Podcasts about Glacier National Park

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Best podcasts about Glacier National Park

Latest podcast episodes about Glacier National Park

Trail EAffect
Christine Byl of Interior Trails LLC - Trail Building in Alaska #111

Trail EAffect

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2023 67:44


Trail EAffect with Christine Byl of Interior Trails LLC - Trail Building in Alaska #111 How Christine got into Trail Building What drew Christine to Glacier National Park and the Trail Crew What drew Christine and her husband Gabe to Alaska Founding Interior Trails with her husband Gabe Types of Projects / Work that Interior Trails takes on Using Helicopters for logistics to get both crew members and materials into work sites Recounting some of her early years of Trail Building compared to what it is today Christine's perspective of the PTBA when she first got involved to where it is today How the PTBA provides a culture of professionalism 2023 International Trails Summit in Reno, NV Christine as a board member of the PTBA The importance of Visibility Women in Trail Building Dawn Packard Women's Gathering at the 2022 Sustainable Trails Conference Favorite Tool(s) that Christine has for Trail Building Christine's book: Dirt Work Coming from Grand Rapid's MI Advice from Christine Closing Comments and Thank You's Christine's Bio: Christine Byl, co-owner of Interior Trails, LLC, is a writer and a trail builder of 27 years. After 12 years working on federal trail crews in Glacier NP, Chugach NF and Denali NP, in 2008 Christine and her husband Gabe Travis founded Interior Trails, specializing in sustainable trail design, layout, construction, consulting and training. Clients across Alaska include the Muni of Anchorage, State of Alaska's DNR, Alaska State Parks, Student Conservation Assoc., Alaska Trails, National Park Service, and many others, as well as international partnerships in Argentina and Canada. For further information about Interior Trails, visit www.interior-trails.com. Christine's first book, Dirt Work: An Education in the Woods is about trail crews, tools, wild places, and labor, and has been selected for many "Best of" lists including by Backpacker Magazine. A new novel is due out in March: Lookout, set in NW Montana which she called home for many years. For information about books, teaching, and keynote speaking, please visit www.christinebyl.com. Christine lives on a few acres of tundra north of Denali National Park and spends as much time as possible exploring via foot, bike, ski, boat and dog. Links: Interior Trails LLC: https://www.interior-trails.com/ Christine Byl: http://www.christinebyl.com/ Dirt Work on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Dirt-Work-Education-Christine-Byl/dp/0807033278 Professional Trail Builders Association: https://www.trailbuilders.org/ 2023 International Trails Summit: https://web.cvent.com/event/24d42cc6-9b01-4aad-8cb7-425826bc429c/summary   This Podcast has been edited and produced by Evolution Trail Services Trail EAffect Show Links: Trail Effect Podcast Website: www.traileaffectpodcast.com Contact Josh at evolutiontrails@gmail.com Support Trail EAffect through donations at: https://www.patreon.com/traileaffect You can also reach out and donate via PayPal or other means if you feel so inclined to do so.

Deck The Hallmark
Love in Glacier National: A National Park Romance (Hallmark Channel - 2023)

Deck The Hallmark

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 47:07


Heather, an avalanche forecasting expert, brings her new technology to Glacier National Park where she faces push-back from Cute Chris, the Director of Mountain Rescue, who's trained in intuition and common sense. Can they learn to work together or will their budding romance be buried?Watch on Philo! - Philo.tv/DTH

Hallmarkies Podcast
LOVE IN GLACIER NATIONAL PARK Cast Interview (Stephen Huszar, Ashley Newbrough, Tegan Moss)

Hallmarkies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2023 38:00


Today we have the cast of Love in Glacier National: A National Park Romance. Stephen Huszar, Ashley Newbrough, and Tegan Moss Stephen https://www.instagram.com/stephenhuszar/ Tegan https://www.instagram.com/teganbmoss/ Ashley https://www.instagram.com/ashleynewbrough/ Our interviews with Stephen: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tve-tuAYl_c https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAa-GSBKl0o Our interview with director Christie Will Wolf https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/pdst.fm/e/traffic.megaphone.fm/ADV7477245556.mp3?updated=1674848236 For more on Piecing it Together podcast https://www.piecingpod.com/ For all of our interviews https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=th52RX04G9c&list=PLXv4sBF3mPUA_0JZ2r5fxhTRE_-RChCj5 Follow Rachel on twitter twitter.com/rachel_reviews Join us over on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/hallmarkies Check out our merch: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/hallmarkies Send us your feedback at feedback@hallmarkiespodcast.com Follow Rachel's blog at http://rachelsreviews.net Follow Rachel's Reviews on youtube https://www.youtube.com/c/rachelsreviews Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

SkeleTales
Boners and Birthdays

SkeleTales

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 49:32


Skeleton boners, mystifying birthday paradoxes, vengeful stardust, reincarnation and more!This week Britt and Alissa cover all sorts of tales of the strange and mystifying.Alissa informs us of a thing called the birthday paradox but doesn't go into too much detail because...numbers.The strangeness is how many family members she has who are born on or near the same day. Britt regails a story told by Margaret that takes place in an old abbey outside of London. Her and her roommate encounter a strange stardust like shimmering spirit who may or maynot be Lord North. We learn a little bit more about Wroxton Abbey and why it is most likely very very haunted.Alissa reads a story written by Steve, the paranormal poet of SkeleTales. He tells of the strange coincidence that has led him to believe that he very well may be the reincarnation of his great grandfather.Britt then transports you to a true teen horror movie with her story from Uncle. He tells of his journey to an abandoned cemetery with a suburban full of rowdy friends. Blue floating orbs and one terrifying red orb haunt them as they try to leave as quickly as possible.The episode is wrapped up by learning of Montana's biggest mysteries. The Vortex House of Mysteries is bound to leave one perplexed and most likely underwhelmed. But the real mystery lies in the hotel bathroom in the Belton Chalet where a little girl is known to join you while you shower.We want to hear your stories!Please e-mail them to us at Skeletalespodcast@gmail.com or leave a message at 302-689-DEAD (3323).As always thanks for listening and Haunt Y'all Later!Support the show (www.skeletalespodcast.etsy.com)Support the showWe want to hear your stories!Please e-mail them to us at Skeletalespodcast@gmail.com or leave a message at 302-689-DEAD (3323).As always thanks for listening and Haunt Y'all Later! Visit the SkeleTales shop to support the show (www.skeletalespodcast.etsy.com)

Second Amendment Radio
Camping in Glacier National Park, next week's the RV Show and New ATF Rules

Second Amendment Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 40:06


Welcome to 2nd Amendment Radio & the Great Outdoors with Marc Cox & Bo Matthews – as always we are produced by Carl Middleman (Pew Pew)! Marc is trying to get a spot to camp at Glacier National Park - six months from now! Then the boys talk to Warren Patton dealer association president of the Midwest Gateway RV Dealers Association. He is also the RV show chairman of the 45th annual STL RV Travel Show happening January 27-29, 2023 at America's Center. STLRV.com  Finally, John Henderson from The Range talks about the new ATF rules.

Poised for Exit
131 - Seller Whisperer

Poised for Exit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 29:49


Seller WhispererWe had the pleasure of interviewing Denise Logan today, who is a national speaker, author and specialist in working with sellers of companies to determine and plan what's next for their life after business!Denise calls herself the "Seller Whisperer" and wrote a book in fable form called "Seller's Journey" that tells the story of a seller and his advisers on a trek through Glacier National Park after the sale of the business closed. Sounds like an intriguing read, doesn't it? Denise has been an entrepreneur herself, as well as a lawyer and psychologist. When she owned and operated a law firm in Washington DC she found that during those years she was really unhappy, and decided to sell the firm. She also spent time as a psychologist specializing in work and financial disorders; people who are addicted to work or money. She also studied death and dying. It's with these experiences she can call herself an expert, especially since she's gone through it herself and also assisted a long time colleague and employer go through a sale. The latter was at the table 3 times before it closed, because the founder was too afraid of the life change and kept sabotaging the deal!Denise encouraged the listeners to ask themselves this question: "What does work provide for, other than money and security?"  The answer is to make a list of 15 things that work provides for you, to understand why it can be very difficult to sell and 'move on'. The emotional arc of exit is the same for every owner, regardless of the company size or industry. Denise says that owners need to spend serious time thinking through what they really want from life and how they will derive satisfaction, because the change can be feared and there is a grieving process. The easier we make it on ourselves by having a next act plan, the smoother the transitional journey will be. Find out more about Denise Logan and Julie Keyes hereListen to this important episode here!Thank you to this month's sponsor!  Sunbelt Business Advisors and TrustPointNEW, low price! Check it out!Business Readiness Transition online course #Keyestrategies

We're No Dam Experts
Episode 108: Glacier's 2023 Reservation System

We're No Dam Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 66:35


Glacier National Park has released its 2023 reservation system. To visit the Crown of the Continent you'll not only need a park pass, but also a reservation. Rebecca and Shannon (attempt) to break down all the details and tell you what you need to know to plan your trip! Check out Glacier National Park's website for the latest construction updates: https://www.nps.gov/glac/index.htm Be sure to check out our social media channels and website for more information: https://visitgreatfallsmontana.org/

Hard Factor
Hooters Might Close Because Millennials Don't Like Boobs Enough and Target Death Blanket Recall | 12.29.22

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 68:52 Very Popular


On today's episode….New travel bans coming for Chinese travelers due to Covid, Bomb Cyclone kills over 50 in NY alone, Target recalls death blankets, Hooters is closing locations because millennials hate boobs, Ugandan man living the life with dozens of wives and hundreds of kids, Bishop buys gas station to clean up the hood, new dating app for Right Wingers, bear mauls a moose during a wedding & Pakistan frees rapist on condition he marries his victim ☕ Cup of Coffee in the Big Time☕ (00:04:37) Joke of the day from Reddit a la TikTok Instagram (00:06:03) China travel ban due to COVID, Millions in China infected per day (00:12:11) Storm of a generation' bomb cyclone claims 50 lives (00:14:17) 10 South Korean tourists stranded in Buffalo (00:16:02) The new Peloton': Target recalls weighted blankets after two babies die

Today's Voices of Conservation Science
Cayley Faurot-Daniels — Hi-Tech Science: Using eDNA to Find Pollinators

Today's Voices of Conservation Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 35:51


Cayley Faurot-Daniels, a graduate student in the Department of Ecology at Montana State University, discusses her many technician positions and her love for field biology. She also discusses her research using eDNA to identify pollinators in Glacier National Park.

People, Place, & Purpose
Camping.Tools: Robert McMillan

People, Place, & Purpose

Play Episode Play 43 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 38:17


Robert McMillan is a native Georgian, a data scientist, and an avid camper. With his extensive background in technology, he has been a part of multiple entrepreneurial endeavors over the years, including selling seeds from his bicycle as a kid. His current venture, Camping.Tools, came about after he discovered an opportunity while on a trip with his two sons. You'll hear that story – and more! – from him. Where you can find Camping.Tools:- Website: https://www.camping.tools/home- Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/app.camping.tools/- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/App.Camping.ToolsMentions from the show:- Milledgeville, Georgia: https://www.visitmilledgeville.org/- Glacier National Park: https://www.nps.gov/glac/- Hershey Park: https://www.hersheypark.com/- Hershey's Chocolate World: https://www.chocolateworld.com/home.html- America's Largest RV Show: https://www.largestrvshow.com/- John Maxwell: https://amzn.to/3j6cBnv- "The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You:" https://amzn.to/3PPFSiR- Porsche 911 Dakar: https://www.topgear.com/car-news/supercars/new-porsche-911-dakar-473bhp-roading-sports-car- "Three Feet From Gold: Turn Your Obstacles into Opportunities!:" https://amzn.to/3FX9APn Stay in touch with People, Place, & Purpose on Instagram and stay tuned for a new episode every Monday!Links may be affiliate links, which means we would get a commission if you decide to make a purchase through our links, at no cost to you.

Montana Public Radio News
Glacier National Park is expanding its reservation system to all main entrances

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 1:22


Glacier National Park's vehicle registration entry program is expanding next year. So, visitors will now need to book in advance to drive into all the park's main entrances.

Coffee Stains Podcast
The Night the Cast Closed the Season Shooting the Shit with Tristan Sadler

Coffee Stains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 168:11


In this week's episode, the cast sits down with Tristan for the THIRD time to talk about his adventures since he joined us in July. You wont want to miss hearing about his month in Glacier National Park and his month in New Zeland!   Cheers friends, see you next year in 2023!      -Stains Gang

Montana Untamed
Ideas for ice: Could geoengineering save glaciers from melting?

Montana Untamed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 35:46


Glacier National Park's namesake ice fields attract millions of visitors a year. Many wonder if they're making a funeral visit. Predictions that all the glaciers in the park will melt by 2030 or sooner have been floating around for a couple decades. That deadline now looms less than a decade away.  What would happen if Glacier Park's glaciers disappeared? And what are some people thinking about as ways to save polar and glacial ice through the emerging field of geoengineering?  On this episode, Rob Chaney, editor of the Missoulian newspaper, talks about work being done to keep glaciers around the world from shrinking.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Guides Gone Wild
STOKE SHORT!: Live Your Own Dream with Nancy Wind of Peaks and Poses

Guides Gone Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 8:47


Peaks and Poses - @PeaksandPoses on Instagram Living in RhythmSētu Retreat Center (VT)Nancy Wind on Guides Gone Wild (February, 2021)Another pandemic rebound stoke story today, hooray!!Nancy Wind is the owner of Peaks and Poses based in Massachusetts. Nancy originally founded Peaks and Poses to combine her loves of yoga and hiking into something she could share with the world, and over time, even more of her curiosity and love of travel have been folded into the company, to the point that it's now hosting retreats and getaways all over the country!Whether adventure to you means backpacking in Glacier National Park, car camping locally or simply sampling from a huge plate of delicious vegetarian Middle-Eastern food, Nancy and Peaks and Poses has something to scratch that itch.

Campfire Chronicles
38. Bear Encounters, 2023 Plans, Resolutions

Campfire Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 67:40


We briefly talk about our experience getting covid. We debrief our bear encounter during our most recent episode in Glacier National Park. We also talk a bit about our 2023 plans and resolutions.

True Crime with Kendall Rae
Wife Pushes Husband Off Cliff After 8 Days of Marriage? The Murder of Cody Johnson

True Crime with Kendall Rae

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 52:27


On July 7th, 2013, just eight days after their wedding, Jordan Graham lured her new husband Cody Johnson to a cliff in Glacier National Park, and shoved him off. She told a lot of different people a lot of different stories as to what happened, but it seemed that she did it because she just didn't want to be married to him. This episode is sponsored by: Vegamour - promo code: kendallrae Care/Of - promo code: kendallrae50 Check out Kendall's other podcasts: The Sesh & Mile Higher Follow Kendall! YouTube Twitter Instagram Facebook Mile Higher Zoo REQUESTS: General case suggestion form: https://bit.ly/32kwPly Form for people directly related/ close to the victim: https://bit.ly/3KqMZLj Discord: https://discord.com/invite/an4stY9BCN CONTACT: For Business Inquiries - kendall@INFAgency.com

Dateline NBC
The Feud

Dateline NBC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 41:03 Very Popular


Just south of Glacier National Park in Montana, tempers flare and personalities clash. One man shoots, another dies…but the story can't be that cut and dry, can it? Keith Morrison reports. 

National Parks Traveler Podcast
National Parks Traveler Audio Postcard From The Parks | "Glacier"

National Parks Traveler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 14:20


There are places in the National Park System that take your breath away. Places such as Glacier National Park, along the shoreline of Avalanche Lake, or atop Logan Pass staring down valley along with the mountain goats. If you've been here, you'll never forget the experience. Husband-wife duo Laurie Raveis & Dennis Kole capture their experiences in "Glacier" in their upcoming 2023 album "In the Moment."

Montana Public Radio News
Glacier National Park considers expanding its entry reservation system

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 0:59


Glacier National Park officials are considering whether to expand a ticket reservation system for entry to new areas of the park.

Montana Untamed
Legal limbo: The 30-year battle over drilling rights in the Badger Two-Medicine

Montana Untamed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 44:54


The Badger-Two Medicine region nestles between the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Glacier National Park and the Helena-Lewis and Clark National Forest. It also lies in legal limbo after the latest court decision re-opened a fight over energy drilling rights that's been going on for three decades. On September 9, U.S. District Judge Richard Leon ordered the Department of Interior to re-instate a federal lease and drilling permit to Solenex LLC. That lease covers about 10 square miles of the Badger Two Medicine, and the permit potentially opens it to road-building for drilling rigs to explore for oil. Last week, the coalition of environmental groups and Blackfeet cultural organizations returned to court seeking to overturn Leon's latest order. It's a back-and-forth routine that's gone on since the 1980s. And while many thought the matter settled at the end of the Obama – and then Trump – administrations, it now appears to live on through the Biden administration. On this episode, Missoulian reporter Josh Murdock and Managing Editor Rob Chaney recount the history of the Badger-Two Medicine legal fight and why this place is important.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bring Birds Back
The Birds and the Trees

Bring Birds Back

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 32:13


Clark's Nutcracker and the whitebark pine have a strong mutualistic relationship: the tree is the bird's best source of food, and the bird is the tree's most dependable seed disperser. But several factors are putting the tree at risk — and the decline in whitebark pines is making that partnership less stable.Peri Sasnett, a ranger at Glacier National Park and co-host of the park's podcast Headwaters, joins Tenijah to talk all about the birds, their intricately interconnected ecosystems, and ways researchers are learning if and how the birds are adapting. Season 2 of Glacier National Park's podcast Headwaters is all about the charismatic whitebark pine and its role as a keystone species.More info and transcript at BirdNote.org.Want more BirdNote? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter. Sign up for BirdNote+ to get ad-free listening and other perks. BirdNote is a nonprofit. Your tax-deductible gift makes these shows possible.

Darkness Prevails Podcast | TRUE Horror Stories
389 | 6 True Glacier National Park HORROR Stories and More Montana Scary Stories

Darkness Prevails Podcast | TRUE Horror Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 68:44


Some very scary things are happening in Glacier National Park and elsewhere in Montana! Follow and review Tales from the Break Room on Spotify and Apple Podcasts! https://pod.link/1621075170 Join EERIECAST PLUS to unlock ad-free episodes and support this show! (Will still contain some host-read sponsorships) https://www.eeriecast.com/plus SCARY STORIES TIMESTAMPS: 0:00 INTRO 0:55 It Ate Our Cows from aberdeen 11:40 I Hit the Dogman from Oh Montana 21:27 Tree People from E.M.F.H.  25:29 I Do Not Fear the Woman in White from Carrielyn 54:35 A Run-In from Anonymous 57:52 The Break-In from Anonymous CREDITS: Music in stories created by: Dark Music LINKS:  Join my DISCORD: https://discord.gg/5Wj9RqTR3w Follow us on Spotify! https://open.spotify.com/show/3mNZyXkaJPLwUwcjkz6Pv2 Follow and Review us on iTunes! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/darkness-prevails-podcast-true-horror-stories/id1152248491   Submit Your Story Here: https://www.darkstories.org/ Get Darkness Prevails Podcast Merchandise! https://teespring.com/stores/darknessprevails Subscribe on YouTube for More Stories! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh_VbMnoL4nuxX_3HYanJbA?sub_confirmation=1 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Motorcycle Vagabond Show
Ep48: Bunk-a-Biker Stories w/ Maloni Iverson

Motorcycle Vagabond Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 16:03


Maloni is a host in north central Montana and she is on the show to regale us with her stories of the guests she's had, who are often on their way to Glacier National Park and/or Alaska. You can find out more about Bunk-a-Biker on www.bunkabiker.org. We have 20+ groups on Facebook to join and our own social site for those who don't like Facebook. Bunk-a-Biker is free to use but it is not free to run, so I ask that anyone who wants and can afford to give back to the community to go through www.patreon.com/bunkabiker. Thank you for being a contributor! Commentators: Zee Traveler and Maloni Iverson. Warning: Some episodes may contain explicit content and vulgar language. Visit www.zeetraveler.com/mvs.htmlto see pictures and other stuff!

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 73 – Unstoppable Visionary and Two-Time Cancer Survivor with Howard Brown

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 76:06


Yes, Howard Brown is a two-time cancer survivor. As you will discover in our episode, he grew up with an attitude to thrive and move forward. Throughout his life, he has learned about sales and the concepts of being a successful entrepreneur while twice battling severe cancer.   Howard's life story is one of those events worth telling and I hope you find it worth listening to. He even has written a book about all he has done. The book entitles Shining Brightly has just been released, but you get to hear the story directly from Howards' lips.   About the Guest: Howard Brown is an author, speaker, podcaster, Silicon Valley entrepreneur, interfaith peacemaker, two-time stage IV cancer survivor, and healthcare advocate. For more than three decades, Howard's business innovations, leadership principles, mentoring and his resilience in beating cancer against long odds have made him a sought-after speaker and consultant for businesses, nonprofits, congregations, and community groups. In his business career, Howard was a pioneer in helping to launch a series of technology startups before he co-founded two social networks that were the first to connect religious communities around the world. He served his alma mater—Babson College, ranked by US News as the nation's top college for entrepreneurship—as a trustee and president of Babson's worldwide alumni network. His hard-earned wisdom about resilience after beating cancer twice has led him to become a nationally known patient advocate and “cancer whisperer” to many families. Visit Howard at ShiningBrightly.com to learn more about his ongoing work and contact him. Through that website, you also will find resources to help you shine brightly in your own corner of the world. Howard, his wife Lisa, and his daughter Emily currently reside in Michigan. About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Hi, and welcome to another episode of unstoppable mindset. Today, we get to interview Howard Brown, I'm not going to tell you a lot because I want him to tell his story. He's got a wonderful story to tell an inspiring story. And he's got lots of experiences that I think will be relevant for all of us and that we all get to listen to. So with that, Howard, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Howard Brown  01:44 Thank you, Michael. I'm really pleased to be here. And thanks for having me on your show. And excited to talk to your audience and and share a little bit.   Michael Hingson  01:54 Well, I will say that Howard and I met through Podapolooza, which I've told you about in the past and event that brings podcasters would be podcasters. And people who want to be interviewed by podcasters together, and Howard will tell us which were several of those he is because he really is involved in a lot of ways. But why don't you start maybe by telling us a little bit about your, your kind of earlier life and introduce people to you and who you are. Sure, sure.   Howard Brown  02:23 So I'm from Boston. I can disguise the accent very well. But when I talked to my mother, we're back in Boston, we're packing a car. We're going for hot dogs and beans over to Fenway Park. So gotta get a soda. We're getting a soda, not a pop. So we add the Rs. They call my wife Lisa, not Lisa. But I grew up I grew up in the suburbs of Boston, a town called Framingham. And I'm a twin. And I'm very unusual. But a girl boy twin, my twin sister Cheryl. She goes by CJ is five minutes older. And I hold that I hold that now against her now that we're older and she didn't want to be older, but now she's my older sister, my big sister by five whole minutes.   Michael Hingson  03:09 Well, she's big sister, so she needs to take care of her baby brother   Howard Brown  03:12 says exactly. And she did. And we're gonna get to that because it's a really important point being a twin, which we'll get to in a second. But so Britta she Where does she live now? So she lives 40 minutes away from me here in Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:25 Oh my gosh, you both have moved out of the area.   Howard Brown  03:27 So she she moved to Albany, New York. I moved to Southern then California, LA area and the beaches, and then Silicon Valley. And then the last 17 years we've all lived close. And we raised our families together here in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:40 What got you to all go to Michigan?   Howard Brown  03:43 Well, for me, it was a choice. My wife is from Michigan, and I was in Silicon Valley. And we were Pat had a little girl Emily, who's four. There's a story there too. But we'll we decided we wanted her to grow up with a family and cousins and aunts and uncles and my in laws live here. My wife grew up here. And this made it closer for my parents and Boston suburbs to get here as well. So great place to raise a family very different from Silicon Valley in Palo Alto, California.   Michael Hingson  04:12 Yeah, but don't you miss Steve's ice cream in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:15 I do. I miss the ice cream. I missed the cannolis in the Back Bay. I missed some of the Chinese food. So in the north end, but it just it I do, but I have not lived there. I went to college there at Babson College number one school for entrepreneurship. And then when I got my first job, I moved out to Ohio but then I moved back and well there's a whole story of why I had to move back as well but we'll get   Michael Hingson  04:41 there. So are your parents still living in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:46 They are and so my dad I call myself son of a boot man. My dad for 49 years has sold cowboy boots in New England in the in the in the western you know the states New York Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts. And that's, you know, anyone who stayed somewhere for 49 years got to be applauded. And he's a straight commission boot salesman and he sold women's shoes prior to that. So he he's, he's a renaissance man.   Michael Hingson  05:15 Wow. So does he sell cowboy boots with snow treads as it were for the winter?   Howard Brown  05:21 No snow trends but, you know, like out west when you're working on, you know, on with cattle and working out west and sometimes it's a fashion statement. Not not too many places in New England like that. But he, he made a living, he enjoyed it. And he's, he's just about to retire at the age of 79. This year.   Michael Hingson  05:39 I remember living in Boston and and when I wear shoes with just leather soles, I slid around a lot on the sidewalks and all that so did get rubber rubbers to go over my boots and then later got real boots.   Howard Brown  05:54 Right. So I have the big hiking boots, the Timberlands, but I too have a pair of a you know, in Boston, we call them rabbits, rabbits, robins. And they basically are slip ons that gave you grip. They slipped right over your leather shoes. And you wore them when anyway in the snow and in those sloshing in the mess. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  06:12 And they worked really well. They did. So you went off to college. And I gather kind of almost right from the beginning you got involved in the whole idea of entrepreneurship.   Howard Brown  06:23 Well, I did I transferred to Babson from a liberal arts school called Connecticut College. I just I found out it wasn't for me and Babson College changed the trajectory of my entire life. i i I knew that I wanted to do sales and then later technology. But Babson was the catalyst for that. They just they support entrepreneurship of all kinds, no matter how you define it, and I just drank it in and I loved, I loved my time there. I love my learning there. And I continue to stay involved with Babson very closely as a past president of the Alumni Association, a former trustee, and very actively recruit students to go there and support student businesses. So it was a big impact on me and I continue to give back to it.   Michael Hingson  07:11 That's pretty cool. So how, how did you proceed as far as a career and entrepreneurial involvement as it were in in sales and all that?   Howard Brown  07:22 So I had an internship, I had wanted cellular one when cellular phones came out and I was basically learning the business. This is really early 1984 And five, and then I got another internship at NCR Corporation if you remember national cash register 120 year old company based out of Dayton, Ohio, and now it's in Atlanta, and it's, it's just not the same company. But I took an internship there a lot of Babson folks work there. And I worked as a trainer, sales installation rep. I trained waitresses, waiters, bartenders, hotel clerks, night audits, how to use cash register computer systems. So I was the teacher and a trainer. And I would, you know, talk to waitresses and waiters and bartenders and say you can make more tips by providing better service. But the way that you do that is you type you the order into a computer, it zaps it to the order station or the back to the back of the house to cook to prepare the foods or for the drinks. And you can spend more time servicing your table which should translate into higher tips. Well, about a third of them said nope, not for me, a third of them were need to be convinced and a third of them are like I'm in. I had a lot of fun doing that. And then after the shift, the either the manager or the owner would come over and they'd give you a savior at a Chinese food restaurant. They give you a poopoo platter to go to take home to your dorm room.   Michael Hingson  08:46 So I had a lot of fun, a lot of fun and a lot of good food.   Howard Brown  08:50 Sure sure. So that's what really started me off and hired me   Michael Hingson  08:55 so did that did that concept of tips and all that and advising people ever get you to translate that to Durgin Park?   Howard Brown  09:03 I actually did install the cashiers to computers area ago Daniel hall so the checkerboard you know draped you know cloth on the table and so you know it's there's a lot of good restaurants in Boston, you know the union Oyster House with a toothpick but I did countless restaurants hotels bars, you know it was I was basically at the whim of the Salesforce and there was a couple of us that went to go train and teach people and take the night shift and make sure everything was going smoothly as they installed the new system of course the no name restaurant and other one but well you know for for your listeners that no name was a place to get, you know, really great discounted seafood but you sat on a park bench. Remember that?   Michael Hingson  09:50 Right? Oh yeah, definitely. It wasn't. Well, neither was Durgin park, but I haven't kept up Is it still there?   Howard Brown  10:00 Yes, I believe it's still there.   Michael Hingson  10:01 Oh, good. I heard somewhere that, that it might not be because of COVID. But we enjoy   Howard Brown  10:07 down it shut down for a while during COVID I hope it's back open. I'm gonna have to go now. Yeah, you're gonna make me go check to see if it's open. But you know, many of them are still there. And obviously restaurants turn over. But that's a mainstay that's got a lot of history.   Michael Hingson  10:19 Oh, it does. And we had a lot of fun with the waitresses and so on at their Compac. I know, once we went there, and you know, the whole story, that Durgan is a place where you sit at family tables, unless we actually have four people then they'll let you sit at one of the tables for for around the outside. Well, there were three of us and my guide dog when we went in one time. And the hostess said, we're gonna put you at one of the tables for for just to give more room for the puppy dog. And she sat us down there. Then the waitress came over and as they are supposed to do at Durgan Park, she said, you're not supposed to sit here. There are only three of you. And I said there's a dog under the table. No, there's not. You can't fool me with that. And the waitress isn't supposed to be snotty, right. And she just kept going on and on about it. And I kept saying there is a dog under the table. She went away. And then she came back a little bit later. And she said, You've got to move and I said no. Why don't you just look, there's a dog under the table. You're not gonna make me fall for that. She finally looked. And there are these Golden Retriever puppy eyes staring back at her. She just melted. It was so much fun.   Howard Brown  11:26 Wouldn't be Boston if you didn't get a little attitude. Well, yeah, that's part of what it's all about your right next seating. And they just they sit you in a and they say, meet each other and be married.   Michael Hingson  11:38 Yeah, yeah. And it was a lot of fun. So how long did it take you to get to Silicon Valley?   Howard Brown  11:44 Well, so the story is that I did. I worked for NCR and I got hired by NCR, but I wanted out of the hospitality business. You know, even though he's young work until two, three in the morning, once they shut the restaurant or bar down or the hotel down, and then you do the night audit and you do the records. It was a hard life. So I looked and I did my research. And I said, you know who's who's making all the money here at NCR in the banking division. And it was really the early days of the outsourcing movement, punch cards, and you're outsourcing bank accounts, over 1200 baud modems. And I said, Well, that's interesting. And so I went to NCRs training at Sugar camp to learn how to be a salesperson were they actually in the early days, they filmed you, they taught you negotiation skills, competitive analysis, Industry Skills, it was fantastic. It's like getting an MBA today. But they did it all in six months, with mixing fieldwork in with, you know, training at this education facility in Dayton, Ohio. And I came out as a junior salesperson working for for very expansive experience, guys. And they just, I knew one thing, if I made them more productive, they'd make me money. And I did. And I, they sent me to banks and savings and loans and credit unions all over New England. And I basically learned the business of banking and outsourcing to these banks. And they made a lot of money. So that was how my career started. You can't do better than that. But to answer the question, because it's a little more complex than that. But it took me NCR in 1988. And then I moved out to Los Angeles in 1991, after a big health scare, which we'll talk about, and then I moved up in 2005. So there's the timeline to get me to Silicon Valley.   Michael Hingson  13:29 So you, you definitely moved around. I know that feeling well, having had a number of jobs and been required to live in various parts of the country when going back and forth from one coast to another from time to time. So you know, it's it's there. So you, you did all of that. And you You ended up obviously making some money and continuing to to be in the entrepreneurial world. But how does that translate into kind of more of an entrepreneurial spirit today?   Howard Brown  14:00 So great question, Michael. So what happened was is that I built a foundation. So at that time when you graduated school, and as far as for technology, the big computer shops like IBM Unisys, NCR, Hewlett Packard, what they did is they took you raw out of college, and they put you through their training program. And that training program was their version of the gospel of their of their products and your competitors and all that. And that built a great foundation. Well, I moved to Los Angeles after this big health scare, which I'm sure we're gonna go back and talk about, and I moved into the network products division. So I didn't stay in the banking division. I looked at the future and said voice data and video. I think there's the future there and I was right and AT and T bought NCR and, unfortunately, this is probably 1992. They also bought McCaw cellular they had just bought all of Eddie computer. They were a big company of five 600,000 employees and I have To tell you, the merger wasn't great. You felt like a number. And I knew that was my time. That was my time where I said, I got my foundation built. It's now time to go to a startup. So your time had come. My time had come. So at&t, offered early retirement for anyone 50 and older, and then they didn't get enough takers. So they offered early retirement for anyone that wanted to change. And so the talk around the watercooler was, let's wait they'll make a better offer. And I was like, I'm 26 and a half years old. I what am I waiting for? So they made a tremendously generous offer. I took early retirement, and I moved to my first true startup called avid technology that was in the production space. And we basically were changing film and television production from analog to digital. And I never looked back, I basically have been with startups ever since. And that, but that foundation I felt was really important that I got from NCR, but I prefer smaller companies and build the building them up from scratch and moving them forward.   Michael Hingson  16:07 Yeah, when you can do more to help shape the way they go. Because the the problem with a larger a lot of larger companies is they get very set in their ways. And they tend not to listen as much as maybe they should to people who might come along with ideas that might be beneficial to them, as opposed to startups as you say,   Howard Brown  16:27 Well, it depends. I mean, you know, you want to build a company that is still somewhat innovative. So what these large companies like Google and Facebook do, and Apple is they go acquire, they acquire the startups before they get too big or sometimes like, it's like what Facebook did with Instagram, they acquired six people, Google acquired YouTube, and they acquire the technology of best of breed technology. And then they shape it, and they accelerate it up. So listen, companies like IBM are still innovative, Apple, you know, is so innovative. But you need to maintain that because it can get to be a bureaucracy, and with hundreds of 1000s of employees. And you can't please everybody, but I knew my calling was was technology startups. And I just, I needed to get that, get that foundation built. And then away away I went. And that's what I've done. Since   Michael Hingson  17:16 you're right. It's all about with with companies, if they want to continue to be successful, they have to be innovative, and they have to be able to grow. I remember being in college, when Hewlett Packard came out with the HP 25, which was a very sophisticated calculator. Back in the the late 19th, early 1970s. And then Texas Instruments was working on a calculator, they came out with one that kind of did a lot of the stuff that HP did. But about that same time because HP was doing what they were doing, they came out with the HP 35. And basically it added, among other things, a function key that basically doubled the number of incredible things that you could do on the HP 25.   Howard Brown  17:58 Right, I had a TI calculator and in high school.   Michael Hingson  18:02 Well, and of course yeah, go ahead HPUS pull reverse Polish notation, which was also kind   Howard Brown  18:09 of fun. Right and then with the kids don't understand today is that, you know, we took typing, I get I think we took typing.   Michael Hingson  18:19 Did you type did you learn to type on a typewriter without letters on the keys?   Howard Brown  18:23 No, I think we have letters I think you just couldn't look down or else you get smacked. You know, the big brown fox jumped over the you know, something that's I don't know, but I did learn but I I'm sort of a hybrid. I looked down once in a while when I'd say   Michael Hingson  18:39 I remember taking a typing course in actually it was in summer school. I think it was between seventh and eighth grade. And of course the typewriters were typewriters, typewriters for teaching so they didn't have letters on the keys, which didn't matter to me a whole lot. But by the same token, that's the way they were but I learned to type and yeah, we learned to type and we learned how to be pretty accurate with it's sort of like learning to play the piano and eventually learning to do it without looking at the keys so that you could play and either read music or learn to play by ear.   Howard Brown  19:15 That's true. And And again, in my dorm room, I had Smith Corona, and I ended up having a bottle of or many bottles of white out.   Michael Hingson  19:25 White out and then there was also the what was it the other paper that you could put on the samosa did the same thing but white out really worked?   Howard Brown  19:33 Yeah, you put that little strip of tape and then it would wait it out for you then you can type over it. Right? We've come a long way. It's some of its good and some of its bad.   Michael Hingson  19:43 Yeah, now we have spellchecker Yeah, we do for what it's worth,   Howard Brown  19:49 which we got more and more and more than that on these I mean listen to this has allowed us to, to to do a zoom call here and record and goods and Bad's to all of that.   Michael Hingson  19:58 Yeah, I still I have to tell people learning to edit. Now using a sound editor called Reaper, I can do a lot more clean editing than I was able to do when I worked at a campus radio station, and had to edit by cutting tape and splicing with splicing tape.   Howard Brown  20:14 Exactly. And that's Yeah, yeah, Michael, we change the you know, avid changed the game, because we went from splicing tape or film and Betamax cassettes in the broadcast studios to a hard drive in a mouse, right? changed, we changed the game there because you were now editing on a hard drive. And so I was part of that in 1994. And again, timing has to work out and we had to retrain the unions at the television networks. And it was, for me, it was just timing worked really well. Because my next startup, liquid audio, the timing didn't work out well, because we're, we were going to try to do the same thing in the audio world, which is download music. But when you do that, when you it's a Sony cassette and Sony Walkman days, the world wasn't ready yet. We we still went public, we still did a secondary offering. But we never really brought product to market because it took Steve Jobs 10 years later to actually sell a song for 99 cents and convince the record industry that that was, you know, you could sell slices of pizza instead of the whole pizza, the whole record out   Michael Hingson  21:17 and still make money. I remember avid devices and hearing about them and being in television stations. And of course, for me, none of that was accessible. So it was fun to to be able to pick on the fact that no matter what, as Fred Allen, although he didn't say it quite this way, once said they call television the new medium, because that's as good as it's ever gonna get. But anyway, you know, it has come a long way. But it was so sophisticated to go into some of the studios with some of the even early equipment, like Avid, and see all the things that they were doing with it. It just made life so much better.   Howard Brown  21:52 Yeah, well, I mean, you're not I was selling, you know, $100,000 worth of software on a Macintosh, which first of all the chief engineers didn't even like, but at the post production facilities, they they they drank that stuff up, because you could make a television commercial, you could do retakes, you could add all the special effects, and it could save time. And then you could get more revenue from that. And so it was pretty easy sale, because we tell them how fast they could pay off to the hardware, the software and then train everybody up. And they were making more and more and better commercials for the car dealerships and the local Burger Joint. And they were thrilled that these local television stations, I can tell you that   Michael Hingson  22:29 I sold some of the first PC based CAD systems and the same sort of thing, architects were totally skeptical about it until they actually sat down and we got them in front of a machine and showed them how to use it. Let them design something that they could do with three or four hours, as opposed to spending days with paper and paper and paper and more paper in a drafting table. And they could go on to the next project and still charge as much.   Howard Brown  22:53 It was funny. I take a chief engineer on to lunch, and I tried to gauge their interest and a third, we're just enthusiastic because they wanted to make sure that they were the the way that technology came into the station. They were they were the brainchild they were the they were the domain experts. So a third again, just like training waitresses and waiters and bartenders, a third of them. Oh, they wanted they just wanted to consume it all. A third of them were skeptical and needed convincing. And a third of whom was like, that's never going out on my hair anywhere. Yeah, they were the later and later adopters, of course.   Michael Hingson  23:24 And some of them were successful. And some of them were not.   Howard Brown  23:28 Absolutely. We continue. We no longer. Go ahead. No, no, of course I am the my first sales are the ones that were early adopters. And and then I basically walked over to guys that are later adopters. I said, Well, I said, you know, the ABC, the NBC and the fox station and the PBS station habit, you know, you don't have it, and they're gonna take all your post production business away from you. And that got them highly motivated.   Michael Hingson  23:54 Yeah. And along the way, from a personal standpoint, somebody got really clever. And it started, of course at WGBH in Boston, where they recognize the fact that people who happen to be blind would want to know what's going on on TV when the dialog wasn't saying much to to offer clues. And so they started putting an audio description and editing and all that and somebody created the secondary audio programming in the other things that go into it. And now that's becoming a lot more commonplace, although it's still got a long way to go.   Howard Brown  24:24 Well, I agree. So but you're right. So having that audio or having it for visually impaired or hearing impaired are all that they are now we're making some progress. So it's still a ways to go. I agree with you.   Michael Hingson  24:36 still a ways to go. Well, you along the way in terms of continuing to work with Abbott and other companies in doing the entrepreneurial stuff. You've had a couple of curveballs from life.   Howard Brown  24:47 I have. So going back to my promotion, I was going driving out to Dayton, Ohio, I noticed a little spot on my cheekbone. didn't think anything of it. I was so excited to get promoted and start my new job. up, I just kept powering through. So a few weeks after I'd moved out to Dayton, Ohio, my mom comes out. And she's at the airport and typical Boston and mom, she's like, What's that on your cheek? What's that on your cheek? And I was like, Mom, it's nothing. I kind of started making excuses. I got hit playing basketball, I got it at the gym or something. And she's like, well, we got to get that checked out. I said, No, Mom, it's okay. It's not no big deal. It's a little little market. Maybe it's a cyst or pebble or something I don't know. So she basically said she was worried, but she never told me. So she helped set up my condo, or an apartment. And then she left. And then as long Behold, I actually had to go speak in Boston at the American Bankers Association about disaster recovery, and having a disaster recovery plan. And so this is the maybe August of 1989. And I came back and that spot was still there. And so my mom told my dad, remember, there was payphones? There was no cell phones, no computers, no internet. So she told my dad, she didn't take a picture of it. But now he saw it. And he goes, Let's go play tennis. There's I got there on a Friday. So on a Saturday morning, we'd go do something. And instead of going to play tennis, he took me to a local community hospital. And they took a look at it. And they said off its assist, take some my antibiotic erythromycin or something, you'll be fine. Well, I came back to see them on Monday after my speech. And I said, I'm not feeling that great. Maybe it's the rethrow myosin. And so having to be four o'clock in the afternoon, he took me to the same emergency room. And he's and I haven't had the same doctor on call. He actually said, You know what, let's take a biopsy of it. So he took a biopsy of it. And then he went back to the weight room, he said, I didn't get a big enough slice. Let me take another. So he took another and then my dad drove me to the airport, and I basically left. And my parents called me maybe three weeks later, and they said, You got to come back to Boston. We gotta go see, you know, they got the results. But you know, they didn't tell us they'll only tell you. Because, you know, it's my private data. So I flew back to Boston, with my parents. And this time, I had, like, you know, another doctor there with this emergency room doctor, and he basically checks me out, checks me out, but he doesn't say too much. But he does say that we have an appointment for you at Dana Farber Cancer Institute at 2pm. I think you should go. And I was like, whoa, what are you talking about? Why am I going to Dana Farber Cancer Institute. So it gets, you know, kind of scary there because I show up there. I'm in a suit and tie. My dad's in a suit down. My mom's seems to be dressed up. And we go, and they put me through tests. And I walk in there. And I don't know if you remember this, Michael. But the Boston Red Sox charity is called the Jimmy fund. Right? And the Jimmy fund are for kids with blood cancers, lymphoma leukemias, so I go there. And they checked me in and they told me as a whole host of tests they're going to do, and I'm looking in the waiting room, and I see mostly older people, and I'm 23 years old. So I go down the hallways, and I see little kids. So I go I go hang out with the little kids while I'm waiting. I didn't know what was going on. So they call me and I do my test. And this Dr. George Canalis, who's you know, when I came to learn that the inventor of some chemo therapies for lymphomas very experienced, and this young Harvard fellow named Eric Rubin I get pulled into this office with this big mahogany desk. And they say you have stage four E T cell non Hodgkins lymphoma. It's a very aggressive, aggressive, very aggressive form of cancer. We're going to try to knock this out. I have to tell you, Michael, I don't really remember hardly anything else that was said, I glossed over. I looked up at this young guy, Eric Rubin, and I said, What's he saying? I looked back out of the corner of my eye, my mom's bawling her eyes out. My dad's looks like a statue. And I have to tell you, I was really just a deer in the headlights. I had no idea that how a healthy 23 year old guy gets, you know, stage four T cell lymphoma with a very horrible prognosis. I mean, I mean, they don't they said, We don't know if we can help you at the world, one of the world's foremost cancer research hospitals in the world. So it was that was that was a tough pill to swallow. And I did some more testing. And then they told me to come back in about a week to start chemotherapy. And so, again, I didn't have the internet to search anything. I had encyclopedias. I had some friends, you know, and I was like, I'm a young guy. And, you know, I was talking to older people that potentially, you know, had leukemia or different cancer, but I didn't know much. And so I I basically showed up for chemotherapy, scared out of my mind, in denial, and Dr. RUBIN comes out and he says, we're not doing chemo today. I said, I didn't sleep awake. What are you talking about? He says, we'll try again tomorrow, your liver Our function test is too high. And my liver function test is too high. So I'm starting to learn but I still don't know what's going on. He says I got it was going to field trip. Field Trip. He said, Yeah, you're going down the street to Newton Wellesley hospital, we're going to the cryogenic center, cryo, what? What are you talking about? He goes, it's a sperm bank, and you're gonna go, you know, leave a sample specimen. And it's like, you just told me that, you know, if you can help me out what why I'm not even thinking about kids, right now. He said, Go do it. He says what else you're going to do today, and then you come back tomorrow, and we'll try chemo. So thank God, he said that, because I deposited before I actually started any chemotherapy, which, you know, as basically, you know, rendered me you know, impotent now because of all the chemotherapy and radiation I had. So that was a blessing that I didn't know about until later, which we'll get to. But a roll the story forward a little more quickly as that I was getting all bad news. I was relapsing, I went through about three or four different cycles of different chemotherapy recipes, nothing was working. I was getting sicker, and they tight. My sister, I am the twin CJ, for bone marrow transplant and she was a 25% chance of being a match. She happened to be 100% match. And I had to then gear up for back in 1990 was a bone marrow transplant where they would remove her bone marrow from her hip bones, they would scrub it and cleanse it, and they would put it in me. And they would hope that my body wouldn't immediately rejected and die and shut down or over time, which is called graft versus host these that it wouldn't kill me or potentially that it would work and it would actually reset my immune system. And it would take over the malignant cells and set my set me back straight, which it ended up doing. And so having a twin was another blessing miracle. You know that, you know, that happened to me. And I did some immunotherapy called interleukin two that was like, like the grandfather of immunotherapy that strengthened my system. And then I moved to Florida to get out of the cold weather and then I moved out to California to rebuild my life. I call that Humpty Dumpty building Humpty Dumpty version one. And that's that's how I got to California in Southern California.   Michael Hingson  32:15 So once again, your big sister savedthe day,   Howard Brown  32:19 as usual.   Michael Hingson  32:21 That's a big so we go,   Howard Brown  32:23 as we call ourselves the Wonder Twins. He's more. She's terrific. And thank God she gave part of herself and saved my life. And I am eternally grateful to her for that,   Michael Hingson  32:34 but but she never had any of the same issues or, or diseases. I gather. She's been   Howard Brown  32:41 very healthy, except for like a knee. A partial knee replacement. She's been very healthy her whole life.   Michael Hingson  32:48 Well, did she have to have a knee replacement because she kept kicking you around or what?   Howard Brown  32:52 No, she's little. She's five feet. 510 So she never kicked me. We are best friends. My wife's best friend. I know. She is just just a saint. She's She's such a giving person and you know, we take that from our parents, but she she gave of herself of what she could do. She said she do it again in a heartbeat. I don't think I'm allowed to give anybody my bone marrow but if I could, would give it to her do anything for her. She's She's amazing. So she gave me the gift, the gift of life.   Michael Hingson  33:21 So you went to Florida, then you moved to California and what did you do when you got out here?   Howard Brown  33:24 So I ended up moving up to northern California. So I met this girl from Michigan in Southern California, Lisa, my wife have now 28 years in July. We married Lisa Yeah, we got married under the Jewish wedding company's wedding canopies called the hotpot and we're looking at the Pacific Ocean, we made people come out that we had that Northridge earthquake in 94. But this is in July, so things are more settled. So we had all friends and family come out. And it was beautiful. We got it on a pool deck overlooking the Pacific. It was gorgeous. It was a beautiful Hollywood type wedding. And it was amazing. So we got married in July of 94. And then moved up to Silicon Valley in 97. And then I was working at the startups. My life was really out of balance because I'm working 20 hours, you know, a day and I'm traveling like crazy. And my wife says, You know what, you got to be home for dinner if we're going to think about having a family. And we're a little bit older now. 35 and 40. And so we've got to think about these things. And so I called back to Newton Wellesley hospital, and I got the specimen of sperm shipped out to San Jose, and we went through an in vitro fertilization process. And she grew eight eight eggs and they defrosted the swimmers and they took the best ones and put them back in the four best eggs and our miracle baby our frozen kids sickle. Emily was born in August of 2001. Another blessing another miracle. I was able to have a child and healthy baby girl.   Michael Hingson  34:58 So what's Emily doing today?   Howard Brown  35:00 Well, thank you for asking that. So, she is now in Missoula, Montana at a television station called K Pax eight Mountain News. And she's an intern for the summer. And she's living her great life out there hiking, Glacier National Park. And she ran I think she ran down to the Grand Tetons and, and she's learning about the broadcast business and reporting. She's a writer by trade, by trade and in journalism. And she likes philosophy. So she'll be coming back home to finish her senior year, this at the end of the summer at the University of Michigan. And so she's about to graduate in December. And she's, she's doing just great.   Michael Hingson  35:35 So she writes and doesn't do video editing us yet using Abbott or any of the evolutions from it.   Howard Brown  35:41 No, she does. She actually, when you're in a small market station, that's you. You write the script, she does the recording, she has a tripod, sometimes she's she films with the other reporters, but when she they sent her out as an intern, and she just covered the, this, you know, the pro pro life and pro choice rallies, she she records herself, she edits on Pro Tools, which is super powerful now, and a lot less expensive. And then, when she submits, she submits it refer review to the news director and to her superiors. And she's already got, I think, three video stories and about six different by lines on written stories. So she's learning by doing, it's experiential, it's amazing.   Michael Hingson  36:23 So she must have had some experience in dealing with all the fires and stuff out at Yellowstone and all that.   Howard Brown  36:31 So the flooding at Yellowstone, so I drove her out there in May. And I didn't see any fires. But the flooding we got there before that, she took me on a hike on the North Gate of Yellowstone. And she's she's, you know, environmentally wilderness trained first aid trained. And I'm the dad, and I'm in decent shape. But she took me out an hour out and an hour back in and, you know, saw a moose saw a deer didn't see any mountain lion didn't see any Grizzlies, thank God, but we did see moose carcass where the grizzly had got a hold on one of those and, and everybody else to get it. So I got to go out to nature weather and we took a road trip out there this summer, it was a blast. It's the those are the memories, when you've been through a cancer diagnosis that you just you hold on to very dearly and very tight. It was a blast. So that's what he's doing this summer. She'll be back. She'll be back in August, end of August.   Michael Hingson  37:22 That's really exciting to hear that she's working at it and being successful. And hopefully she'll continue to do that. And do good reporting. And I know that this last week, with all the Supreme Court cases, it's it's, I guess, in one sense, a field day for reporters. But it's also a real challenge, because there's so many polarized views on all of that.   Howard Brown  37:44 Well, everybody's a broadcaster now whether it's Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and all the other ones out there, tick tock. So everybody's sort of a reporter now. And you know, what do you believe, and unfortunately, I just can't believe in something in 140 characters or something in two sentences. Yeah, there's no depth there. So sometimes you miss the point, and all this stuff. And then everything's on 24 hours on CNN, on Fox on MSNBC, so it never stops. So I call that a very noisy world. And it's hard to process. You know, all this. It's coming at you so fast in the blink of an eye. So we're in a different time than when we grew up, Michael, it was a slower pace. Today in this digital world. It's, it's, it's a lot and especially COVID. Now, are we just consuming and consuming and binging and all this stuff, I don't think it's that healthy.   Michael Hingson  38:36 It's not only a noisy world, but it's also a world, it's very disconnected, you can say all you want about how people can send tweets back and forth, text messages back and forth and so on. But you're not connecting, you're not really getting deep into anything, you're not really establishing relationships in the way that as you point out, we used to, and we don't connect anymore, even emails don't give you that much connection, realism, as opposed to having meaningful dialogue and meaningful conversations. So we just don't Converse anymore. And now, with all that's going on, in the very divided opinions, there's there's no room for discussion, because everybody has their own opinion. And that's it, there's no room to dialogue on any of it at all, which is really too bad.   Howard Brown  39:21 Yeah, I agree. It's been divisive. And, you know, it's, it's hard because, you know, an email doesn't have the body language, the intent, the emotion, like we're talking right now. And, you know, we're expressing, you know, you know, I'm telling stories of my story personally, but you can tell when I get excited, I smile, I can get animated. Sometimes with an email, you know, you don't know the intent and it can be misread. And a lot of that communication is that way. So, you know, I totally get where you're coming from.   Michael Hingson  39:55 And that's why I like doing the podcasts that we're doing. We get to really have conversation isn't just asking some questions and getting an answer and then going on to the next thing. That's, frankly, no fun. And I think it's important to be able to have the opportunity to really delve into things and have really good conversations about them. I learned a lot, and I keep seeing as I do these podcasts, and for the past 20 plus years, I've traveled around the world speaking, of course, about September 11, and talking about teamwork, and trust, and so on. And as I always say, if I don't learn more than I'm able to teach or impart, then I'm not doing my job very well.   Howard Brown  40:35 So that's exactly and that's, that's where I'm going after the second health concern. You know, I'm now going to teach, I'm gonna inspire, I'm going to educate. And that's, that's, that's what I do, I want to do with the rest of my time is to be able to, you know, listen, I'm not putting my head in the sand, about school shootings, about an insurrection about floods about all that. You gotta live in the real world. But I choose, as I say, I like to live on positive Street as much as possible, but positive street with action. That's, that's what makes the world a better place at the end of the day. So you sharing that story means that one we'll never forget. And you can educate the generations to come that need to understand, you know, that point in time and how it affected you and how you've dealt with it, and how you've been able to get back out of bed every day. And I want to do the same.   Michael Hingson  41:26 Well, there's nothing wrong with being positive. I think that there is a need to be aware. But we can we can continue to be positive, and try to promote positivity, try to promote connectionism and conversations and so on, and promote the fact that it's okay to have different opinions. But the key is to respect the other opinion, and recognize that it isn't just what you say that's the only thing that ever matters. That's the problem that we face so much today.   Howard Brown  41:58 Right? Respect. I think Aretha Franklin saying that great. She   Michael Hingson  42:01 did. She did. She's from Motown here. There you go. See? When you moved out to California, and you ended up in Silicon Valley, and so on, who are you working for them?   Howard Brown  42:14 So I moved up, and I worked for this company called Liquid audio that doesn't exist anymore. And it was just iTunes 10 years too early on, there was real audio, there was Mark Cuban's company was called Audio net and then broadcast.com used for a lot of money. And so the company went public and made a lot of money. But it didn't work. The world wasn't ready for it yet to be able to live in this cassette world. It was not ready. I Napster hadn't been invented, mp3 and four hadn't been invented. So it just the adoption rate of being too early. But it still went public a lot. The investors made a ton of money, but they call that failing, failing forward. So I stayed there for a year, I made some money. And I went to another startup. And that startup was in the web hosting space, it was called Naevus. site, it's now won by Time Warner. But at that time, building data centers and hosting racks of computers was very good business. And so I got to be, you know, participate in an IPO. You know, I built built up revenue. And you know, the outsourcing craze now called cloud computing, it's dominated by the folks that like Amazon, and the folks at IBM, and a few others, but mostly, you know, dominated there, where you're basically having lots of blinking lights in a data center, and just making sure that those computers stay up to serve up the pages of the web, the videos, even television, programming, and now any form of communication. So I was, I was early on in that and again, got to go through an IPO and get compensated properly unduly, and, but also my life was out of balance. And so before we were called out for the sperm and had a baby, I transitioned out when Silicon Valley just the pendulum swung the other way, I ended up starting to work at my own nonprofit, I founded it with a couple of Silicon Valley guys called Planet Jewish, and it was still very technologically driven. It was the world's first Community Calendar. This is before Google Calendar, this is in 2000. And we built it as a nonprofit to serve the Jewish community to get more people to come to Jewish events. And I architected the code, and we ran that nonprofit for 17 years. And before calendaring really became free, and very proud of that. And after that, I started a very similar startup with different code called circle builder, and it was serving faith and religions. It was more like private facebook or private online communities. And we had the Vatican as a client and about 25,000 Ministries, churches, and nonprofits using the system. And this is all sort of when Facebook was coming out to you know, from being just an edu or just for college students. And so I built that up as a quite a big business. But unfortunately, I was in Michigan when I started circle builder. I ended up having to close both of those businesses down. One that the revenue was telling off of the nonprofit and also circuit builder wasn't monetizing as quickly or as we needed as well. But I ended up going into my 50 year old colonoscopy, Michael. And I woke up thinking everything was going to be fine. My wife Lisa's holding my hand. And the gastroenterologist said, No, I found something. And when I find something, it's bad news. Well, it was bad news. Stage three colon cancer. Within about 10 days or two weeks, I had 13 and a half inches of my colon removed, plus margins plus lymph nodes. One of the lymph nodes was positive, install a chemo port and then I waited because my daughter had soccer tournaments to travel to but on first week of August in 2016, I started 12 rounds of Rockem sockem chemotherapy called folfox and five Fu and it was tough stuff. So I was back on the juice again, doing chemotherapy and but this time, I wasn't a deer in the headlights, I was a dad, I was a husband. I had been through the trenches. So this time, I was much more of a marine on a mission. And I had these digital tools to reach out for research and for advocacy and for support. Very different at that time. And so I unfortunately failed my chemotherapy, I failed my neck surgery, another colon resection, I failed a clinical trial. And things got worse I became metastatic stage four that means that colon cancer had spread to my liver, my stomach linings called the omentum and peritoneum and my bladder. And I had that same conversation with a doctor in downtown Detroit, at a Cancer Institute and he said, We don't know if we can help you. And if you Dr. Google, it said I had 4% of chances of living about 12 to 18 months and things were dark I was I was back at it again looking looking at the Grim Reaper. But what I ended up doing is research and I did respond to the second line chemotherapy with a little regression or shrinkage. And for that you get more chemotherapy. And then I started to dig in deep research on peritoneal carcinoma which is cancer of the of the of the stomach lining, and it's very tricky. And there's a group called colon town.org that I joined and very informative. I there then met at that time was probably over 100 other people that had had the peritoneal carcinoma, toma and are living and they went through a radical surgery called cytoreduction high pack, where they basically debulk you like a de boning a fish, and they take out all this cancer, they can see the dead and live cells, and then they pour hot chemo in you. And then hot chemo is supposed to penetrate the scanning the organs, and it's supposed to, in theory kill micro cell organism and cancer, although it's still not proven just yet. But that surgery was about a 12 and a half hour surgery in March of 2018. And they call that the mother of all surgeries. And I came out looking like a ghost. I had lost about 60 pounds, and I had a long recovery. It's that one would put Humpty Dumpty back together. It's been now six years. But I got a lot of support. And I am now what's called no evidence of disease at this time, I'm still under surveillance. I was quarterly I just in June, I had my scans and my exams. And I'm now going to buy annual surveillance, which means CAT scans and blood tests. That's the step in the right direction. And so again, I mean, if I think about it, my twin sister saved my life, I had a frozen sperm become a daughter. And again, I'm alive from a stage four diagnosis. I am grateful. I am lucky, and I am blessed. So that's that a long story that the book will basically tell you, but that's where I am today.   Michael Hingson  48:50 And we'll definitely get to the book. But another question. So you had two startups that ran collectively for quite a period of time, what got you involved or motivated to do things in the in the faith arena?   Howard Brown  49:06 So I have to give credit to my wife, Lisa. So we met at the Jewish Federation of Los Angeles at this young leadership group. And then they have like a college fair of organizations that are Jewish support organizations. And one of them happened to be Jewish Big Brothers, now Jewish Brothers and Big Sisters of Los Angeles. Suppose you'd be a great big brother. I was like, well, it takes up a lot of time. I don't know. She's like, you should check it out. So I did. And I became I fill out the application. I went through the background checks, and I actually got to be a Jewish big brother to this young man II and at age 10. And so I have to tell you, one of the best experiences in my life was to become a mentor. And I today roll the clock forward. 29 years in is now close to 40 years old or 39 years old. He's married with a son who's one noble and two wife, Sarah, and we are family. We stayed together past age 18 Seen, and we've continued on. And I know not a lot of people do that. But it was probably one of the best experiences I've ever done. I've gotten so much out of it. Everyone's like, Oh, you did so much for in? Well, he did so much for me and my daughter, Emily calls him uncle and my wife and I are we are his family, his dad was in prison and then passed away and his mom passed away where his family now. And so one of the best experiences. So that's how I kind of got into the Jewish community. And also being in sales I was I ended up being a good fundraiser. And so these nonprofits that live their lifeblood is fundraising dollars. I didn't mind calling people asking them for donations or sitting down over coffee, asking them for donations. So I learned how to do that out in Southern California in Northern California. And I've continued to do that. So that gave me a real good taste of faith. I'm not hugely religious, but I do believe in the community values of the Jewish community. And you get to meet people beyond boards and you get to raise money for really good causes. And so that sort of gave me another foundation to build off of and I've enjoyed doing that as a community sermon for a long time.   Michael Hingson  51:10 I'll bite Where does Ian live today?   Howard Brown  51:13 Okay, well, Ian was in LA when we got matched. I had to move to San Francisco, but I I petitioned the board to keep our match alive because it was scholarship dollars in state right. And went to UC Santa Cruz, Florida State for his master's and got his last degree at Hastings and the Jewish community supported him with scholarships. And in was in very recently was in San Francisco, Oakland area, and now he's lives in South Portland, Oregon.   Michael Hingson  51:39 Ah, so you haven't gotten back to Michigan yet? Although he's getting into colder weather. So there's a chance?   Howard Brown  51:45 Well, let me tell you, he did live with us in Michigan. So using my connections through the Jewish community, I asked if he could interview with a judge from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals a friend of mine, we sat on a on a board of directors for the American Jewish Committee, Detroit. And I said, she's like, well, Howard, I really have to take Michigan kids. I said, You know what? No problem. You decide if he's if he's worthy or not go through your process, but would you take the phone call? So she took the phone call, and I never heard anything. And then Ian called me and he said, I got it. I as a second year loss. Going to be a second year law student. I'm going to be clerking for summer interning and clerking for this judge Leanne white. And again, it just it karma, the payback, it was beautiful. So he lived with us for about four and a half months. And when he came back, and it was beautiful, because Emily was only about four or five years old. And, and he lived with us for that time. And it was beautiful.   Michael Hingson  52:43 But that's really great. That, that you have that relationship that you did the big brother program. And I'm assuming you've been big brother to other people as well.   Howard Brown  52:53 No, no. I have not actually. Because what it did is it trained me to be a dad. So when I had Emily, it was more it was more difficult actually to do that. And so no, Ian has been my one and only match. I mentor a lot of Babson students, and I mentor and get mentored by some cancer patients and, and some big entrepreneurs. Mentorship is a core value of mine. I like to be mentored. And I also like to mentor others. And I think that's, that's what makes the world go round. So when Steve Gates when Bill Gates, his wife, Melinda, just donated 123 million to the overall arching Big Brothers, Big Sisters of America. And that money will filter to all those, I think that that's such a core value. If a young person can have someone that takes interest in them, they can really shape their future and also get a lot out of it. So mentorship is one of my key values. And I hope it's hope it's many of your viewers and yours as well. Michael,   Michael Hingson  53:52 absolutely is I think that we can't do anything if we can't pass on what we've learned and try to help other people grow. I've been a firm believer my entire life of you don't give somebody a fish, you teach them how to fish and however, and wherever that is, it's still the same thing. And we need to teach and impart. And I think that in our own way, every one of us is a teacher and the more we take it seriously, the better it is.   Howard Brown  54:18 Well, I'm now a student not learning podcasting. I learned how to be a book author and I'm learning how to reinvent myself virgin Humpty Dumpty, version two coming out.   Michael Hingson  54:29 So you had been a national cancer survivor advocate and so on. Tell me a little bit about that if you would.   Howard Brown  54:35 So I respect people that want to keep their diagnosis private and their survivorship private. That's not me. I want to be able to help people because if I would have been screened at age 40 or 42, I probably wouldn't have had colon cancer and I was not, but this is a preventable disease and really minorities and indigenous people as they need to get screened more, because that's the highest case of diagnosis for colorectal cancer. But what I think that that's what his needs now it's the second leading killer of cancer right now. And it's an important to get this advocacy out and use your voice. And so I want to use my voice to be able to sound the alarm on getting screening, and also to help people survive. There's I think, 16 million growing to 23 or 4 million by 2030. Cancer survivors out there, cancer diagnosis, it sucks sex all the way around, but it affects more than the patient, it affects your caregiver, it affects your family affects relationships, it affects emotions, physical, and also financial, there is many aspects of survivorship here and more people are learning to live with it and going, but also, quite frankly, I live with in the stage for cancer world, you also live with eminence of death, or desperation to live a little bit longer. You hear people I wish I had one more day. Well, I wish I had time to be able to see my daughter graduate high school, and I did and I cherished it. I'm going to see her graduate college this December and then walk at the Big House here in Michigan, in Ann Arbor in May. And then God willing, I will walk her down the aisle at the appropriate time. And it's good to have those big goals that are important that drive you forward. And so those are the few things that drive me forward.   Michael Hingson  56:28 I know that I can't remember when I had my first colonoscopy. It's been a while. It was just part of what I did. My mother didn't die of colon cancer, but she was diagnosed with colon cancer. She, she went to the doctor's office when she felt something was wrong. And they did diagnose it as colon cancer. She came home my brother was with her. She fell and broke her hip and went into the hospital and passed away a few days later, they did do an operation to deal with repairing her hip. And but I think because of all of that, just the amount that her body went through, she just wasn't able to deal with it. She was 6970. And so it was no I take Yeah, so I was just one of those things that that did happen. She was 71, not 70. But, you know, we've, for a while I got a colonoscopy every five years. And then they say no, you don't need to do it every five years do it every 10 years. The couple of times they found little polyps but they were just little things. There was nothing serious about them. They obviously took them out and autopsy or biopsy them and all that. And no problems. And I don't remember any of it. I slept through it. So it's okay.   Howard Brown  57:46 Great. So the prep is the worst part. Isn't it though? The preps no fun. But the 20 minutes they have you under light anesthesia, they snipped the polyps and away you go and you keep living your life. So that's what I hope for everyone, because I will tell you, Michael, showing through the amount of chemotherapy, the amount of surgeries and the amount of side effects that I have is, is I don't wish that on anyone. I don't wish on anyone. It's not a good existence. It's hard. And quite frankly, it's, I want to prevent about it. And I'm just not talking about colon cancer, get your mammogram for breast cancer, get your check for prostate cancer, you know, self care is vital, because you can't have fun, do your job, work Grow family, if your hell if you're not healthy, and the emotional stuff they call the chemo brain or brain fog and or military personnel refer to it as PTSD. It's real. And you've got to be able to understand that, you know, coming from a cancer diagnosis is a transition. And I'll never forget that my two experiences and I I've got to build and move forward though. Because otherwise it gets dark, it gets lonely, it gets depressing, and then other things start to break down the parts don't work well. So I've chosen to find my happy place on the basketball court be very active in sounding the alarm for as an advocate. And as I never planned on being a book author and now I'm going to be a published author this summer. So there's good things that have come in my life. I've had a very interesting, interesting life. And we're here talking about it now so I appreciate it.   Michael Hingson  59:20 Well tell me about you in basketball seems to be your happy place.   Howard Brown  59:24 So everyone needs to find a happy place. I'll tell you why. The basketball court I've been playing since I was six years old and I was pretty good you know, I'm not gonna go professional. But I happen to like the team sport and I'm a point guard so I'm basically telling people what to do and trash talk and and all that. But I love it a

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FVCC Nature Journal
Episode 50 - The Adaptable Red Fox

FVCC Nature Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 12:05


The red fox is one of the most widespread mammals across North America. In recent years, this adaptable carnivore seems to be expanding its range to high elevations in Glacier National Park. Join us on our 50th episode of the Nature Journal to learn all about this member of the Canid (dog) family!

Dr Mary Travelbest Guide
Banff, Canada

Dr Mary Travelbest Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 8:09


In this episode, the FAQ is: If I am a Step 2 traveler, how do I reach Step 3? Today's Destination is: Banff, Canada Today's Mistake- I rented a hotel room in Alaska without A/C Travel Advice:  Stoke your wanderlust   FAQ: If I am a Step 2 traveler, how do I reach Step 3?   Step 2 is for traveling in your same country and in a comfort zone that is familiar. Getting over that level takes some adventure. Ask yourself if you're ready to see more diverse experiences now. Are you ready to make a move to a distant land, such as Hawaii, Alaska, or the Bahamas?  Get a travel guidebook and start researching the area for clues on how to get there, what to do and how to prepare. Then talk to people you know who have been there. Ask them questions about what they liked. Be curious. Eventually,  you will have the courage and the savings to make the trip and enjoy the higher step to a more difficult and rewarding adventure. Today's destination: Banff, Canada   Banff was on my bucket list for a long time. It may be on yours, too. You can get here by train, plane or automobile.  You'll see the pure beauty of Canada's outdoors, even if it's rainy for part of the day. It's scenic and green because it rains a lot here. The drive from Calgary to Banff is beautiful and it's about 90 miles.   https://www.banfflakelouise.com/ https://www.banffjaspercollection.com/attractions/banff-gondola/   https://destinationlesstravel.com/calgary-to-banff/ Dr. Travelbest: I drove to Banff, Canada from Waterton, Canada after eating at the Prince of Wales Restaurant near the US/Canada border. I had been in Glacier National Park and on the Canadian side to explore further into Canada. I liked the feel of the town of Banff immediately. It's a European-like city. I took a strenuous hike to the top of the Sulfur Mountain Trail. 5.5 km, 655 m elevation gain (2.5-3 hours), and saw stunning views of the Bow (rhymes with throw) Valley. Follow a short trail up to the historic Cosmic Ray Station. There is also a 4-person gondola which in 8 minutes soars to the top of Sulphur Mountain for a bird's-eye view of six incredible mountain ranges.    Whether you walk or take the gondola, stroll along the ridgetop boardwalk where the views get better with every step. Outside is a 360-degree rooftop observation deck and inside a multi-sensory theatre with interactive exhibits,  plus restaurants.   That Jacuzzi at the bottom of the mountain felt great after my hike. Banff is known for its hot springs. Take one or more.   Banff Springs Hotel (Fairmont) had a convention center and the best tea/coffee ever. Then I drove to Lake Louise Chateau (Fairmount) and had one of the best buffet breakfasts ever. Five-star quality and a high price to match, but I ate for the day here.    The weather was pouring rain, then sunny skies all within an hour, and the beauty was seen in the reflective turquoise water. Nearby is the grand Ice Fields Highway. 3-5 hours to a full-day drive, depending on how often you stop. There are tours you can hire, in the event you don't have a car. You'll see Bow (throw) Falls and Morraine Lake. I kept driving up to Jasper, so that may be on your list as well.    Do see the Ice Fields Highway. Don't get close to a moose. Lesson learned- I rented a hotel room in Alaska without A/C   Most days in Alaska are cold. I've visited twice, and both times were in July. If you are going to Alaska in the summer, check to see if they have air conditioning. I timed it to the hot days and there was no A/C to cool off. You may find a fan as I eventually did. You should expect extreme temperatures when in Alaska. Learn that lesson here.    Today's Travel Advice-Stoke your wanderlust   If you are thinking of a trip you want to take, start a list of things you know about that country. Do you know anyone who's been there? Do you know anyone else who may know about the region? Visit your local library, bookstore, and online search engine to find out more and satisfy your curiosity. Keep that list growing. It will soon become your bucket list for travel. I want to bring meaning to your travels. Send a question or travel tip to info@drmarytravelbest.com. We can connect on my website, Facebook page, group, or Instagram. Subscribe to YouTube, Twitter, or other social channels. Find 5 Steps to Solo Travel series on Amazon. The show notes have more details for you to connect.   Connect with Dr. Travelbest Drmarytravelbest.com Dr. Mary Travelbest Twitter Dr. Mary Travelbest Facebook Page Dr. Mary Travelbest Facebook Group Dr. Mary Travelbest Instagram email: info@drmarytravelbest.com Dr. Mary Travelbest Podcast Dr. Travelbest on TikTok Dr.Travelbest onYouTube

The Pursuit of Happiness
(Ep. 95) All About Visiting Glacier National Park with Elizabeth Bailey

The Pursuit of Happiness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 69:22


Elizabeth Bailey (Wandering on the Weekends) rejoins my podcast for the 2nd part of our mini-series on her adventures to Alaska and Glacier National Park. This episode is all about Glacier National Park. There is some seriously great travel trips and advice to get you prepared for your trip to the "Jewel of the Contient." We discuss everything from where to book in advance, the best hikes, Going to the Sun Road, the wildlife and so much more. Find out where Glacier National Park ranks on her list of National Parks! Follow Liz on Instagram @wanderingontheweekends

The Pursuit of Happiness
(Ep. 94) Recapping Her Adventures, Itinerary and Advice on Her Trip to Alaska with Elizabeth Bailey

The Pursuit of Happiness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 78:30


Elizabeth Bailey (Wandering on the Weekends) rejoins my podcast for a mini-series on her adventures to Alaska and Glacier National Park. This episode focuses solely on her 10 day trip to Alaska and its National Parks. As always, she gives amazing travel trips and advice for anyone looking to visit the land of the rising sun. She mentions everything from Brooks Falls and the brown bears, to taking seaplanes to some of the most remote areas of the state. I went to Alaska one year prior, so we compare and contrast our adventures, stories and give you the best advice for your own Alaskan adventure! Follow Liz on Instagram @wanderingontheweekends

A Life Outside Podcast
Doug No Longer Works Here: Writer's Choice

A Life Outside Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 92:20


Dani had a dream and Doug was in it. This week we share stories about whatever we wished. Doug starts a tale about a world he's building in Glacier National Park and Dani cancels plans due to smoke. I won't dress like you, saying hello on a trail is what normal people do, and no apologies to the clowns. Join us on Patreon for bonus episodes, videos, and more! https://www.patreon.com/ALifeOutside We've merch! https://teespring.com/stores/a-life-outside-podcast Find out more about us and access our stories and episodes: https://www.alifeoutsidepod.com/ Follow us: TikTok https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMeApskrU/ YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8azr4noqQqB164qOh3MAoA Twitter http://Twitter.com/alifeoutsidepod Instagram http://Instagram.com/alifeoutsidepod Theme song performed by Jasmine Emery   https://soundcloud.app.goo.gl/7dCRpW27znCU3nEU6

Vacation Mavens
213: Glacier Country, Montana

Vacation Mavens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 48:07


This episode is sponsored by Glacier Country Tourism. All opinions are our own. This week, Tamara shares what it is like to visit Glacier Country, Montana on a girls' trip and Kim shares her thoughts on this scenic part of Northwestern Montana. From Missoula to Whitefish, Kalispell to Glacier National Park -- if Montana is on your bucket list, give this episode a listen! Read more: Adventurous Weekend Getaways to Western Montana- We3Travel Best Things to do in Glacier National Park - Stuffed Suitcase Things to do in Glacier Country, Montana Glacier Country is a tourism region of Northwestern Montana that covers eight counties To get to Glacier Country you can fly into Missoula or Glacier Airport in Kalispell, both of which offer many direct flights, especially from the western USA You need to rent a car to visit this region and part of the experience is the scenic drives through the countryside To visit Glacier National Park, Tamara stayed at the Homewood Suites in Kalispell, which is about 45 minutes to the western entrance of Glacier National Park To visit Glacier National Park you need a reservation to drive the Going-to-the-Sun Road from when it opens in June through mid-September. Reservations open 120 days in advance and fill up in minutes.  Things in and around the park close by mid-September to early October. Kalispell and Whitefish are both good for exploring Glacier National Park if you can't get reservations in the park. Whitefish is a ski resort town that is very cute but also pricey. The road into the Many Glacier section and Two Medicine Lake are gravel and very rough road. Kim stayed in Under Canvas at Glacier National Park in West Glacier and the Isaac Walton Inn, which is an old train depot and you can stay in a train caboose. On her trip, Tamara stayed in a few different types of accommodations including: The Lodge at Trout Creek -- B&B lodge Bridge Street Cottages in Big Fork Laughing Horse Lodge Residence Inn Missoula If you want to see wildlife, drive through the Bison Range not far from Missoula Other fun outdoor adventures are: Kootenai Suspension Bridge & Kootenai Falls Ross Creek Cedars Scenic Area Llama trekking with Swan Mountain Llama Treks Soak in the hot springs at Quinn's Hot Springs Kayaking Clearwater Trail into Seely Lake Sunset boat tour on Flathead Lake Shoulder season in September was a great time to be  If you are visiting be sure to Recreate Responsibly: Leave no trace Plan ahead and make reservations Be flexible as plans may need to change because of weather, fire, road closures, etc. Be mindful of wildlife and carry bear spray when hiking (buy it there but don't bring it on the plane)  

A Life Outside Podcast
The Cilantro of Edibles: Changing Our Plans

A Life Outside Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 64:56


Dani is swimming in sweaters and Doug is seeing some snow This week we cancel regular plans and talk about the parks we didn't write about, adventures in Glacier National Park, and animals who camp. Sand in my living room would be great, rangers love to watch your skits, and let's face it, some animals aren't campers. That sub place had the best fries. Join us on Patreon for bonus episodes, videos, and more! https://www.patreon.com/ALifeOutside We've merch! https://teespring.com/stores/a-life-outside-podcast Find out more about us and access our stories and episodes: https://www.alifeoutsidepod.com/ Follow us: TikTok https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMeApskrU/ YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8azr4noqQqB164qOh3MAoA Twitter http://Twitter.com/alifeoutsidepod Instagram http://Instagram.com/alifeoutsidepod Theme song performed by Jasmine Emery   https://soundcloud.app.goo.gl/7dCRpW27znCU3nEU6

JUMP with Traveling Jackie
JUMP 163: Glacier National Park with Jackie

JUMP with Traveling Jackie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 44:40 Very Popular


We rode bikes on the famous Going-to-the-Sun-Road in Glacier National Park and we're here to recap our experience! Join Jackie and participants Dawn, Carley, Ashley, and Makenna from the first ever JUMP Adventures WEEKEND that took place in Glacier National Park, Montana. We hiked, we rode, we ate, we challenged ourselves, and we learned to always bring bear spray into Glacier NP.  Set the headphones aside and join us IN-PERSON for active experiences in epic destinations around the world (and in the back yard!) at JUMPAdventures.com Say hi and connect with us at @jump.adventures and @travelingjackie Let us know where YOU want to go with us! JUMPAdventures.com/survey Where we stayed: ROAM Beyond View photos from the weekend Join us on future JUMP Adventures!

Off the beaten path but not lost
45. Quick visit to Glacier National Park

Off the beaten path but not lost

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 46:23


Glacier National Park is on our top 5 list of National Parks we've visited. We visited the park in July/August of 2021 for the first time and were completely shocked at how gorgeous this park was. This year we only had a short time to visit the park on our fast track to North Dakota. Shownotes: https://thefaiolas.com/45

The Worm
The Worm for September 27, 2022

The Worm

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 8:41


It's Tuesday, September 27. Today, Canada removes its COVID-19 border measures, good news for Montana jobs, and Glacier National Park will end commercial flights over the park by the end of the decade.

Blind Hog and Acorn
Season 3, Episode #32~ Went on vacation and all I came home with was this lousy 'Rona......

Blind Hog and Acorn

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 37:54


No- seriously, the week in the rockies as FABULOUS!  Blind Hog and Acorn both lost like 5-6 lbs, crazy good hiking days and wonderful lodgings.  Airports were "interesting" to say the least.  Missed one connecting flight by minutes, but truly that only set the holiday back by 4 hours- big whoop.  At least the luggage did not get lost~Three nights on the Icefields Parkway, three nights at Glacier.  Packed it in and could easily have made it a week in each place.  Things to look forward to in the future- a return trip to the Icefields!Blind Hog and Acorn tested for the 'Rona the day before the trip and the morning after returning.  Negative and negative.  Wednesday night Blind Hog had a hard time sleeping and Thursday he was not feeling well, chalked it up to the A-Fib but when he complained of "being cold," his temp read 99.1.  Another covid test popped positive before the solution crossed the control line!  Acorn tested positive 2 days later... We see this...  Least she does not have to wear an N-95 mask in the house all day!So, imagine ragweedy allergy symptoms and that is how they feel.  Indeed, they truly went on holiday and brought home no souvenirs, except...  except...

The John Freakin’ Muir Pod
The Long, Long Walk with Carl "Prof" Stanfield

The John Freakin’ Muir Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 65:26


Carl "Prof" Stanfield calls in during a Zero in Glacier National Park during his quest to set the record for most miles traveled on foot in a calendar year.  With his eyes set on 10,500 miles by Dec. 31, Prof talks to Doc on day 238 about the challenges involved while hiking on a time budget.  During the discussion, appropriately, they cover a lot of ground, including spooky stories from Florida, the benefits of hiking with Greased Pig, how to grind through 12 pairs of trail runners, and that one time Prof worked as a nude model for Outside Magazine. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/johnfreakinmuir/support

Montana Public Radio News
Stellar views and Blackfeet stories combine during Glacier Park's star party

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 2:14


Glacier National Park has some of the darkest skies in the country. Last weekend the park held its first star watching party since the pandemic. MTPR's Aaron Bolton reports.

National Parks Traveler Podcast
National Parks Traveler | Kenai Fjords' Glaciers

National Parks Traveler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 34:43 Very Popular


One of the most amazing settings in the National Park System are glacial landscapes. From Glacier National Park in Montana and Mount Rainier National Park in Washington state to Alaska, these rivers of ice are captivating to see and, if you're lucky enough, to walk upon or watch as they calve blocks of ice into Pacific waters. But as amazing as these rivers of ice are, they are vanishing under the warmth of climate change. Glacier National Park's glaciers could be gone by mid-century. Many of those in Alaska are almost visibly in retreat. But how serious is the problem, what is the overall state of glacial ice in the Park System? Two researchers, Deborah Kurtz from the National Park Service and Taryn Black, a doctoral student in Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington, have tried to answer that question as it applies to Kenai Fjords National Park two hours south of Anchorage, Alaska. We're joined today by Taryn Black.

Flathead Beacon Podcasts
A Quiet Park

Flathead Beacon Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 30:16


In July, the nonprofit Quiet Parks International (QPI) acknowledged Glacier National Park with its Wilderness Quiet Park award, the first of its kind in North America. The award "reinforces the natural sounds educational efforts the park makes to distinguish the natural soundscape from noise, and the importance of the visitors' opportunity for that experience."Host Micah Drew reported on this award over the last few months, and brings together some excerpted conversations with QPI co-founder Gordon Hempton, Wilderness Quiet Park director Matt Mikkelson, QPI sound recordist Nick McMahon and Quiet! Glacier founder Mary McClelland, who nominated Glacier for the award. Read more about all of this week's stories and get the latest breaking news at flatheadbeacon.com and sign up for our new daily newsletter at flatheadbeacon.com/newsletter.RELATED LINKSSeptember 9 E-EditionA Quiet Park Quiet Parks International Quiet! GlacierThe introductory music in this this episode is “Thinking Music” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License, The episode also features two songs from Montana singer/songwriter Mike Murray's album We Are Like Warriors, "The Good Ol' Days You're In" and "Moment of Time," used with permission.Read more about all of this week's stories and get the latest breaking news at flatheadbeacon.com and sign up for our new daily newsletter at flatheadbeacon.com/newsletter. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Healing with Nicole
Glacier National Park

Healing with Nicole

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 71:53


Hi everyone I am back. It has been a while. During my absence I started a podcast with ChrisXMatt called Sorry, No Lo Siento. You can check it out on your favorite podcast platform or on YouTube on the Overly Blunt Network channel. In this episode I talk about my experience at Glacier National Park, how I dealt with fear on this trip, what I learned and how much my ancestors are with me. Thank you for listening. Love you! You can follow me on Social Media: IG: @healingwithnicolepodcast / healing.with.nicole Twitter: @healwithnicole TikTok: Healing.with.nicole --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Worm
The Worm for September 8, 2022

The Worm

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 18:23


It's Thursday, September 8. Today, hot weather triggers elevated fire danger at area national parks, Riverstone Health selects a new boss, and star-watching parties return to Glacier National Park.

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
A Cultural History of Glacier National Park - TAS 187

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 69:05


We recently spent some time in Glacier National Park, and while we were there we took a tour of the park lead by Jack Gladstone, a member of the Blackfeet Nation in Montana. We were blown away by not only his cultural knowledge of the area, but also his amazing singing and songwriting! We just had to share (with Jack's permission of course!) some of the tour, plus some information on the prehistoric peoples of the area, the historic development of Glacier into a national park, and some of the recent archaeology they have found in the park. Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months with code TAS. Click this message for more information. Links Jack Gladstone Jack Gladstone's Music on Apple Jack Gladstone's Music on Spotify Glacier National Park Sun Tours Contact Chris Webster chris@archaeologypodcastnetwork.com Rachel Roden rachel@unraveleddesigns.com RachelUnraveled (Instagram) ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

Get Out Alive
Ep 34: Night of the Grizzlies - Part 2

Get Out Alive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 58:16 Very Popular


In Part 2 of our coverage of Night of the Grizzlies, we find out exactly who was screaming and why. Although most of our stories are graphic, this one is especially so. Listener discretion is advised. Julie Helgeson and Michele Koons became the first recorded victims of a fatal grizzly bear attack in Glacier National Park, on the same night, by different bears. Their deaths changed the way that National Parks, especially Glacier, manage their grizzlies. Their deaths could have been avoided if park officials had responded to the reports of the increasing number of negative grizzly encounters, and the continued habituation of the bears. And for years to follow their deaths, the North American grizzly population suffered greatly. Now, in 2022, we know better and must do better.If you'd like more details on this story, see Jack Olsen's  Night of the Grizzlies. You can also check out Montana PBS's coverage here. To learn more about how you can recreate safely in our National Parks around bears, please see the National Park Service's website.You can sign Ashley's petition to change RSA 207:26 here.WE HAVE NEW MERCH! Support the show by shopping at www.getoutalivepodcast.com/shopFollow us on Instagram,  Facebook, and check out our website GetOutAlivePodcast.com and join us on Patreon!You can find Ashley @TheAngryOlogist on Twitter and Nick will respond to people on social media but still maintains that he does not have social media.Disclaimer: This is not professional advice; Follow at your own risk.Support the show

PlanetGeo
Great Rocks, Summer Excursions, and Confusing Minerals

PlanetGeo

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 37:48 Very Popular


After a long break from recording, Chris and Jesse return to our studios to discuss our extremely busy summer.  Jesse recaps his trip to Hawaii where he saw some amazing geology.  He also talks about teaching field camp in Idaho to some of the Penn State undergrads.  His favorite though, was continuing his field research in the Northwest Territories of Canada.  He and his PhD student collected over 1,000 pounds of rocks.  When asked about his favorite rocks seen this summer, Jesse didn't hesitate - the ancient rocks in Northern Canada.  The toothpaste rocks won out over the much younger pahoehoe rocks of Hawaii.Chris talked about taking 26 high school seniors out West for 3 weeks on the field course that he teaches.  They went to the South Dakota Badlands, Black Hills, Devils Tower, Grand Tetons, Yellowstone, and Glacier National Park.  The floods that ravaged Yellowstone in early June didn't prevent the students from learning about the incredible geology of Yellowstone.  Following this, Chris returned to the West with his family to hike and climb.  They went to the flatirons of Red Rocks and then on to Long's Peak.  The Long's Peak granite was easily his favorite rock of the summer.  The rock is interesting because it is a porphyritic granite.  The huge phenocrysts are peculiar because they are not randomly oriented.  Instead, they are aligned in a preferred direction which is a topic of current research.  After leaving Colorado, Chris and family spent the next two weeks banging around in the Tetons.We wrap up the episode by discussing a couple of mineral pairs that can be confusing to identify in the field.  Join us as we have a casual conversation about some incredible geology!As always, send us any questions you may have! Like, Subscribe, and leave us a rating! ——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/

American Birding Podcast
06-33: The Nature of Nutcrackers with Peri Sasnett

American Birding Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 40:01 Very Popular


One of the most iconic and beloved birds of the North American west is the Clark's Nutcracker, the highlight of anyone's trip to the high country. It will come as no surprise to anyone that the bird's relationship to the ecosystem goes beyond begging for trail mix from hikers, a fascinating symbiosis that was recently the topic of Glacier National Park's Headwaters podcast, whose host, Peri Sasnett, joins us to talk nutcrackers and conservation. Also, changes to the ABA Checklist are here, with more potentially on the way.  Subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and Google Podcasts, and please leave a rating or a review if you are so inclined! We appreciate it!

Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
304: TEAM-CBT, Spirituality, and Beyond: Featuring Angela Poch

Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 69:45


304: TEAM-CBT, Spirituality, and Beyond: Featuring Angela Poch Rhonda begins today's podcast, as usual, by reading two touching emails from podcasts fans, including Coach Teddy, who said that Podcasts 295 and 296 featuring live work with Zeina were incredible, and Carol who was equally enthusiastic about Podcast 297 (on “Homework—Yuck!). Carol also strongly recommends David's book, Ten Days to Self-Esteem which is a simplified version of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy that can be used as a manual for therapy or self-help groups. https://www.amazon.com/Days-Self-Esteem-David-Burns-M-D/dp/0688094554 Today, we interview Angel Poch, a certified life coach, registered professional counselor, and certified Level 4 TEAM therapist and trainer. She lives two hours north of Glacier National Park in British Columbia, but teaches therapists and treats people virtually from around the world. Her new booklet, “The Truth Shall Set You Free,” integrates TEAM-CBT with a Christian perspective and is available for free on her website. https://www.angelapoch.com/. She is a regular in David's weekly virtual psychotherapy training group at Stanford and assists in the teaching. She has also worked tirelessly and selflessly behind the scenes making David's work way more accessible to lay people as well as mental health professionals wanting to learn more about TEAM-CBT. For example, she adds links to every new Feeling Good Podcast on David's website, so you can easily find and link to more than 300 podcasts. Check it out! She has also transformed a massive amount of David's work into electronic tools for shrinks, accessible in David's online shop: Recently, she has created two amazing new documents you can link to. One is a spreadsheet that lists 138 of David's TEAM-CBT tools and techniques, like the “Anti-Procrastination Sheet” and many others, with page links to the descriptions of how to use each tool in David's books, like Feeling Good, Feeling Great, David's TEAM-CBT therapist eBook, and many others. Check it out! This data base will be invaluable to interested lay people, therapists, and teachers who want clear instructions on how to use the Daily Mood Log, Relationship Journal, and numerous additional tools and techniques. Derek Gurney and Angela are working on an equally awesome database for the Feeling Good Podcasts: Check it out as well! Angela begins her personal statement in today's podcast by describing her struggles with depression and irritability, including some very dark days in 2006. Her doctor recommended an SSRI antidepressant, and she went to integrative health program, “Depression: the Way Out” that required participants to read Feeling Good https://www.amazon.com/Feeling-Good-New-Mood-Therapy/dp/0380810336 Although she didn't love the book, she resonated with the idea that all of our feelings, positive and negative, result from our thoughts, or perceptions, and her depression cleared up. She liked that when she read Feeling Good, she got many new tools she could use to change her negative thoughts and feelings. She also appreciated the ideas in the book didn't go against her belief system, which many fear about psychology. David pointed out his own father, a Lutheran minister, worried about this, and was very suspicious of psychiatrists. Angela's thinking, which resonates with David's, is that the core ideas of religion and psychotherapy are actually high compatible, and even synergistic. Angela explains that when she was a young child, she didn't fit in socially or even in her own skin. “I felt like I was a boy in a woman's body. I felt like I was in the wrong body, and prayed for help.” She started to see in a very limited, childlike way, her thoughts were distorted, that a body was just a body and she could trust God wouldn't give her more than she could bear. These new realistic, counter thoughts relieved the negative body dysmorphia she'd been struggling with. She reports, “I decided it was okay to be flawed and not fit in.” The rest of her young childhood was mostly joyful. In middle school she was the target of mean-spirited bullying because she was a tomboy. She developed intense social anxiety and was relieved when her mom took her out of school. She was homeschooled for a few years and studied Karate to exercise and develop some confidence. High school brought new challenges. She describes responding with her version of the Five Secrets of Effective Communication to an aggressive bully who threatened her with brass knuckles and challenged her to fight her. However, the girl backed off and started telling people that Angela was her friend! After a bad relationship, Angela started to struggle with depression and described her suicide attempt when she was 18 because “I wanted the pain to stop.” She explains that: I met my husband, moved home, and started reading the Bible. I was impressed by the passage, “the truth shall set you free.” I realized I had to control my own thoughts rather than look for the approval of others, but she still didn't totally recovery from my anxiety. The cognitive piece in Feeling Good helped Angela a lot. She states, “I pursued a lot of careers, never holding down a job for more than 6 months, and one day someone asked if I'd considered a career in counseling. . .” She went on to take one of David's four-day live intensives in Whistler BC where she learned TEAM-CBT and hasn't looked back since! After learning and applying TEAM, Angela was able to crush her social and other anxieties. Angela has a deep love for her Creator and has done a great deal of thought about the integration of her Christian faith with TEAM-CBT. David also has a strong interest in the overlap between TEAM-CBT and virtually all religions and spiritual paths. He described an unusual and overpowerful spiritual experience he had as a medical student crossing the Nevada desert that made a strong impact on him. Angela would like to mention, “I have a profound gratitude for David's work. He makes things so clear and relatable. His approach is applicable to all faiths or no faith if one is truly ready to give up their negative thoughts and feelings. As we aim for the truth, and let go of the so called “self,” we find peace and joy. I will forever be indebted to him because I would not be able to help people without TEAM and that brings me joy every day!” I, David, would like to thank Angela for her intense and tireless devotion to helping spread the “gospel” of TEAM-CBT in so many ways! Thanks for listening today! Angela, Rhonda, and David I

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E47 - This Month In The Apocalypse with Margaret, Brooke, and Casandra

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022


Episode Notes Episode summary In this new monthly segment, members of the Strangers Collective discuss current events as they relate to community preparedness. If you're watching the news and wondering what's going on with inflation, supply chain shortages, the heat "wave", or Q'anon talking about space lasers and the black holes that are causing all of this, tune in. The group breaks down the mechanics of inflation, why prices are what they are, why we're seeing shortages, and ways you can prepare now for when things get worse. Host Info Casandra can be found on Twitter @hey_casandra or Instagram @House.Of.Hands Margaret Killjoy can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. Publisher Info This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org, or on Twitter @TangledWild and Instagram @Tangled_Wilderness. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Transcript This Month In The Apocalypse Margaret 00:15 Hello and welcome to Live Like The World Is Dying, your podcast for feels like the times. I'm one of your hosts, Margaret killjoy, because joining me today are two other co-hosts if y'all want to introduce yourself. Casandra 00:28 I'm Cassandra. Brooke 00:30 I'm Brooke. Margaret 00:32 And today, we are starting a new, a new fun series talking about all the fun stuff that's going to be coming your way soon. It's called This Month In The Apocalypse, because we've realized that on this podcast, we talk a lot with different people about how to do different skills, about different specific issues, but there's so much happening these days that it seems worthwhile to kind of keep track of this as it happens, all the different things that are happening, I don't know, does that decent description of what the hell we're trying to do? Casandra 01:09 Yeah. Margaret 01:11 And you will be excited to know that this podcast is a proud member of the Channel Zero network of anarchists podcasts, and here's a jingle from another show on the network. Jingle song 01:24 It's going down, and you're invited for what they sell it. We buy in, there is no running. There is no hiding. There's only fighting or dying. It's going down, and you're invited for what they're selling, we aint buying. There is no running. There is no hiding. There's only fighting or dying. Jingle Host 01:53 It's going down is a digital Community Center from anarchists, Anti-Fascist, autonomous, anti-capitalist and anti-colonial movements. Our mission is to provide an autonomous and resilient platform to publicize and promote revolutionary theory and action. Jingle Host 2 02:10 Go to itsgoingdown.org for daily updates, check out our online store for ways to donate and rate and follow us on iTunes if you like this podcast Margaret 02:27 We're back from the jingle. I'm used to having another podcast where there's actual ads, which sucks. And so I don't know how to talk anymore. So, nothing really happened this month and everything is continuing as it should. I believe there's no major supply chain interruptions nothing forecasted bad to happen. Does that that match with the yall's understanding? Brooke 02:54 Yeah, good done, end of pod. Move on with our lives. Margaret 03:01 What do we want to talk about first? Want to talk about shortages? All the stuff there's shortages of? Brooke 03:09 Sure. Casandra 03:10 Yeah, I was looking at a list. And it's it's just everything. They're shortages in everything. Margaret 03:16 Give me some example. Casandra 03:17 It started out like meat, dairy, eggs. And then it was like produce, aluminum for packaging things, plastic packaging things, fuel to get things to places. Margaret 03:27 Yeah, one of the things I was trying to think about was like, you know, when I was looking through, it seems like some of the things that they're shortages of there's shortages of from a supply chain point of view, sort of a temporary point of view, right? Like, like one of them is like pet food. I saw that one and I like freaked out. It's like I have a pet. You know, do I need to fill my basement with like a like a ball pit, but just full of kibble? Brooke 03:52 Ongoing forumla shortage issues. Margaret 03:55 Yeah. Well, but and what's interesting is to try and figure out which of these things are....the pet food issue, at least as I saw was a little bit different than some of the other ones. It actually more is about there's increased demand, because locked down got more people to decide to become closer buds with different creatures that aren't human that eat pet food. And, I guess there's a word for those. And so... it'sprobably in the word pet food. Food. People decided to become friends with different food. Shit, I'm supposed to be the vegan on this podcast. Okay, so.... Brooke 04:30 We're off to a banging start. Margaret 04:34 Hell yeah. So pet food, it seems like the shortage is, at least at the moment more just that like there's a lot more demand for pet food. And, so therefore, like people are rushing to keep up. Kind of like the mask shortage at the beginning of the pandemic wasn't like, "Oh God, we're out of the capacity to produce masks." They just were like, "Oh, we need to like ramp up our infrastructure." And so there's like some of it like that. But, then it seems like some of the other shortages are a little bit more because there's not the capacity to either create the thing, or distribute the thing. I don't know, you all know more about this. Casandra 05:09 Or even there's...I think about crops, like there's the ability to create the thing, but not to actually harvest and process the thing. It's seems like every step along the way, is having issues. Brooke 05:23 Right. And if you've got issues with plastic and aluminum, then you can't package the thing. So, maybe you could make it and maybe you even can ship it, but you pack it up. But, there's also then lots of problems with actually transporting it from place A to B. Margaret 05:40 One of the things...Okay, I was reading a list too. And I came up with this clever segue. So I'll just draw too much attention to the fact that I planned this ahead of time. One of the things that there's a supply chain shortages of, I was like, looking through this list, and one of them was garage doors. And that's not something that I think about on a regular basis. I just don't think about whether or not I could go down to the store and buy a garage door today. Right? But it has all of these like, cascading effects. And like, I don't know, you all were having this interesting conversation that I'm trying to trick you into having, again, about housing and the ability to construct homes and all that shit. Casandra 06:21 Oh, I thought you were referencing the conversation about how I actually need a new garage door. And I was like, "Oh, I don't think that's useful. I don't think that's useful on this podcast, Margaret." Margaret 06:30 I was just gonna embarrassingly admit that I have two garage doors, because I live rurally and there's multiple garages on the property. So, I just feel like I'm kind of like, you know, I'm stealing doors. Casandra 06:44 Rich in doors! Brooke 06:46 Well, I mean, technically, Cassandra and I also both have two garage doors, because we have two car bays in our garage and each has a separate door. So we are all two garage door people. Casandra 06:57 Door Priviliege. Door Privilege. Yeah, no, what you actually asked me about was much more useful. Margaret 07:02 Okay. Casandra 07:06 Brooke, please help. Brooke 07:09 Yeah, well, I feel like it came up, because you know Cassandra, you are renting your current house and would love to buy it and have wanted to buy it for a while. And so, you and I keep having these conversations about everything going on with the housing market. Margaret 07:27 So let's talk about that. Casandra 07:28 Right before Covid, it seemed like a good time to buy a house. And then six months later, it seemed awful. And it seems like it's just getting worse. Brooke 07:38 Yeah, that's super accurate. And for just a whole bunch of different reasons. I mean, housing has been overpriced for a while and has gotten just exponentially more so. The cost of housing is outrageous. But then the bigger kicker in the last year is interest rates on mortgages have doubled. So you know, they went from a place where they were at like 3 or 4%, which is actually really pretty reasonable. And now they're up between, like closer to 6%, on average, most of the time, which is not a good interest rate. And one of the things that we saw before the fall of the housing market back in '08, was these super high interest rates, you know, 7-8%, or some of the really predatory lending stuff, people will have them at 10-12%. And we're not quite seeing that. But we are seeing with things like the 6,7,8% interest rates right now, which is not good. Margaret 08:33 Does that mean we're heading for similar places as 2008? Like, how does the how do these compare? I feel like you know, a little bit more about this. Brooke 08:39 Yeah, the the underlying factors that are causing our current bubble, are very different from what we saw in 2008. The ultimate outcome will be a lot the same in a housing crash, and people not being able to afford their mortgages and all the ripples through the economy and whatnot. But, the underlying causes are different. One of them is that the inflation has been on the rise. And so mortgages, you know, we tend to think of a mortgage as a thing that we have in order to buy our house. But from a bank's perspective, a mortgage is a commodity, it's a product that they're buying and selling. So anytime you see prices for products on the rise, mortgages are going to be one of those products that become more expensive. Margaret 09:24 How does this affect renters? Like I would guess, sort of maybe rudely that most of our listeners are renters, and, you know, is it like is that just kind of cause rents to go up if the fact that like if if mortgages are getting harder and harder for landlords like... Casandra 09:40 Well, rents are already going up, at least here. I guess I wonder how much that's related, though. Margaret 09:47 No, I don't know. Is it just going up because of inflation? Casandra 09:49 Yeah, i think it's just general inflation. Yeah. Margaret 09:51 Which is interesting, though, right? Because one of the advantages of homeownership, it seems to me is that it's slightly more inflation resistant, because If your interest stays the same as locked in of whatever you bought it at, you know, and so...and the amount you owe, the bank doesn't go up to match interest. So the landlords have any excuse at all for jacking up rents? Because it's not like they're not like their mortgages have gone up, you know, the same amount is as interest. Brooke 10:21 Well, if they're requiring, if they're using the mortgage payment that you're making in order to fund their life that's their source of income is the profit, you renting the house. Then their costs for all of their other goods in life are going up, so they need to make more money off of the thing that pays them, i.e. the renter, Margaret 10:42 It doesn't seem like a good system, the idea that someone can just make money off of someone else's work instead of their own work. That doesn't that doesn't sound right. That sounds like Communism. It doesn't actually sound like Communism. But that is what people claim. Brooke 11:01 It's incredibly problematic. Margaret 11:04 So landlordism, not not a good... Casandra 11:07 Not great. Margaret 11:09 Hot take. Brooke 11:10 I do not stand. I do not stand the landlords. Casandra 11:13 I hope my landlord doesn't listen to this podcast. Brooke 11:17 If he's the kind of person who listens to this podcast, he should just give you your house. Casandra 11:21 It's true. Shout out to my landlord. Margaret 11:23 And if you're a landlord listening to this, sell your houses to your renters at reasonable rates. Casandra 11:32 Right? Margaret 11:32 Or just give them if you can afford it. Brooke 11:35 Yeah, we were talking about the interest rate the other day, Cas, I think you had some good questions about...you had a bunch of good questions the other day that I would love to talk about here on the pod to if you want. Casandra 11:47 Oh shit, I wonder if I can remember what my questions were. The other day, it was a long time ago. Brooke 11:54 Understood. And also, you know the answers, so you're not wondering anymore. Casandra 11:59 Yeah. Or I just got confused and forgot, which is also possible. Margaret 12:05 That's what I would have done if someone explained many things to me. Casandra 12:08 Yeah, that's generally what my brain does as well. That's why Brooke's here. Thank you, Brooke! Brooke 12:13 Sorry, I guess we should have done in the introduction why I'm relevant too. Margaret 12:19 Yeah, okay. Well, so like, so folks who've listened, if you've listened before, you've probably met me. You might have met Casandra. Casandra has been on a few more times recently. Brooke, who are you? Brooke 12:35 I am a baby anarchist with the pronouns "she" and "her", living in Oregon, relatively near to Casandra. And I have a background in economics and accounting, because before I was an anarchist, I was a capitalist. I'm sorry. And I thought that capitalism was good and fine. And I did a whole lot of time studying and learning about it. And now I like to use all of that knowledge and understanding to talk about how bad capitalism is. Margaret 13:09 I mean, the person who did the most work researching capitalism was Karl Marx. Like, as far as I understand, like, a lot of capitalists were like, "Ah, yeah, that that's what we're doing," you know, after he like, actually wrote down how capitalism works. Just had different takes about whether it was good or bad. So, you know, I dunno. Yeah, so, so we've been talking about...and Brooke is part of Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness, the publishing collective that puts out this podcast as well as other good things, like a podcast with it's the name Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness that you can listen to also. And so we just, we've been having a lot of conversations amongst ourselves about like, "Well, what the fuck we going to do as people as all this crisis happens?" And then we were like, "Oh, right, we should, we should talk about this stuff more." So... Casandra 14:02 l remember. Margaret 14:04 Great. Casandra 14:06 Thanks for that, giving me time to remember. So, I asked about your interest rates. The last time they were this high was 1984. And theoretically they're hiking up interest rates to help deal with inflation, which doesn't make sense to me. But Brooke, you had you understood that? Brooke 14:33 Yeah, because when you mentioned the thing about the interest rates, I was like, "Wellllll, not actually." Because the interest rate that we hear about a lot in the news is the Federal Funds rate, which is set by the Federal Reserve, which is the National Bank that we have in our system. It's basically the bank that our banks use, so all of your US banks and Chases and all of that, they bank at the Federal Reserve. And that's the interest rate that we're talking about is the Federal Reserve's rate that they pay to banks to store money with them. So you're a bank, and you are legally required to have a certain amount of your cash saved at the Federal Bank. It's like 10% of your holdings have to be there. And then the government says, "Thanks for letting us sit around and hold on your money, here's some interest." And to incentivize banks to save more of their money, they've raised that interest rate. So that's the one that you've heard about that's higher than it's been since 1984. Margaret 15:39 Oh, interesting. Brooke 15:40 And it's not directly tied to the other types of interest rates, like loan interest rates, you know, mortgages and credit cards and cars and stuff. But it definitely influences them, because when you look at it from a bank's perspective, like you walk down to your neighborhood bank, and you want to take out a loan from them, they have the choice to get a certain guaranteed interest rate from the Federal government, which is super secure, they're gonna get their money back, they're gonna get their interest, you know, think safe over there, or to loan you a consumer money and gain interest from you. And they only want to give you money, if they can make more on it than they would by loaning it to the Federal government, especially because you as a consumer might be taking it out for like, a mortgage loan, which is going to be 30 years, let's say, so the banks not going to get their money back for a much longer period of time. Whereas with the Federal government, they can go anytime and say, "Hey, I need some of my money," and get it right then. But you as the consumer, they can't. So, they charge you the consumer higher level of interest. So, whatever the federal interest rate is, the bank is going to then want to set its interest rates that it charges to people higher, so it can make more money. And if you can't afford to pay that higher interest, the bank is like, "Fine, I can load my money to the government, and still make still make money off it." Margaret 17:05 So how does this relate to inflation? How does this relate to everything costing more money now and like, you know, you're saying that they were like, they're doing this to solve it, it sounds like it would make it worse to me, I don't know shit about shit. But... Brooke 17:20 Yeah, so they're trying to make money more valuable. So right now, because inflation is high....Let's say you have $1 in your pocket, and you go buy a banana today, and that banana costs $1. So your dollar equals a banana. Let's say you decide to buy a banana tomorrow, and you still only have $1, but the price of the banana has gone up to $1.10. You no longer have one bananas worth of money, in this situation, Margaret 17:51 92% of a banana or something. Brooke 17:55 It's too high for a banana, but that was the first thing that came to mind. Anyway, so they want to curb that inflation so that tomorrow you can still buy your banana for $1. But in order to do that, they have to make your money more valuable, in a sense. And they do that by removing some of the money that's out there in the world. Casandra 18:18 It's...is it possible I'm an anti-capitalist just because the shit can.... Brooke 18:21 Doesn't make sense? Casandra 18:22 Yeah. Brooke 18:23 Yeah, you have to stop thinking about money, the way that we as normal human beings think about it as like, "I give you this stupid thing and you give me something good and useful." And think about it in terms of a bank that thinks of it as a product. So their money is a product that they can buy and sell and get value for. So when you decrease the amount of a product that's available, what's left becomes more valuable. Casandra 18:48 I'm glad this isn't a visual recording so people can't see my like trying to grasp face. Brooke 18:53 This is very helpful to me to know whether or not I am making any fucking sense at all. Casandra 18:59 I'm sure you're making sense. I just...yeah, my brain shuts down when I think of all this stuff, which is why I'm glad you're here. Margaret 19:07 Yeah, and it's like, I want to understand this stuff, but I've also have a little bit of a like, yeah, part of why I'm anti capitalist is I'm like, "This just seems needlessly complicated." And then I'm like, but then I turned around, and I'm like, "Okay, so a federated model, where you have all of these different autonomous groups, and the spokes go to this other thing. And then those make decisions by consensus, except in some cases where they use majority vote, except people have a block, but then as it goes to this other level, and then this is the way they communicate." And so then I'm like, okay, I'm not actually afraid of complicated organizational structures. Casandra 19:45 But that's...Complicated is different than bureaucratic, you know? Margaret 19:49 Okay. Okay. Brooke 19:50 Yeah. I find myself living in this weird place of like, all of this is just ridiculous and unnecessary and most really bad. But also, this is how the thing works, and I'm a pretty big opponent and like, understanding how the thing works, especially when you want to dismantle the system, Margaret 20:11 Yeah. No, and like, I actually just want to appreciate you and people like you, you know, I remember I had a conversation with someone once recently, or they're like, "Oh, I don't think the anarchists would like me. I like spreadsheets too much." And I'm like, "No, we need you.... Casandra 20:25 We love you! Casandra 20:25 We need you more than we need other people." Brooke 20:28 Yeah. For the listeners at home, every time the word "spreadsheet" comes up in the Strangers' group discussions for work, I'm always like, "Me! Me?, do I get to do it? Can I have a spreadsheet?" Margaret 20:39 Whereas I'm like, I've been doing it? And I'm like, I don't know, I'm just beating my head against these things. Casandra 20:47 Well Brooke, you mentioned wanting to understand like, how, how things work. And I'm wondering, so we talked about that the fact that there is inflation, but I'm wondering what the factors are contributing to that, like, why it's continuing to go up at such a rapid rate, because we haven't really... Brooke 21:08 inflation? Casandra 21:09 Yeah. Brooke 21:09 Why it's gone up so much? Casandra 21:11 Yeah. Brooke 21:11 Inflation is a complicated beast. We know that a portion of it is just straight up corporate greed and fucking capitalism being capitalism, you know, of companies saying, "Oh, we can, we can raise prices and have great profits. And people will just like, do that, and we get more money? Yay!" So, and because it's happening in real time, there's not like great data to say, "Oh, half of the reason of inflation..." or whatever, like, we don't know exactly how much that specific action is contributing to it. But it's some large portion of inflation is just because companies are awful greedy, terrible. But, a couple of other factors that are leading into it are fuel prices, like everything in the world is basically affected by fuel prices to move things from A to B, and the creation of so many things, you know, incorporate some amount of petroleum. And...there was a third thing that just fell in my brain. But that actual cost is on the rise. So like it is more expensive to create products. So, that's contributing to it. And then also, the shortages in the supply chain, like we were just talking about that anytime there's less of something, it becomes more valuable. So like, how you see price gouging, when there's an emergency, you know, like, like, if the city's water shuts off, suddenly bottled water becomes more expensive. It's because there's less of it, then they can start to charge more, because people who will afford it can still buy it, and people who can't, then too bad for that. And again, it's all just because capitalism is evil and bad. Margaret 22:57 So, in terms of like solutions, one of the things we talk about when wee want to talk about all the bad stuff and then we want to talk about what people can do, at least as individuals and communities to combat it. Right? And like, and I'll say that for my own sake, and I don't know that this is actually a you know, I actually, I've talked to some of my friends who actually work in finance, and they're a little bit like, "That's not what I would have first thought of," but that's...I guess that makes some sense. You know, one of the things I've been thinking about, right is like, I don't know, like, if you can get in things that hold value, right? You know, this is in the sort of traditional prepper sense, this is where you like run out and buy gold, right? Not because gold is an investment, it doesn't become necessarily more valuable, but it because it like, is more likely to hold its value as inflation goes up. But I would argue the same is true of hard liquor, which does not go bad. I don't even drink hard liquor, but I have a bunch of it.Ammunition. Eh Eh? Okay, this is gonna be where everyone's giving me the "We let this wingnut prepper on." But ammunition does go up and down in value. But overall, I will argue that it will stay valuable and therefore continue to hold its value against inflation. And then also like, this is where my financial friends get really mad at me. I'm like, "Basically like spend it if you've got it," because like, because money is becoming less and less valuable. So like, cash in your pocket is just losing money when it stays in your pocket. Its value goes down every day, you get fewer and fewer bananas. Brooke 24:32 Bananas. Margaret 24:32 Yeah, you have fewer bananas every day. The longer that you hold on to it. Casandra 24:36 This is making me hungry. Margaret 24:38 Yeah, I kind of want a banana. I need to go to the grocery store. But okay, so this is like for example, this is like why I'm like, "Alright, well fuck it," like, get tools. Get stuff if you can, right? Obviously, this is like kind of annoying advice for anyone who I mean like right now I think most of the money issue that people have right now is not having enough money for their basic necessities that they meet on a regular basis. But even like, like I was like, I don't know, as I try to explain someone to be like, Alright, look, if you're going to go out if you're going to spend X amount of money on canned chili over the next three months, buying it now, instead of later, if you can afford it will literally get you more chili, because the prices of everything are just going to go up. And so as you're able to fucking cans of chili are better than cash right now is my my claim, especially the good vegan chili with the little TVP in it. Brooke 25:39 Yeah, if you've got a spare dollar in your pocket today, it's going to be less valuable tomorrow. It's going to be less valuable the day after that. It's just going to keep getting less valuable as long as we're in this cycle of this high inflation. So as much as I tend to be like a saver, it does make more sense at the moment to go buy things preferably things that are like durable, useful, and will last then to... Casandra 26:08 That's still saving. Brooke 26:10 Yeah Margaret 26:11 Yeah, you're just transferring the value into a different form. Brooke 26:14 Yeah, buy some seeds. Casandra 26:15 [At the same time] My favorite form is seeds. Yeah, that's my preferred one. Margaret 26:19 Yeah. Brooke 26:20 How To books. Casandra 26:22 Like oh, I just got I got all my spring seeds for next year. Brooke 26:25 Oh, wow. Casandra 26:25 Well, yeah, just last week, because I knew they'd be way more expensive next year, and they're just in the fridge in plastic bags. Waiting. Brooke 26:34 Very smart. That's a genuinely a good investment, especially given the food supply shortages that we've got going on right now. Casandra 26:43 Yeah, what a good segue Margaret 26:44 [At that same time] What a good segue.[Everyone laughing] Hope you all like this new format of friends chatting. We'll work on it. Casandra 26:56 We're doing great! Brooke 26:57 Yeah, no, it's gonna be exactly this great every time. Margaret 27:02 Food shortages. What do you mean food shortages? That sounds like a bunch of wing nut talk. Casandra 27:11 There are no food shortages. Brooke 27:13 There's no such thing as food. Buy guns. Casandra 27:20 Eat ammo. Brooke 27:22 That's exactly what I was thinking when you said ammo and gold and I was like that's good. Those are things you can eat. We'll be fine. Margaret 27:29 Yeah, yeah. [Everyone laughing] Casandra 27:30 I think there's something to be said about the fact that you and I both have kids, Brooke. So, when I'm like oh...You know if I have 20 extra bucks, what am I putting it into? It's like it's food. Margaret 27:41 It's not whiskey? Brooke 27:45 Pretty much all the time or the next size of clothing for my child that doesn't stop growing. But But yeah, food shortages. So, that's like a really interesting and again very complicated topic. So, I work part time for a local farm as well. And here in Oregon, our spring was especially wet like it's it's...Oregeon is a fairly wet place and we get a fair amount of rain in the spring, but it was like a lot more than usual. And it stayed cold for longer. So this farm, which usually opens up the first week of June and starts selling produce had to delay by a week its start date, because there just was there weren't crops and then they're battling larger infestations of problems and new and different ones so they've had funguses, and mold, and bugs, different kinds of bugs, and greater quantity of bugs attacking their crops, and they've been sending like... Margaret 28:44 Larger bugs. Brooke 28:44 Yeah. Casandra 28:45 Yeah, the pest have gone wild up here. Margaret 28:46 Like bugs the size of cars. Brooke 28:48 Yes. Yeah, they've been sending almost weekly samples to the state, the Oregon State Extension office which is our...they do a bunch of farming program things anyway they... Casandra 29:01 OSU? Brooke 29:02 Yeah, OSU. A lot of states have extension services from their state university, anyway that that analyze like "What is this blight? What is this fungus? Why is this thing turning yellow? Why...what is causing this?" So they... Margaret 29:17 What is this language it's speaking to me and why are its eyes rotating sideways from its head. Brooke 29:22 Yeah, they test for that kind of thing too. E.T. For sure. You know, they would usually send maybe a couple of samples in a season and they've had to send like almost weekly samples for two or three months and then you know devising on the fly--because organic farm, you know, safe organic practices to combat these things. And it's, you know, required a lot of extra time and investment and attention to the farm and the crops that are going in it just to to get a healthy crop out of it. Casandra 29:56 And we're not even experiencing you know, the heat wave here that they're experiencing what, like Western Europe right now. Margaret 30:05 Yeah. And parts of the southern and central United States also. But like. Casandra 30:10 Yeah, and North Africa. Margaret 30:12 Yeah. Casandra 30:13 I was reading that in Portugal. It's so hot that farm equipment is setting dried crops on fire as they're like trying to harvest things. Brooke 30:25 Oh, wow. Casandra 30:26 Like things are that hot and dry. Growing food is becoming more difficult. That seems to be the moral of the story. Margaret 30:36 Well fortunately, I believe the biggest breadbasket of the world, or at least of Europe, is doing just fine and isn't currently being invaded by a megalomaniac, and certainly huge chunks of what's left aren't supporting someone who would invade such a place, so....Or, as I doubt this is news to anyone who is listening, but maybe it is, you know, the the war in Ukraine is fucking up well will fuck up remarkably, the harvest in Ukraine of wheat, and I believe, like it's them in the US maybe are the biggest exporters of wheat in the world. I should have looked up my actual.. I'm learning so much about how I'm gonna do this next time. Casandra 31:22 I was just reading percentages, and they fell out of my brain, but it's big. Brooke 31:27 The combination of Ukraine and Russia and it's mostly Ukraine on this, they provide 12% of the world's wheat supply. Or to put it in other terms, Ukraine's wheat feeds 400 million people a year. So like, the for scale, the population of the US, like one year's worth of wheat. So yeah, it's, it's a lot. And they're basically going to have essentially zero harvest coming out of Ukraine this year in terms of wheat. Casandra 32:01 And it's not just like not having flour on the shelf, but if you're a meat eater, you know, grain fed, grain finished...My brain just died. Brooke 32:15 Animal feed. Casandra 32:16 Thank you. Fuel and animal feed. Brooke 32:20 Cows in particular, yeah, all the little things that the grain goes into, yeah, it's very bad. And, you know, we in the US might not experience as much of that being a wealthy country that's more insulated. Like one of the readings I was doing was talking about how, of course, Africa will be one of the most impacted continents by all of this because it has the highest rate of imports of food from other places, because so much of its inhospitable to growing or growing large quantities of food. And they often get the short end of the stick when there's global supply chain issues. Margaret 32:56 And it's not just the US' position as wealthy. It's that we grow...I think I, I think we're the largest exporter of food in the world, I again, really have learned so much about the kind of stuff I'm going to look up before I start recording next time. Brooke 33:12 Yeah, California, grows like some percentage of the entire world's...just California State of California alone grows an appreciable percent of the world's food supply. Margaret 33:25 Not to just drive home the animal agriculture point, but wow, it sure takes so much more grain to feed a cow to then turn around to feed a person than to just feed the grain to the person. Whooa! Anyway, if I'm gonna get accused of propaganda. Casandra 33:44 But Margaret, I can't eat grain. Margaret 33:46 Yeah, no, I know. That's actually why I don't believe in, everyone should do X. There's very few things I would say everyone should do, and that certainly, certainly applies to diet more than almost anything else. People should do, what they need and what their bodies want. And also what their, you know, local environment sustains most effectively and all those things. Casandra 34:14 I was listening to a podcast yesterday about food shortages that I'm going to forget the name of now. Brooke 34:19 There are other podcasts? Casandra 34:21 There are other podcasts like this? Wild. Margaret 34:24 Cool People Who Do Cool Stuff? Casandra 34:26 No, it wasn't that one, I'm sorry, Margaret. Margaret 34:28 Wait, there's a third podcast? Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness? Casandra 34:33 Is it Behind The Bastards? Is that the? Margaret 34:35 Oh, yeah, I guess they do technically... Brooke 34:37 Are they still allowed to have a podcast? I thought we shut that down. Casandra 34:42 Anyway, Margaret 34:44 So you can't start with another podcast because it takes too much grain. Casandra 34:49 Noooo! Brooke 34:52 That's the title of this episode now. Margaret 34:57 It's called interrupting Casandra. That's the name of the podcast. Brooke 35:01 I love you, Casandra. I'm sorry. Casandra 35:03 You guys, my brain can't hold a thought for that long. Brooke 35:06 Understood. Casandra 35:08 Okay, so I was listening to this, what I would call like a progressive podcast. And I'm usually really annoyed with the like, "We can solve climate change and world hunger by eating locally." But when we're talking about, you know, International food shortage crises, that does seem like one of the more manageable solutions. And we were talking in the chat prior to this episode noticing that I feel really grateful for my CSA share this summer. Because I paid for it, you know, months ago, which means that, you know, if we're going back to the banana analogy, Margaret 35:52 The value hold on. Brooke 35:53 I mean, that is very accurate. You know, we've got, we've got eggs included in the CSA that I work on. And, you know, we do a small markup on that just to cover all the logistics of getting the eggs from the egg supplier. But she had to raise prices at the start of the season. And we'll probably have to raise them again, like in the fall. But if you signed up for the CSA, and that included eggs in your particular box, your price gets to be set, right where it is. Casandra 36:26 Yeah, it's hard, though, right, because especially when we're talking about prepping like one of...I get annoyed with prepping conversations, because oftentimes, people either don't have the space to store large quantities of things or the money to buy things in bulk. And I would consider paying for a CSA ahead of time buying a thing in bulk, or similar, you know, similar impact. And it's hard because a lot of people can't do that. Like, I was hurting for a few months, because the payment came out. I was like, "Oh, yeah, that thing I said I'd pay for." I'm glad I did it. But... Margaret 37:06 Okay, but. [Brooke interupts] Go ahead....Okay, so there is a community solution to this, though. So you can't eat ammunition. But if you have enough ammunition and friends....This thing that happened in history, that should never happen again, because it was violent, during the Spanish Civil War, people collectivized all the farms. Brooke 37:32 Wrong podcast. Wrong podcast. Margaret 37:34 No, but see, see, this is... Casandra 37:36 Did they do it with dinosaurs? Margaret 37:39 I've heard that dinosaurs were involved. They...I at least read one story about that. But, you know, it...I means it's funny to me, right? Because it's like, on some level, okay, so individual solutions are complicated, because they involve certain types of resources. A lot of community solutions are good. And they're working to set up different kinds of like small scale agriculture that you can do within a community and mutual aid organizations that can take care of people and help fill in some holes and different people's, like, dietary needs and stuff like that. But it's like, it's so frustrating, because honestly, like, like, a lot of the solutions to these problems are destroy the existing infrastructure and build an infrastructure, well, not even the infrastructure, the systems that control the current infrastructure, and enter them into a more reasonable and equitable method of distribution. But obviously that has some risks associated with it. So I don't know, I guess, I guess sometimes I get like, frustrated, because it's like, you know, we're all like, kind of trying to be like, "Okay, how do we deal with these issues in this issue," and it's like, and we should figure out how to do it on these, like, smaller scales, but it's like, so frustrating because I think so many people like, kind of have a sense of like, what the grander solution is, and just don't know how to fucking do it. Casandra 39:01 Yep. Margaret 39:01 Including me, I don't know how to do it. Although in 1936...Anyway. Casandra 39:07 Were you gonna say something, Brooke? Brooke 39:10 One way to help solve the problem of food supplies in a very small way, amongst you and your friends: We grow things more efficiently when we focus on growing one thing at a time. So we've talked about on the pod growing, starting a garden, even a single container on your balcony kind of thing. But ,if you have a friend or a couple of friends that can also do a little gardening, maybe talking amongst yourselves and have each of you grow a specific thing or a couple of specific things. And they have each of the three of you be different. And that way you can focus on doing a good job of growing a couple of things. And they can do a good job growing their couple of things and then you can exchange the produce as it starts to ripen because it'll be more than you want. Casandra 40:01 I like that. When you said one thing my brain was like, "But polyculture!?" Brooke 40:06 Yeah, sorry, I'm thinking of like, if I can get everyone on my street to, you know, grow something in their backyard, and we all had one different crop, you know, just this whole weird place that my brain goes to that would be beautiful. But the other thing about the the food shortages, the crop growing problems, and all of that that I wanted to point out is how much this is an immediate future problem. Like, right now we're having all of these problems growing things and creating the food. And what we're eating for a lot of the part is if you're eating dry foods, packaged foods and stuff that was grown maybe last year in a previous growing season. So where we're going to start to see this pinch, even worse is going to be later this year and into next year, when we're going to buy things that were grown in a previous season. Except they weren't, because Ukraine didn't export any grain or because all of the black bean crops failed, or what have you. So it's going to get worse very soon, because of that kind of problem. Margaret 41:15 Yay. Yeah. Brooke 41:20 Thinking about growing a thing, like right now before that problem really hits home, and then you'll suddenly have some food growing on your back porch, or whatever. Casandra 41:29 That also makes me grateful for...this is probably an option in other areas, not just where we are, but Brooke and I are part of a co op. And we can purchase things through companies at wholesale prices. So like, I just put in an order for like 10 pounds of salt and 25 pounds of beans and, you know, makes me grateful for options like that. Brooke 41:59 Yeah, bulk buying. Margaret 42:02 And that's like, kind of the origins of food co ops, as far as I understand it is that, you know, now we have this conception. And I feel like most people are like, "Why would a food co-op be cheaper food co-ops are more expensive, because like food co-op is like practically just like, a way of saying super bougie independent grocery store with natural food. And the origin of food cooperatives is basically people pulling together and saying like, well, "We want to buy a bunch of food. So let's act like we're a store and go to the distributor, and put in orders together." And those do still exist in various places. And also, not everything that call itself a food Co-Op is just bougie and shitty and like, some of them are very good. Brooke 42:44 I would say ours isnt...wasn't. At least that's from my very biased perspective. Margaret 42:50 Wasn't good or wasn't bad? Brooke 42:52 Wasn't bougie wasn't bougie. Margaret 42:54 Ah.Yeah. Brooke 42:56 Can I go back to Casandra, you mentioned, the heatwave stuff happening in Europe and crops catching on fire. I had read last week about this heatwave that was coming in Europe and some of the problems they anticipated having but I have not had time this week to like catch up on what actually happened. And I think both of you guys have been paying more attention to that news. And I'm curious if you want to enlighten me and perhaps our listeners about the actual effects of that heatwave in addition to farming equipment catching crops on fire. Which is bad. Casandra 43:29 Part of a glacier collapsed in Italy. Margaret 43:34 They still have glaciers there? Casandra 43:36 Apparently. Margaret 43:38 You ever get depressed, you ever go to Glacier National Park and just been sad, because you're like, it's just full of signs that are like, "There used to be a glacier here." and you're like, "This sucks." Brooke 43:48 That would be depressing. Margaret 43:49 It's really beautiful. Anyways. Brooke 43:51 What is what does it mean, the glacier collapsed, like a portion fell over? Casandra 43:55 Like an avalanche, like a portion of this glacier collapsed and it killed 11 people, but it's just also a testament to how hot it was. Iran was like 126 degrees. Casandra 43:59 There was something about the railways, the rail lines that so was having problems. Margaret 44:17 Yeah. So, TERF Island is this island off of the coast of Europe. That is ruled by, it's still a monarchy, and it's ruled by J.K. Rowling, Queen of the TERFS. But unfortunately, most of her subjects actually wish they didn't live on a place called TERF Island, and wish that they could go back to just being embarrassed about having colonized most of the world. That's also worth being embarrassed about anyway, yeah, England, TERF Island, is pretty fuck right now, and I mean, the same as the rest of Europe, right. But, England is normally a dreary, overcast place and that's why everyone has turned their head against so many people. And so they are...And so their their rail infrastructure is designed, you can build railways for cold, and you can build railways for heat, but it's like actually kind of hard to build railways for both. Because you have these, like, long chunks of steel, these rails, right, and they warp. And as people want to go faster and quieter, they are now continuous rails that are welded into like one continuous thing. Which means that when they distort in the heat or contract in the cold or whatever, it's a bigger issue, right? So, their rail system, at least as we record right now is just like fucked. And like, a lot of the rails aren't running or if they are running, they're running really slowly to not, like, I believe, cause additional heat and cause additional problems. I actually don't remember exactly why going slowly is the solution to this. But it's like such as like a clear example....And then they're having this thing where, and I'm sure this happens everywhere. But they're particularly good at being like, cozy during crisis that's like part of the national character as far as I can tell. And so they're like, "Oh, this isn't a big deal." And like, they had this heatwave in 1976. And so they're all like, "Oh, this is just like 1976." But and 1976 was bad, right? But there hasn't been like more and more heat more and more times, right? That was a little bit of an outlier year. Whereas they're constantly breaking all these records. And it's just, it's fucking everything up. And I hate...I want...I sort of hate that I know more about this than I know about some of the stuff that's going on in Iran, or I know that very recently, India has had really massive heat waves that have caused a lot of problems. I know... Casandra 46:35 China. Margaret 46:36 Yeah. Yeah. And, but there's this sort of like, I don't know, at least by the way, people are talking about it who are not in England. I almost feel like there's this like, Oh, thank god if this happens to the English and to the white Americans, like maybe something will start happening. And because like just seen as like these like centers of power or whatever, but people are very resistant to actually believing anything's wrong. But it's really obviously something wrong. Casandra 47:06 Oh my gosh. But, you know what people are willing to believe is wrong? Margaret 47:12 What? Casandra 47:14 People are willing to believe that our globalist overlords at CERN have shifted our dimension multiple times and opened a gateway to Hell, and summonned Satan. And that's why everything's bad. Margaret 47:33 Please Explain. Casandra 47:34 It can't be climate change, it has to be a Stranger Things portal...run by the Jews. Margaret 47:43 I was about to ask if the Jews were involved. I thought you all were busy with the space laser. Casandra 47:48 Always. God, if only we had an actualy space laser. Margaret 47:53 I know! You all multitask so well, like you're busy running the space laser. I mean, I guess thats.. Casandra 47:59 It's because we rest one whole day a week that we have all this energy. Brooke 48:02 Hey, wait a minute, Mormons do too, but we do not have space lasers. So.... Casandra 48:07 You have like alien and tablets and shit. Margaret 48:08 Yeah, Catholics don't rest. Wait, so please explain more. So there. Okay. So CERN is the the miniature black hole creator, right. [Brooke and Casandra laugh skeptically] Wait, at that point. I thought I wasn't even lying. I thought that was what it does. Like it investigates...Am I wrong? Casandra 48:29 It's, it's.... Brooke 48:31 It's a particle accelerator. Margaret 48:32 Yeeah Casandra 48:33 No, it's not. It's a group. It's a group. CERN isn't even the thing itself. CERN is the like group that does the research. Margaret 48:39 Oh, like the Zionist Cabal or whatever. Casandra 48:44 Yeah, and it's been around since the 50s and they do like particle physics shit that I don't understand. You know, finding new particles, researching antimatter, potentially creating mini black holes, apparently. Margaret 49:00 Do you think antimatter gets mad at regular matter? Like kind of like an Antifa versus FA kind of thing? Brooke 49:08 Well, matter wins over antimatter. So I mean, it can get mad all it wants. It loses the battle. Casandra 49:13 So they're trying to find, you know, proof of like the Big Bang and doing all these....But then, so it's been around for a long time. It's been around since the 50s I think. But, I want to say the facility, the particle collider...this is gonna be the funniest explanation because none of us understand it fully. But, apparently the facility is like 17 miles wide, and most of its underground and it looks very like you know, Stranger Things, Sci Fi, space AG. Brooke 49:52 It's that wide because it's a giant metal circle. So it's not actually like taking up 17 miles, but like you're able to go from one end of this metal tube to the other like it is that far apart. Margaret 50:03 Yeah, it's like a roller derby rink. Brooke 50:07 Yeah, more or less. Margaret 50:10 Or it will be. Casandra 50:10 Yeah, so all these conspiracy theorists for years now I think particularly since 2012, have decided that the reason things continue to be bad is that...there are multiple theories, but one is that the world actually ended in 2012. Another is that each time they turn on this particle collider, we like shift timelines. So that's happened in like, 2012, 2016. And then just this last July 5, apparently. It's just fascinating to me, the lengths people will go to to explain bad shit happening rather than just like, accepting climate change. Margaret 50:53 Yeah. Casandra 50:54 Or like, pausing to understand capitalism and its function. And it's like, "Nope, it's gotta be a black hole to Satan." Brooke 51:03 This is especially funny to me, because the, the collider literally takes like, the like, the tiniest little bits of matter. Like it tries to get down to like a single atom, and then sends it through this giant tube to smash into each other. And I'm like, Yeah, so you're telling me that like, two oxygen molecules smashing into each other, is what's opening multiple timelines? Casandra 51:29 And it's stuff that's like, only comprehensible and interesting to physicists, as far as I can understand. Like, if you look at their list of achievements, none of that makes sense to a normal human being. You know? Margaret 51:45 I kind of like some of that stuff. But I read a lot of science fiction. Casandra 51:49 Yeah, I have an ex who's like, really into both space and physics, and is really fascinated by some of the work they've done. But yeah, it doesn't make sense to me at all. And it doesn't make sense to the conspiracy theorists either. Brooke 52:07 Okay, so we're running out of food. Europe's on fire. Casandra 52:13 Not just Europe, apparently North Africa, China, India, the southern United States, Brooke 52:18 Most of the world in the last two years has burned down in one way or another. We're opening black hole portals. No one can buy a house. Casandra 52:27 What's that, Margaret? Margaret 52:29 Oh, just always the wrong parts of it are burning down. Casandra 52:32 Right Margaret 52:33 I mean, well with the exception of the Third Precinct. Brooke 52:35 Yes. Margaret 52:36 Notable. Notable Exception. Casandra 52:39 We're still figuring out how to aim the space laser. Margaret 52:44 Okay, okay. So it was actually you all. It wasn't actually Dark Biden. Casandra 52:48 Oh, no. Marjorie Taylor Greene blamed the wildfires. Margaret 52:52 On the space lasers? Casandra 52:53 That's how the spacel laser thing started. Margaret 52:55 Oh, my God. Really? Why would you burn down the forest? Is her claim that you all don't know how to aim it? Casandra 53:06 Let me find this was... Margaret 53:08 What is your [Marjorie's] rationale for why the Jews have decided to start forest fires? It it seems to me that even if I....There are other targets that I could imagine, as an anti-semitic conspiracy theorist that I would imagine that the Jews would point the space laser at. Casandra 53:26 Right? Let me try to...let me see if I can find the exact tweet because it was really funny. Oh, all I can find is spoof tweets in my quick search. Brooke 53:35 I feel bad for you having to read through Marjorie Taylor Green's tweets right now. That's a punishment you do not deserve. Casandra 53:42 The like wingnut anti-Semites kind of crack me up. I don't know why she would blame it on that. I have no idea. It's... Casandra 53:49 I mean, Q'anon ties into the whole thing. Margaret 53:50 Well, let's come up with it. Margaret 53:51 Oh, yeah. Brooke 53:53 Casandra, do your people hate forests? Casandra 53:57 Forests? Brooke 53:58 Yes. Casandra 53:59 No, of course not. We actually have a whole holiday dedicated to trees. Margaret 54:05 Whoa, that's cool. Casandra 54:06 Tu BiShvat. We liked the trees. Margaret 54:15 Well, maybe you are trying to....No, I don't even want to. I'm trying to come up with anti-semetic conspiracy theorists. But I don't want to do it. I can't do it. Brooke 54:25 Here's a news thing that we didn't talk about in our briefing. And I don't know if we care to right now. But, are y'all paying any attention to the whole January 6th committee things? They just had one last night. Margaret 54:36 Yeah, a little bit. Casandra 54:37 No, I didn't read about last night. Brooke 54:40 I am mostly not paying attention as well, except that I see these tweets of people being like, "Oh my gosh, did you know blah, blah, blah." And most of it's like all along I feel like yeah, that's been reported on already. We already knew about that. Why is this news? Margaret 54:54 That's kind of how I feel about it. I like maybe maybe it's not fair. Bu,t I kind of just say this political theater at this point like we we all know what they did. We watched it. And we all know what their organizations look like. Anti-fascists have done the infiltration work and released all of the...like everything anyone has ever said to each other that's a fascist in the United States has been released by anti-fascists, not the government. And so in some ways, I'm a little bit like...and maybe it's not right, maybe, maybe I should care more about it. But in my mind, I'm a little bit like, I've moved on to the next news cycle issue in my head, and it feels like kind of like...remember how we were like waiting forever for them to impeach Trump? And they're like, "We swear we're going to impeach Trump soon." And I'm like, is this whole thing just a way for The Washington Post to sell newspapers? And that's more...again, more than is fair, how I how I feel a little bit about January, 6th, it's just like, Okay, y'all found something that you can milk for? I don't know.... Casandra 56:05 I mean the too little too late sort of encapsulates our response to most things, right. Margaret 56:12 Yeah. Casandra 56:12 Whether it's climate change or insurrection. Brooke 56:15 Now the one good thing that did that did come out of last night's was little video of Senator Josh Hawley running away from the rioters. And then all the people on Twitter who use that little video and set it to various pieces of music. Casandra 56:33 Finding moments of joy. Margaret 56:35 He's the guy who supported....he's the guy who was supporting them beforehand, right? Brooke 56:40 Yeah, he's the one with like the really well known fist raised in support picture rightbefore they started destroying everything. Margaret 56:47 I never thought that the leopards eating people's faces party would eat my face...Well, does that seem like a decent spot to end it for July? Nothing bad can happen in the next week.There's gonna be like at least a.... Casandra 57:06 I think we wanted to give people more hope you know, like more tools, or ideas? Or even just like... Margaret 57:16 Oh, right. Buy whiskey. Build a bunker. Hole up Brooke 57:19 Tanks are bad. Casandra 57:20 If you live in wildfire country like we do those plastic windows... Brooke 57:26 Blame the Jews. Casandra 57:27 Blame the Jews. We can say that because I'm a Jew. I want to make that really clear. Before we put this podcast out. No, buy those plastic windows sealer kits and fresh filters for your air filters. Margaret 57:45 Yeah, do it before they're needed. That's part of the supply chain stuff. Brooke 57:50 Plant a zucchini, Casandra 57:51 Planted zucchini with your neighbors and trade them with each other. Margaret 57:57 What if everyone just grows zucchini? Casandra 58:00 Zucchini's really versatile. You know. Brooke 58:01 Zucchini and potatoes. Margaret 58:02 That was the main thing that my mom grew. My mom grew mostly zucchini. And so it was just like nothing, nothing, nothing and then everything is made out of zucchini for like two weeks. And I actually loved it because we ate so much zucchini bread and it was so good. Casandra 58:17 Yeah. Brooke 58:18 They're relatively easy, like if you haven't gardened before and you need something to garden that'll make you feel really good and successful. Like they're easier to grow you know a little harder to kill than, and then when they start producing like you get these big zucchinis and like if you completely ignore them, you can get these like just monstrous beasts and it's just really satisfying to grow zucchini. Casandra 58:41 I never grow zucchini because I always have friends who grow zucchini and have too much. Brooke 58:45 Yes. As zucchini does. Casandra 58:49 Anyway. Brooke 58:50 Grow zucchini. Margaret 58:52 This podcast is brought to you by zucchini. Okay, what's another hopeful? Don't rush out and buy a garage door right now if you can avoid it. Turn your basement fear into a kiddie pool full of kibble. Casandra 59:15 If your garage door privileged you can just like revel in that. Margaret 59:18 Yeah. Brooke 59:20 Genuinely you know, pet food is an example of a thing where if you're gonna go if you have some extra money and you're gonna go invest it quote unquote, in something pet food will hold up and your pet will need food. So instead of bananas buy pet food. Margaret 59:34 If you do buy bananas, you have to put them in you have to peel them and put them in the freezer if you want them to last and then you've turned them into smoothies. Casandra 59:43 That's the only good way to eat a banana anyway. Controversial take Brooke 59:48 I do not agree. Margaret 59:50 Yeah, I just...Huh, I thought we I thought we were friends. Casandra 59:58 I just lost to friends. Brooke 1:00:05 I just know not to bring bananas over your house. They won't be safe. Margaret 1:00:09 Well they are safe. Casandra 1:00:09 You can use them perfectly for smoothies and banana bread. How do we end this? Margaret 1:00:21 We we like can do this, right? Like all this like bad shits happening, but like the reason to talk about all this bad shit that's happening is to stare soberly into the face of what's coming. Not so that we like, give up and like, it's not the part in the movie where the "Run there's a monster," and then the monster eats everyone. It's the part where you're standing on the bulwark of the--I watch love fantasy movies--the bulwark of the castle and you look out and there's the gathering storm and the hordes of usually poorly racially designed enemies...is coming...now I just feel bad about using this analogy. I love Lord of the Rings, but i was not... Casandra 1:01:03 The new Lord of the Rings is about to come out. Margaret 1:01:05 Yeah. Casandra 1:01:05 Apparently it's more racially fair and equitable and diverse. Margaret 1:01:09 Yeah. That's good. And I personally more than I probably should think Tolkien would have listened to some of this criticisms since he like, like, when the Nazis came to Tolkien, and were like, "Hey, we love your story, are you Aryan?" and he got really fucking mad. And he was like, they like he was like, "If you're asking if I'm Jewish, I am sad to say that I am not, but fuck all of you forever." So anyway. he's not a perfect man. Casandra 1:01:43 Comrade Tolkien. Margaret 1:01:45 But I think he, I think he meant, well, we all know that intentions are what matters. Okay. So but this is the part of the movie where you're staring out at the, you know, the bad thing is coming, right? And it is a big, bad thing. And we can't just all go back to bed and be like, "Oh, the government will take care of this for us, right?" Because the government is one of the things that's out there gathering and the big fucking mass. Well parts of it, because governments are made out of people. And some parts of it will probably stop being part of the government when bad things happen. But... well like the National Guard like gives food to the like mutual aid groups and like that they're supposed to give to Red Cross, like this has happened sometimes. They're like, "Oh, shit, y'all actually put things where they're supposed to go." And they like help the anarchists instead of the bureaucracies, because they're people. But, we can do this. We can look, we can see what's happening, we can face it, we can communicate with other people about what we're facing. We can work together to get through this. And, and I genuinely believe that and that's why I do this podcast. And that's why my basement is full of kibble. And um... Casandra 1:02:54 We're all gonna come swim in it. Margaret 1:02:55 Yeah, totally. Yeah, it's probably gonna be full of rats by that time, but you know. Margaret 1:03:01 Yeah! Brooke 1:03:01 Rats are food...too. Margaret 1:03:01 I'm like a rat farmer in my basement. That's a turn you never expected from Ol' Margaret. Brooke 1:03:01 Rats need food too. Casandra 1:03:14 Vegan turned rat farmer. Margaret 1:03:17 That's still vegan. Brooke 1:03:21 Okay, so this segment is... Casandra 1:03:24 Devolving. Margaret 1:03:25 Alright. And, so thank you all so much for listening. If you enjoy this podcast, please tell people about it. You can tell people about it on the internet. And you can tell people about it not on the internet. And both of those things are good, because not in person. Because on the internet is good because of algorithms and in person is good because that's a better way to live your life. She said while living alone and on the top of a mountain. And also, if you want to support us more directly, you can do so by sponsoring our Patreon. We are published by Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness, which is a anarchists collective that is dedicated to creating culture and good stuff. Sometimes we do theory, but that's like not our thing. It's like almost like we try and kind of do the other stuff around. And you can support us by following us on Patreon or by supporting us on Patreon patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. If you sponsor us at $10 or more a month, we will send you a zine anywhere in the world for free every month. If you sponsors at all, you'll get access to the digital copy, even before other people get access. I think usually we're good at that. Sometimes. Most of the time. We're still getting our shit together. But there's lots of good content. We have bunch of books coming out. We have another podcast you can check out called Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness, which is the monthly zine, but it is available to everyone and then it also follows with an interview with the Creator talking about their process. It's really good. You should check it out. Do either of you to have anything to plug before I? Casandra 1:04:58 I just got this book in the mail that I did the art for that you might know about. Margaret 1:05:03 Yeah, what is it? Casandra 1:05:06 It's your book. Margaret. Margaret 1:05:07 I have a book? Casandra 1:05:08 Yeah. You have a book coming out. Margaret 1:05:09 Is it called "We Won't Be Here Tomorrow. I have a book of short stories that's coming out called "We Won't Be Here Tomorrow." It comes out September 20. From AK Press, which is a collectively run anarchist publisher, which rules and if you order it now you get art print made by Casandra. Well, drawn by Cassandra. It's probably made by a printer somewhere. The prints part of it anyway, and it illustrates one of my stories and also Casandra did the cover art, and it's really beautiful. So, you should check it out. And in particular, we want to thank some of our Patreon backers. We want to thank Hoss the dog, Chris, Sam, Micaiah, Kirk, Natalie, Eleanor, Jenipher, Staro, Cat J, Chelsea, Dana, David, Nicole, Mikki, Oxalis, Paige, and SJ. Thank you so much for for making this possible. And yeah, I hope you all are doing as well as you can with everything that's going on. Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

Park Predators
The Woods

Park Predators

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 41:20 Very Popular


Two young girls vanish into thin air along the boundary of Glacier National Park in Montana. Their disappearance plagues a small Montana community for years, until a ruthless predator strikes again, leading authorities to the doorstep of a sadistic man who claimed to have no memory of his horrific deeds. Sources for this episode cannot be listed here due to character limitations. For a full list of sources, please visit

Backpacker Radio
#159 | Shayla "Kiddo" Paradeis on Hiking Without a Smartphone and Healing from Trauma

Backpacker Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 118:57 Very Popular


In today's episode of Backpacker Radio presented by The Trek, we are joined by Shayla "Kiddo" Paradeis. Shayla is a very accomplished backpacker, with the triple crown just scratching the surface of her hiking resume, but it's her approach to backpacking that makes this conversation stand out. We chat about what it's like to backpack in today's age without a smartphone, including the differences of keeping in touch with hikers, navigating on trail, tracking the forecast, and more. Shayla also shares her experience of healing on trail, and how her experiences as a sexual assault survivor have played a major role in her desire to be in the backcountry. Another warning to listeners, if the subject of sexual assault is especially triggering to you, we encourage you to skip ahead about half way into today's interview. We wrap the show with the triple crown of reasons to go to a baseball game, we check in with MG as she's just hiked through the 100-Mile Wilderness, we discuss things that feel like a scam but aren't (but also sort of are), and give a shoutout to a couple who got engaged on the PCT this year! Gossamer Gear: Use code “littledonkeygirl” for 15% off at gossamergear.com.  Enlightened Equipment: Use code “ultralight10” for 10% off Enlightened Equipment's Stock Revelation Quilt or Torrid Jacket at enlightenedequipment.com. Ned: Use code “backpacker” for 15% off at helloned.com/backpacker. Interview with Shayla “Kiddo” Paradeis Shayla's Website Shayla's Youtube Channel Time stamps & Questions 00:02:52 - QOTD: What isn't a scam but feels like one? 00:05:50 - Reminders: Leftover trail days shirts *were* in the Trek store! 00:06:38 - Introducing Shayla 00:07:23 - How does one decide to hike without a smartphone? 00:10:23 - What's the rationale? 00:13:12 - Are you off of social media entirely? 00:15:10 - Do you ever listen to music? 00:17:24 - How have you noticed hikers change as you've hiked so many trails? 00:21:59 - Have you noticed a change in how you get through your day? 00:24:37 - How are you checking the weather forecast? 00:25:54 - Do you get frustrated being around other hikers who are always on their phones? 00:28:10 - Has any part of you lost faith in humanity? 00:29:57 - Discussion about navigation and getting lost without a phone. 00:33:52 - Tell us about your hiking group patterns for your long trails. 00:36:25 - What was your hitchhiking method? 00:37:07 - Did you ever get bothered by your hiking partners using their phones? 00:38:36 - If you could do it over again, would you hike alone? 00:40:17 - Do you have any tips for people wanting to set boundaries? 00:46:44 - Tell us about the Haute Route. 00:49:06 - Can you compare the Haute Route and the Tour du Mont Blanc? 00:51:02 - Are you also a runner? 00:52:30 - Why don't you like racing as much anymore? 00:53:44 - Did you have a light pack in 2011? 00:54:41 - Tell us about eating better. 00:56:51 - How many calories did you consume on trail? 00:57:49 - Are you a competitive person? 01:01:11 - Tell us more about why you're hiking. 01:04:57 - What happened that led you to run away to Glacier? 01:06:30 - Were your parents disappointed when you left New York? 01:08:02 - Did the trauma you experience relate to getting into backpacking? 01:09:42 - Have you found thru-hiking to be healing? 01:10:41 - (Begin trigger warning) How did your relationship on trail pan out? 01:12:33 - Did any part of you want to quit hiking after that? 01:15:10 - How did you feel safety-wise after that? 01:16:36 - Tell us more about your book. 01:18:47 - Can you give us a synopsis of what the book is about? 01:21:22 - (End trigger warning) Tell us about the volunteering you do in Glacier National Park. 01:25:50 - Tell us about grizzlies and wolves! 01:27:10 - Discussion about how wolves impact the ecosystem. 01:29:08 - Is there anything else you want to share? 01:29:48 - Thank you! SEGMENTS MG Check-In Trek Propaganda Meet the Thru-Hiking Couple Who Got Engaged on the PCT by Penina Satlow After 9,000 Miles of Thru-Hiking, These Are the 10 Items I Never Leave Home Without by Jenn Wall Triple Crown of reasons to go to a baseball game Pupdate Mara-Edition Mail Bag 5 Star Review [divider] Check out our sound guy @Paulybooyshallcross. Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes (and please leave us a review)!  Find us on Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. Support us on Patreon to get bonus content. Advertise on Backpacker Radio Follow The Trek, Chaunce, Badger, and Trail Correspondents on Instagram. Follow The Trek and Chaunce on YouTube. Follow Backpacker Radio on Tik Tok.  A super big thank you to our Chuck Norris Award winner(s) from Patreon: Andrew, Austen McDaniel, Jason Lawrence, Christopher Marshburn, Sawyer Products, Brad and Blair (Thirteen Adventures), Patrick Cianciolo, Paul Packman Sealy, Matt Soukup, Jason Snailer, Greg Mac, Tracy “Trigger” Fawns, and Mike Poisel. A big thank you to our Cinnamon Connection Champions from Patreon: Liz Seger, Cynthia Voth, Emily Brown, Dcnerdlet, Jeff LaFranier, Peter Ellenberg, Jacob Northrup, Peter Leven.