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Polar region around the Earth's South Pole

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  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST
Antarctic

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Best podcasts about Antarctic

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Latest podcast episodes about Antarctic

Off Track - ABC RN
Antarctic blue whales and their amazing hums

Off Track - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 25:18


The song calls of Antarctic blue whales are so deep that they're almost infrasonic - you feel them as much as you hear them.

Science Friday
Omicron And Kids, Ivermectin Origins, Icefish Nests. Jan 14, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 47:15


A Replacement Heart, From A Pig This week, doctors reported that they had successfully transplanted a heart taken from a pig into a human being, a type of procedure known as xenotransplantation. The pig had been genetically modified to lack a certain protein thought to be responsible for organ rejection in previous transplant attempts. The patient, a 57 year-old man, will be monitored for any sign of rejection or infection with a porcine virus—but doctors are hopeful that the work will lead to further transplants and a new source of replacement organs for people. Science journalist Roxxane Kamsi joins Ira to talk about that and other stories from the week in science, including research into how antivirals work in people infected with HIV, the role of clothes dryers on microplastics pollution, a push to make the U.S. electric grid greener, and more.   Omicron Sparks Surge In Pediatric Hospitalizations Omicron's rapid spread has many parents and caregivers of young children on edge. The most recent CDC data shows 5.3 cases per 100,000 children under four are hospitalized with COVID-19 in the United States, the highest number since the pandemic started. And kids under five still aren't eligible to be vaccinated. When word went out that we were going to answer questions about COVID and kids, we were flooded with questions from our listeners. To help answer some of those questions, and better understand how to keep our kids safe, Ira spoke with Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, pediatrician, and professor of global health and infectious diseases at Stanford University, and Dr. Rick Malley, infectious diseases specialist at Boston Children's Hospital and professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.   Ivermectin's False Reputation Exemplifies How Misinformation Spread Not a single scientific or health authority in the U.S. recommends the use of the anti-parasitic drug ivermectin to treat or prevent COVID-19. Still, some Americans see the unproven drug as a way out of the pandemic. Ivermectin is mostly used in large animals and is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating human conditions, including head lice and stomach worms. But across the country, demand for the drug has surged in recent months — leading to a spike in hospitalizations for human exposures to ivermectin. The drug is among the latest politically divisive public health issues unfolding across the country. The situation has fast-tracked conversations about the risks and benefits of publicizing research findings that have not yet been vetted by the scientific community. That's because much of the misinformation on ivermectin draws on insufficient data — some coming from low-quality studies, including ones that were retracted after further examination revealed problems and even potential fraud. Read the rest at sciencefriday.com. A Massive New Find Of Icefish Found Near Antarctic The frigid waters near Antarctica are home to an unusual family of fishes collectively known as the icefish. They have translucent blood, white hearts, and have adapted to live without red blood cells or hemoglobin, relying instead on copper compounds that function better at low temperatures. Now, researchers mapping the floor of the Weddell Sea report in the journal Current Biology that they have spotted a massive colony of the unusual sea creatures—containing over 60 million icefish nests. “A few dozen nests have been observed elsewhere in the Antarctic, but this find is orders of magnitude larger,” said Autun Purser, of the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven, Germany. Purser and his colleagues were mapping the seafloor of the Filchner ice shelf region, in an area of thermal upwelling, where there are slightly warmer temperatures. They found masses of icefish nests clumped close together as far as the eye can see, somewhat like a land-based colony of nesting penguins. Purser joins Ira to talk about the discovery, and what's known about the ultra-cold ecosystems of Antarctic seas.    

Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle
Inside Europe 13.01.2022

Inside Europe | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 55:00


Tension builds on the Ukrainian-Russian border, car smashing provides release from COVID stress in the Netherlands, Greece's missing marbles and Serbians on Novak Djokovic. Also: Turkey's not-so “pious generation", life after Brexit, retreating Scottish snow patches and a violin made from the floorboards of legendary Antarctic explorer Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton.

Speak Up For The Ocean Blue
SUFB 1256: Invasive species arriving in Antarctica buy boats

Speak Up For The Ocean Blue

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 21:54


Is visiting the Antarctic on your bucket list? If so, you may want to take the right boat to get there.  PhD researcher at the University of Cambridge, Arlie McCarthy, wrote a great piece that we should all be talking about regarding invasive species reaching the Antarctic on Conversation.com. The article describes the difficult path invasive species have had to travel to reach the shores of the Antarctic. The Southern Ocean's currents rotate clockwise around the continent deflecting many of the species. If the invasive species do make it to the coastal area, then they would have to survive the freezing cold temperatures and rough waters. These conditions make it difficult for invasive species to settle. Unless they travel by boat. Humans visit the continent for a variety of reasons: tourism, research, fishing, and supply researchers. The ships they take to reach the frozen continent provide invasive species with a direct pathway to the coastal area increasing the chance of species survival and colonization.  Invasive mussels and crabs can pose problems for local species. Mussels can outcompete local species for space by forming mussel beds and altering the habitat. Crabs can be a new threat to local populations as they become new predators. The results can alter the Antarctic coastline as we know it. There are measures that can be taken to reduce the level of exposure to invasive species. Add a coating to the hull of the boat to ensure animals and plants do not stick to the hull. Exchanging ballast water outside the coastal zone would also help. Preventative measures are helpful, but enforcement will be necessary to ensure success.  Link to article: https://theconversation.com/antarcticas-unique-ecosystem-is-threatened-by-invasive-species-hitchhiking-on-ships-174640 Connect with Speak Up For Blue: Website: https://www.speakupforblue.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/speakupforblue/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/speakupforblue  

The Big Travel Podcast
126. Will Bolsover; Natural World Safaris, Big Cats in Siberia, Little Lizards in Madagascar and the Challenges of Covid-Era Travel

The Big Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 34:30


A year spent camping out in the bush in Cameroon led Will Bolsover from Natural World Safaris make travel his life's work. From tracking tigers in Siberia, to finding hidden corners of Madagascar and most recently spending 48 minutes in the Antarctic followed by 11 nights in hotel quarantine…it's not always straightforward but it certainly sounds absolutely magical.  www.naturalworldsafaris.com On this episode we talk: Launching Will's own travel podcast for Natural World Safaris Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Polar Regions  From adventure through to luxury Guiding in Francophone Africa  Starting with primates and throwing in big cats and bears  The best way to see the Galapagos  How nobody combines being a vet and a priest How Madagascar is an unsung hero  Lisa's low cultural references Up close and personal with wildlife in Madagascar  Lemurs bouncing across the lawns  The haunting calls of the teddy bear creature  Needing to be patient with the weather in the Polar regions  Spending 48 minutes in Antarctica!  Following by ten days in hotel quarantine outside Heathrow Hotel quarantine being not as bad as he worried it would be  Boling mulled wine in the kettle  Lisa finding home quarantine very difficult Doing a lot of solo travel  Tracking tigers in Siberia  Spending a year in the Bush in Cameroon  How the standout moment was going home! Building a football pitch The transient periods of travel can be challenging  How leaving on a plane can access intense feelings Balancing his work with children Swimming with whales in Sri Lanka And Sperm Whales in Dominica  How the community of conservationists is key  Stargazing in the middle of nowhere  The pandemic being a chance to re-set travel Travel bans affecting everyone from high end companies to the guides on the ground in Botswana  The travel industry needing industry-specific support  Morcheeba at sunset on the ridge of the Atlas Mountains www.naturalworldsafaris.com @willbolsover @portraitsonhumanity  

Scotland Outdoors
Trees, Birds, Peatland, Antarctic Expeditions and Gaelic Place Names

Scotland Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 83:14


Mark and Euan with this week's Scotland Outdoors podcast.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
Earth and Mars Were Formed from Inner Solar System Material

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 29:08


The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 25 Episode 2*Earth and Mars were formed from inner Solar System materialA new study has confirmed that the Earth and Mars were formed from material that largely originated in the inner Solar System – with only a tiny few percent originating beyond Jupiter's orbit.*Black holes carve out gigantic bubbles in a massive galaxy clusterAstronomers have found four enormous cavities, or bubbles, at the centre of a galactic cluster which appear to have been carved out by a pair of erupting supermassive black holes closely orbiting each other.*France launches its new signet spy satellitesArianespace has successfully launched a Vega rocket carrying three new French spy satellites into orbit.*A Turkish delight in orbitSpaceX have launched a new Turkish telecommunications satellite.*The Science ReportWarnings that the Thwaites Glacier could shatter part of the Antarctic ice shelf within five years.The top 10 government-subsidised medicines prescribed in Australia.The Australian Army to build self-propelled 155 mm howitzers.How smart are brain surgeons and rocket scientists really.Alex on Tech your digital footprintListen to SpaceTime on your favorite App with our universal listen link: https://link.chtbl.com/spacetime For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen to. Thank you…https://bitesz.com

MPR News with Angela Davis
Ann Bancroft Foundation inspires big dreams for girls

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 48:50


Ann Bancroft was the first woman to reach the North Pole on foot with dog sleds in 1986. A few years later she skied across the ice to the South Pole with a group of three other women, inspiring students across the country with updates along the journey.  But polar expeditions aren't her only legacy. Bancroft started a foundation 25 years ago that has awarded grants totaling more than $2 million to thousands of Minnesotan girls who have big dreams and need a boost.  MPR News host Angela Davis talks with Bancroft and the new executive director of the Ann Bancroft Foundation about encouraging and uplifting girls. Guests:  Ann Bancroft is an adventurer, author and teacher. She was the first woman to reach the North Pole on foot and sled and to complete a number of other expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic. She's the founder of the Ann Bancroft Foundation.  Ethelind B. Kaba is executive director of the Ann Bancroft Foundation.  Use the audio player above to listen to the full conversation. Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS.

This is Our Time
Antarctic Polar Plunge

This is Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 2:47


It's a New Year's Tradition! The polar plunge...it's not something that's done quietly. Dive into the icy waters with us. Brought to you by the Audio Love Newsletter; Unforgettable short audio clips, with the incredible backstory, delivered right to your inbox. Subscribe here: https://bit.ly/Audio-love

Guy Benson Show
Here We Go Again: Surge In Covid Cases Prompt School Lockdowns

Guy Benson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 109:47


Guy Benson Show - 1-3-2022 [00:00:00] 3:06 pm - Here We Go Again: Another Day, Anoth [00:16:50] 3:28 pm - Scott Gottelieb : Schools should not [00:18:21] 3:35 pm - Josh Kraushaar, Politics Editor at N [00:33:15] 3:54 pm - Antarctic outpost hit by Covid-19 ou [00:36:34] 4:06 pm - Mollie Hemingway Senior Editor at Th [00:51:57] 4:26 pm - Woke Tales: NY School Replaced Popul [00:54:57] 4:35 pm - AOC Spotted in Miami Beach as NYC Re [01:09:21] 4:53 pm - AOC reaction [01:13:09] 5:06 pm - Dr. Nicole Saphier, Board Certified [01:25:34] 5:23 pm -RIP Betty White [01:31:30] 5:35 pm - Homestretch: Snow Day! [01:40:25] 5:48 pm - Homestretch: Christmas Covid

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla
US Air Force Colonel leaks coordinates of ancient Antarctic Ruins

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 6:55


On December 26, my US Army source, JP, was given a set of geographical coordinates from an unnamed Lt Colonel (USAF) who simply told him to publicly release them. JP had seen the officer at a classified briefing he attended at a military base where he is currently stationed, where he was told about ancient ruins being found on Antarctica, the Moon, Mars, and elsewhere in our solar system. These were being investigated in joint missions with various Earth nations, including China. JP participated in the Moon mission, which I covered in my previous interview with him, and in an earlier joint mission to Ganymede. The coordinates given to JP (72°31'12"S 3°36'26"W) appear to show a large building complex located about 150 miles (240 km) from the Antarctic coastline in Queen Maud Land. This is an area that was claimed by Hitler's Third Reich and where an Antarctic Colony, Base 211, was secretly established during World War 2.

Shirtloads of Science
Nuyina - Australia's new Antarctic Traveller (270)

Shirtloads of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 22:38


Australia has a new Antarctic Vessel. Jono Reeve takes Dr Karl on a virtual tour of the features of the RSV Nuyina.  drkarl.com RSV Nuyina

Woman's Hour
Weekend Woman's Hour: Sarah Ransome, Sheila Watt-Cloutier, Donna Ward

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 57:39


British woman Sarah Ransome says she wanted to be at Ghislaine Maxwell trial when it started: not to testify but to see justice take its course. Like the four women who gave evidence, she says she's also a victim of Epstein's and Maxwell's. She tells us more about her story and Harriet Wistrich, founder of Centre for Women's Justice discusses the wider impact this case could have. Sheila Watt-Cloutier, is a world renowned human rights and climate change activist, who has made it her life's work to protect her Inuit culture and the Arctic regions where Inuit live, in Greenland, Canada and Alaska. She was born in Arctic Canada and launched the first legal petition linking climate change to human rights. We discuss the word 'spinster' and what it really means with Australian author Donna Ward. Her new book She I Dare Not Name: A Spinster's Meditations on Life., explores the meaning and purpose she has fought to find in a life lived entirely accidentally without a partner or children. BBC History is launching a 100 objects collection to mark 100 years of the BBC in 2022. Head of History Robert Seatter gives us a sneak peak into a few objects which represent the history of women at the BBC including a 1930s job advert looking to recruit the first women TV announcers, a cookbook by Madhur Jaffrey and a 1920s scrapbook from Evelyn Dove, the first black female singer to perform on BBC. British women weren't allowed to visit the Antarctic until 1983 but now scores of women are making major contributions to polar science. Morgan Seag who has just submitted her PhD in gendered institutional change in 20th century Antarctic science to the University of Cambridge and Jo Johnson who has visited Antarctica seven times tell us more.

The English Heritage Podcast
Episode 144 - Life on ice: Sir Ernest Shackleton and the blue plaque polar explorers

The English Heritage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 40:08


On the centenary of the death of Antarctic explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton, we're joined by senior historian Howard Spencer to discuss Shackleton's adventures and the blue plaque that commemorates his achievements at his former London home. We also discuss the exploits of five other polar explorers honoured by blue plaques for their commitments to mapping the globe and pushing the limits of human endurance. To learn more about English Heritage's blue plaque scheme, go to www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/blue-plaques

Woman's Hour
Women of Snow and Ice; Sheila Watt-Cloutier; Antarctic Women; Nancy Campbell and Cold Water Swimming

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 57:27


Sheila Watt-Cloutier, is a world renowned human rights and climate change activist, who has made it her life's work to protect her Inuit culture and the Arctic regions where Inuit live, in Greenland, Canada and Alaska. Sheila was born in Kuujjuaq in Arctic Canada where she lived traditionally, travelling only by dog team for the first ten years of her life. She was elected as President of the Inuit Circumpolar Council in 1995 and launched the first legal petition linking climate change to human rights - work that led to her being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Nancy Campbell is captivated by the stark, rugged beauty of ice and its solid but impermanent nature. Her book The Library of Snow and Ice is about her time spent living in Upernavik, a small town in north-western Greenland and the traces left by explorers of the Arctic and Antarctic. Her recent book Fifty Words for Snow looks at the origins and mythologies of snow around the globe. She shares with Emma her fascination for snow, ice and its place in our world. British women were banned from visiting Antarctica until 1983 when Janet Thomson was finally granted passage by the British Antarctic Survey. But now scores of women are making major contributions to polar science, especially those working on the stability of ice shelves and sheets. So how did women break through the ice ceiling to create opportunities and become leaders in their fields? Emma speaks to Morgan Seag who has just submitted her PhD in gendered institutional change in 20th century Antarctic science to the University of Cambridge and Jo Johnson who has visited Antarctica seven times with the British Antarctic Survey. We also hear from Dr Alison Banwell, a British glaciologist and research scientist who is currently based at the University of Colorado Boulder and her team conducting research on the ice right now; Rebecca Dell and Laura Stevens. Heading to the cold of the Arctic and the Antarctic wrapped up in the right gear is one thing but there are some women that actually choose to immerse themselves in freezing water, even in winter here in the UK. Hayley Dorian is one of them, she has set up a swimming group called Wild Sea Women who meet to embrace the waves in North East England and South-West Scotland . But are there benefits of cold water swimming? Emma finds out from Hayley and Dr Heather Massey who works in the Extreme Environments Lab at the University of Portsmouth.

This is Our Time
Skua Symphony Slow Radio

This is Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 3:16


Time for some slow radio...take a walk with me on Paulet Island, in the archipelago of Antarctica. No agenda. No story. Just get lost in the sounds of walking amongst these curious creatures. A walking path between the water and their rookery...with the perfect natural amphitheatre. These large gulls are better known for their ability to thieve food, than hunting food. Brought to you by the Audio Love Newsletter; Unforgettable short audio clips, with the incredible backstory, delivered right to your inbox. Subscribe here: https://bit.ly/Audio-love

New Books in Environmental Studies
Jennifer Fay, "Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene" (Oxford UP, 2018)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 112:08


Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene (Oxford UP, 2018) explores the connection between cinema and artificial weather, climates, and even planets in or on which hospitality and survival are at stake. Cinema's dominant mode of aesthetic world-making is often at odds with the very real human world it is meant to simulate. The chapters in this book take the reader to a scene —the mise-en-scène— where human world-making is undone by the force of human activity, whether it is explicitly for the sake of making a film, or for practicing war and nuclear science, or for the purpose of addressing climate change in ways that exacerbate its already inhospitable effects. The episodes in this book emphasize our always unnatural and unwelcoming environment as a matter of production, a willed and wanted milieu, however harmful, that is inseparable from but also made perceivable through film. While no one film or set of films adds up to a totalizing explanation of climate change, cinema enables us to glimpse anthropogenic environments as both an accidental effect of human activity and a matter of design. Chapters on Buster Keaton, American atomic test films, film noir, the art of China's Three Gorges Dam, and films of early Antarctic exploration trace parallel histories of film and location design that spell out the ambitions, sensations, and narratives of the Anthropocene, especially as it consolidates into the Great Acceleration starting in 1945. Jennifer Fay is Associate Professor of English and Director of Film Studies, Vanderbilt University Gustavo E. Gutiérrez Suárez is MA in Anthropology, and BA in Social Communication. His areas of interest include Andean and Amazonian Anthropology, Film theory and aesthetics. You can follow him on Twitter vía @GustavoEGSuarez. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books in History
Jennifer Fay, "Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene" (Oxford UP, 2018)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 112:08


Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene (Oxford UP, 2018) explores the connection between cinema and artificial weather, climates, and even planets in or on which hospitality and survival are at stake. Cinema's dominant mode of aesthetic world-making is often at odds with the very real human world it is meant to simulate. The chapters in this book take the reader to a scene —the mise-en-scène— where human world-making is undone by the force of human activity, whether it is explicitly for the sake of making a film, or for practicing war and nuclear science, or for the purpose of addressing climate change in ways that exacerbate its already inhospitable effects. The episodes in this book emphasize our always unnatural and unwelcoming environment as a matter of production, a willed and wanted milieu, however harmful, that is inseparable from but also made perceivable through film. While no one film or set of films adds up to a totalizing explanation of climate change, cinema enables us to glimpse anthropogenic environments as both an accidental effect of human activity and a matter of design. Chapters on Buster Keaton, American atomic test films, film noir, the art of China's Three Gorges Dam, and films of early Antarctic exploration trace parallel histories of film and location design that spell out the ambitions, sensations, and narratives of the Anthropocene, especially as it consolidates into the Great Acceleration starting in 1945. Jennifer Fay is Associate Professor of English and Director of Film Studies, Vanderbilt University Gustavo E. Gutiérrez Suárez is MA in Anthropology, and BA in Social Communication. His areas of interest include Andean and Amazonian Anthropology, Film theory and aesthetics. You can follow him on Twitter vía @GustavoEGSuarez. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Film
Jennifer Fay, "Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene" (Oxford UP, 2018)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 112:08


Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene (Oxford UP, 2018) explores the connection between cinema and artificial weather, climates, and even planets in or on which hospitality and survival are at stake. Cinema's dominant mode of aesthetic world-making is often at odds with the very real human world it is meant to simulate. The chapters in this book take the reader to a scene —the mise-en-scène— where human world-making is undone by the force of human activity, whether it is explicitly for the sake of making a film, or for practicing war and nuclear science, or for the purpose of addressing climate change in ways that exacerbate its already inhospitable effects. The episodes in this book emphasize our always unnatural and unwelcoming environment as a matter of production, a willed and wanted milieu, however harmful, that is inseparable from but also made perceivable through film. While no one film or set of films adds up to a totalizing explanation of climate change, cinema enables us to glimpse anthropogenic environments as both an accidental effect of human activity and a matter of design. Chapters on Buster Keaton, American atomic test films, film noir, the art of China's Three Gorges Dam, and films of early Antarctic exploration trace parallel histories of film and location design that spell out the ambitions, sensations, and narratives of the Anthropocene, especially as it consolidates into the Great Acceleration starting in 1945. Jennifer Fay is Associate Professor of English and Director of Film Studies, Vanderbilt University Gustavo E. Gutiérrez Suárez is MA in Anthropology, and BA in Social Communication. His areas of interest include Andean and Amazonian Anthropology, Film theory and aesthetics. You can follow him on Twitter vía @GustavoEGSuarez. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

New Books in Dance
Jennifer Fay, "Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene" (Oxford UP, 2018)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 112:08


Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene (Oxford UP, 2018) explores the connection between cinema and artificial weather, climates, and even planets in or on which hospitality and survival are at stake. Cinema's dominant mode of aesthetic world-making is often at odds with the very real human world it is meant to simulate. The chapters in this book take the reader to a scene —the mise-en-scène— where human world-making is undone by the force of human activity, whether it is explicitly for the sake of making a film, or for practicing war and nuclear science, or for the purpose of addressing climate change in ways that exacerbate its already inhospitable effects. The episodes in this book emphasize our always unnatural and unwelcoming environment as a matter of production, a willed and wanted milieu, however harmful, that is inseparable from but also made perceivable through film. While no one film or set of films adds up to a totalizing explanation of climate change, cinema enables us to glimpse anthropogenic environments as both an accidental effect of human activity and a matter of design. Chapters on Buster Keaton, American atomic test films, film noir, the art of China's Three Gorges Dam, and films of early Antarctic exploration trace parallel histories of film and location design that spell out the ambitions, sensations, and narratives of the Anthropocene, especially as it consolidates into the Great Acceleration starting in 1945. Jennifer Fay is Associate Professor of English and Director of Film Studies, Vanderbilt University Gustavo E. Gutiérrez Suárez is MA in Anthropology, and BA in Social Communication. His areas of interest include Andean and Amazonian Anthropology, Film theory and aesthetics. You can follow him on Twitter vía @GustavoEGSuarez. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Jennifer Fay, "Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene" (Oxford UP, 2018)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 112:08


Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene (Oxford UP, 2018) explores the connection between cinema and artificial weather, climates, and even planets in or on which hospitality and survival are at stake. Cinema's dominant mode of aesthetic world-making is often at odds with the very real human world it is meant to simulate. The chapters in this book take the reader to a scene —the mise-en-scène— where human world-making is undone by the force of human activity, whether it is explicitly for the sake of making a film, or for practicing war and nuclear science, or for the purpose of addressing climate change in ways that exacerbate its already inhospitable effects. The episodes in this book emphasize our always unnatural and unwelcoming environment as a matter of production, a willed and wanted milieu, however harmful, that is inseparable from but also made perceivable through film. While no one film or set of films adds up to a totalizing explanation of climate change, cinema enables us to glimpse anthropogenic environments as both an accidental effect of human activity and a matter of design. Chapters on Buster Keaton, American atomic test films, film noir, the art of China's Three Gorges Dam, and films of early Antarctic exploration trace parallel histories of film and location design that spell out the ambitions, sensations, and narratives of the Anthropocene, especially as it consolidates into the Great Acceleration starting in 1945. Jennifer Fay is Associate Professor of English and Director of Film Studies, Vanderbilt University Gustavo E. Gutiérrez Suárez is MA in Anthropology, and BA in Social Communication. His areas of interest include Andean and Amazonian Anthropology, Film theory and aesthetics. You can follow him on Twitter vía @GustavoEGSuarez. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books in Communications
Jennifer Fay, "Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene" (Oxford UP, 2018)

New Books in Communications

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 112:08


Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene (Oxford UP, 2018) explores the connection between cinema and artificial weather, climates, and even planets in or on which hospitality and survival are at stake. Cinema's dominant mode of aesthetic world-making is often at odds with the very real human world it is meant to simulate. The chapters in this book take the reader to a scene —the mise-en-scène— where human world-making is undone by the force of human activity, whether it is explicitly for the sake of making a film, or for practicing war and nuclear science, or for the purpose of addressing climate change in ways that exacerbate its already inhospitable effects. The episodes in this book emphasize our always unnatural and unwelcoming environment as a matter of production, a willed and wanted milieu, however harmful, that is inseparable from but also made perceivable through film. While no one film or set of films adds up to a totalizing explanation of climate change, cinema enables us to glimpse anthropogenic environments as both an accidental effect of human activity and a matter of design. Chapters on Buster Keaton, American atomic test films, film noir, the art of China's Three Gorges Dam, and films of early Antarctic exploration trace parallel histories of film and location design that spell out the ambitions, sensations, and narratives of the Anthropocene, especially as it consolidates into the Great Acceleration starting in 1945. Jennifer Fay is Associate Professor of English and Director of Film Studies, Vanderbilt University Gustavo E. Gutiérrez Suárez is MA in Anthropology, and BA in Social Communication. His areas of interest include Andean and Amazonian Anthropology, Film theory and aesthetics. You can follow him on Twitter vía @GustavoEGSuarez. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/communications

New Books Network
Jennifer Fay, "Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene" (Oxford UP, 2018)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 112:08


Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene (Oxford UP, 2018) explores the connection between cinema and artificial weather, climates, and even planets in or on which hospitality and survival are at stake. Cinema's dominant mode of aesthetic world-making is often at odds with the very real human world it is meant to simulate. The chapters in this book take the reader to a scene —the mise-en-scène— where human world-making is undone by the force of human activity, whether it is explicitly for the sake of making a film, or for practicing war and nuclear science, or for the purpose of addressing climate change in ways that exacerbate its already inhospitable effects. The episodes in this book emphasize our always unnatural and unwelcoming environment as a matter of production, a willed and wanted milieu, however harmful, that is inseparable from but also made perceivable through film. While no one film or set of films adds up to a totalizing explanation of climate change, cinema enables us to glimpse anthropogenic environments as both an accidental effect of human activity and a matter of design. Chapters on Buster Keaton, American atomic test films, film noir, the art of China's Three Gorges Dam, and films of early Antarctic exploration trace parallel histories of film and location design that spell out the ambitions, sensations, and narratives of the Anthropocene, especially as it consolidates into the Great Acceleration starting in 1945. Jennifer Fay is Associate Professor of English and Director of Film Studies, Vanderbilt University Gustavo E. Gutiérrez Suárez is MA in Anthropology, and BA in Social Communication. His areas of interest include Andean and Amazonian Anthropology, Film theory and aesthetics. You can follow him on Twitter vía @GustavoEGSuarez. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Retronauts Video Chronicles
NES Works Gaiden #30: Antarctic Adventure / Yie Ar Kung Fu / Ninja-Kun

Retronauts Video Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 14:22


An 8-bit heavy hitter makes its Famicom debut, right around the same time as they first dipped a toe into the SG-1000 market: Konami, eventual creators of Castlevania and Contra, here still a mere stripling of a home games developer. As on Sega's platform, Konami made its debut in Nintendo-land with two games, though I would say both turned out far better than their SG-1000 counterparts. I mean, nobody's going to fall in love with Yie Ar Kung-Fu here in 2021, but Antarctic Adventure (or Kekkyoku Nankyoku Daibouken, if you want to be formal about it) is a good time for all. Less so the third entry in this episode, Jaleco and TOSE's dire rendition of Universal's Ninja-kun. Video Works is funded via Patreon (http://www.patreon.com/gamespite) — support the show and get access to every episode up to two weeks in advance of its YouTube debut! Plus, exclusive podcasts, eBooks, and more! Production notes: - NES and Famicom footage in this episode was captured from  @Analogue  Nt / Nt Mini / Nt Mini Noir via RGB out. - SG-1000 footage captured from Analogue Sg with cart adapter and SG-1000 II (RGB mod by  @iFixRetro ) - Game Boy footage captured from Super Game Boy 2 / Super NES model 2 via JP21 SCART cable. - Standard definition video upscaled to 720 with xRGB Mini Framemeister and  @Retro Tink  5X.

Ivan Teller
Remote View Mars Malaysia Flight 370 Diego Garcia Military Base McMurdo Station Antarctic

Ivan Teller

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 33:23


Selling From the Heart Podcast
Antarctic Mike-Developing Resilience in Sales

Selling From the Heart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 34:43


What if setbacks, challenges, and discomfort were the key to developing the mental muscles of courage and belief? Our guest, Mike Pierce, aka. Antarctic Mike, shares what he learned while training for a marathon and an ultra-marathon which he ran in the Antarctic. Mike shares powerful and practical ideas that will have you laughing while challenging you to the core. Prepare to be inspired!Would you like to be a part of a community of like-hearted sales professionals? Learn more about the Selling From the Heart INSIDERS Group at www.sellingfromtheheart.net/insiders.

The Forum
Antarctic Treaty: Protecting the icy continent

The Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 38:59


It's widely regarded as the most successful treaty in the world, and it was the first arms control agreement established during the Cold War. The Antarctic Treaty, which came into force in 1961, protects what is one of the most unspoilt places on earth, from mining, from military activity and allows only scientific exploration and peaceful pursuits. It was thanks to the treaty and research carried out in Antarctica that scientists identified a hole in the ozone layer in the 1980s, but it's been most powerful as a symbol of what can be achieved to create peace between nations and give wilderness protection. So what has made this treaty so effective, and can it still hold up today in a world which is hungry for minerals and where an increasing number of states are seeking to project their technological and scientific prowess in Antarctica? Joining Bridget Kendall is Birgit Njaastad, the Chair of the Committee for the Environmental Protection of the Antarctic, and for more than 25 years a Norwegian Polar Institute environmental expert; Professor Alan Hemmings, a specialist on the geopolitics of the Antarctic from the University of Canterbury New Zealand; and Dr Jessica O'Reilly, Associate Professor of International Studies at Indiana University in Bloomington in the United States, and the author of The Technocratic Antarctic. With poetry and song about the Antarctic by the New Zealand poet Bill Manhire. Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service. (Photo: Chinstrap Penguins on Half Moon Island, South Shetlands, Antarctica. Credit: V Stokes/ iStock/ Getty Images Plus)

My Modern Met Top Artist Podcast
2021 Holiday Special: Our Favorite Moments From the Past Year

My Modern Met Top Artist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 31:26


As we get ready for the new year, we thought we'd take some time to reflect on our favorite moments from this past season. We've been so lucky to have had such an incredible roster of artists come on the show in 2021, so this week on the My Modern Met Top Artist Podcast, we're looking back at some of our favorite moments in a special "2021 Holiday Bonus" episode. You'll hear from our hosts Jessica, Sam, and Sara, as well as our podcast editor Alex, as they share the moments from this past year that inspired them. You'll hear short clips from some of your favorite guests Including legendary photographer Ami Vitale, quilter Bisa Butler, and Craig Dykers: cofounder of Snøhetta. In addition, you'll get a sneak peek at what's coming in next year, hearing from the Antarctic flag designers of True South, as well as how painter Brian Peterson uplifts those experiencing homelessness by painting their portraits and giving them the money earned from sales. This episode is brought to you by BetterHelp, a service that makes it easy to get set up with your own licensed professional therapist. As a listener, you'll get 10% off your first month by visiting our sponsor at BetterHelp.com/listener. Did you know that we're on YouTube? Watch your favorite episode now! Follow us on Instagram to see some of the visuals we talked about in today's episode. We want to hear from you! Leave us a listener voicemail and subscribe to our newsletter so you can submit questions for upcoming interviews. You'll find everything on podcast.mymodernmet.com.  Want to support the artists we feature and the podcast? Check out books by our guests on the Top Artist Bookstore. My Modern Met Store is offering a special discount for Top Artist listeners. Get a 10% discount on our entire curated selection of creative products when you enter the code TOPARTIST10 at checkout. Read more about some of the projects we discuss: Photographer Ami Vitale on Following your Heart and Documenting Stories of Hope [Podcast] Fiber Artist Bisa Butler on Her Vibrant Quilted Portraits That Share Black Stories [Podcast] Interview: Artist Changes the Lives of the Homeless by Painting their Portraits

This is Our Time
Have You Ever Held Snow in Your Hands?

This is Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 3:21


Do you remember the first time you held snow? When it burned your hand while also making it feel cold? Spend a moment mountainside on Paulet Island, in Antarctica, one afternoon, when Samantha and Dr Hillary McManus come across Kerryn Miller holding snow...for the first time. Brought to the Audio Love Newsletter. To have unforgettable short audio clips, with the incredible backstory, delivered right to your inbox follow this link: https://bit.ly/Audio-love

The Big Travel Podcast
125. Christmas Special 2021; Sathnam Sanghera, Lisa Jewell, Matt Forde, Anne Sebba, Olly Mann, Greenham Common and more

The Big Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 28:47


Authors Anne Sebba on the Royal abdication, Sathnam Sanghera on a dismal Christmas restaurant, Lisa Jewell singing Boney M in Barbados, adventurer Jamie Douglas-Hamilton rowing to the Antarctic, satirist Matt Forde in an NYC  football bar, podcaster Olly Mann's disappointing Santa in LA, artist Firouz FarmanFarmaian hybrid Muslim Catholic Christmas in Marrakesh, Yellowood Adventures' Sam McManus's ancient fiesta tradition in Northern Spain, Festival promoter Huw Win's Italian restaurant in Thai paradise and Nobel Peace Prize winter Rebecca Johnson on a magical protesting Christmas with the women of Greenham Common.

Nemos News Network
THE SECRET LAND - Operation High Jump - Antarctica Expedition 1947

Nemos News Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 69:36


In this special report: In 1947 Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal sent a naval task force to Antarctic including Admiral Nimitz, Admiral Krusen and Admiral Byrd, called "Operation Highjump". It was touted to be an expedition to find "coal deposits" and other valuable resources, but in actuality they were trying to find the Nazi underground bases.The task force of OVER 40 SHIPS, included the flagship "Mount Olympus", the aircraft carrier "Philippine Sea", the seaplane tender "Pine Sea", the submarine "Senate", the destroyer "Bronson", the ice breaker "Northwind", and other tanker and supply ships. An armed contingent of 1400 sailors, and three dog sled teams were also on board.Share this far and wide!For breaking news from one of the most over the target and censored names in the world join our 100% Free newsletter at www.NemosNewsNetwork.com/newsAlso follow us at Gabhttps://gab.com/nemosnewsnetworkNemos News is 100% listener funded. Thank you for your support in our mission to Break the Cycle of Fake News.If you value our work please consider supporting us with our vetted patriot sponsors!www.NemosNewsNetwork.com/sponsorsShop Patriot & Detox the Deep State with www.RedPillLiving.com, Home of Sleepy Joe - the world's most powerful all natural sleep formula & The Great Awakening Gourmet Coffee for Patriots."Our Specialty, is Waking People Up."Other LinksJoin our Telegram chat: www.NemosNewsNetwork.com/chat

The Douglas Coleman Show
The Douglas Coleman Show w_ Thomas Peschak and Robert P. French

The Douglas Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 48:11


One of National Geographic's most popular nature photographers, Thomas Peschak shares 200 breathtaking images -- and the stories behind them -- from a wide swath of wild ocean locales around the globe in the new Wild Seas. It is filled with pictures of whales, sharks, sea turtles, saltwater crocs, among many others in places many of us will never see: Antarctic, Galapagos, South Africa, Australia, Seychelles and beyond.http://nationalgeographic.comRobert French is a software developer, turned actor, turned author. He is the writer of the seven (so far) Cal Rogan Mysteries crime-thrillers about a drug-addicted ex-cop who fights his way from living rough on the streets to being a much-sought-after PI. The series, set in Vancouver, Canada, reflects the best and worst of the city. He is passionate about having the right words on the page and with every new book, his goal is to make it better than the previous one.His loves are his family, science, language, certain elements of philosophy and craft beer.http://robertpfrench.comThe Douglas Coleman Show now offers audio and video promotional packages for music artists as well as video promotional packages for authors. We also offer advertising. Please see our website for complete details. http://douglascolemanshow.comIf you have a comment about this episode or any other, please click the link below.https://ratethispodcast.com/douglascolemanshow

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 139*Jets discovered erupting from the Milky Way's supermassive black holeAstronomers have detected jets erupting from Sagittarius A* -- the supermassive black hole at the heart of our Milky Way galaxy.*A new tool in the search for life beyond EarthA new study says scientists need to know more about the chemical make up of the Venusian atmosphere before they can really speculate about the possibility of life in the clouds.*Antarctic solar eclipseThe Antarctic has experienced a rare total solar eclipse is giving researchers a unique opportunity to learn more about how solar eclipses affect space weather.*The Science ReportChina has launched another cyberattack against AustraliaAI-designed life forms develop a new -- never before seen in nature -- form of reproduction.Archaeologists have discovered a 2,100-Year-Old Hellenistic fortress in central Israel.Skeptic's guide to a 12-year study psychic predictions.Listen to SpaceTime with our universal listen link: https://link.chtbl.com/spacetime This episode of SpaceTime is brought to you by NordVPN...simply the best. To check our special holiday season offer, just visit www.nordvpn.com/stuartgary or use the code stuartgary at checkout to get the deal. For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen too. Thank you…To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify and Apple Podcasts.

Town Hall Seattle Science Series
157. Bill Schutt—Pump: A Natural History of the Heart

Town Hall Seattle Science Series

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 70:45


We've pondered the puzzles of the human body for millennia, questioning the function of both the visible parts and the parts hidden away behind layers of skin, muscle, and bones. When it comes to the human body— and the bodies of many other living creatures— the heart is an organ that's long been central to our understanding of life. How did humans get from mummifying the heart separately from the body in order to weigh the soul inside it, as ancient Egyptians once did, to the modern ability to save and extend lives by transplanting a heart from one human into another? In Pump: A Natural History of the Heart, zoologist Bill Schutt explored the mind-boggling history of the heart in both human and non-human life forms. He covered everything from clear-blooded Antarctic icefish to the origin of the stethoscope, weaving in fascinating myths, hypotheses gone wrong, and scientific breakthroughs along the way. You'll never consider that rhythmic thumping in your chest the same way again. Bill Schutt is a vertebrate zoologist and author of six nonfiction and fiction books, including the New York Times Editor's Choice, Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History. Recently retired from his post as professor of biology at LIU Post, he is a research associate at the American Museum of Natural History, where he has studied bats all over the world. His research has been featured in Natural History magazine as well as in the New York Times, Newsday, the Economist, and Discover. Buy the Book: Pump: A Natural History of the Heart (Hardcover) from Third Place Books Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

The Inner Chief
219. Ian Snape, CEO of Frontline Mind, on resilience by design, leading Antarctic expeditions and relaxing in high stakes environments

The Inner Chief

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 46:22


In this episode of The Inner Chief podcast, you'll hear from Ian Snape, CEO of Frontline Mind, on resilience by design, leading Antarctic expeditions and relaxing in high stakes environments. chiefmaker.com/219 LAST CHANCE! REGISTER FOR OUR JANUARY MINI-MBA INTAKE: chiefmaker.com/minimba Ian has over 30 years of experience leading and managing teams in strategy, innovation, and adventure. His speciality in coaching and training is on the topics of resilience, performance, recovery and wellbeing, especially to people who operate in complex high-risk situations such as Special Forces, police, paramedics, as well as Olympic athletes, company directors and senior executives. He has a PhD in Geochemistry from the University of Edinburgh and also has a Graduate Certificate in Neuro-linguistic Programming. He has led teams on expeditions to the Antarctic to conduct research on pollution issues in cold regions that were crucial to policy and regulatory decisions. He is the co-founder of two related coaching and training companies, The Coaching Space and Frontline Mind and is the author of the book, Resilience by Design. In this episode we talk about: Building a foundation of focusing on relaxation instead of stress; Resilience strategies to manage tricky situations and decisions; Leading Antarctic expeditions; and The difference between your state and your emotions. Connecting with Ian Snape You can connect with Ian via LinkedIn Books and resources You Are What You Risk - by Michele Wucker The Gray Rhino - by Michele Wucker

My Wakeup Call with Dr. Mark Goulston
Ep - 273 Alison Levine

My Wakeup Call with Dr. Mark Goulston

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 43:50


In this episode I speak with polar explorer, mountain climber, women's activist, top keynote speaker, multi-heart surgery survivor and author of the NY Times best-seller, "On the Edge," Alison Levine whose wakeup call was being fascinated by the Arctic and Antarctic as a child and inspired by her whistle-blower, former FBI agent father to always speak out when you see wrong being done. https://alisonlevine.com/

Crime and Roses
Episode 146 True Crime: The Mysterious Death of Rodney Marks

Crime and Roses

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 37:27


Last week was Michelle's Men Tell All and most of the men yelled, hence our recap episode title, Men Yell All. Megan wasn't really feeling that as a theme this week, so instead, she found a very unique case that's connected to the apple of our eye, Rodney Mathews (who should have been our next Bachelor)! By all accounts, Rodney Marks was a dedicated and passionate astrophysicist research scientist. He was studying Antarctic astronomy at the South Pole when he was mysteriously murdered in 2000. Or was it an accident? We discuss. (Story starts at: 4:26) CONTENT WARNING: BRIEF MENTION OF SUICIDE. Links Discussed in the Episode: Drinking the Kool-Aid Pod Episode 81 - Catfishin' You can always connect with us at: linktr.ee/CrimeandRoses. There you can see links to our podcast and social media platforms. You can support the podcast by becoming a Patreon Member at: www.patreon.com/CrimeAndRoses. We have several levels of membership, and we truly love you, mean it. Always feel free to email us at: CrimeandRoses@gmail.com. Send us true crime story suggestions and any questions or comments you may have. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/crimeandroses/support

Earth Wise
Arctic Communities And Permafrost Thaw | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 2:00


Permafrost is frozen soil, rock or sediment that can be as much as a few thousand feet thick.  To qualify as permafrost , the material has to have been at or below the freezing point of water for two or more years.  Most of it is located in high latitudes in the Arctic and Antarctic […]

Jimmy Akin Podcast
Seeds of Doom (4) - The Secrets of Doctor Who

Jimmy Akin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 49:30


The 4th Doctor v. killer plants! Jimmy Akin, Dom Bettinelli and Fr. Cory Sticha discuss this 4th Doctor story that combines Lovecraft's "Mountains of Madness" and Hawks' film "The Thing From Another World," including a Bond-level villain, an Antarctic base, and an English country estate.

SQPN: Secrets of Doctor Who
The Seeds of Doom (4)

SQPN: Secrets of Doctor Who

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 49:30


The 4th Doctor v. killer plants! Jimmy Akin, Dom Bettinelli and Fr. Cory Sticha discuss this 4th Doctor story that combines Lovecraft's "Mountains of Madness" and Hawks' film "The Thing From Another World," including a Bond-level villain, an Antarctic base, and an English country estate. The post The Seeds of Doom (4) appeared first on SQPN.com.

Ampersand: The Poets & Writers Podcast
In the Antarctic Circle by Dennis James Sweeney

Ampersand: The Poets & Writers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 2:43


In the Antarctic Circle by Dennis James Sweeney by Poets & Writers

The IcePod
We Have to Move with the Weather – The IcePod with Karin Strand

The IcePod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 64:58


In the new episode of The IcePod, we meet with Karin Strand, Vice President of Expeditions of Hurtigruten, a Norwegian coastal ferry service and cruise line that offers expeditions to Antarctica. When Karin Strand began studying law in the late 1990s, she had no idea where life would take her. It all started with a student job in the summer; here she cleaned cabins aboard the ships of the traditional Norwegian ferry service that carries people from Bergen to Kirkenes in northern Norway. "Little did I know by the time", how much nature would become her profession. "During breaks at sea, I used to go out on deck and look at the coastline," she says. After graduating from law school, she decided to leave law behind and work for Hurtigruten on their ships instead. At the time, Hurtigruten had begun operations on the Chilean coast and in Antarctica which Karin was able to join as a purser to take care of passengers. She remembers well her first glimpse of Antarctica: while she expected it to basically be a copy of what she knew from the Norwegian coast, she quickly realized that Antarctica was "way bigger than myself". She has returned to Antarctica every year since, with the exception of last season when Hurtigruten had to temporarily suspend service due to COVID-19. When Hurtigruten established an outdoor program, Karin was offered the opportunity to join the Antarctic cruises as an expedition leader. Being an expedition leader requires three things: a good eye for logisticts, curiosity and passion. "This is much more than a job, it's a lifestyle", Karin explains. Today, as the Vice President of Expeditions, Karin is responsible for a fleet of six ships in Antarctica and the Arctic, including onshore expeditions and the onboard educational program. The latter has grown significantly over the years; Hurtigruten not only conducts Citizen Science projects, but offers scientists the opportunity to collect data during cruises. In her role, Karin is heavily involved into the planning the expedition itinerary. The team onboard uses several sources to check weather and sea-ice forecast, including windy.com (https://www.windy.com) and the Norwegian weather forecast from yr.no (https://www.yr.no). To make sure, we stay safe, "we usually go with the worst-case scenario", Karin explains. Better fog and wind forecasts would be very useful, and if there were a wish list, Karin would look for a combined product where information on sea ice, wind and ocean currents would be available from a single source, "because those are the elements that would stop us on our way.”

Real Life French
Collecter (Gather)

Real Life French

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 3:34


Texte: La première expédition britannique pour collecter des météorites dans l'Antarctique est revenue avec un butin de 36 pierres de l'espace. Traduction: The first British-led expedition to gather meteorites in the Antarctic has returned with a haul of 36 space rocks.

LevelOneWalkthrough Podcast
Episode 97 "Know That 1997 Bit" Game Bug = GTA? & PSN Codename: Spartacus + Bioshock: Antarctic City

LevelOneWalkthrough Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 137:15


Welcome to the L.O.W. LevelOneWalkthrough Podcast!! www.lowpodcast.net Episode 97 "Know That 1997 Bit" Game Bug = GTA? & PSN Codename: Spartacus + Bioshock: Antarctic City WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW MORE?? LISTEN Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1tPrFZJXOeJ73XfUTHy5kv Itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id1487561483 Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/levelonewalkthrough FOLLOW US Twitter: twitter.com/levelonetester Instagram: www.instagram.com/levelonewalkthroughpodcast/ YouTube www.youtube.com/lowspotlight Twitch www.twitch.tv/lowspotlight Throughout the podcast Rob aka Big Boss & Toine discuss topics happening in the world of video games. They occasionally test each other's old school video game knowledge with a segment called “Know that Bit”, talk about what they've been playing and really, anything else they feel like! Please enjoy our first ever podcast that took over 15 years to come true!! Rate & Comment!! Email us: levelonewalkthroughpodcast@gmail.com

Subconscious Mind Mastery Podcast
Podcast 268 - Fred Dodson Interview - "The Mysteries of the Arctic and Antarctic"

Subconscious Mind Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 20:20


Fred Dodson has a new audiobook out - "The Mysteries of the Arctic and Antarctic." Things are not as they appear to be! Let's find out why Fred, the Reality Creation guy, wrote about the Antarctic! Audibook on AudibleFred's Website: RealityCreation.orgSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/subconscious-mind-mastery. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Conspiracy Show with Richard Syrett
"Plandemic" & Ancient Antarctic Civilizations

The Conspiracy Show with Richard Syrett

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 104:51


"PLANDEMIC" THE MOVIE/ WILL HILLARY BE INSTALLED AS PRESIDENT? Richard welcomes the documentary filmmaker behind the most banned and censored documentary series in history, Plandemic and Plandemic, and Plandemic 2: Indoctrination. Then, Richard speaks with a syndicated talk-radio host about his prediction that the Democrats are planning to push President Biden aside and install Hillary Clinton as President before the next presidential election in 2024. Guest:

The John Batchelor Show
Mark Piesing, #UNBOUND, the complete, forty-minute interview, Arctic exploration; August 28, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 39:30


Photo:  Arctic tern.  "No moss grows on this Arctic bird's wings. One of the farthest-ranging fliers in the world, Arctic terns travel an estimated 2.4 million km (1.49 million miles) in their lifetimes. Their migratory patterns are so ambitious, in fact, that they get to enjoy two summers per year." @Batchelorshow   N-4 Down: The Hunt for the Arctic Airship Italia, by Mark Piesing.  PorterSqBooks.  Hardcover – August 31, 2021    "GRIPPING. . . . One of the greatest polar rescue efforts ever mounted." —Wall Street Journal The riveting, true story of the largest polar rescue mission in history: the desperate race to find the survivors of the glamourous Arctic airship Italia, which crashed near the North Pole in 1928.              Triumphantly returning from the North Pole on May 24, 1928, the world-famous exploring airship Italia—code-named N-4—was struck by a terrible storm and crashed somewhere over the Arctic ice, triggering the largest polar rescue mission in history. Helping lead the search was the famed Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, the poles' greatest explorer, who himself soon went missing in the frozen wastes. Amundsen's body has never been found, the last victim of one of the Arctic's most enduring mysteries . . .              During the Roaring Twenties, zeppelin travel embodied the exuberant spirit of the age. Germany's luxurious Graf Zeppelin would run passenger service from Germany to Brazil; Britain's Imperial Airship was launched to connect an empire; in America, the iconic spire of the rising Empire State Building was designed as a docking tower for airships.              But the novel mode of transport offered something else, too: a new frontier of exploration. Whereas previous Arctic and Antarctic explorers had subjected themselves to horrific—often deadly—conditions in their attempts to reach uncharted lands, airships held out the possibility of speedily soaring over the hazards. In 1926, Roald Amundsen—the first man to reach the South Pole—partnered with the Italian airship designer General Umberto Nobile to pioneer flight over the North Pole. As Mark Piesing uncovers in this masterful account, while that mission was thought of as a great success, it was in fact riddled with near disasters and political pitfalls.              In May 1928, his relationship with Amundsen corroded beyond the point of collaboration. Nobile, his dog, and a crew of fourteen Italians, one Swede, and one Czech, set off on their own in the airship Italia to discover new lands in the Arctic Circle and to become the first airship to land men on the pole. But near the North Pole they hit a terrible storm and crashed onto the ice. Six crew members were never seen again; the injured (including Nobile) took refuge on ice floes, unprepared for the wretched conditions and with little hope for survival.              Coincidentally, in Oslo a gathering of famous Arctic explorers had assembled for a celebration of the first successful flight from Alaska to Norway. Hearing of the accident, Amundsen set off on his own desperate attempt to find Nobile and his men. As the weeks passed and the largest international polar rescue expedition mobilized, the survivors engaged in a last-ditch struggle against weather, polar bears, and despair. When they were spotted at last, the search plane landed—but the pilot announced that there was room for only one passenger. . . .              Braiding together the gripping accounts of the survivors and their heroic rescuers, N-4 Down tells the unforgettable true story of what happened when the glamour and restless daring of the zeppelin age collided with the harsh reality of Earth's extremes. https://www.amazon.com/N-4-Down-Arctic-Airship-Italia/dp/0062851527

Freaky Geeks' Podcast
Episode 52: Lake Vostok and the Horrors of Its Antarctic Secrets

Freaky Geeks' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 67:21


Join us as we discuss the mysterious Lake Vostok of Antarctica.  This massive and mysterious body of water sits approximately 13,000 feet below the surface of our favorite continent and has been subjected to a Cold War 2.0 between the United States and former Soviet Russia.  Something is calling from the depths of Antarctica once more and it's hungry for human blood...

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know
CLASSIC: What's Beneath the Antarctic Ice?

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 64:37


Antarctica is one of the most mysterious places on the planet. If the ice melted, what would we find beneath? Find out in this classic episode. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Dave Chang Show
A Long Shot Takes the Crown | My Opinion Is Fact

The Dave Chang Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 60:12


At last, we answer America's burning question: Who won the Pronunciation Bee? And then: a glimpse into Dave's vast Basque Rolodex, a prophecy fulfilled, buying a 14-pound serrano ham from Costco, the eternally unsolved croissant conundrum, dubious expat accents, a supercomputer-fueled rumination on holiday homecomings, Proustian trauma, Christmas in the Philippines, Chris's skin care routine, winning Friendsgiving with a gravy thermos, and Antarctic ice-sampling missions into the depths of the parental fridge. Hosts: Dave Chang and Chris Ying Guest: Noelle Cornelio Associate Producer: Sasha Ashall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices