, and gold in abundance, and precious stones: and when she was come to Solomon, she command with him all that was in her heart. Resources:https://www.nps.gov/glac/learn/education/continental_divide.htm 

Digital Planet
Robots under the Thwaites Glacier

Digital Planet

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 44:36


Huge robots, including a seven-metre two-tonne vessel named Ran, are on their way to the Thwaites Glacier to learn more about the retreating ice and its impact on Climate Change. But this won't be the only tech that's being deployed on the 65-day mission; British Antarctic Survey's Boaty McBoatface and the Autosub Long Range vehicle operated by the National Oceanography Centre in the UK, will travel under the ice shelf along with Ran. Professor Anna Wåhlin from the University of Gothenburg tells us more about her robot Ran and about the data she'll be collecting. Tiny light engines We're talking to Ed Tang, the CEO of Avegant. They're the company behind the world's smallest light engines for augmented reality. Developing projectors thinner than the width of a pencil means we're on the brink of AR glasses that will barely look different from standard glasses. Alongside talking about how this technology works, Ed also spoke to us about what this means for the future of AR. James Webb telescope tech Space journalist Kate Arkless-Gray is live on the show to tell us about the tech that got the James Webb Telescope into space and how vital it is that none of the tech deployed goes wrong - unlike the Hubble space telescope, repair missions to James Webb are impossible. The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington. Studio Manager: Nigel Dix Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz (Image: Ran navigates its way under the ice front of Thwaites Glacier. Photo credit: Filip Stedt)

Science Weekly
Is the world's most important glacier on the brink of collapse?

Science Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 11:37


It's been called the most important glacier in the world. The Thwaites glacier in Antarctica is the size of Florida, and contains enough water to raise sea levels by over half a metre. Over the past 30 years it has been melting at an increasing pace, and currently contributes 4% of annual global sea level rise. Ian Sample speaks to marine geophysicist Dr Rob Larter about a new research mission to the Thwaites glacier, the role of Boaty McBoatface and what it's like to see a region melt away before your eyes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

Kottke Ride Home
Fri. 01/07 - Boaty McBoatface and the Doomsday Glacier

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 17:50


How Boaty McBoatface is helping diagnose the severity of the situation at the Doomsday Glacier in Antarctica. Plus, it looks like solar shingles are finally actually a thing. And something to try this weekend––the Dutch practice of uitwaaien.Sponsors:ExpressVPN, ExpressVPN.com/kottke for an extra 3 months FREE on a one-year packageShopify, Get a 14-day free trial at shopify.com/kottkeLinks:How Explosives, a Robot, and a Sled Expose a Doomsday Glacier (Wired) Boaty McBoatface Is Set to Confront Antarctica's Doomsday Glacier (Gizmodo)Doomsday Glacier in Antarctica Could Collapse Soon: New Research (Rolling Stone)Scientists explore Thwaites, Antarctica's 'doomsday' glacier (AP)What Antarctica's 'Doomsday' Glacier Could Mean For The World (Science Alert)10/19/2020 - Grand Duke Travis of Westarctica Wants To Save the Planet (Kottke Ride Home) The solar roof could finally become a reality thanks to GAF's nailable solar shingles (The Verge)Solar shingles you can nail to a roof unveiled by GAF Energy (Venture Beat)GAF Energy's easy-install solar shingles aim to outshine Tesla roofs and traditional panels (Tech Crunch)Forget hygge, it's time for uitwaaien (Washington Post)Uitwaaien: the Dutch invention you never knew you needed, until now (Dutch Review)Uitwaaien, or Outblowing, Is the Dutch Cure for the Winter Blues (Mental Floss)09/17/2020 episode - Practice Friluftsliv This Winter (Kottke Ride Home)Corona's New Beer Adds Vitamin D, Removes Alcohol (AdWeek) Corona Looks to Conquer the "Vitamin D Beer" Market With Odd New "Sunbrew 0.0" Non-Alcoholic Beer (Paste)Wes Anderson to Direct Benedict Cumberbatch in Roald Dahl Film Adaptation (Collider)Wes Anderson to make new Roald Dahl adaptation with Benedict Cumberbatch (The Guardian)Kottke.OrgJackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Chicago Dog Walk
Wednesday 1/5/22 - Antartica's 'Doomsday Glacier' Part II

Chicago Dog Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 20:57


Today is Part II on the Thwaites "Doomsday Glacier" in Antartica. We get into Baba Vanga's predictions for 2022, the role fossil fuels have in melting the glacier, comparing it to the Yellowstone Supervolcano, and more.

Screaming in the Cloud
Fear and Loathing on the re:Invent Show Floor of ‘21 with Aaron Booth

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 33:30


About AaronI am a Cloud Focused Product Management and Technical Product Ownership Consultant. I have worked on several Cloud Products & Services including resale, management & governance, cost optimisation, platform management, SaaS, PaaS. I am also recognised as a AWS Community Builder due to my work building cloud communities cross-government in the UK over the last 3 years. I have extensive commercial experience dealing with Cloud Service Providers including AWS, Azure, GCP & UKCloud. I was the Single Point of Contact for Cloud at the UK Home Office and was the business representative for the Home Office's £120m contract with AWS. I have been involved in contract negotiation, supplier relationship management & financial planning such as business cases & cost management.I run a IT Consultancy called Embue, specialising in Agile, Cloud & DevOps consulting, coaching and training. Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/AaronBoothUK LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aaronboothuk/ Embue: https://embue.co.uk Publicgood.cloud: https://publicgood.cloud TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open-source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers, and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. So, when I went to re:Invent last year, I discovered a whole bunch of things I honestly was a little surprised to discover. One of those things is my guest today, Aaron Booth, who's a cloud consultant with an emphasis on sustainability. Now, you see a number of consultants at things like re:Invent, but what made Aaron interesting was that this was apparently his first time visiting the United States, and he started with not just Las Vegas, but Las Vegas to attend re:Invent. Aaron, thank you for joining me, and honestly, I'm a little surprised you survived.Aaron: Yeah, I think one of the things about going to Las Vegas or Nevada is no one really prepared me for how dry it was. I ended up walking out of re:Invent with my fingers, like, bleeding, and everything else. And there was so much about America that I didn't expect, but that was one thing I wish somebody had warned me about. But yeah, it was my first time in the US, first time at re:Invent, and I really enjoyed it. It was probably the best investment in myself and my business that I think I've done so far.Corey: It's always strange to look at a place that you live and realize, oh, yeah, this is far away for someone else. What would their experience be of coming and learning about the culture we have here? And then you go to Las Vegas, and it's easy to forget there are people who live there. And even the people who live there do not live on the strip, in the casinos, at loud, obnoxious cloud conferences. So, it feels like it's one of those ideas of oh, I'm going to go to a movie for the first time and then watching something surreal, like Memento or whatnot, that leaves everyone very confused. Like, “Is this what movies are like?” “Well, this one, but no others are quite like that.” And I feel that way about Las Vegas and re:Invent, simultaneously.Aaron: I mean, talking about movies, before it came to the US and before I came to Vegas, I was like, “Oh, how can I prepare myself for this trip?” I ended up watching Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. And I don't know if you ever seen it, with Johnny Depp, but it's probably not the best representation, or the most modern representation what Vegas would be like. And I think halfway through the conference, went down to Fremont Street in the old downtown. And they have this massive, kind of, free block screen in the sky that is lit up and doing all these animations. And you're just thinking, “What world am I on?” And it kind of is interesting as well, from a point of view of, we're at this tech conference; it's in Vegas; what is the reason for that? And there's obviously lots of different things. We want people to have fun, but you know, it is an interesting place to put 30,000 people, especially during a pandemic.Corey: It really is. I imagine it's going to have to stay there because in a couple more years, you're going to need a three block long screen just to list all of the various services that AWS offers because they don't believe in turning anything off. Now, it would be remiss for me not to ask you, what was announced at re:Invent that got you the most, let's call it excited, I guess? What got you enthusiastic? What are you happy to start working with more?Aaron: I think from my perspective, there's a few different announcements. The first one that comes to mind is the stuff of AWS Amplify Studio, and that's taken this, kind of, no-code Figma designs and turn into a working front end. And it's really interesting for me to think about, okay, what is the point of cloud? Why are we moving forward in the world, especially in technology? And, you know, abstracting a lot of stuff we worry about today to simple drag-and-drop tools is probably going to be the next big thing for most of the world.You know, we've come from a privileged position in the West where we follow technology along the whole of the journey, where now we have an opportunity to open this out to many more regions, and many more AWS customers, for example. But for me, as a small business owner—I've run multiple businesses—there's a lot of effort you put into, okay, I need to set up a business, and a website, and newsletter, or whatever else. But the more you can just turn that into, “I've got an idea, and I can give it to people with one click,” you'll enable a lot more business and a lot more future customers as well.Corey: I was very excited about that one, too, just from a perspective of I want to drag and drop something together to make a fairly crappy web app, that sounds like the thing that I could use to do that. No, that feels a lot more like what Honeycode is trying to be, as opposed to the Amplify side of the world, which is still very focused on React. Which, okay, that makes sense. There's a lot of front end developers out there, and if you're trying to get into tech today and are asking what language should I learn, I would be very hard-pressed to advise you pick anything that isn't JavaScript because it is front end, it is back end, it runs slash eats the world. And I've just never understood it. It does not work the way that I think about computers because I'm old and grumpy. I have high hopes of where it might go, but so far I'm looking at it's [sigh] it's not what I want it to be, yet. And maybe that's just because I'm weird.Aaron: Well, I mean, you know, you mentioned part of the problem really is two different competing AWS services themselves, which with a business like AWS and their product strategy being the word, “Yes,” you know, you're never really going to get a lot of focus or forward direction with certain products. And hopefully, there'll be the next, no-code tool announced in re:Invent in a few years' time, which is exactly what we're looking for, and gives startup founders or small businesses drag-and-drop tools. But for now, there's going to be a lot of competing services.Corey: There's so much out there that it's almost impossible to wind up contextualizing re:Invent as a single event. It feels like it's too easy to step back and say, “Oh, okay. I'm here to build websites”—is what we're talking about now in the context of Amplify—and then they start talking about mainframes. And then they start talking about RoboRunner to control 10,000 robots at once. And I'm looking around going, “I don't have problems that feel a lot like that. What's the deal?”Aaron: I think even just, like you said in perspective of re:Invent is like, when you go to an event like this, that you can't experience everything and you probably have a very specific focus of, you know, what am I here to do. And I was really surprised—again, my first time at a big tech conference, as well as Vegas and the US is, how important it was just to meet people and how valuable that was. First time I met you, and you know, going from somebody who's probably very likely interacted with you on Twitter before the event to being on this podcast and having a great conversation now is kind of crazy to think that the value you can get out of it. I mean, in terms of over services, and areas of re:Invent that I found interesting was the announcement of the new sustainability pillar, as part of the well-architected framework. You know, I've tried to use that before in previous workplaces, and it has been useful. You know, I'm hoping it is more useful in the future, and the cynical part of me worries about whether the whole point of putting this as part of a well-architected framework review where the customer is supposed to do it is Amazon passing the buck for sustainability. But it's an interesting way forward for what we care about.Corey: An interesting quirk of re:Invent—to me—has always been that despite there being tens of thousands of people there are always a few folks that you wind up running into again and again and again throughout the week. One year for me it was Ben Kehoe; this trip it was you where we kept finding ourselves at the same events, we kept finding ourselves at the same restaurants, and we had three or four meals together as a result, and it was a blast talking to you. And I was definitely noticing that sustainability was a topic that you kept going back to a bunch of different ways. I mean previously, before starting your current consulting company, you did a lot of work in the government—specifically the UK Government, for those who are having trouble connecting the fact this is the first time in America to the other thing. Like, “Wow, you can be far away and work for the government?” It's like, we have more than one on this planet, as it turns out.Yes, it was a fun series of conversations, and I am honestly a little less cynical about the idea of the sustainability pillar, in no small part due to the conversations that we had together. I initially had the cynical perspective of here's how to make your cloud infrastructure more sustainable. It's, isn't that really a “you” problem? You're the cloud provider. I can't control how you get energy on the markets, how you wind up handling heat issues, how you address water issues from your data center outflows, et cetera. It seems to me that the only thing I can really do is use the services you give me, and then it becomes a “you” problem. You have a more nuanced take on it.Aaron: I think there's a log of different things to think about when it comes to sustainability. One of the main ones is, from my perspective, you know, I worked at the UK Home Office in the UK, and we'd been using cloud for about six or seven years. And just looking at how we use clouds as an enterprise organization, one of the things I really started to see was these different generations of cloud and you've got aspects of legacy infrastructure, almost, that we lifted-and-shifted in the early days, versus maybe stuff would run on serverless now. And you know, that's one element, from a customer is how you control your energy usage is actually the use of servers, how efficient your code is, and there's definitely a difference between stringing together EC2 and S3 buckets compared to using serverless or Lambda functions.Corey: There's also a question of scale. When I'm trying to build something out of Lambda functions, and okay, which region is the most cost effective way to run this thing? The Google search for that will have a larger climate impact than any decision I can make at the scale that I operate at. Whereas if you're a company running tens of thousands of instances at any given point in time and your massive scale, then yeah, the choices you make are going to have significant impact. I think that a problem AWS has always struggled with has been articulating who needs to care about what, when.If you go down the best practices for security and governance and follow the white papers, they put out as a one-person startup trying to build an idea this evening, just to see if it's viable, you're never going to get anywhere. If you ignore all those things, and now you're about to go public as a bank, you're going to have a bad time, but at what point do you have to start caring about these different things in different ways? And I don't think we know the answer yet, from a sustainability perspective.Aaron: I think it's interesting in some senses, that sustainability is only just enter the conversation when it comes to stuff we care about in businesses and enterprises. You know, we all know about risk registers, and security reviews, and all those things, but sustainability, while we've, kind of, maybe said nice public statements, and put things on our website, it's not really been a thing that's, okay, this is how we're going to run our business, and the thing we care about as number one. You know, Amazon always says security is job zero, but maybe one day someone will be saying sustainability is our job zero. And especially when it comes down to, sort of, you know, the ethics of running a business and how you want that to be run, whether it is going to be a capitalistic VC-funded venture to extract wealth from citizens and become a billionaire versus creating something that's a bit more circular, and gives back as sustainability might be a key element of what you care about when you make decisions.Corey: The challenge that I find as well is, I don't know how you can talk about the relative sustainability impact of various cloud services within the AWS umbrella without, effectively, AWS explaining to you what their margins are on different services, in many respects. Power usage is the primary driver of this and that determines the cost of running things. It is very clear that it is less expensive and more efficient to run more modern hardware than older hardware, so we start seeing, okay, wow, if I start seeing those breakdowns, what does that say about the margin on some of these products and services? And I don't think they want to give that level of transparency into their business, just because as soon as someone finds out just how profitable Managed NAT gateways are, my God, everything explodes.Aaron: I think it's interesting from a cloud provider or hyperscaler perspective, as well, is, you know, what is your USP? And I think Amazon is definitely not saying sustainability is their USP right now, and I think you know, there are other cloud providers, like Azure for example, who basically can provide you a Power BI plugin; if you just log in with your Cloud account details, it will show you a sustainability dashboard and give you more of this information that you might be looking for, whereas Amazon currently doesn't offer anything like that automated. And even having conversations with your account team or trying to get hold of the right person, Amazon isn't going to go anywhere at the moment, just because maybe that's the reason why we don't want to talk about it: It's too sensitive. I'm sure that'll change because of the public statements they've made at re:Invent now and previously of, you know, where they're going in terms of energy usage. They want to be carbon neutral by 2025, so maybe it'll change to next re:Invent, we'll get the AWS Sustainability Explorer add-on for [unintelligible 00:15:23] or 12—Corey: Oh no.Aaron: —tools to do the same thing [laugh].Corey: In the Google Cloud Console, you click around, and there are green leafs next to some services and some regions, and it's, on the one hand, okay, I appreciate the attention that is coming from. On the other hand, it feels like you're shaming me for putting things in a region that I've already built things out in when there weren't these green leafs here, and I don't know that I necessarily want to have that conversation with my entire team because we can't necessarily migrate at this point. And let's also be clear, here, I cannot fathom a scenario in which running your own data centers is ever going to be more climate-friendly than picking a hyperscaler.Aaron: And I think that's sort of, you know, we all might think about is, at the end of the day, if your sustainability strategy for your business is to go all-in-on cloud, and bet horse on AWS or another cloud provider, then, at the end of the day, that's going to be viable. I know, from the, sort of, hands-on stuff I've done with our own data centers, you can never get it as efficient as what some of these cloud providers are doing. And I mean, look at Microsoft. The fact that they're putting some of their data centers under the sea to use that as a cooling mechanism, and kind of all the interesting things that they're able to do because they can invest at scale, you're never going to be able to do that with the cupboard beyond the desks in your local office to make it more efficient or sustainable.Corey: There are definite parallels between Cloud economics and sustainability because as mentioned, I worship at the altar of Our Lady of Turn that Shit Off because that's important. If you don't have a workload running and it doesn't exist, it has no climate impact. Mostly. I'm sure there are corner cases. But that does lead to the question then of okay, what is the climate sustainability impact, for example, of storing a petabyte of data and EBS versus in S3?And that has architectural impact as well, and there's also questions of how often does it move because when you move it, Lord knows there is nothing more dear than the price of data transfer for data movement. And in order to answer those questions, they're going to start talking a lot more about their architecture. I believe that is why Peter DeSantis's keynote talked so much about—finally—the admission of what we sort of known for ages now that they use erasure coding to make S3 as durable yet inexpensive, as it is. That was super interesting. Without that disclosure, it would have been pretty clear as soon as they start publishing sustainability numbers around things like that.Aaron: And I think is really interesting, you know, when you look at your business and make decisions like that. I think the first thing to start with is do you need that data at all? What's a petabyte of data are going to do? Unless it's for serious compliance reasons for, you know, the sector or the business that you're doing, the rest of it is, you know, you've got to wonder how long is that relevant for. And you know, even as individuals, we could delete junk mail and take things off our internal emails, it's the same thing of businesses, what you're doing with this data.But it is interesting, when you look at some of the specific services, even just the tiering of S3, for example, put that into Glacier instead of keeping it on S3 general. And I think you've talked about this before, I think cost the same to transfer something in and out of Glacier as just to hold it for a month. So, at the end of the day, you've got to make these decisions in the right way, and you know, with the right goals in mind, and if you're not able to make these decisions or you need help, then that's where, you know, people like us come in to help you do this.Corey: There's also the idea of—when I was growing up, the thing they always told us about being responsible was, “Oh, turn out the lights when you're not in the room.” Great. Well, cloud economics starts to get in that direction, too. If you have a job that fires off once a day at two in the morning and it stops at four in the morning, you should not be running those instances the other 22 hours of the day. What's the deal here?And that becomes an interesting expiratory area just as far as starting to wonder, okay, so you're telling me that if I'm environmentally friendly, I'm also going to save money? Let's be clear people, in many cases—in a corporate sense—care about sustainability only insofar as that don't get yelled out about it. But when it comes to saving money, well, now you've got the power of self-interest working for you. And if you can dress them both up and do the exact same things and have two reasons to do it. That feels like it could in some respects, be an accelerator towards achieving both outcomes.Aaron: Definitely. I think, you know, at the end of the day, we all want to work on things that are going to hopefully make the world a better place. And if you use that as a way of motivating, not just yourself as a business, but the workforce and the people that you want to work for you, then that is a really great goal as well. And I think you just got to look at companies that are in this world and not doing very great things that maybe they end up paying more for engineers. I think I read an interesting article the other day about Facebook is basically offering almost double or 150 percent of over salaries because it feels like a black mark on the soul to work for that company. And if there is anything—maybe it's not greenwashing per se, but if you can just make your business a better place, then that could be something that you can hopefully attract other like-minded people with.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of, “Hello World” demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And let me be clear here, it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking, load balancing, and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small-scale applications, or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: One would really like to hope that the challenge, of course, is getting there in such a way that it, well, I guess makes sense, is probably the best way to frame it. These are still early days, and we don't know how things are going to wind up… I guess, it playing out. I have hopes, I have theories, but I just don't know.Aaron: I mean, even looking at Cloud as a concept, how long we've all worked with this now ranges probably from fifteen to five, and for me the last six years, but you got to think looking at the outages at the end of last year at Amazon, that [unintelligible 00:21:57], very close to re:Invent, that impacted a lot of different workloads, not just if you were hosted in us-west or east-1, but actually for a lot of the regional services that actually were [laugh]… discovered to be kind of integral to these regions. You know, one AZ going down can impact single-sign-on logins around the world. And let's see what Amazon looks like in ten years' time as well because it could be very different.Corey: Do you find that as you talk to folks, both in government and in private sector, that there is a legitimate interest in the sustainability story? Or is it the self-serving cynical perspective that I've painted?Aaron: I mean, a lot of my experience is biased towards the public sector, so I'll start with that. In terms of the public sector, over the last few years, especially in the UK, there's been a lot more focus on sustainability as part of your business cases and your project plans for when you're making new services or building new things. And one of the things they've recently asked every government department in the UK to do is come up with a sustainability strategy for their technology. And that's been something that a lot of people have been working on as part of something called the One Gov Cloud Strategy Working Groups—which in the UK, we do love an abbreviation, so [laugh] a bit of a long name—but I think there's definitely more of an interest in it.In terms of the private sector, I'm not too sure if that's something that people are prioritizing. A lot of the focus I kind of come across as either, we want to focus on enterprise customers, so we're going to offer migration professional services, or you're a new business and you're starting to go up and already spending a couple a hundred pounds, or thousands of pounds a month. And at that scale, it's probably not going to be something you need to worry about right now.Corey: I want to talk a little bit about how you got into tech in the first place because you told me elements of this story, and I generally find them to be—how do I put this?—they strain the bounds of credulity. So, how did you wind up in this ridiculous industry?Aaron: I mean, hoping as I explain them, you don't just think I'm a liar. I have got a Scouse accent, so you're probably predisposed towards it. But my journey into tech was quite weird, I guess, in the sense that when I was 16—I was, again, like I said, born in Liverpool and didn't really know what I wanted to do in the world, and had no idea what the hell to do. So, I was at college, and kind of what happened to me there is I joined, like, an entrepreneurship club and was like, “Okay, I'll start my own business and do something interesting.” And I went to a conference at college, and there was a panel with Richard Branson and other few of business leaders, and I stood up and asked the question said, you know, “I'm 16. I want to start a business. Where can I get money to start a business?”And the panel answered with kind of a couple of different things, but one of them was, “Get a job.” The other one was, “Get money off your parents.” And I was kind of like, “Oh, a bit weird. I've got a job already. You know, I would ask my parents put their own benefits.”And asked the woman with the microphone, “Can I say something back?” And she said, “No.” So, being… a young person, I guess, and just I stood back up and said, you know, “You're in Liverpool. You've kind of come to one of the poorest cities in some sense in the UK, and you kind of—I've already got a job. What can I really do?”And that's when Richard Branson turned round and said, “Well, what is it you want to do?” And I said, “I make really good cheesecakes and I want to sell them to people.” And after that sort of exchange, he said he'd give me the money. So, he gave me 200 pounds to start my own business. And that was just, kind of like, this whirlwind of what the hell's going on here?But for me, it's one of those moments in my life, which I think back on, and honestly, it's like one of these ten [left 00:25:15] moments of, you know, I didn't stand back up and say something, if I didn't join the entrepreneurship club, like, I just wouldn't be in the position I am right now. And it was also weird in the sense that I said at the start of the story, I didn't know what I wanted to do in my life. This was the first time that anyone had ever said to me, “I trust you to do something, and here's 200 pounds to do it.” And it was such a small thing, and a small moment that basically got me to where I am today. And kind of a condensed version of that is, you know, after that event, I started volunteering for a charity who—a, sort of, magazine launch, and then applied for the civil service and progressed through six to eight years of the civil service.And it was because of that moment, and that experience, and that confidence boost, where I was like, “Oh, I actually can do something with my life.” And I think tech, and I think a lot of people talk about this is, it can be a bit of a crazy whirlwind, and to go from that background into, you know, working with great people and earning great money is a bit of a crazy thing sometimes.Corey: Is there another path that you might have gone down instead and completely missed out on, for lack of a better term—and not missed out. You probably would have been far happier not working in tech; I know I would have been—but as far as trying to figure out, like, what does the road not taken look like for you?Aaron: I'm not too sure, really. And at the time, I was working in a club. I was like 16, 17 years old, working in a nightclub in Liverpool for five pounds an hour, and was doing that while I was studying, and that was almost like, what was in my mind at the time. When it came to the end of college, I was applying for universities, I got in on, like, a second backup course, and that was the only thing to do was food science. And it was like, I can't imagine coming out of university three years after that, studying something that's not really that relevant to a lot of industries, and trying to find a good job. It could have just been that I was working in a supermarket for minimum wage after I came out for uni trying to find what I wanted to do in the world. And, yeah, I'm really glad that I kind of ended up where I am now.Corey: As you take a look at what you want your career to be about in the broad sweep of things, what is it that drives you? What is it that makes you, for example, decide to spend the previous portion of career working in public service? That is a very, shall we say, atypical path—I say, as someone who lives in San Francisco and is surrounded by people who want to make the world a better place, but all those paths just coincidentally would result in them also becoming billionaires along the way.Aaron: I mean, it is interesting. You know, one of the things that worked for the civil service for so long, is the fact that I did want to do more than just make somebody else more money. And you know, there are not really a lot of ways you can do that and make a good wage for yourself. And I think early on in your career, working for somewhere like the civil service or federal government can be a little bit of that opportunity. And especially with some of the government's focus on tech these days, and investments—you know, I joined through an apprenticeship scheme and then progressed on to a digital leadership scheme, you know, they were guided schemes to help me become a better leader and improve my skills.And I think I would have probably not gone to the same position if I just got the tech job or my first engineering job somewhere else. I think, if I was to look at the future and where do I want to go, what do I care about? And, you know, you ask me, sort of, this question at re:Invent, and it took me a few days to really figure out, but one of the things when I talk about making the world a better place is thinking about how you can start businesses that give back to people in local areas, or kind of solve problems and kind of keep itself running a bit like a trust does, [laugh], if only that keeping rich people running. And a lot of the time, like, you've highlighted is coincidentally these things that we try and solve whether it's, like, a new app or a new thing that does something seems to either be making money for VCs, reinventing things that we already have, or just trying to make people billionaires rather than trying to make everyone rise up and—high tide rise all ships, is the saying. And there are a few people that do this, a few CEOs who take salaries the same as everyone else in the business. And I think that's hopefully you know, as I grow my own business and work on different things in the future, is how can I just help people live better lives?Corey: It's a big question, and it's odd in that I don't find that most people asking it tend to find themselves going toward government work so much as they do NGOs, and nonprofits, and things that are very focused on specific things.Aaron: And it can be frustrating in some sense is that, you know, you look at the landscape of NGOs, and charities, and go, “Why are they involved in solving this problem?” You know, one of the big problems we have in the UK is the use of food banks where people who don't have enough money, whether they receive benefits or not, have to go and get food which is donated just by people of the UK and people who donate to these charities. You know, at the end of the day, I'm really interested in government, and public sector work, and potentially one day, being a bit more involved in policy elements of that, is how can we solve these problems with broad brushstrokes, whether it's technology advancements, or kind of policy decisions? And one of the interesting things that I got close to a few times, but I don't think we've ever really solved is stuff like how can we use Agile to build policy?How can we iterate on what that policy might look like, get customers or citizens of countries involved in those conversations, and measure outcomes, and see whether it's successful afterwards. And a lot of the time, policies and decisions are just things that come out of politicians minds, and it'd be interesting to see how we can solve some of these problems in the world with stuff like Agile methodologies or tech practices.Corey: So, it's easy to sit and talk about these things in the grand sweep of how the world could be or how it should look, but for those of us who think in more, I guess, tactical terms, what's a good first step?Aaron: I think from my point of view, and you know, meeting so many people at re:Invent, and just have my eyes opened of these great conversations we can have a great people and get things changed, one of the things that I'm looking at starting next year is a podcast and a newsletter, around the use of public cloud for public good. And when I say that, it does cover elements of sustainability, but it is other stuff like how do we use Cloud to deliver things in the public sector and NGOs and charities? And I think having more conversations like that would be really interesting. Obviously, that's just the start of a conversation, and I'm sure when I speak to more people in the future, more opportunities and more things might come out of it. But I'd just love to speak to more people about stuff like this.Corey: I want to thank you for spending so much time to speak with me today about… well, the wide variety of things, and of course, spending as much time as you did chatting with me at re:Invent in person. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Aaron: So yep, got a few social media handles on Twitter, I'm @AaronBoothUK. On LinkedIn is the same, forward slash aaronboothuk, and I've also got the website for my consultancy, which is embue.co.uk—E-M-B-U-E dot co dot uk. And for the newsletter, it's publicgood.cloud.Corey: And we will, of course, include links to that in the [show notes 00:32:11]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really do appreciate it.Aaron: Thank you so much for having me.Corey: Aaron Booth, cloud consultant with an emphasis on sustainability. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn with an emphasis on optimizing bills. And this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment that you will then kickstart the coal-burning generator under your desk to wind up posting.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Climate Pod
The 'Doomsday Glacier's' Disastrous Potential (w/ Dr. Richard Alley)

The Climate Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 53:58


This week, we spoke with Dr. Richard Alley, a glaciologist and member of the International Thwaites Glacier Collaborative, about why this particular glacier - dubbed the 'Doomsday Glacier by Jeff Goodell - could raise sea levels beyond catastrophic levels and cause so much damage to coastal communities around the world. We also discuss how soon and how likely that might actually happen, and the latest findings that his group recently published. Dr. Richard Alley is the Evan Pugh University Professor of Geosciences at Penn State, where he focuses on glaciology, ice sheet stability, and understanding how Earth's climate has changed by examining ice cores. Check out the International Thwaites Glacier Collaborative's presentation to the American Geophysical Union in December 2021. Subscribe to our Substack newsletter "The Climate Weekly": https://theclimateweekly.substack.com/ As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our new YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group. Check out our updated website! Further Reading: The Return of the Urban Firestorm. What happened in Colorado was something much scarier than a wildfire.  

i want what SHE has
#205 Nancy Graham and Louisa Finn "Love and Mohonk Consultations"

i want what SHE has

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 109:54


Nancy Graham serves on the board of Mohonk Consultations and the arts council of The Lace Mill, where they live in Midtown Kingston. They have worked or volunteered for numerous nonprofits related to social justice, alternative media, theatre, film, and writing. Poet/writer/visual artist under the name Nancy O. Graham; actor under the name Noa Graham. Her most recent theatre project was Orchid Receipt Service, starring Asia Kate Dillon, at Theater MITU580 in Brooklyn, pre-pandemic. Most recent film project is a short called Elegy for a Glacier, about an environmental activist and her glaciologist daughter forced to face off about the construction of a ski resort in the Rockies.Louisa Finn is a  Hudson Valley native, whose mother was a member of the Quaker Smiley family of Mohonk Mountain House, and father a Russian Jewish pianist from the Bronx.  She has spent her life thus far actively engaged in learning what it is to be human and to be herself.  She works as a Speech/Language Pathologist and Reading Tutor, and clinical instructor at SUNY New Paltz.  She is on the Board of Mohonk Consultations, where she serves as Administrative Coordinator, and Sky Lake Shambhala Center Buddhist Retreat.  She writes poetry, and is creating a forest garden in her front yard.Today we're talking about Love and a myriad of related and thought provoking subjects. Nancy and Louisa share about their first memories of love and how they relate to the word which takes us into the realm of spiritual materialism, caring for others, and being a mother.  The show is inspired by bell hooks and her writings on love and self love/self worth so we dive into self-love as Louisa and Nancy share their own process to love themselves better as well as how self-love relates to caring for others and being a woman. We then leave the personal towards the end of the show to talk about the public and how the work of Mohonk Consultations is cultivating love in its own way, bringing folks together to collaborate, lifting voices, and caring for land and others. We leave you with a call for your own definition or thoughts on Love.  bell hooks herself seemed to have a few, "love is the action we take on behalf of our own or another's spiritual growth..." "love is a combination of trust, commitment, care, respect, knowledge and responsibility..." So, what say you?Thanks to Ian Seda from Radio Kingston for engineering today's show!Our show music is from Shana Falana !!!Feel free to email me, say hello: she@iwantwhatshehas.org** Please: SUBSCRIBE to the pod and leave a REVIEW wherever you are listening, it helps other users FIND IThttp://iwantwhatshehas.org/podcastITUNES | SPOTIFY | STITCHERITUNES: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/i-want-what-she-has/id1451648361?mt=2SPOTIFY:https://open.spotify.com/show/77pmJwS2q9vTywz7Uhiyff?si=G2eYCjLjT3KltgdfA6XXCASTITCHER: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/she-wants/i-want-what-she-has?refid=stpr'Follow:INSTAGRAM * https://www.instagram.com/iwantwhatshehaspodcast/FACEBOOK * https://www.facebook.com/iwantwhatshehaspodcastTWITTER * https://twitter.com/wantwhatshehas

Chicago Dog Walk
Tuesday 1/4/22 - Antartica's 'Doomsday Glacier'

Chicago Dog Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 22:29


Chief joins the show to talk about the Thwaites "Doomsday Glacier" in Antartica. We get into the increase in sea levels if the glacier breaks off, the displacement caused to the world's population, Chief proposing his solutions to the issue, and more.

Wine Cellar Media
Kristina (Flanagan) Graper Threatens Murder On Black Boy - Dooms Day Glacier

Wine Cellar Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 34:00


http://paypal.me/PhoenixAndWilliam Kristina Graper, a 51-year-old New Hampshire woman, has been convicted after telling a Black child she'd "kneel on his neck." Graper threatened the child after he accidentally broke a toy that belonged to her son. Her son had pushed the child, causing the toy to break, according to a civil complaint.

Your Mountain
Grizzly Bears and the Rinella Family Feud

Your Mountain

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 60:34


Dave and Nephi provide an update on all things grizzly bears, including updating on a petition to delist Yellowstone grizzlies; a petition to delist Northern Continental Divide grizzlies; and a new population estimator showing there are lots of freaking bears. They also weigh in on a recent Matt Rinella piece advocating for fewer hunters. Spoiler: the guys commend Matt for being willing to speak up, but think he's missing the forest through the trees. 

The Current
Sounding the alarms about a potential Thwaites Glacier collapse

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 19:44


A group of ice scientists who've been studying the Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica have reported that the glacier is closer to potential collapse than previously thought. Jeff Goodell, who first nicknamed it the “Doomsday Glacier,” tells us about the environmental and societal impacts the glacier's collapse could have. He's a journalist and the author of The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World.

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 2 | Best of Tim Conway Jr. Show NYE @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 29:09


Doomsday glacier // Briang Regan on Flying // Ken Kragen - We Are The World // Cow Hugs

Baleine sous Gravillon (BSG)
Rediff S02E100 Pôles 1/5: Briser la glace... Lydie Lescarmontier (glaciologue)

Baleine sous Gravillon (BSG)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 27:50


Lydie Lescarmontier est glaciologue, guide et photographe. Pendant 10 ans, Lydie a fait des allers-retours entre l'Australie et la base française Dumont d'Urville en Antarctique, pour étudier les déplacements du glacier Mertz. Ces 10 années furent loin d'être un long fleuve tranquille, ce furent d'abord des traversées houleuses dans les 40e rugissants, les 50e hurlants et les 60 déferlants. Ce furent des allers incertains et des retours hypothétiques entre des tempêtes et des pannes d'hélicoptère et de bateau, le célèbre Astrolabe, qui a été pris plus de 50 jours dans les glaces. Lydie raconte ces aventures dans son livre "La Voix des Pôles". Elle intercale, entre les chapitres du récit, des pépites de connaissances précieuses sur l'océan, les pôles, la glace et le climat. NB: Vous pouvez désormais nous soutenir gratuitement, en utilisant le moteur de recherche solidaire Lilo: https://bit.ly/lien_magq_lilo_BSG 

Wrestling With Reality
WCW Monday Nitro (2/3/1997) Watch Along

Wrestling With Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 123:21


On this episode we are checking the February 3, 1997 edition of WCW Monday Nitro. The following is the matches for this show: * The Ultimo Dragon (w/ Sonny Onoo) vs Rey Mendoza Jr. * Glacier vs Billy Kidman * Ice Train (w/ Teddy Long) vs La Parka * Harlem Heat (Booker T & Stevie Ray) (w/ Sister Sherri) vs. The Steiner Brothers (Rick Steiner & Scott Steiner) * Dean Malenko vs Mike Enos * Diamond Dallas Page vs The Renegade * Alex Wright vs Super Calo * Konnan (w/ Jimmy Hart) vs Chris Benoit (w/ Woman) * Jeff Jarrett vs Steve McMichael (w/ Debra McMichael) Please make sure to like and follow our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/rwrevivalpodcast #prowrestling #wrestling #wwe #aew #nxt #wrestler #wwenxt #wwenetwork #ProWrestling #professionalwrestling #wweuniverse #impactwrestling #WCWNitro #WCW #wwesmackdown #wcw #womenswrestling #aewdynamite #ecw #allelitewrestling

We Root for Earth
We Root for Earth Episode 17: The 'Doomsday Glacier'

We Root for Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 3:47


Welcome back to We Root for Earth! We are a group that is dedicated to helping restore our environment. We'd also love it if you would come on this journey with us and as we try new things to help mend our environment. This podcast discusses the Thwaites Glacier, a glacier that scientists call the doomsday glacier. Here are some ways to reduce your C02 Emissions and save the Thwaites Glacier: Take showers instead of baths Use a reusable water bottle Keep windows and blinds closed Turn off your lights when you're not using them Use cold water when washing your clothes Use your dishwasher rather than hand washing dishes Try carpooling or walking/biking in substitute for cars Refraining from using single-use plastics Taking a walk with gloves and a trash bag to clean up your neighborhood Sources Used: https://www.earthreminder.com/how-to-prevent-glaciers-from-melting/ (Earth reminder) https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-59644494 (BBC News)

Raw vs Nitro - Reliving The War
Reliving The War Episode 82 - May 5th 1997

Raw vs Nitro - Reliving The War

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 35:06


The Raw before In Your House: A Cold Day in Hell. Stone Cold Steve Austin battles The British Bulldog in the main event while over on Nitro, the nWo launch an attack on WCW to close the show. Matches this week include Glacier vs Lizmark Jr, Rey Mysterio vs Syxx, Crush running the Gauntlet and The Legion of Doom vs Furnas & Lafon.

Painkiller Already
PKA 576 w/ Tavarish & RR: Bumble BFF, Woody Saves Man's Life, Doomsday Glacier

Painkiller Already

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 256:05


Let's Know Things
Doomsday Glacier

Let's Know Things

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 25:49


This week we talk about Thwaites, sea level rise, and the news. We also discuss scientific research, glaciers, and climate change. Support the show: patreon.com/letsknowthings & letsknowthings.com/support Show notes/transcript: letsknowthings.com Check out my other shows & publications: understandary.com

The Pat Flynn Show
A Conversation with Former Professional Wrestler Ray Lloyd (aka Glacier)

The Pat Flynn Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 61:57


Pat is joined by former WCW professional wrestler Ray Lloyd to discuss all the nerdy things you've wanted to know about life in the ring, from fitness routines to how much it hurts getting speared by Bill Goldberg! 

5 Things
Global sea levels may quickly rise if 'doomsday' glacier breaks away

5 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 11:45


NOW reporter Jordan Mendoza talks about the latest climate change travesty. Plus, a CDC panel recommends Pfizer and Moderna over Johnson & Johnson for COVID-19 vaccines, Kentucky rebuilds after devastating tornadoes, travel reporter Eve Chen talks about a Facebook group that connects queer people with stand-in parents and college football bowl season is here.(Audio: Associated Press)Episode Transcript available hereAlso available at art19.com/shows/5-ThingsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Daily Space
Massive Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica at Risk of Collapse

The Daily Space

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 19:03


A team of scientists collected cores and modeled ice cliff failure and found that Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica is melting more quickly than ever and could be at risk of collapse, threatening global coastlines with almost a meter of sea level rise. Plus, new results from Percy, and this week's What's Up.

Highlights from The Hard Shoulder
Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica recedes rapidly

Highlights from The Hard Shoulder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 8:43


One of the biggest glaciers in Antarctica recedes rapidly, to assess what might be ahead, Kieran was joined by lecturer in climate policy and environmental politics in DCU, Sadhbh O'Neill... Listen and subscribe to The Hard Shoulder on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts and Spotify.      Download, listen and subscribe on the Newstalk App.     You can also listen to Newstalk live on newstalk.com or on Alexa, by adding the Newstalk skill and asking: 'Alexa, play Newstalk'.

The Morning Joe Rant Show Podcast
Hottest ever in Siberia, doomsday glacier, earth black box, teachers "dash for cash", 12.7 million go freelance, retirees asked to un-retire, family estrangement, & richest 10% produce most emissions

The Morning Joe Rant Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 32:43


Hottest ever in Siberia, doomsday glacier, earth black box, teachers "dash for cash", 12.7 million go freelance, retirees asked to un-retire, family estrangement, & richest 10% produce most emissions - Quick clips - - Hottest ever in Siberia - Scientists have detected new cracks in the key ice shelf that holds Antarctica's doomsday Glacier, indicating that the ice shelf could break apart within the next five years - Earth is getting a black box to record events that lead to the downfall of civilization - Teachers in South Dakota do a “Dash for Cash” where teachers get on their knees and fight for one dollar bills that they can use for classroom supplies while spectators watch and cheer Main stories - New Data Finally Shows Why People Are Quitting Their Jobs. It's Definitely Not Because They're Lazy (hint they went freelance) - Source Millions of workers retired during the pandemic. The economy needs them to "unretire," experts say. - Source Family estrangement: Why adults are cutting off their parents - Source Polarized politics and a growing awareness of how difficult relationships can impact our mental health are fuelling family estrangement, say psychologists. The richest 10% produce about half of greenhouse gas emissions. They should pay to fix the climate - Source Produced by The Wild 1 Media www.thewild1media.com. Check out our other podcasts- https://darksidediaries.sounder.fm https://anchor.fm/ttmygh https://crypto101.sounder.fm --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Suite Dreams Wellness Travel
Glamping in the National Parks of the West

Suite Dreams Wellness Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 20:42


One thing I love about travel is the opportunity to look forward to and dream about something great in the future. How does glamping (glamorous camping) near national parks sound for this next summer? Kind of like a dream come true? For those who love to camp but aren't as crazy about planning and packing for the experience, glamping (glamorous camping) is a great option! There are lots of different types of glamping out there but in this podcast episode, I'm talking about glamping near some of the great National Parks of the American west including Moab, Grand Canyon, Glacier, and others.  (To learn more about glamping, read my post about it here: https://www.suitedreamstravel.net/post/want-to-be-a-happy-camper-the-hottest-camping-trend-of-this-year-and-next)Locations are carefully chosen for beautiful views, remote nature, and proximity to national parks, monuments, and recreational areas. Forget five-star hotels - these are BILLION-star accommodations! Imagine marveling at the night sky as you stay comfortably. You can pay extra for meals, bring your own food to cook, or simply drive to a charming nearby town for eateries.Listen to see if a summer glamping trip is for you and let's get started planning!  As your wellness travel experts, we take care of all of the planning, research, and arrangements, so that you can focus on the important part: creating memories and changing your life, one travel experience at a time.Discover our services below.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Melting of the Thwaites Glacier could rewrite the global coastline

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 5:34


A warming atmosphere is creating concern in the Arctic Circle and on the continent of Antarctica. The Arctic Report Card shows high temperatures, shrinking sea ice and extreme melting events are transforming the region. At the opposite pole, in Antarctica, a key ice shelf that sits in front of the Thwaites Glacier could break up much sooner than expected -- within 5 years. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Melting of the Thwaites Glacier could rewrite the global coastline

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 5:34


A warming atmosphere is creating concern in the Arctic Circle and on the continent of Antarctica. The Arctic Report Card shows high temperatures, shrinking sea ice and extreme melting events are transforming the region. At the opposite pole, in Antarctica, a key ice shelf that sits in front of the Thwaites Glacier could break up much sooner than expected -- within 5 years. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Flathead Beacon Podcasts
Updates to Glacier's Ticketed Entry

Flathead Beacon Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 12:59


Today host Micah Drew shares a brief conversation with Flathead Beacon managing editor Tristan Scott about the latest changes announced for next summer's ticketed reservation entry system at Glacier National Park. Tristan has been covering the effects of the system since it was implemented this year, including overcrowding at lesser visited corners of the park, which officials hope to remedy next year. Later, Micah runs through the latest stories from the last week including the retirement of northwest Montana's resident grizzly bear conflict specialist, updates on plans to replace two bridges near Bigfork, and the start of the winter prep sports season. Read more about all of this week's stories and get the latest breaking news at flatheadbeacon.com and sign up for our new daily newsletter at flatheadbeacon.com/newsletter.RELATED LINKSDecember 15 E-EditionGlacier National Park Unveils Details for 2022 Reservation SystemTwo Bigfork Bridges to be ReplacedTrailblazing Grizzly Conflict Specialist to RetireFlathead Wrestlers off to Strong StartThe music in this this episode is “Thinking Music” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License, See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

RTÉ - Drivetime
Thwaites Glacier

RTÉ - Drivetime

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 4:37


Philip Boucher-Hayes, RTÉ Reporter

Into the Ether
EthHub Weekly #196: Arrow Glacier fork, ETH price action, Reddit expanding community points, Polygon acquires Mir, Aztec Connect, Euler is live, Coinbase + Compound team up and Argent X on StarkNet

Into the Ether

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 46:55


On the EthHub Weekly Recap we cover topics from the EthHub Weekly Newsletter. In this episode we discuss the Arrow Glacier fork, ETH price action, Reddit expanding community points, Polygon acquires Mir, Aztec Connect, Euler is live, Coinbase + Compound team up and Argent X on StarkNet

AA Cafe Podcast
Glacier Confection

AA Cafe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 43:29


Gene Leiterman from Glacier Confection stops by for a visit at the AA Cafe studio to talk about how chocolate is made, from the tree all the way to the bar. Glacier's collaboration with DoubleShot Coffee Company came to a culinary pitch this year with the creation of four unique dark chocolate bars infused with the four holiday coffees roasted and released by the DoubleShot for 2021. Learn all about this delicacy, and order the bars at DoubleShotCoffee.com.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Glacier towns short hundreds of staff ahead of summer season

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 5:11


Businesses in Franz Josef and Fox Glacier are hundreds of staff short for the summer season with many struggling to find and afford workers. A recent survey paints a grim picture of South Westland with more business closures, job losses, poorer mental health and community members leaving. Tourism reporter Tess Brunton has more.

Red Carpet Rendezvous
Dwayne Fields from 'Welcome to Earth' on Disney+!

Red Carpet Rendezvous

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 10:47


We're so excited for you to hear this episode featuring polar expeditionist Dwayne Fields from the new show on Disney+ ('Welcome to Earth') streaming TODAY! Dwayne and Will Smith, yes the Fresh Prince, embark on a journey in the middle of a GLACIER! It's so crazy and you'll want to hear the whole story here! 'Welcome to Earth' was executive produced by Darren Aronofsky.

Montana Public Radio News
Glacier-area grizzly bear mortalities increase in 2021

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 0:29


There have been 43 grizzly bear mortalities in and around Glacier Park this year, an increase from 2020. Eighteen of those bears were females and 25 were males.

WIRED Science: Space, Health, Biotech, and More
Hints of New Life in the Shadows of Venezuela's Last Glacier

WIRED Science: Space, Health, Biotech, and More

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 8:14


When ice goes, lichens and mosses move in and an entirely new ecosystem starts to take shape.

Manga Machinations
372 - Triple Dip 58 - F, Tsukiko and the Satellite and other stories, Rabbit Game

Manga Machinations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 106:09


We have another small manga publisher Triple Dip this week, this time with Glacier Bay Books! We check out Tsukiko and the Satellite and other stories, Rabbit Game, and F! Also Morgana reads Moto Hagio's cute cat manga Lil' Leo and dakazu loves the comedy memoir of a Dominatrix manga artist and her masochist slave husband in Teishu Genki de Mazo ga Ii!!!! Buy manga from Glacier Bay Books! Send us emails! mangamachinations@gmail.com  Follow us on Twitter! @mangamacpodcast Check out our website! https://mangamachinations.com Check out our YouTube channel! https://www.youtube.com/mangamactv Check out our tumblr! http://mangamachinations.tumblr.com Join our Discord! https://discord.me/mangamac Buy us a Ko-fi! https://ko-fi.com/mangamac Timestamps: 00:00:00 - Intro Song: “Are You Ready For Me Baby” by Funky Giraffe, Opening, Introductions 00:01:13 - Clarification on the lettering in Vasilisa! The Wise Princess and Other Classic Folktales, Keishi Kuraibe's thank you illustration 00:03:53 - Whatchu Been Reading: Transition Song: “Funkymania” by The Original Orchestra, Darfox has finally upgraded his potato into an actual computer 00:08:50 - Morgana checked out Moto Hagio's Lil' Leo which features a cute cat who talks and attends school 00:15:10 - Former dominatrix manga artist Ryo Rokutan made manga about her masochistic husband called Teishu Genki de Mazo ga Ii! and Jyoou Returns! ~Bondage wo mou ichido!~ but changed her pen name to Yagi Saotome to make Aida ni Hatachi and Boku Tachi wa Hanshoku wo Yameta 00:25:41 - Next Episode Preview and Rundown: Manga in Motion on the Netflix Cowboy Bebop, we will review and discuss season 1 of the live action adaptation of Shinichiro Watanabe's neo-noir anime Cowboy Bebop 00:27:10 - Main Segment Glacier Bay Books Triple Dip: Tsukiko and the Satellite and other stories/Rabbit Game/F, Transition Song: “It's Over” by Generation Lost, We review three books from Glacier Bay Books for discussion before picking our favorite of the three, Including: 00:28:25 - Tsukiko and the Satellite and other stories by Mississippi 00:44:35 - Rabbit Game by Miyoshi 01:02:14 - *CONTENT WARNING* (Islamic State propaganda, Executions videos, Torture) F by Imai Arata 01:40:03 - We picks our favorite out of the three manga 01:44:25 - Next Week's Topic: Netflix Cowboy Bebop, Social Media Rundown, Sign Off Song: “Crazy for Your Love” by Orkas

The Ski Podcast
A Ski Podcast Special: Latest Snow News from around the Alps

The Ski Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 17:10


We had so many snow reports for this week's podcast, rather than edit them down, we thought we'd release them as a one-off special.  We cover six resorts in four countries – so it's time to get excited and hear about the great conditions out in the Alps right now. SHOW NOTES Charlie Rees reported from Diavolezza/Engadin in Switzerland https://twitter.com/theskipodcast/status/1467551739062673414 Dave Burrows from SnowPros Ski School was in Glacier 3000, Switzerland Andy Butterworth from Kaluma Travel is in St Anton, Austria https://twitter.com/theskipodcast/status/1467466717894959109 Keith Webb was reporting from Kaprun in Austria. Find out more about his apartments on Instagram Luca Caruso is  based in Cervinia, Italy Steve Angus is a ski instructor in Val d'Isère in France  We release regular episodes every two weeks, covering all aspects of the world of skiing and snowboarding, from resorts to racing, Ski Sunday to slush.  Make sure you subscribe so you never miss an episode of The Ski Podcast.

Crossbody of Work
Ep 92: Chris Kanyon

Crossbody of Work

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 72:37


This week we dive into the career of Chris Kanyon. We're looking at all iterations of the WCW star, including Mortis, the Jersey Triad, and Positively Kanyon. Matches this week include DDP, Mike Awesome, Kane, Undertaker, and the legendary Glacier. Follow the podcast on Twitter at @CrossbodyOfWork and be sure to rate & subscribe wherever you're listening. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Screaming in the Cloud
Keeping the Chaos Searchable with Thomas Hazel

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:43


About ThomasThomas Hazel is Founder, CTO, and Chief Scientist of ChaosSearch. He is a serial entrepreneur at the forefront of communication, virtualization, and database technology and the inventor of ChaosSearch's patented IP. Thomas has also patented several other technologies in the areas of distributed algorithms, virtualization and database science. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from University of New Hampshire, Hall of Fame Alumni Inductee, and founded both student & professional chapters of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).Links:ChaosSearch: https://www.chaossearch.io TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinksCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous non-sense.   Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted episode is brought to us by our friends at ChaosSearch.We've been working with them for a long time; they've sponsored a bunch of our nonsense, and it turns out that we've been talking about them to our clients since long before they were a sponsor because it actually does what it says on the tin. Here to talk to us about that in a few minutes is Thomas Hazel, ChaosSearch's CTO and founder. First, Thomas, nice to talk to you again, and as always, thanks for humoring me.Thomas: [laugh]. Hi, Corey. Always great to talk to you. And I enjoy these conversations that sometimes go up and down, left and right, but I look forward to all the fun we're going to have.Corey: So, my understanding of ChaosSearch is probably a few years old because it turns out, I don't spend a whole lot of time meticulously studying your company's roadmap in the same way that you presumably do. When last we checked in with what the service did-slash-does, you are effectively solving the problem of data movement and querying that data. The idea behind data warehouses is generally something that's shoved onto us by cloud providers where, “Hey, this data is going to be valuable to you someday.” Data science teams are big proponents of this because when you're storing that much data, their salaries look relatively reasonable by comparison. And the ChaosSearch vision was, instead of copying all this data out of an object store and storing it on expensive disks, and replicating it, et cetera, what if we queried it in place in a somewhat intelligent manner?So, you take the data and you store it, in this case, in S3 or equivalent, and then just query it there, rather than having to move it around all over the place, which of course, then incurs data transfer fees, you're storing it multiple times, and it's never in quite the format that you want it. That was the breakthrough revelation, you were Elasticsearch—now OpenSearch—API compatible, which was great. And that was, sort of, a state of the art a year or two ago. Is that generally correct?Thomas: No, you nailed our mission statement. No, you're exactly right. You know, the value of cloud object stores, S3, the elasticity, the durability, all these wonderful things, the problem was you couldn't get any value out of it, and you had to move it out to these siloed solutions, as you indicated. So, you know, our mission was exactly that, transformed customers' cloud storage into an analytical database, a multi-model analytical database, where our first use case was search and log analytics, replacing the ELK stack and also replacing the data pipeline, the schema management, et cetera. We automate the entire step, raw data to insights.Corey: It's funny we're having this conversation today. Earlier, today, I was trying to get rid of a relatively paltry 200 gigs or so of small files on an EFS volume—you know, Amazon's version of NFS; it's like an NFS volume except you're paying Amazon for the privilege—great. And it turns out that it's a whole bunch of operations across a network on a whole bunch of tiny files, so I had to spin up other instances that were not getting backed by spot terminations, and just firing up a whole bunch of threads. So, now the load average on that box is approaching 300, but it's plowing through, getting rid of that data finally.And I'm looking at this saying this is a quarter of a terabyte. Data warehouses are in the petabyte range. Oh, I begin to see aspects of the problem. Even searching that kind of data using traditional tooling starts to break down, which is sort of the revelation that Google had 20-some-odd years ago, and other folks have since solved for, but this is the first time I've had significant data that wasn't just easily searched with a grep. For those of you in the Unix world who understand what that means, condolences. We're having a support group meeting at the bar.Thomas: Yeah. And you know, I always thought, what if you could make cloud object storage like S3 high performance and really transform it into a database? And so that warehouse capability, that's great. We like that. However to manage it, to scale it, to configure it, to get the data into that, was the problem.That was the promise of a data lake, right? This simple in, and then this arbitrary schema on read generic out. The problem next came, it became swampy, it was really hard, and that promise was not delivered. And so what we're trying to do is get all the benefits of the data lake: simple in, so many services naturally stream to cloud storage. Shoot, I would say every one of our customers are putting their data in cloud storage because their data pipeline to their warehousing solution or Elasticsearch may go down and they're worried they'll lose the data.So, what we say is what if you just said activate that data lake and get that ELK use case, get that BI use case without that data movement, as you indicated, without that ETL-ing, without that data pipeline that you're worried is going to fall over. So, that vision has been Chaos. Now, we haven't talked in, you know, a few years, but this idea that we're growing beyond what we are just going after logs, we're going into new use cases, new opportunities, and I'm looking forward to discussing with you.Corey: It's a great answer that—though I have to call out that I am right there with you as far as inappropriately using things as databases. I know that someone is going to come back and say, “Oh, S3 is a database. You're dancing around it. Isn't that what Athena is?” Which is named, of course, after the Greek Goddess of spending money on AWS? And that is a fair question, but to my understanding, there's a schema story behind that does not apply to what you're doing.Thomas: Yeah, and that is so crucial is that we like the relational access. The time-cost complexity to get it into that, as you mentioned, scaled access, I mean, it could take weeks, months to test it, to configure it, to provision it, and imagine if you got it wrong; you got to redo it again. And so our unique service removes all that data pipeline schema management. And because of our innovation because of our service, you do all schema definition, on the fly, virtually, what we call views on your index data, that you can publish an elastic index pattern for that consumption, or a relational table for that consumption. And that's kind of leading the witness into things that we're coming out with this quarter into 2022.Corey: I have to deal with a little bit of, I guess, a shame here because yeah, I'm doing exactly what you just described. I'm using Athena to wind up querying our customers' Cost and Usage Reports, and we spend a couple hundred bucks a month on AWS Glue to wind up massaging those into the way that they expect it to be. And it's great. Ish. We hook it up to Tableau and can make those queries from it, and all right, it's great.It just, burrr goes the money printer, and we somehow get access and insight to a lot of valuable data. But even that is knowing exactly what the format is going to look like. Ish. I mean, Cost and Usage Reports from Amazon are sort of aspirational when it comes to schema sometimes, but here we are. And that's been all well and good.But now the idea of log files, even looking at the base case of sending logs from an application, great. Nginx, or Apache, or [unintelligible 00:07:24], or any of the various web servers out there all tend to use different logging formats just to describe the same exact things, start spreading that across custom in-house applications and getting signal from that is almost impossible. “Oh,” people say, “So, we'll use a structured data format.” Now, you're putting log and structuring requirements on application developers who don't care in the first place, and now you have a mess on your hands.Thomas: And it really is a mess. And that challenge is, it's so problematic. And schemas changing. You know, we have customers and one reasons why they go with us is their log data is changing; they didn't expect it. Well, in your data pipeline, and your Athena database, that breaks. That brings the system down.And so our system uniquely detects that and manages that for you and then you can pick and choose how you want to export in these views dynamically. So, you know, it's really not rocket science, but the problem is, a lot of the technology that we're using is designed for static, fixed thinking. And then to scale it is problematic and time-consuming. So, you know, Glue is a great idea, but it has a lot of sharp [pebbles 00:08:26]. Athena is a great idea but also has a lot of problems.And so that data pipeline, you know, it's not for digitally native, active, new use cases, new workloads coming up hourly, daily. You think about this long-term; so a lot of that data prep pipelining is something we address so uniquely, but really where the customer cares is the value of that data, right? And so if you're spending toils trying to get the data into a database, you're not answering the questions, whether it's for security, for performance, for your business needs. That's the problem. And you know, that agility, that time-to-value is where we're very uniquely coming in because we start where your data is raw and we automate the process all the way through.Corey: So, when I look at the things that I have stuffed into S3, they generally fall into a couple of categories. There are a bunch of logs for things I never asked for nor particularly wanted, but AWS is aggressive about that, first routing through CloudTrail so you can get charged 50-cent per gigabyte ingested. Awesome. And of course, large static assets, images I have done something to enter colloquially now known as shitposts, which is great. Other than logs, what could you possibly be storing in S3 that lends itself to, effectively, the type of analysis that you built around this?Thomas: Well, our first use case was the classic log use cases, app logs, web service logs. I mean, CloudTrail, it's famous; we had customers that gave up on elastic, and definitely gave up on relational where you can do a couple changes and your permutation of attributes for CloudTrail is going to put you to your knees. And people just say, “I give up.” Same thing with Kubernetes logs. And so it's the classic—whether it's CSV, where it's JSON, where it's log types, we auto-discover all that.We also allow you, if you want to override that and change the parsing capabilities through a UI wizard, we do discover what's in your buckets. That term data swamp, and not knowing what's in your bucket, we do a facility that will index that data, actually create a report for you for knowing what's in. Now, if you have text data, if you have log data, if you have BI data, we can bring it all together, but the real pain is at the scale. So classically, app logs, system logs, many devices sending IoT-type streams is where we really come in—Kubernetes—where they're dealing with terabytes of data per day, and managing an ELK cluster at that scale. Particularly on a Black Friday.Shoot, some of our customers like—Klarna is one of them; credit card payment—they're ramping up for Black Friday, and one of the reasons why they chose us is our ability to scale when maybe you're doing a terabyte or two a day and then it goes up to twenty, twenty-five. How do you test that scale? How do you manage that scale? And so for us, the data streams are, traditionally with our customers, the well-known log types, at least in the log use cases. And the challenge is scaling it, is getting access to it, and that's where we come in.Corey: I will say the last time you were on the show a couple of years ago, you were talking about the initial logging use case and you were speaking, in many cases aspirationally, about where things were going. What a difference a couple years is made. Instead of talking about what hypothetical customers might want, or what—might be able to do, you're just able to name-drop them off the top of your head, you have scaled to approximately ten times the number of employees you had back then. You've—Thomas: Yep. Yep.Corey: —raised, I think, a total of—what, 50 million?—since then.Thomas: Uh, 60 now. Yeah.Corey: Oh, 60? Fantastic.Thomas: Yeah, yeah.Corey: Congrats. And of course, how do you do it? By sponsoring Last Week in AWS, as everyone should. I'm taking clear credit for that every time someone announces around, that's the game. But no, there is validity to it because telling fun stories and sponsoring exciting things like this only carry you so far. At some point, customers have to say, yeah, this is solving a pain that I have; I'm willing to pay you money to solve it.And you've clearly gotten to a point where you are addressing the needs of those customers at a pretty fascinating clip. It's bittersweet from my perspective because it seems like the majority of your customers have not come from my nonsense anymore. They're finding you through word of mouth, they're finding through more traditional—read as boring—ad campaigns, et cetera, et cetera. But you've built a brand that extends beyond just me. I'm no longer viewed as the de facto ombudsperson for any issue someone might have with ChaosSearch on Twitters. It's kind of, “Aww, the company grew up. What happened there?”Thomas: No, [laugh] listen, this you were great. We reached out to you to tell our story, and I got to be honest. A lot of people came by, said, “I heard something on Corey Quinn's podcasts,” or et cetera. And it came a long way now. Now, we have, you know, companies like Equifax, multi-cloud—Amazon and Google.They love the data lake philosophy, the centralized, where use cases are now available within days, not weeks and months. Whether it's logs and BI. Correlating across all those data streams, it's huge. We mentioned Klarna, [APM Performance 00:13:19], and, you know, we have Armor for SIEM, and Blackboard for [Observers 00:13:24].So, it's funny—yeah, it's funny, when I first was talking to you, I was like, “What if? What if we had this customer, that customer?” And we were building the capabilities, but now that we have it, now that we have customers, yeah, I guess, maybe we've grown up a little bit. But hey, listen to you're always near and dear to our heart because we remember, you know, when you stop[ed by our booth at re:Invent several times. And we're coming to re:Invent this year, and I believe you are as well.Corey: Oh, yeah. But people listening to this, it's if they're listening the day it's released, this will be during re:Invent. So, by all means, come by the ChaosSearch booth, and see what they have to say. For once they have people who aren't me who are going to be telling stories about these things. And it's fun. Like, I joke, it's nothing but positive here.It's interesting from where I sit seeing the parallels here. For example, we have both had—how we say—adult supervision come in. You have a CEO, Ed, who came over from IBM Storage. I have Mike Julian, whose first love language is of course spreadsheets. And it's great, on some level, realizing that, wow, this company has eclipsed my ability to manage these things myself and put my hands-on everything. And eventually, you have to start letting go. It's a weird growth stage, and it's a heck of a transition. But—Thomas: No, I love it. You know, I mean, I think when we were talking, we were maybe 15 employees. Now, we're pushing 100. We brought on Ed Walsh, who's an amazing CEO. It's funny, I told him about this idea, I invented this technology roughly eight years ago, and he's like, “I love it. Let's do it.” And I wasn't ready to do it.So, you know, five, six years ago, I started the company always knowing that, you know, I'd give him a call once we got the plane up in the air. And it's been great to have him here because the next level up, right, of execution and growth and business development and sales and marketing. So, you're exactly right. I mean, we were a young pup several years ago, when we were talking to you and, you know, we're a little bit older, a little bit wiser. But no, it's great to have Ed here. And just the leadership in general; we've grown immensely.Corey: Now, we are recording this in advance of re:Invent, so there's always the question of, “Wow, are we going to look really silly based upon what is being announced when this airs?” Because it's very hard to predict some things that AWS does. And let's be clear, I always stay away from predictions, just because first, I have a bit of a knack for being right. But also, when I'm right, people will think, “Oh, Corey must have known about that and is leaking,” whereas if I get it wrong, I just look like a fool. There's no win for me if I start doing the predictive dance on stuff like that.But I have to level with you, I have been somewhat surprised that, at least as of this recording, AWS has not moved more in your direction because storing data in S3 is kind of their whole thing, and querying that data through something that isn't Athena has been a bit of a reach for them that they're slowly starting to wrap their heads around. But their UltraWarm nonsense—which is just, okay, great naming there—what is the point of continually having a model where oh, yeah, we're going to just age it out, the stuff that isn't actively being used into S3, rather than coming up with a way to query it there. Because you've done exactly that, and please don't take this as anything other than a statement of fact, they have better access to what S3 is doing than you do. You're forced to deal with this thing entirely from a public API standpoint, which is fine. They can theoretically change the behavior of aspects of S3 to unlock these use cases if they chose to do so. And they haven't. Why is it that you're the only folks that are doing this?Thomas: No, it's a great question, and I'll give them props for continuing to push the data lake [unintelligible 00:17:09] to the cloud providers' S3 because it was really where I saw the world. Lakes, I believe in. I love them. They love them. However, they promote the move the data out to get access, and it seems so counterintuitive on why wouldn't you leave it in and put these services, make them more intelligent? So, it's funny, I've trademark ‘Smart Object Storage,' I actually trademarked—I think you [laugh] were a part of this—‘UltraHot,' right? Because why would you want UltraWarm when you can have UltraHot?And the reason, I feel, is that if you're using Parquet for Athena [unintelligible 00:17:40] store, or Lucene for Elasticsearch, these two index technologies were not designed for cloud storage, for real-time streaming off of cloud storage. So, the trick is, you have to build UltraWarm, get it off of what they consider cold S3 into a more warmer memory or SSD type access. What we did, what the invention I created was, that first read is hot. That first read is fast.Snowflake is a good example. They give you a ten terabyte demo example, and if you have a big instance and you do that first query, maybe several orders or groups, it could take an hour to warm up. The second query is fast. Well, what if the first query is in seconds as well? And that's where we really spent the last five, six years building out the tech and the vision behind this because I like to say you go to a doctor and say, “Hey, Doc, every single time I move my arm, it hurts.” And the doctor says, “Well, don't move your arm.”It's things like that, to your point, it's like, why wouldn't they? I would argue, one, you have to believe it's possible—we're proving that it is—and two, you have to have the technology to do it. Not just the index, but the architecture. So, I believe they will go this direction. You know, little birdies always say that all these companies understand this need.Shoot, Snowflake is trying to be lake-y; Databricks is trying to really bring this warehouse lake concept. But you still do all the pipelining; you still have to do all the data management the way that you don't want to do. It's not a lake. And so my argument is that it's innovation on why. Now, they have money; they have time, but, you know, we have a big head start.Corey: I remembered last year at re:Invent they released a, shall we say, significant change to S3 that it enabled read after write consistency, which is awesome, for again, those of us in the business of misusing things as databases. But for some folks, the majority of folks I would say, it was a, “I don't know what that means and therefore I don't care.” And that's fine. I have no issue with that. There are other folks, some of my customers for example, who are suddenly, “Wait a minute. This means I can sunset this entire janky sidecar metadata system that is designed to make sure that we are consistent in our use of S3 because it now does it automatically under the hood?” And that's awesome. Does that change mean anything for ChaosSearch?Thomas: It doesn't because of our architecture. We're append-only, write-once scenario, so a lot of update-in-place viewpoints. My viewpoint is that if you're seeing S3 as the database and you need that type of consistency, it make sense of why you'd want it, but because of our distributive fabric, our stateless architecture, our append-only nature, it really doesn't affect us.Now, I talked to the S3 team, I said, “Please if you're coming up with this feature, it better not be slower.” I want S3 to be fast, right? And they said, “No, no. It won't affect performance.” I'm like, “Okay. Let's keep that up.”And so to us, any type of S3 capability, we'll take advantage of it if benefits us, whether it's consistency as you indicated, performance, functionality. But we really keep the constructs of S3 access to really limited features: list, put, get. [roll-on 00:20:49] policies to give us read-only access to your data, and a location to write our indices into your account, and then are distributed fabric, our service, acts as those indices and query them or searches them to resolve whatever analytics you need. So, we made it pretty simple, and that is allowed us to make it high performance.Corey: I'll take it a step further because you want to talk about changes since the last time we spoke, it used to be that this was on top of S3, you can store your data anywhere you want, as long as it's S3 in the customer's account. Now, you're also supporting one-click integration with Google Cloud's object storage, which, great. That does mean though, that you're not dependent upon provider-specific implementations of things like a consistency model for how you've built things. It really does use the lowest common denominator—to my understanding—of object stores. Is that something that you're seeing broad adoption of, or is this one of those areas where, well, you have one customer on a different provider, but almost everything lives on the primary? I'm curious what you're seeing for adoption models across multiple providers?Thomas: It's a great question. We built an architecture purposely to be cloud-agnostic. I mean, we use compute in a containerized way, we use object storage in a very simple construct—put, get, list—and we went over to Google because that made sense, right? We have customers on both sides. I would say Amazon is the gorilla, but Google's trying to get there and growing.We had a big customer, Equifax, that's on both Amazon and Google, but we offer the same service. To be frank, it looks like the exact same product. And it should, right? Whether it's Amazon Cloud, or Google Cloud, multi-select and I want to choose either one and get the other one. I would say that different business types are using each one, but our bulk of the business isn't Amazon, but we just this summer released our SaaS offerings, so it's growing.And you know, it's funny, you never know where it comes from. So, we have one customer—actually DigitalRiver—as one of our customers on Amazon for logs, but we're growing in working together to do a BI on GCP or on Google. And so it's kind of funny; they have two departments on two different clouds with two different use cases. And so do they want unification? I'm not sure, but they definitely have their BI on Google and their operations in Amazon. It's interesting.Corey: You know its important to me that people learn how to use the cloud effectively. Thats why I'm so glad that Cloud Academy is sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense. They're a great way to build in demand tech skills the way that, well personally, I learn best which I learn by doing not by reading. They have live cloud labs that you can run in real environments that aren't going to blow up your own bill—I can't stress how important that is. Visit cloudacademy.com/corey. Thats C-O-R-E-Y, don't drop the “E.” Use Corey as a promo-code as well. You're going to get a bunch of discounts on it with a lifetime deal—the price will not go up. It is limited time, they assured me this is not one of those things that is going to wind up being a rug pull scenario, oh no no. Talk to them, tell me what you think. Visit: cloudacademy.com/corey,  C-O-R-E-Y and tell them that I sent you!Corey: I know that I'm going to get letters for this. So, let me just call it out right now. Because I've been a big advocate of pick a provider—I care not which one—and go all-in on it. And I'm sitting here congratulating you on extending to another provider, and people are going to say, “Ah, you're being inconsistent.”No. I'm suggesting that you as a provider have to meet your customers where they are because if someone is sitting in GCP and your entire approach is, “Step one, migrate those four petabytes of data right on over here to AWS,” they're going to call you that jackhole that you would be by making that suggestion and go immediately for option B, which is literally anything that is not ChaosSearch, just based upon that core misunderstanding of their business constraints. That is the way to think about these things. For a vendor position that you are in as an ISV—Independent Software Vendor for those not up on the lingo of this ridiculous industry—you have to meet customers where they are. And it's the right move.Thomas: Well, you just said it. Imagine moving terabytes and petabytes of data.Corey: It sounds terrific if I'm a salesperson for one of these companies working on commission, but for the rest of us, it sounds awful.Thomas: We really are a data fabric across clouds, within clouds. We're going to go where the data is and we're going to provide access to where that data lives. Our whole philosophy is the no-movement movement, right? Don't move your data. Leave it where it is and provide access at scale.And so you may have services in Google that naturally stream to GCS; let's do it there. Imagine moving that amount of data over to Amazon to analyze it, and vice versa. 2020, we're going to be in Azure. They're a totally different type of business, users, and personas, but you're getting asked, “Can you support Azure?” And the answer is, “Yes,” and, “We will in 2022.”So, to us, if you have cloud storage, if you have compute, and it's a big enough business opportunity in the market, we're there. We're going there. When we first started, we were talking to MinIO—remember that open-source, object storage platform?—We've run on our laptops, we run—this [unintelligible 00:25:04] Dr. Seuss thing—“We run over here; we run over there; we run everywhere.”But the honest truth is, you're going to go with the big cloud providers where the business opportunity is, and offer the same solution because the same solution is valued everywhere: simple in; value out; cost-effective; long retention; flexibility. That sounds so basic, but you mentioned this all the time with our Rube Goldberg, Amazon diagrams we see time and time again. It's like, if you looked at that and you were from an alien planet, you'd be like, “These people don't know what they're doing. Why is it so complicated?” And the simple answer is, I don't know why people think it's complicated.To your point about Amazon, why won't they do it? I don't know, but if they did, things would be different. And being honest, I think people are catching on. We do talk to Amazon and others. They see the need, but they also have to build it; they have to invent technology to address it. And using Parquet and Lucene are not the answer.Corey: Yeah, it's too much of a demand on the producers of that data rather than the consumer. And yeah, I would love to be able to go upstream to application developers and demand they do things in certain ways. It turns out as a consultant, you have zero authority to do that. As a DevOps team member, you have limited ability to influence it, but it turns out that being the ‘department of no' quickly turns into being the ‘department of unemployment insurance' because no one wants to work with you. And collaboration—contrary to what people wish to believe—is a key part of working in a modern workplace.Thomas: Absolutely. And it's funny, the demands of IT are getting harder; the actual getting the employees to build out the solutions are getting harder. And so a lot of that time is in the pipeline, is the prep, is the schema, the sharding, and et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. My viewpoint is that should be automated away. More and more databases are being autotune, right?This whole knobs and this and that, to me, Glue is a means to an end. I mean, let's get rid of it. Why can't Athena know what to do? Why can't object storage be Athena and vice versa? I mean, to me, it seems like all this moving through all these services, the classic Amazon viewpoint, even their diagrams of having this centralized repository of S3, move it all out to your services, get results, put it back in, then take it back out again, move it around, it just doesn't make much sense. And so to us, I love S3, love the service. I think it's brilliant—Amazon's first service, right?—but from there get a little smarter. That's where ChaosSearch comes in.Corey: I would argue that S3 is in fact, a modern miracle. And one of those companies saying, “Oh, we have an object store; it's S3 compatible.” It's like, “Yeah. We have S3 at home.” Look at S3 at home, and it's just basically a series of failing Raspberry Pis.But you have this whole ecosystem of things that have built up and sprung up around S3. It is wildly understated just how scalable and massive it is. There was an academic paper recently that won an award on how they use automated reasoning to validate what is going on in the S3 environment, and they talked about hundreds of petabytes in some cases. And folks are saying, ah, S3 is hundreds of petabytes. Yeah, I have clients storing hundreds of petabytes.There are larger companies out there. Steve Schmidt, Amazon's CISO, was recently at a Splunk keynote where he mentioned that in security info alone, AWS itself generates 500 petabytes a day that then gets reduced down to a bunch of stuff, and some of it gets loaded into Splunk. I think. I couldn't really hear the second half of that sentence because of the sound of all of the Splunk salespeople in that room becoming excited so quickly you could hear it.Thomas: [laugh]. I love it. If I could be so bold, those S3 team, they're gods. They are amazing. They created such an amazing service, and when I started playing with S3 now, I guess, 2006 or 7, I mean, we were using for a repository, URL access to get images, I was doing a virtualization [unintelligible 00:29:05] at the time—Corey: Oh, the first time I played with it, “This seems ridiculous and kind of dumb. Why would anyone use this?” Yeah, yeah. It turns out I'm really bad at predicting the future. Another reason I don't do the prediction thing.Thomas: Yeah. And when I started this company officially, five, six years ago, I was thinking about S3 and I was thinking about HDFS not being a good answer. And I said, “I think S3 will actually achieve the goals and performance we need.” It's a distributed file system. You can run parallel puts and parallel gets. And the performance that I was seeing when the data was a certain way, certain size, “Wait, you can get high performance.”And you know, when I first turned on the engine, now four or five years ago, I was like, “Wow. This is going to work. We're off to the races.” And now obviously, we're more than just an idea when we first talked to you. We're a service.We deliver benefits to our customers both in logs. And shoot, this quarter alone we're coming out with new features not just in the logs, which I'll talk about second, but in a direct SQL access. But you know, one thing that you hear time and time again, we talked about it—JSON, CloudTrail, and Kubernetes; this is a real nightmare, and so one thing that we've come out with this quarter is the ability to virtually flatten. Now, you heard time and time again, where, “Okay. I'm going to pick and choose my data because my database can't handle whether it's elastic, or say, relational.” And all of a sudden, “Shoot, I don't have that. I got to reindex that.”And so what we've done is we've created a index technology that we're always planning to come out with that indexes the JSON raw blob, but in the data refinery have, post-index you can select how to unflatten it. Why is that important? Because all that tooling, whether it's elastic or SQL, is now available. You don't have to change anything. Why is Snowflake and BigQuery has these proprietary JSON APIs that none of these tools know how to use to get access to the data?Or you pick and choose. And so when you have a CloudTrail, and you need to know what's going on, if you picked wrong, you're in trouble. So, this new feature we're calling ‘Virtual Flattening'—or I don't know what we're—we have to work with the marketing team on it. And we're also bringing—this is where I get kind of excited where the elastic world, the ELK world, we're bringing correlations into Elasticsearch. And like, how do you do that? They don't have the APIs?Well, our data refinery, again, has the ability to correlate index patterns into one view. A view is an index pattern, so all those same constructs that you had in Kibana, or Grafana, or Elastic API still work. And so, no more denormalizing, no more trying to hodgepodge query over here, query over there. You're actually going to have correlations in Elastic, natively. And we're excited about that.And one more push on the future, Q4 into 2022; we have been given early access to S3 SQL access. And, you know, as I mentioned, correlations in Elastic, but we're going full in on publishing our [TPCH 00:31:56] report, we're excited about publishing those numbers, as well as not just giving early access, but going GA in the first of the year, next year.Corey: I look forward to it. This is also, I guess, it's impossible to have a conversation with you, even now, where you're not still forward-looking about what comes next. Which is natural; that is how we get excited about the things that we're building. But so much less of what you're doing now in our conversations have focused around what's coming, as opposed to the neat stuff you're already doing. I had to double-check when we were talking just now about oh, yeah, is that Google cloud object store support still something that is roadmapped, or is that out in the real world?No, it's very much here in the real world, available today. You can use it. Go click the button, have fun. It's neat to see at least some evidence that not all roadmaps are wishes and pixie dust. The things that you were talking to me about years ago are established parts of ChaosSearch now. It hasn't been just, sort of, frozen in amber for years, or months, or these giant periods of time. Because, again, there's—yeah, don't sell me vaporware; I know how this works. The things you have promised have come to fruition. It's nice to see that.Thomas: No, I appreciate it. We talked a little while ago, now a few years ago, and it was a bit of aspirational, right? We had a lot to do, we had more to do. But now when we have big customers using our product, solving their problems, whether it's security, performance, operation, again—at scale, right? The real pain is, sure you have a small ELK cluster or small Athena use case, but when you're dealing with terabytes to petabytes, trillions of rows, right—billions—when you were dealing trillions, billions are now small. Millions don't even exist, right?And you're graduating from computer science in college and you say the word, “Trillion,” they're like, “Nah. No one does that.” And like you were saying, people do petabytes and exabytes. That's the world we're living in, and that's something that we really went hard at because these are challenging data problems and this is where we feel we uniquely sit. And again, we don't have to break the bank while doing it.Corey: Oh, yeah. Or at least as of this recording, there's a meme going around, again, from an old internal Google Video, of, “I just want to serve five terabytes of traffic,” and it's an internal Google discussion of, “I don't know how to count that low.” And, yeah.Thomas: [laugh].Corey: But there's also value in being able to address things at much larger volume. I would love to see better responsiveness options around things like Deep Archive because the idea of being able to query that—even if you can wait a day or two—becomes really interesting just from the perspective of, at that point, current cost for one petabyte of data in Glacier Deep Archive is 1000 bucks a month. That is ‘why would I ever delete data again?' Pricing.Thomas: Yeah. You said it. And what's interesting about our technology is unlike, let's say Lucene, when you index it, it could be 3, 4, or 5x the raw size, our representation is smaller than gzip. So, it is a full representation, so why don't you store it efficiently long-term in S3? Oh, by the way, with the Glacier; we support Glacier too.And so, I mean, it's amazing the cost of data with cloud storage is dramatic, and if you can make it hot and activated, that's the real promise of a data lake. And, you know, it's funny, we use our own service to run our SaaS—we log our own data, we monitor, we alert, have dashboards—and I can't tell you how cheap our service is to ourselves, right? Because it's so cost-effective for long-tail, not just, oh, a few weeks; we store a whole year's worth of our operational data so we can go back in time to debug something or figure something out. And a lot of that's savings. Actually, huge savings is cloud storage with a distributed elastic compute fabric that is serverless. These are things that seem so obvious now, but if you have SSDs, and you're moving things around, you know, a team of IT professionals trying to manage it, it's not cheap.Corey: Oh, yeah, that's the story. It's like, “Step one, start paying for using things in cloud.” “Okay, great. When do I stop paying?” “That's the neat part. You don't.” And it continues to grow and build.And again, this is the thing I learned running a business that focuses on this, the people working on this, in almost every case, are more expensive than the infrastructure they're working on. And that's fine. I'd rather pay people than technologies. And it does help reaffirm, on some level, that—people don't like this reminder—but you have to generate more value than you cost. So, when you're sitting there spending all your time trying to avoid saving money on, “Oh, I've listened to ChaosSearch talk about what they do a few times. I can probably build my own and roll it at home.”It's, I've seen the kind of work that you folks have put into this—again, you have something like 100 employees now; it is not just you building this—my belief has always been that if you can buy something that gets you 90, 95% of where you are, great. Buy it, and then yell at whoever selling it to you for the rest of it, and that'll get you a lot further than, “We're going to do this ourselves from first principles.” Which is great for a weekend project for just something that you have a passion for, but in production mistakes show. I've always been a big proponent of buying wherever you can. It's cheaper, which sounds weird, but it's true.Thomas: And we do the same thing. We have single-sign-on support; we didn't build that ourselves, we use a service now. Auth0 is one of our providers now that owns that [crosstalk 00:37:12]—Corey: Oh, you didn't roll your own authentication layer? Why ever not? Next, you're going to tell me that you didn't roll your own payment gateway when you wound up charging people on your website to sign up?Thomas: You got it. And so, I mean, do what you do well. Focus on what you do well. If you're repeating what everyone seems to do over and over again, time, costs, complexity, and… service, it makes sense. You know, I'm not trying to build storage; I'm using storage. I'm using a great, wonderful service, cloud object storage.Use whats works, whats works well, and do what you do well. And what we do well is make cloud object storage analytical and fast. So, call us up and we'll take away that 2 a.m. call you have when your cluster falls down, or you have a new workload that you are going to go to the—I don't know, the beach house, and now the weekend shot, right? Spin it up, stream it in. We'll take over.Corey: Yeah. So, if you're listening to this and you happen to be at re:Invent, which is sort of an open question: why would you be at re:Invent while listening to a podcast? And then I remember how long the shuttle lines are likely to be, and yeah. So, if you're at re:Invent, make it on down to the show floor, visit the ChaosSearch booth, tell them I sent you, watch for the wince, that's always worth doing. Thomas, if people have better decision-making capability than the two of us do, where can they find you if they're not in Las Vegas this week?Thomas: So, you find us online chaossearch.io. We have so much material, videos, use cases, testimonials. You can reach out to us, get a free trial. We have a self-service experience where connect to your S3 bucket and you're up and running within five minutes.So, definitely chaossearch.io. Reach out if you want a hand-held, white-glove experience POV. If you have those type of needs, we can do that with you as well. But we booth on re:Invent and I don't know the booth number, but I'm sure either we've assigned it or we'll find it out.Corey: Don't worry. This year, it is a low enough attendance rate that I'm projecting that you will not be as hard to find in recent years. For example, there's only one expo hall this year. What a concept. If only it hadn't taken a deadly pandemic to get us here.Thomas: Yeah. But you know, we'll have the ability to demonstrate Chaos at the booth, and really, within a few minutes, you'll say, “Wow. How come I never heard of doing it this way?” Because it just makes so much sense on why you do it this way versus the merry-go-round of data movement, and transformation, and schema management, let alone all the sharding that I know is a nightmare, more often than not.Corey: And we'll, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:39:40]. Thomas, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. As always, it's appreciated.Thomas: Corey, thank you. Let's do this again.Corey: We absolutely will. Thomas Hazel, CTO and Founder of ChaosSearch. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment because I have dared to besmirch the honor of your homebrewed object store, running on top of some trusty and reliable Raspberries Pie.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Prog-Watch
Episode 848 - Variety + Three Colours Dark on Progressive Discoveries

Prog-Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 88:12


More great, contemporary progressive sounds await on this week's Prog-Watch! We'll hear music from Moron Police, Glacier, Jethro Tull, A Secret River, and Hasse Fröberg & Musical Companion! Plus, our friend and resident reviewer, Dr. Rob Fisher, returns to take us on a voyage of Progressive Discovery with the latest album by Three Colours Dark!

MoneywebNOW
[TOP STORY] The place of endowments within financial planning

MoneywebNOW

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 4:22


For flexibility and optionality in terms of properly diversifying offshore, one needs to know the capacity and the rules: Roenica Tyson – investment product manager at Glacier by Sanlam.

MoneywebNOW
Did buying Friday's Omicron selloff make you money?

MoneywebNOW

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 20:27


Sanlam Private Wealth's Nick Kunze takes a look at market responses to Omicron. Frank Magwegwe of Sanlam Health Solutions as people downgrade their medical aid to save money, but at what cost? Roenica Tyson investment product manager at Glacier by Sanlam talks all things endowments.

Live From Progzilla Towers
Live From Progzilla Towers - Edition 407

Live From Progzilla Towers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 177:53


Welcome to Live From Progzilla Towers Edition 407. In this edition we heard music by Gary Brooker, Trip The Witch, Jakub Krieger, Golden Earring, Yes, Glacier, Pain Of Salvation, John Ghost, Nine Skies, Big Big Train, Not A Good Sign, Peter Gabriel, The Flower Kings, Spheroe, Cal, Tigran Hamasyan & The Blackheart Orchestra.

Rick Steves' Europe Video
Chamonix, France: Mer de Glace Glacier

Rick Steves' Europe Video

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 2:29


One of the world's oldest mountain resorts, Chamonix has long made it easy for romantics to enjoy its alpine wonders—starting with a cogwheel train to the Mer de Glace glacier. Nowadays, visitors can stroll inside the “sea of ice” while noting poignant markers indicating how dramatically it's shrinking. For European travel information, visit ricksteves.com.

Good Swill Hunting - A Budget Beer Review Podcast

We don't know what a glacier tastes like, but Kokanee beer might be as close as we get. This Canadian budget beer is an oldie and by some accounts; a goodie. Learn more about the beers we try, our team of experts, and our ratings at GoodSwillHunting.com.

Walking Distance
#20 | Bear Safety ft. Tom Smith

Walking Distance

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:54


In this episode of Walking Distance presented by The Trek and hosted by Blissful Hiker (Alison Young), we are joined by Tom Smith, a professor of wildlife sciences at Brigham Young University in Utah. Initially Smith's research specialities included bighorn sheep and caribou, but when he began working at Katmai National Park in Southwest Alaska, he shifted to studying the most common animal there: bears. In the last 20 years, Smith has conducted research in Alaska, India, and in bear country in the lower 48 states.  Blissful Hiker covers why it's important to have bear deterrent, rules of thumb about making noise while on the trail, methods to bear-proof a campsite, and explains what conventional bear wisdom still holds true. Garage Grown Gear discount code: Use code “distance10” to save 10% at garagegrowngear.com.  Gossamer Gear discount code: Use code “walkingdistance” to save 15% off your cart at GossamerGear.com. Interview with Tom Smith 2:00 - Introduction to ‘bear country' and Tom Smith 3:42 - What are your thoughts on Timothy Treadwell, and his involvement in Katmai National Park with bear environmentalism? 5:12 - Our podcast is for hikers and backpackers, and to help people feel safe and capable outdoors. One thing you've already mentioned is bear deterrent, so could you break down what bear spray is and how to use it best? 9:00 - I've read articles about people spraying bear spray around their tent, which is definitely not the correct use. Is there data on that? 12:00 - Does bear spray train bears to stay away from humans? Is there any data that bears might associate the pain of bear spray with humans if they experience it? 12:50 - I'm a bit embarrassed to share this story, but last July I was in Glacier National Park, and I hiked alone at dawn in bear country. I didn't see any bears, but I was playing with fire, wouldn't you say? 17:22 - Glacier rangers told me that bears are curious, and that bear bells and some other noises like singing might actually attract them. What do you know about that? 19:32 - People who go on long distance trails, for instance I was on the Continental Divide Trail, often hike alone. I wonder if there's a rule of thumb about making noise if you're alone and you want to ward bears off? 22:24 - You said something really interesting, that in Yellowstone or Glacier the bears are more aggressive than on the coastline of Alaska, for instance. Why is that? 26:53 - We've spoken a lot about food storage on Walking Distance, from cooking and eating away from where you camp, using a bear can, and pack away smelly items. But you've mentioned other things that aren't as obvious, such as not using very smelly shampoo, and that gas canisters can attract bears. 33:47 - Let's shift to bear encounters; as you've said, most bears are risk averse, and they don't want to fight with us. But in the rare instance that a bear is charging you, what do you do? 36:50 - How do you bear-proof a campsite? 39:40 - Would you even use your bear-proofing methods in Montana? 41:40 - The most surprising advice I read in your work is that the conventional wisdom of playing dead around a bear is wrong, that you should always stand your ground. Can you explain? 46:20 - If we were to sum all this up for our listeners, I'd say to be aware in bear country, carry your deterrent at the ready, hike with another person and have a plan of how to defend yourself. 47:08 - What are the differences in behavior in bear types? What is the reason that a bear would be clearly predatory, is that rare? 50:13 - Although it's rare that you will have a bear encounter, carrying bear spray is like wearing your seatbelt in the car: it might save your life. Mentioned in this episode: Tom Smith  Critter Gitter  Camp Fence  Sky Blazer Flare  Bear Safety Handout  Get all of the Walking Distance Podcast episodes. About Alison Young Alison Young, aka Blissful Hiker, is a former host and producer at American Public Media and professional flutist. She's thru-hiked New Zealand's Te Araroa and the Pacific Crest Trail, as well as long trails in South America, South Africa, Europe, Pakistan and all over the US. In her podcast Blissful Hiker, she shares personal essays from the trail along with collected sound. Her goal in life is to hike until she drops. Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes (and please leave us a review)!  Find us on Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Podcasts. Follow Walking Distance on Facebook and Instagram. Follow The Trek on YouTube.

Disgorgeous
Episode 183: Friendsgiving, Main Course: Mixed Case (Recorded at Wild World Festival)

Disgorgeous

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 96:14


ITS THE WILDWORLD EPISODE, AND BOY DID OUR BOYS WORK IT.  This weeks episode is a hodgepodge of different interviews with booze luminaries about what beverages inspired them. Duck keeps calling it bricolage, but fuck that guy. Thank you to our guests: Alice Jun from Hana Makgeoli, Andy Brennan from Aaron Burr,  Cooper Anderson from Austin Winery,  Nika Carlson from Greenpoint Cidery, and James Priest and Amy Rodriguez from the Referend Bier Blendery. Thank you SO MUCH TO THE WILD WORLD FESTIVAL and our Temporary studio at OTTRA  luxury furniture.  ////LIST////Aaron Burr Cidery, Bachinette, 2020//American Wine Project, Marquette, ‘Glacier's Edge Gardens,' 2021//Alta Marfa Wines, Robert Clay Vineyards Tempranillo, ‘Sobrino,' NV///Austin Winery,  Piquette, NV//Pipe and Tabor Coffee Roasters,  Santa Cruz Ozolotopec, Mexico ////Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/Disgorgeous)

This Morning With Gordon Deal
This Weekend with Gordon Deal November 13, 2021

This Morning With Gordon Deal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021


How Baylor steered lower-income parents to debt they couldn't afford, what is Aaron Rodgers' future as an endorser, and teddy bear lost in Glacier park returned to 6-year-old girl.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Glacier ice samples act as records of climate change's impact on Earth

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 9:05


The impacts of a warming world and changing climate are more evident every day. Many of the Earth's tropical glaciers are in jeopardy because of human activity's effect on the atmosphere. William Brangham reports on a couple in Columbus, Ohio, who have dedicated their scientific careers to preserving and studying these crucial, endangered parts of the planet's ecosystem. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders