Podcasts about Active shooter

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Best podcasts about Active shooter

Latest podcast episodes about Active shooter

Fraud Busting with Traci Brown
Uvalde Shooting Unmasked with Active Shooter Expert Carol Cambridge Ep. 100.

Fraud Busting with Traci Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 53:50


What REALLY went on at the Uvalde school shooting?  Active Shooter Expert Carol Cambridge fills us in on the details of why things led to complacency and miscommunication and allowed things to  go so wrong.  You'll learn what you should do if you find yourself in an active shooter true crime situation.  Your life could depend on it. Help keep the show going and buy us a coffee:  Here's the link  https://www.buymeacoffee.com/Traci37

Further. Every. Day.
#066 From FBI Mass Shooting Stats Pt 1- 10 Good Guys Without A Gun - Further. Every. Day.

Further. Every. Day.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 70:53


Many people will claim that there is never a “Good Guy With A Gun” to save the day in an Active Shooter Situation. While simply untrue, there is a point to be made here: 94% of Active Shooter Events take place in so-called “Gun Free Zones”. This means that law abiding citizens are rarely able to carry near the incident. We'll look at several cases today where the citizens had to go to their car to get their gun. We took a dive into the 2000-2018 FBI stats on “Active Shooter” cases and we found at least 47 cases that were stopped in part or in whole by citizens, some with guns, and some without. Some of these are off-duty law enforcement, but these people certainly qualify as “Good Guys With Guns” and they were not there because of a 911 call. Again, most people will not carry a firearm in a gun free zone, but off-duty LEOs may feel more free to do so than most because of their ID, training, and position. Many were un-armed and were injured or certainly risked it all to wrestle the attacker down with their bare hands. Some didn't make it, but saved countless others. Let me ask you a question: Which is more evil: The gunman, or disarming the people who now provide the gunman easy targets? We could philosophize on the merits of a good guy or we could just tell you there stories: Story 1: In the early morning of April 23, 2001 before any children had been picked up for school in San Jose, California, CP went to the Bus Barn where she had worked for the better part of a decade, and began murdering her co-workers. She successfully killed a driver-trainer and wounded three other ladies, before Gregory Allan Lee, another driver, caught her attention and ultimately restrained CP until the police could arrive, saving an untold number of lives. https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2001-apr-24-mn-54869-story.html Story 2: Near lunch time on July 28th, 2003, a disgruntled employee, RB, of the Kanawha School Board attempted to set his supervisor ablaze with a bucket of gasoline 10 minutes into the school board's meeting. After his match failed to light, RB resorted to his rifle, but was restrained by onlookers before he could inflict fatal wounds. These onlookers had to restrain RB without the aid of a firearm as they were at a School Board Meeting. One lady suffered gunshot trauma to the gut. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/school-board-meeting-attacked/ Story 3: After a long and hard night of seething jealousy, a jilted man, AC, arrived at his estranged wife's place of work the morning of July 28th 2003 with a handgun. He killed the owner of Gold-Leaf Nursery and one of his wife's co-workers after he had ended his wife's life. AC had a hard time figuring out which man was his wife's lover, and never had the chance to do so. Before AC could reload, two employees jumped AC and subdued him. https://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/fl-xpm-2003-09-24-0309230677-story.html Story 4: After suffering from alleged bullying by Seth Bartell at their school, JM brought a .22 caliber pistol to Rocori High School and fired on Seth twice, one of these missing and striking another boy, Aaron Rollins. After escaping momentarily, Bartell was shot in the forehead by JM, who went on as if to continue the shooting spree. Mark Johnson, a PE Teacher, confronted JM who raised his gun to shoot Johnson. Johnson literally raised his hands and said “No”, and JM surrendered. https://murderpedia.org/male.M/m/mclaughlin-jason.htm Story 5: At roughly 10:30 AM JR walked into Columbia High School with a rage and pain he wanted to spread carrying a 12 gauge shotgun and the ammo to do it. Thankfully, JR only got two shots off, only managing to wound one of his teachers in the leg before an Assistant Principal could tackle JR and subdue him.Police and SWAT arrived several minutes later. https://www.nytimes.com/2004/02/10/nyregion/student-opens-fire-at-a-high-school-near-albany-hitting-a-teacher.html Story 6: February 13th, 2005, a quiet Sunday morning at the Hudson Valley Mall was interrupted by a black clad 24 year old RB. Despite shooting a 20 year old Army Recruiter in the knee and a 56 year old man in the hand, RB managed to miss everyone else and was eventually tackled by employees. https://www.recordonline.com/story/news/2005/02/14/gunman-goes-on-rampage-at/51136353007/ Story 7: On the afternoon of November 8, 2005 KB was called into the administrator's office of Campbell County Comprehensive High School for yet another weapon infraction. This time however, it was a .22 caliber that KB had brought to school. Upon being confronted, KB shot and killed an assistant principal and shot two other faculty. He was restrained by students and teachers until police took him away. He was later released from prison only to be in and out of prison with some charges including domestic abuse and allegedly killing his girlfriend's toddler. He is at large as of 2019 due to multiple miscarriages of justice. https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna9970713 https://www.knoxnews.com/story/news/crime/2019/01/28/campbell-county-school-shooting-kenneth-bartley-trial/2666499002/ Story 8: Before the bell rang at 9:00 AM at Pine Middle School, Jencie Fagan heard a student yell at JN and JN fire 3 rounds into two 14 year old girls who survived. Fagan had the courage to confront JN and demand that he put the gun down and wait for authorities. JN heeded Fagan's prompting. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pine_Middle_School_shooting Story 9: Angered by the disciplinary actions meted out by Principal Klang at Weston Highschool, EH walked into school at 8:00 AM on September 29th, 2006 and aimed a shotgun at the Social Studies teacher. A janitorial staff member jumped EH and wrestled the shotgun out of EH's hands. Upon seeing the staff member struggling with the student, Principle Klang attempted to help the struggling janitor restrain EH. EH, however also had a .22 caliber pistol with which he shot Principle Klang multiple times. Although Klang and other staff were able to restrain EH, Klang died several hours later from the wounds to his head, torso, and leg. https://nthfmemorial.org/swept-the-gun-away-john-alfred-klang/ https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna15060698 Story 10: On July 27, 2008 at The Tennessee Valley Unitarian Universalist Church, a shooter opened fire on the congregation killing 2 wounding 7, before the congregants could tackle the shooter DA. According to the manifesto DA wrote, he intended to shoot congregants until he was shot by police. God had other plans.

Ray Appleton
Hour 1 -Active Shooter Hoax Prompts Lockdowns Including Bullard High.

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 35:29


Several California schools evacuated Wednesday after reports of a person with a gun on campus – reports that were later deemed hoaxes. Including tense moments on the Bullard High campus as Fresno police responded to what was believed to be an active shooter. Just eight minutes later, it was deemed a hoax.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Heroes Nation
After Action Review with Jamie Walden: Active Shooter Training

Heroes Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 76:17


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Coming SOON: NOW and NEXT
Active shooter alerts, suing government over climate change and a new Little Mermaid

Coming SOON: NOW and NEXT

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 53:44 Transcription Available


Tackling these top stories - a veteran Toronto police officer killed while on his lunch in ‘ambush'; a group of teens are suing the Ontario Government over the climate and Disney launches a new look Little Mermaid (and it's about time). Plus, on The Brief, Dave sits down with acclaimed actor and War Child USA Ambassador Thomas Sadowski. You'll know Sadowski from shows like The Newsroom and Life in Pieces. He's premiering a new film at the 2022 Toronto International Film Festival. Support Now and Next!  nowandnext.supercast.com Time Codes: 02:20 - Active shooter alerts? 08:50 - Can we sue the gov't over Climate Inaction? 17:34 - Wtf is happening in Russia? 20:38 - Erin cries over The Little Mermaid 23:33 - Affordability and Food (an announcement) 26:19 - DT on The Brief with Thomas Sadowski 48:29 - TIFF - here for the movies, big for the TO economy Here's the TikTok Little Mermaid video that will melt your heart. Dave on Twitter  Dave on LinkedIn Erin on Twitter Erin on LinkedIn Erin on Instagram Email us hello@storystudionetwork.com Now & Next Cast and Crew Associate Producer Becky Coles Production Manager Jaime Nickerson Audio Editors Mike Treutler and Drew Garner Sonic Logo Designer and Creative Branding Greg MacDonald       Now & Next is a Story Studio Network Original Support Now and Next! Subscribe to our Exclusive Supercast feed for access to AMAs, our message board and early access to Now & Next episodes.

Heroes Nation
After Action Report with Robert Griswold on the Active Shooter Training

Heroes Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 66:58


HeroesNation is a BMG Studio Production Get The App : HeroesNation.tv

Eddie Lowery Off The Deep End
Off The Deep End: Active Shooter Prevention 001 Derek Sanders

Eddie Lowery Off The Deep End

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 99:47


When I ask teachers, cops, students, parents and elected officials what our cities are doing to bolster the safety of our children I get two answers. 1: “I am not sure…” 2: “Nothing.” It is no secret that ACTIVE SHOOTERS, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, and VIOLENT OFFENDERS have gripped the nation and torn apart our families. This is going to one of if not the most important podcast so far. TODAY IS THE DAY Derek Sanders for Thurston County Sheriff will be joining me for a very special episode oF Eddie Lowery Off The Deep End Podcast We will be addressing them and talking about his plan to make a difference in his community. Derek has been endorsed by so many and it's not hard to see why. His plan of action is solid, his approach to issues is rooted in transparency and solving the problems at their foundation. The work his is planning on accomplishing with my Brotha Anthony Triplett at All In A Day's Work is nothing short of amazing. Today we will be addressing many things including the importance of bolstering the defenses of our schools. As always please reach out on our FB Page and let's have a conversation. This is meant to start conversations within the world. Let's chat! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Heroes Nation
Robert Griswold Active Shooter Course

Heroes Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 26:40


to the the Active Shooter Course & Self Defense CALL 800-627-3809 or go to ReadyMadeResources.com

RSLASH: Best Of Reddit Stories 2022
Reports of Active Shooter at IRS Building In Memphis

RSLASH: Best Of Reddit Stories 2022

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 1:05


Reports of Active Shooter at IRS Building In MemphisTENNESSEE – There were unconfirmed reports of a shooting at an IRS building in Memphis Thursday.A large police response was seen at the facility — located at 5333 Getwell Road.The Memphis police department later released a statement saying, ‘no incident has occurred that would cause harm to the public.'“Be advised that we are experiencing several calls regarding various activities that are reportedly occurring within the City of Memphis. Officers are responding to every call; however, no incident has occurred that would cause harm to the public. If any incident is found to be true and could effect the public, we will advise.As always, we will continuously provide information to the public on our social media platforms. We will also work with our media partners. We encourage community members to remain alert and vigilant; however, also remain calm until official notification has been made by a law enforcement agency.”The scare comes a day after a man killed 4 people during a shooting that he streamed on Facebook live

Business Resilience Decoded
Are You Prepared for an Active Shooter Situation?

Business Resilience Decoded

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 5:02


Episode 121: Are You Prepared for an Active Shooter? This episode is brought to you by Fusion Risk Management, Building a More Resilient World Together. Request a demo at https://bit.ly/FusionDECODED today! Active shooter scenarios are an increasingly prominent threat to public safety, especially in schools and in the workplace. In 2022 alone, we've seen examples of workplace violence related to active shooters, whether they were disgruntled employees or angry customers. In this episode, Vanessa is sharing her tips for evaluating whether you're prepared for an active shooter in your workplace. Sign up for our Four Corners newsletter for opportunities to connect, access to exclusive content, bonus interviews, and more at https://bit.ly/BRDFourCorners. Some key takeaways from this episode include: Be proactive – establish systems, protocols, and communications BEFORE the crisis, not afterwards. The more you and your organization prepare for crises, the shorter your response and recovery times will be. Involve everyone – the senior leadership team and front-line employees have different roles in a crisis. Communicate with your team, and ensure they are clear with expectations and responsibilities. Practice – plans are words on a shelf until you put them into action. Your team will respond confidently the more you practice. Disaster Recovery Journal: Register for DRJ's weekly (Wednesday) webinar series: https://drj.com/webinars/up-coming/ Register for DRJ Fall 2022: The Evolution of Resilience: https://www.drj.com/fall2022 Asfalis Advisors: Visit our website here: https://www.asfalisadvisors.com Apply to be a guest on the podcast: https://www.asfalisadvisors.com/decoded/ Download the 5 Step Crisis Strategy: https://www.asfalisadvisors.com/services/ Connect with the podcast! Email us: podcast@drj.com Podcast website: https://drj.com/decoded/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BRDecoded LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/business-resilience-decoded/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNEIrqWlxuyDvkXB24h6Obw/videos Vanessa Mathews, host Vanessa Mathews is the founder and chief resilience officer of Asfalis Advisors, where they are focused on protecting the legacy of the leaders they serve through business resilience. Before becoming an entrepreneur, Mathews developed global crisis management and business continuity programs for government and private sector organizations to include Lowe's Companies, Gulfstream Aerospace, and the Department of Homeland Security. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vanessa-vaughn-mathews-mba-cbcp-70916b4b/ Book Mathews as a speaker: https://bit.ly/VanessaMathews Jon Seals, producer Jon Seals is the editor in chief at Disaster Recovery Journal, the leading magazine/event in business continuity. Seals is an award-winning journalist with a background in publication design, business media, content management, sports journalism, social media, and podcasting. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonseals/ Disaster Recovery Journal: https://drj.com/

The Board Table
The Active Shooter Event: Prevention Planning and Response

The Board Table

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 27:07


Over the last few years, there has been an increase in the frequency of Active Shooter events in schools and other similar settings. In this episode of The Board Table, Donna Lynch, NCSBA's Litigation Counsel and manager of the North Carolina School Boards Trust, leads a discussion on prevention planning and response to school shooting events. Donna is joined by Paul Marshall, the creator of the Active Shooter Crisis Risk program at McGowan Program Administrators and Mike McClanahan from Victor Insurance who serves as the longtime broker for the NCSBT programs.

The Flow Roll Podcast
134.5: Shorty - Active Shooter Training / Renters / Unbreakable / Stallone / Bert Reynolds

The Flow Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 40:26


Here's the shorty for the Samaritan. A shorty is the extra conversations that could pull focus of a podcast episode. The host, Edgar OtraVez and Cousin Primo riff on a few interesting topics during the Samaritan episode. Follow Us On: Cousin Primo on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the_real_cousinprimo/ Edgar OtraVez on Instagram: https://instagram.com/edgarotravez/ TheFlowRoll on Instagram: https://instagram.com/theflowroll/ The Flow Roll Website: https://TheFlowRollPodcast.com/ Affiliate and Sponsor Links Music "Triumphant Winning!" by DJ DENZ The Rooster Use my referral link for this track and more music at Epidemic Sound: https://epidemicsound.theflowrollpodcast.com Blue Host The best hosting service for a great price: https://www.bluehost.com/track/edgarotravez/podcastDescription/ Monday Plan, organize and track your team's work in one place. Work Without Limits https://mondaycom.TheFlowRollPodcast.com #TheFlowRollPodcast #TheFlowRoll #FlowRoll #ActiveShooter #SylvesterStallone #superheroMovie #superheroGenre #BertReynolds #Guyver

Heroes Nation
Ep 185 After Action Review on the Active Shooter Training

Heroes Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 62:17


HeroesNation Podcast Presents Doug Thornton- American Vindicta

C3 Podcast: Active Shooter Incident Management
Ep 51: Listener Question - Who Sets Tactical?

C3 Podcast: Active Shooter Incident Management

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 24:48


Episode 51: Listener Question - Who Sets Tactical?This week are live on the road with the ASIM team in New York City. Today we are answering a former ASIM student's question on "Who sets tactical with only three or four officers on duty?"Bill Godfrey:Bill Godfrey: Welcome to the Active Shooter Incident Management Podcast. My name is Bill Godfrey, your podcast host. I have with me today, three of the C3 instructors, Kevin Burd, our Director of Training. Kevin, thanks for being here today.Kevin Burd:Thanks for having me, Bill.Bill Godfrey:All right. And we got Jason Kelley. Jason, good to have you here.Jason Kelley:Thank you, sir.Bill Godfrey:Or, as we call him, Slide Deck. And we have Coby Briehn. Coby, welcome back.Coby Briehn:Thanks for having me.Bill Godfrey:All right, so today we got something a little bit different for our topic today. We actually have an audience question. The question comes from a former student of ours from an ASIM course, and he says, "I work for a university police department in a city of about a hundred thousand. Our active shooter instructors have a question about setting up tactical. If we only have three or four armed officers on duty, such as the weekends or second shifts or third shifts." And the question is, "if we only have three officers to respond, do we send in a two-officer contact team and keep the third for tactical to manage the city and county officers who respond into the campus? Or do we give up tactical to have our third officer make entry and search for the threat and let the city officer take the lead on running tactical operations?" He goes on to say, "There's been some discussion both ways. There's not a consensus." And he is asking if we could provide a recommendation and the reasoning why we would recommend that as our course of action.So, a number of interesting things here. He's concerned about the shifts where they've only got three or four officers on duty. Okay, so that's first of all. So, obviously, they got backup coming from the city and the county. I'm guessing one of the questions you guys have is, what's our response time for the city and the county? Let's assume the city's going to be right there because the university's in the city, a couple minutes, they're there pretty quick. And for the county, let's say it's a little bit longer, a little over 10 minutes for that. Before we get rolling on thoughts, does anybody have any other questions that they want to ask about it?Kevin Burd:My first question would be, what is the standard policies and procedures that they would operate under? Is everybody who's responding under the same guidance? Is it a countywide response plan? Is it three individual plans? That would probably dictate some of our answers or thoughts on this.Bill Godfrey:I think those are both great questions. And actually, I asked him a couple of those questions and he did give me some additional information. He said that they all three have some common training, but they have different policies and procedures. The university police has adopted the ASIM process. The others haven't gone quite that far. They've had to negotiate some things, so instead of tactical taking up the position and doing staging, they have tactical go to the door and control everything at the door. The other thing that I think is important to mention, is they do not have compatible communication systems. The university police doesn't have the ability to go to the city channels and the city police do not have the ability to go to the university channels. All right? Any other questions before we start talking or who wants to lead off?Jason Kelley:Oh, I'll lead off. This is Jason. I'll lead off. I guess my first concern is, three agencies on three separate channels. If you're going to place a university officer outside the tactical as that third officer, and sending to his contact teams to stop the killing. To me, that probably makes sense. So, they have direct line of communication from tactical to the interior units, additional resources responding. My opinion is, you need to then send a city and county to tactical, to that university officer, so now we have communications for additional responding officers.Bill Godfrey:All right. That's a tough call, right? I mean, you've only got three or four gun-toters to begin with, we're going to minus one to keep them outside to try to coordinate the rest of this response. Coby, what do you think? Two going in real quick with hopefully a couple more coming in a few minutes?Coby Briehn:Right. All good considerations. Off the top of my head, I'm thinking where in the building? Is it a multi-story building? That would lead me towards having somebody there at the doorway or the crisis-site entry to relay that, to follow-on responders, initial responders of, "hey, you're going to the seventh floor," that kind of thing. If you need access passes, all this stuff, getting key cards to them. They may be collecting up key cards from officers that are coming to give to other follow-on responders. You may have to put those relays in place to get officers into the multiple stories, but obviously the communication's going to be the big thing.And if, let's play on the other side of it, if they don't have communication issues or compatibility, then we're simply running individual contact teams that would have no communication, so everybody's going to self-dispatch, which is defeating the entire organizational process. I would hope there's a way to integrate that, having county, state, and city guys all in there, so the radio frequencies are in play. But the goal is to go in and stop the killing, obviously. If you can do that with two or three and then have that fourth or fifth at the door to relay it on as to what they need upstairs or down the hallway, that's going to be the best bet for me, I would believe.Bill Godfrey:All right, Kevin, what's your quick reaction.Kevin Burd:So, a few things are coming to mind here and Coby just touched on it. Where are we in this incident? And what environment are we working in? If we have active stimulus, we obviously have to address that threat, so obviously the first couple officers need to go in. And I think back to a lot of incidents I've been involved in, where we've had to integrate other teams on the tactical side to work together because we weren't sharing the same radio communication. They don't have it in place, but we need to look at, if we don't have it in place, how are we going to integrate that? By leaving somebody from university, as an example, there and the city or the county comes in, we need to integrate because we need to manage this thing at some point. We can't have teams working inside individually, right? Somebody's got to be in charge.So we need to agree...Bill Godfrey:Otherwise we end up blue on blue, we're doing duplicate work. We're missing things.Kevin Burd:Absolutely, a hundred percent. We need to organize that. And I think part of the question was too, do we lose that interoperability or communications when we go inside? Can we operate in there? And the relays that Coby was talking about has come into play in some of these incidents and we need to coordinate all that. Where are we in our priorities? Is it still an active threat or do we not have stimulus? Now we're going into the rescue part, but we have to manage this, right? Somebody has to put the brakes on and manage this scene. And if it's going to be an integrated response, multiple agencies coming, how do we integrate that communications and command so we're all on the same page to avoid those blue on blues and everything else?Bill Godfrey:Sure, sure. I'm going to step back from this question, the specifics of this question, which are very tactical in nature, and I get, and put my chief's hat on and look at the bigger picture here. To me, there's two ongoing problems that the chiefs, the chiefs at the university, the chiefs at the city, the chiefs or the sheriff at the county, that they own and need to solve.Number one, inability to operate on each other's radios. As a guy that spent a number of years working with interoperable radio technology, I can tell you from a technology perspective, we solved this problem 15-20 years ago. There is no reason, even if you're operating on different bands, there is no technical reason that you cannot have one system be connectable to a different system. That is a technical problem that can be solved, probably a dozen different ways and some of those ways of solving that are not expensive.That's to me, problem number one and one of the lowest hanging fruit and the quickest things to fix, is to get that interoperability across their radios fixed immediately. And that's an issue for leadership, that's got to work it out. And there's going to be a little bit of cost there. Who's going to bear that cost and how are they going to divvy up those responsibilities? That might even hit the elected officials or the city manager, the county manager, things like that. That's problem number one.Problem number two, is that they're not all on the same policy and procedure. A police department for a city of a hundred thousand is not a big enough police department that they're going to take care of an active shooter event on their own. They're going to have other agencies and entities from the county and every place else coming in. You need to get everybody on the same policy. Once again, that's a leadership issue, where we need to push through the politics, the relational challenges, history, the biases. We've got to find common ground and get everyone on the same page.And what I would say is, his whole question, the fundamental basis of his question of, can those first three officers go in? Or do I need to sacrifice an officer early on to stay outside? Well, you know what? If you've got interoperability on your radios and everybody's trained on the same process, all those officers can go in because the city guys following behind you are going to know how to set up command. They're going to know how to structure this. They're going to know how to carry on the response. Same thing with the county guys. The problem is when we don't have that, now you're having to make a really difficult choice, which is exactly... And I get that's exactly the debate that's going on, a really difficult choice.But what I hear you guys saying is you got to leave that guy out, that third guy out. And I agree with you because, if everybody goes in and you've got no coms, you're going to be the one isolated. You're going to have no idea what they've done, no idea how they're going to manage it, how they're going to organize the thing. And it's just a prescription for a disaster. Here's the other thing, and I think a couple of you were alluding to this. Coby, when you were talking about the key cards, how many floors is the thing? The university cops know the building. They know the layout, they know the environment, they know the keys, they know the access. They know the notification systems to put the campus on lockdown. If they're all inside, none of that's getting done.I think the lesser of the evils here, from my perspective, is you've got to sacrifice that one extra guy, the last guy, to stay out, begin the incident management process and be that expert on the building to communicate. And then those first couple of officers that get there from the city, you push them in and get them linked up with a team that's already inside. You begin to mix and match, share radios, get one of the city people that stays with the other officer outside. We haven't really talked about that.And let's jump to that. Let's take a pause. Let's assume that one of the campus cops stays outside, takes tactical and is running it at the door. Now city guys come up, they're on a different radio channel. County guys come up, they're on a different radio channel. Guys, talk about how you would see that working at the tactical level.Coby Briehn:How I could see it, sitting here thinking about it, is this question has probably been discussed, like you mentioned, for the last several years. Because if it's a university, then they have sporting events, concerts, things where they've had to work together. I'm hoping that this question has been asked. Another question that would be concerning is, if they're just having dispatch call each other and basically telling dispatch and then dispatch telling the other agencies dispatch over the phone, how things or what they're doing, if we're having... That's the relay system that they have into play. Off the top of my head, when you're having the relays and the multiple radio channel difficulties like I had mentioned earlier, essentially, we're just going into solo responder events then. And so the agencies aren't able to talk to each other and everything's going to get duplicated or missed. That's the options that you have is, it either should have been answered before you go there and have this and the best way to do it without it being answered is, you've got to have communications there to direct it and control it.Jason Kelley:Good point, Coby. To take it a step further, I see additional responding officers from the city or the county are going to link up with the university tactical positions, so you'll have basically, in essence, three tactical positions that are covered from law enforcement. Instead of that tactical transport triage three, we're going to have basically that five, tactical is going to be operating under three personnel. Exactly how we communicate from fire and EMS and law enforcement because they're standing co-located. Same thing would have to happen here. You've got three different radio channels, three people have to stand next to each other in order to communicate. Something comes over city, he can turn to university, he can turn to county, relay that information. Now he can send it out to their contact teams, university sends it out to their contact team and vice versa.Bill Godfrey:Okay. Kevin?Kevin Burd:A few things are going through my mind right now, listening to Coby and Jason talk about this. Number one, we don't want to have this problem the day something happens.Bill Godfrey:Oh boy.Kevin Burd:Training, joint training, regional training. We all need to get on the same page, which goes back to, Bill, you mentioning before about getting in the room. And one of our instructors coined that phrase, "leave the PPE at the door," right? Leave the politics, the personalities, and the egos of the door. Get inside, figure out what the larger response is going to look like, when you have these resource challenges and start gearing your training towards that, so we are on the same page and not figuring this out the day that it comes. Communications-wise, that's been answered for quite some time now. We just need to continue to have those conversations and get on the same page and knowing the environments that we're going to be working in. The university is asking this question and I don't know the answer to this. Have they had joint trainings there? Are they bringing city and county in so they know the environment they're going to be working in? Instead of, and it sounds like they are all together.Bill Godfrey:Hopefully. And are they including fire EMS, their com centers, their emergency management?Kevin Burd:Absolutely. And it actually reminds me of, from the SWAT or the tactical side, drilling that tactical position when SWAT arrives and we start to see that transition into tactical teams. As an example, I would integrate one of our team leaders in that tactical position, so they are in communication face-to-face with that tactical officer because we're working on separate channels and everything else. Vocally for me, we had that discussion, we could move over to a channel that we all share, but that's not the case and the question that's being asked right now. You may have the five headed beast instead of the three headed fluffy that we talk about in some of our trainings.Bill Godfrey:Yeah. All right, I think that's a pretty solid way to answer, provides our reasoning or rationale for it. I do want to pivot to one other piece of this that caught my attention. And that was, that they have their tactical position go up to the door and actually work the door, be door control. Now, let me say, this is of course out of my domain, so I want to come around to you guys to think what you think about that. But the one thing that does occur to me is, doesn't that assume that there's only one door that's going to be in use? And that seems a little odd, especially for large building structures like that. What do you guys think about tactical being right up at the door and trying to control people? Not having staging back away from the scene, but instead having everybody staged right up at the door, trying to organize your teams at the door.Coby Briehn:The problems I see with that are, what we are talking about is, let's presume it's a residence hall where there's going to be multiple entry points. And are the follow-ons all coming to that same entry point? Are they coming into the front door? Are they going into the side door? All that communication has to be relayed out before. I could see dispatches making the calls to other agencies of, go to the A-side, the one side, the front door, right there, and then make that the designated entry. All that communication has to happen before, without the interoperability of the radios or pre-planning of this. What's it going to look like? Well, it's going to be self-dispatch teams going in whatever door they parked in front of and then doing their own thing.Jason Kelley:Got a follow up question to that. Are they putting somebody at the door because of breaching issues or to get into the structure or the building? Or is that just simply where they're positioning their tactical? If it's entry stuff, then obviously they can solve that by either, one, law enforcement conducts actual breaches or key cards or fobs or through the locks, something like that, if that's the case. If it's not, then personally, I don't want to be that close if I'm tactical because you can get sucked into now the incident. All of a sudden, they need some resources right inside the door, and all of a sudden now, they're looking around, who do I need? And all of a sudden, now I'm interjecting myself into the problem, where if I back off, give it a bit more situational awareness and be away from that situation, I can now start managing, organizing and controlling that incident.Bill Godfrey:I think that's a really good question, Jason. And from my reading of the email, what he said was that they're doing that because they don't have the radio com issues. And so instead of using staging, everybody is responding up to the door and they're organizing there and then pushing the teams in. So essentially, they're not just doing tactical at the door, tactical is also doing staging at the door at the same location. Which to me, defeats the purpose and the value of having staging back a little way, so that you can manage your flow of resources and get them assigned. But no, from my reading of the email, they're doing that because of the lack of interoperability on the radios between the different agencies.Jason Kelley:And maybe my response to that is you're going to have to triple up all locations. So, if you're running staging, you're going to have to make sure that you have law enforcement from university, city, county, at probably staging too, to make sure everyone's communications that are getting all that information over. Potentially two thoughts on that.Bill Godfrey:Yeah, Kevin.Kevin Burd:Yeah, I think everyone's hit on it here. The vision in my head is, there's too many at that door. When everyone starts to come, how do we manage all the responding agencies and run basically the tactical triage and transport operations there? And next thing you know, you turn, you've got 10, 20, 40, 50 more people there. And how many times have we been involved, in our careers and incidents, where the command post gets stood up and it's the magnet. Everybody keeps coming to it. And I'm just trying to picture, could that impact the effectiveness of that tactical triage and transport position by now trying to run staging out of the same exact location? There'd be too many voices, too many opinions, too many people. And are we going to start to get overwhelmed with the amount that ends up there? And again, I don't know the resources that may be going there, but I'm envisioning the events, reading the after-action reports, and the tens, if not hundreds of agencies and officers, personnel that are coming to this, and now you're trying to all manage it from one location.Bill Godfrey:Yeah. I'm with you, Kevin. It's very difficult for me to imagine that actually being successful on a real event. I think it would become very overwhelming for whoever's at the door trying to do that very quickly. And the other thing I would point out is, I'd go back to what I said earlier when I put my chief hat on. This is all being driven by a lack of compatibility on a radio, so fix the radio problem. We're not talking hundreds of thousands of dollars to fix this. There are solutions that can be done in the thousands. And even some that can be done that are less than $10,000, that allow you to tie these radio systems together. So to me, there's very difficult tactical decisions here that are being forced because of some, I guess, for a better way to say it, political problems or budget problems, or just a lack of cooperation.I do want to echo though, what you said earlier, Kevin, which is, what's going on with training? And I think all of us would acknowledge in our careers, it's nice when leadership all gets together and sings kumbaya and pushes down the road, shoulder to shoulder. If you guys can't see the faces of the instructors, they're all grinning ear-to-ear right now. Like, "Yeah right, when does that ever happen?" Yeah, and that's the problem. That is the unicorn.But what I think we have all seen, is that when you put the different agencies in the same training and we start to get to know each other and we start to train together, it doesn't happen immediately, but that's when the barriers start to come down. There's a little more cooperation, there's sharing of ideas. There's workarounds that come up, things like that. I just really wanted to echo your comment on getting everybody training together, because I will say, out of my entire career, I think that has been more effective at getting all the Hatfields and the McCoys to play nice with each other, as opposed to trying to dictate it from on high. All right, any other parting thoughts? Coby?Coby Briehn:No, sir. All good, all covered.Bill Godfrey:Jason, anything else you want to add?Jason Kelley:Nothing on my end and I think we touched on it all. And I think it boils down to what you just wrapped up with, it's the training. We just all have to get together, get on the same page and figure out how does it work for our community? Because at the end of the day, are two obstacles, right? Criminal and the clock, and we've got to work together in order to save lives.Bill Godfrey:Yeah, and that, by the way, that effort to work together and deal with those two obstacles, the criminal and the clock, starts with leadership and policy guidance and solving some of these problems.Well, there you have it. I hope that that's helpful to the individual that emailed us in the question. I hope that gives some food for thought and I enjoyed this. This was fun to get a listener question that's a challenge like this. It's a really, really good question.Well gentlemen, thank you very much for being here with us today, ladies and gentlemen, thank you for listening to the podcast. If you haven't subscribed, please click the subscribe button wherever you get your podcast. I want to say thank you to Karla Torres, our producer, for putting this together and making us sound a lot more intelligent than we are. Until next time, stay safe.

fireengineering
Scenes of Violence

fireengineering

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 70:00


Host Steve Hamilton talks with guest Brad Pinsky about issues related to firefighters, EMS, and law enforcement responding to scenes of violence. Sponsored by MagneGrip: https://www.magnegrip.com  

Latino Business Report
A Candid Conversation with Michael Matranga, a School Safety and Active Shooter Response Expert

Latino Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 47:32


Episode 39 - In this episode, Latino Business Report host J.R. Gonzales has a candid conversation about mass shootings with Mike Matranga, CEO of M6 Global, a team of the nation's top security and emotional intelligence experts. According to the Gun Violence Archive, there have been 441 mass shootings in the U.S. as of Aug. 27. One day before that, it was 438. On average this year, there are 13 mass shootings a week. Texas is the state with the second highest number of mass shootings since the organization began tracking them. In the past decade, however, Texas comes in Number One. M6 Global - https://www.m6globaldefense.com/     

The Watchdog
Ohio County Asst Super And WPHS Principal On Active Shooter Video

The Watchdog

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 15:10


Ohio County Asst Super And WPHS Principal On Active Shooter Video by The Watchdog

Active Self Protection Podcast
Armed Shop Manager Defends Employees From Active Shooter! Don (Last Name redacted)

Active Self Protection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 60:26


This week on the Active Self Protection Podcast we sit down with Florida Auto Shop General Manager Don as he recounts the day an active Shooter entered his business shooting his employees multiple times and how he was forced to use his concealed firearm to end the threat. Then we sit down with investigative reporter Stephen Gutowski of thereload.com and discuss the surprising results a recent AP poll asking Americans about their gun ownership and their positions on gun control measures. Active Self Protection exists to help good, sane, sober, moral, prudent people in all walks of life to more effectively protect themselves and their loved ones from criminal violence. On the ASP Podcast you will hear the true stories of life or death self defense encounters from the men and women that lived them. If you are interested in the Second Amendment, self defense and defensive firearms use, martial arts or the use of less lethal tools used in the real world to defend life and family, you will find this show riveting. Join host and career federal agent Mike Willever and the rest of the ASP staff as they talk to real life survivors and hear their stories in depth. You'll hear about these incidents and the self defenders from well before the encounter occurred on through the legal and emotional aftermath. Music: bensound.com

Church Security Made Simple
6. How My Defender Mindset And Firearms Training Prepared Me For The Day I Met An Active Shooter With Stephen Willeford

Church Security Made Simple

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 36:46


In today's episode I'm talking with Stephen Willeford known as either “the barefoot defender” or “the good guy with a gun” Stephen is best known for tackling and shooting back at an armed shooter during the deadliest mass church shooting in U.S history. November 2017 at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs Texas 26 people lost their lives at the hands of an armed shooter. This conversation takes a slightly different approach to dive deep into the mindset of taking the life of another person. Join our next 5-week group coaching program: https://www.worshipsecurity.org/group-coaching Become a member of our video library: https://www.worshipsecurity.org/videocoach Season sponsor - Bullis Insurance: http://www.bullisagency.com/

The Jayme & Grayson Podcast
Active shooter drill in Omaha goes wrong, who's to blame? - HR1

The Jayme & Grayson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 41:13


Retail Sales Motivation Podcast
Run, Hide, Fight

Retail Sales Motivation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 20:34


When we are confronted with things that make us uncomfortable, we typically do whatever we can to avoid the pain. I thought about this as I completed my store's training for how to handle active shooter emergencies.

Dave and Dujanovic
Back to school: DIY at home active shooter drills

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 19:23


A deep dive into DIY at-home active shooter drills. A mom's video of her training her 5 year old son is catching our attention too.Her heart seems to be in the right place, but Deb worries she may be inadvertently given him bad advice. Wyatt Weber, UHP Department of Public Safety and active shooting trainer joins the show to discuss See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

InForum Minute
Morning headlines: Cass County Sheriff's Office conducting active shooter training in Casselton

InForum Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 4:00


Today is Wednesday, Aug. 17. Here are your top stories from around the Fargo, North Dakota area.  InForum Minute is a product of Forum Communications, brought to you by reporters from The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead and WDAY TV. For more news from throughout the day, go to InForum.com.

The Sovereign Man Podcast
SMP EP53 Ernest Emerson -- Bad Guy With A Gun -- How To Survive The Attack Of An Active Shooter

The Sovereign Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 87:04


“Faith is what will give you the courage to do something when you know that it may be the last thing that you ever do.” - Ernest Emerson “Don't pray for an easier life, pray for stronger men.” - John F. Kennedy Ernest Emerson is the man who designed the tactical folding knife used by the Navy Seals. He's a martial artist who's been instructing hand-to-hand combat for over 30 years to likes of the Navy Seals, law enforcement, London Guards and many other elite groups of warriors. The wealth of knowledge and experience he's gained has been captured in his new book, Bad Guy With A Gun: How To Survive The Attack Of An Active Shooter. With topics such as The Protocols of Action, the Process of an Attack, the Dangers of the Bias for Normalcy, the Principles of Pre-Emptive Self-Defense and the knowledge of Active Counter Measures, you will be prepared if you ever encounter extreme violence. The book is endorsed by several U.S. Navy Seals and combat specialists including JiuJitsu legend, Royce Gracie and former U.S. Navy Seal, Leif Babin who co-author the book Extreme Ownership with Jocko Willink. You can find the book on Amazon. Ernest Emerson is also the creator of Emerson Knives in Harbour City, California. Emerson Knives have set the standard for tactical knives used by elite military and law enforcement units around the world.   https://emersonknives.com/   Check out the Sovereign Circle or the Battle Ready program at https://www.sovereignman.ca/. While you're there, check out the store for Sovereign Man t-shirts, hats, and books.

VPR News Podcast
State police want Vermonters to be prepared for an active shooter incident

VPR News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 5:02


The Vermont State Police are offering a series of forums in August to train people how to react to an active shooter.

Sling'N Lead
Episode 114: Prepping for Active Shooter - Mass Casualty

Sling'N Lead

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 117:23


We spoke in depth about the Uvalde shooting last week. This week, we want to focus the conversation around what you can do as an individual to prepare.  We've got MERCH!!!https://teespring.com/stores/slingnleadpodcastGet your medical kit from Dark Angel Medical. Use code "bb15" for 15% off your order and enter "Sling'N Lead Podcast" in the show notes. If you missed the live show be sure to catch us on Apple Podcast, Spotify, BuzzSprout, and of course here on YouTube. Green Mountain Defense Website:greenmountaindefense.com/Subscribe to our channelsLead Sling 'N Gingerhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeJX...Green Mountain Defensehttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIAf...As always be sure to like, share, and subscribe. If you have questions or comments please post them below. All firearms were checked, cleared, and rendered safe prior to filming. We are not lawyers. At no time is any of the commentary presented on this channel to be considered legal advice. Always check local, state, federal laws for your area and consult with an attorney for more information. All statements, comments, answers, and input are solely those of the originating person and in no way represent the views and opinions on any one organization or company. Unless otherwise specified in the video, all products being reviewed or discussed (including those from channel partners or contributors) are paid for with our own money.

Federal Newscast
IG says 'inconsistent' Pentagon policy on active shooters could make things worse

Federal Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 9:01 Transcription Available


(8/12/22) - In today's Federal Newscast: The IG warns an inconsistent DoD policy on active shooters could be deadly. The union for letter carriers contends USPS is way understaffed. And the Navy and the state of Hawaii join forces to clean-up the military's mess in Paradise.

Gray Beard Chronicles Podcast
GBC #161 - Active Shooter Attack Prevention and Preparedness with FBI SSA Aaron Snyder

Gray Beard Chronicles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 48:01


Active shooter and mass shooting situations have become all too common in our society today. It's important to know what to do should you find yourself in one of these situations and MORE IMPORTANTLY what to pay attention to, etc. to prevent these from happening when clues present themselves. Join the Gray Beards for this fast paced and informative conversation with FBI Supervisory Special Agent Aaron Snyder as he shares his knowledge and expertise on this subject and more. Enjoy!!! For more information on the resources mentioned, see below: safe2tell.org sandyhookpromise.org  tips.fbi.gov, 1-800-TELL-FBI fbi.gov/about/partnerships/office-of-partner-engagement/active-shooter-resources www.dontnamethem.org  

Podcast | PreparedEx
Preparing Organizations for Active Shooter Situations – An Interview with Scott Hemingway

Podcast | PreparedEx

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 35:36


In Episode 103 of the podcast Rob interviewed Scott Hemingway who is the Director of Security at the Signature Healthcare system and runs The Hemingway Group a security consulting firm. It was humbling to hear Scott talk about his recent visit to Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Additionally, Scott spoke about the importance of […] The post Preparing Organizations for Active Shooter Situations – An Interview with Scott Hemingway appeared first on PreparedEx.

DTFF: The Volunteer Firefighter Podcast - Down To Fight Fire
E199 - Active Shooter Stop The Bleed, Keremeos Creek Wildfire Update

DTFF: The Volunteer Firefighter Podcast - Down To Fight Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 47:47


E199 - Active Shooter Stop The Bleed, Keremeos Creek Wildfire Update This week we sat down and debriefed a Stop The Bleed session Todd and Scott put on, got an update on the Keremeous Creek Wildfire and were interrupted with a few calls and had to cut the Podcast short. Apologies to all our Shout Outs, we will make up for it next week! As a group of Rural Volunteer Firefighters, our Fire Department has built our firefighter training from both old and new tactics in the fire service and adapted them to fit the realities of equipment, manpower, and costs around what our community requires. WHAT WE DO We create video, audio and written word content to share these training and tactics methods with our Brothers and Sisters in our extended fire families, and to showcase to those that may be interested in becoming firefighters the fun you can have and the amazing skills and abilities you get to learn, whilst keeping the lives of the people around you safe! WHY WE SHARE Firefighters are problem solvers whose role requires them to be on their best day whilst others are having their worst day, and while we do not claim to be perfect we are willing to put our lives on the line to try. It's during the trying that we continue to develop the mindset, tactics, and training that allow us to be effective, safe and successful where it's needed the most, and by sharing our experiences we hope that it may help other Fire Departments in creating what works for them to help bring everyone home safe. THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT If you would like to help support us then you can visit us by clicking the link to your favorite social media platform below to Subscribe and be the first to see more of our content! Stay Safe Fire Family and Stay DTFF! JOIN OUR FIRE FAMILY - Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/VFFPodcastDTFF/ - Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/dtffpodcast/?hl=en - YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBnJUapYv-APV_vavv_nTLQ/ - TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@downtofightfire - LinedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dtff-the-volunteer-firefighter-podcast-6b8b12199/ WHAT WE HIGHLIGHT IN OUR CONTENT Firefighter Training Firefighter Tactics Firefighter Interviews Firefighter Wellness & Mental Health Leadership Product Reviews Product Discounts CAUSES WE SUPPORT - https://www.StopTheBleed.org/ - Learn how to Stop The Bleed TODAY and get better prepared to save your life and the lives of those around you TOOLS & EQUIPMENT WE LIKE - DISCOUNT CODES - https://ca.motisfirerescue.com/ - Snagger (hose handling) Tool, Wedges, kit pouches and more! MOTIS Discount Code: Use the code DTFF5 to save 5% off your order - https://ignitionusa.us/ - Soft entry tools! SEARAT Discount Code: Use the code DTFF2020 for 20% off your order #DTFFpodcast #DownToFightFire #Firefighting #Volunteer #Firefighter #FireFamily #Firefighters #EMS #Rescue #Fire #Emergency #FireDepartment #FirstResponders #Firedept #FireDepartment #FireHouse #FireRescue #ThinRedLine #FireService #BrotherHood #SisterHood #FireFighterLife #Fireman #VolunteerFirefighter #VolunteerFirefighters #StopTheBleed #StayDTFF

Becker’s Healthcare - Clinical Leadership Podcast
Nurses sue AdventHealth over active shooter drill they thought was real; 7 healthcare takeaways from Senate Democrats' newly passed $739B landmark bill

Becker’s Healthcare - Clinical Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 6:38


The Joe Pags Show
Mall of America Possible Active Shooter - Aug 4 Hr 1

The Joe Pags Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 43:21


Mall of America has a Possible Active Shooter, WNBA Star Brittney Griner is SENTENCED to 9 1/2 Years in Russian Prison, PLUS-- Sheriff Mark Lamb joins Pags on the AZ Voting Issues. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Boss Hog of Liberty
263: Patty Broyles: What matters in a City? Active Shooter Response

The Boss Hog of Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 79:00


Episode 263 of Boss Hog of Liberty is out! It's a hyper local episode covering the future of New Castle Indiana. Jeremiah Morrell, Dakota Davis, Zach Burcham, Patty Broyles, and Mike Broyles are the voices in your ear. Candidates are going to be filing in the next few months for every city election race. What issues are going to matter? We talk about downtown, investments, parks and paths. What makes a community livable? How does a city government influence that? The local schools are back in session. There was an active shooter alert that had police and local officials clearing every elementary school in town. We attempt to make sense of it all. Our program is community supported on Patreon. Do your part by chipping into the cause by donating monthly at any level at www.patreon.com/bosshogofliberty and receive even more BONUS coverage and content. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Harden Up Podcast
Ep 29: Chris on Active Shooter Response

The Harden Up Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 53:38


In this episode Matt talks with one of the OpTempo instructors about active shooter events. Listen in as Chris, a law enforcement active shooter subject matter expert, discusses the history of active shooter incidents, the evolution of the law enforcement response, and what you can do to be better prepared for the unthinkable. The OpTempo Training Group website for an updated list of classes:https://optempotraining.com/@optempotraining on Instagram and FacebookFind us on Youtube at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4kBpYUjDdve9BULTHRF2Bw/featured?view_as=subscriberLowa BootsIG: @lowa.professional and @lowabootshttps://www.lowaboots.com/

C3 Podcast: Active Shooter Incident Management
Ep 50: Implementing the ASIM Process

C3 Podcast: Active Shooter Incident Management

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 48:28


Ep 50: Implementing the ASIM ProcessSheriff Michelle Cook and Police Chief Terry Nichols share their experiences implementing the Active Shooter Incident Management Checklist process and their tips for success. Don't miss this discussion!Bill Godfrey:Welcome to the Active Shooter Incident Management Podcast. It's good to be back with you today. My name is Bill Godfrey. I'm your podcast host, and I have with me today two former C3 instructors as our guest stars today, both of them law enforcement leaders, and hoping that one day when they do retire-retire, we might actually get them back as C3 instructors; hint hint, Chief Nichols, who just retired in the last few weeks. So I have with me Michelle Cook. She is currently serving as the Sheriff in Clay County. She also did ... Michelle was almost 30 years at Jacksonville?Michelle Cook:26 years at Jacksonville, yeah.Bill Godfrey:Yeah, so 26 years at Jacksonville Sheriff's Office Police Department as the operations chief, so she had an awful lot of responsibility there. Did a short stint as the Police Chief at Atlantic Beach, which was kind of a retirement job, but too easy for you. You needed something with more, and so now she's the elected Sheriff at Clay County, which is in north Florida. And we have with us Terry Nichols. Terry was the Assistant Director at Alert from the founding to, what was it? 2018, 20-Terry Nichols:2016, 2016.Bill Godfrey:2016. Left Alert, became the Police Chief in Brownwood, Texas, and then you did, what, a little over three years there?Terry Nichols:Three years there, and then moved to Seguin as chief, and spent three years there, and now I'm retiredBill Godfrey:Like a week and a half ago, two weeks ago? It's been pretty recent.Terry Nichols:It's been a month, it's been a month.Bill Godfrey:So it's exciting to have both of you here. I really appreciate you taking the time. I know the sheriff especially, you have a very busy schedule. But I wanted to have a podcast where we talk about implementing the Active Shooter Incident Management checklist and the process that goes with it. Because it sounds simple on the surface, and when you've gone through training, it's fairly straightforward, but trying to roll that out to a whole organization is a little bit of a logistics machine.And the two of you have each done this, not only in your organizations, but you've done it more than once. So sheriff, you did it at Jacksonville, then did it at Atlantic Beach, now at Clay County, and Terry, you did it at both Brownwood and Seguin. So what I wanted to just get from you guys is, what was it about this process that made you say, "This is the way I want to go," and what were your lessons learned? How did you approach it and go along the way? So sheriff, you want to start us off?Michelle Cook:Sure. First of all, thank you for having me today to talk about this. I'm very passionate about this. You've asked why ASIM, why choose this method of managing an active shooter event, and I will tell you, I'm entering into my 30th year of law enforcement, and I've worked some huge cases, some huge incidents, thousands of them, and for me, being a street cop for so long and then the leader of street cops, the ASIM process, the ASIM methodology, it just makes sense.In our industry, and Terry, correct me if you see differently, we teach young officers, young supervisors, to handle everything themselves. And on 99% of the calls that we handle, that can be done, but on a mass critical incident, like an active shooter event, relying on one person to handle everything is just unrealistic, and that's how things get missed, and unfortunately, that's how people die, is you got one person trying to handle everything.Terry Nichols:Yeah. For me, everything the sheriff said makes perfect sense, and she is spot on. Having been involved with Alert and standing it up from the get go, driving it post-Columbine, and how we were training cops, and then fast-forward several years and get introduced to the ASIM model, and realizing we had been missing the boat early on. When we started first training our officers, we were missing the management piece of this. We were doing good at going in and realizing that we have a different duty. There's no longer sit and wait for SWAT, that we had a different mission on these active shooter events.But there's a whole management piece of this, and like the sheriff alluded to, that we're real good at teaching cops to go handle a problem by themselves, and they do it 9 times out of 10, but these events are catastrophic. They are geographical in nature. It doesn't just happen in a vacuum in one little place, and it takes significant resource management being trained to do that, and that the ASIM, I was just pulled to it and said it makes all the sense in the world.Bill Godfrey:Well, it's very humbling to hear that, and I'm thrilled that you guys ... I was thrilled to have both of you as instructors and as founding members, if you will, of what we were doing a very, very long time ago. Terry, when you were at Alert, you had a hand in helping us get the pilot up and running, and Michelle attended one of the very first pilots. Wait, in fact, I think it was the very first pilot delivery we did for certification, when we did it at Seminole County, so you guys have certainly been on the road with us for a long time. Terry, what was your strategy? So Brownwood, you might want to ... Brownwood was a little more rural, Seguin's a little more suburban. What was your strategy when you wanted to implement it the first time around, and then how did that change for you the second time around?Terry Nichols:I want to back up to something that you said on the intro too, if I can remember what it was now, that it's not just an agency that we implemented these in, it was a geographical area. So it was multiple agencies.Bill Godfrey:Good point.Terry Nichols:Yeah, I may have been the Chief of Brownwood, but I had the Sheriff's Department, and I had two of the law enforcement agencies right there in the county as well, and it was very rural. If you look at Brownwood, Texas on a map, it is in the geographical center of Texas, and I tell people, "You go out to nowhere and turn left, and you're in Brownwood," and not a lot of resources out there.Our closest big city is Abilene, Texas, and that's an hour away. But I knew, A, the need when I got there. I saw the quick needs assessment that we had no active shooter training. We had nothing. We had zero partnership with our fire and EMS partners, we had a third-party EMS provider, we were not working with our Sheriff's Department who was in the same building as us, so a lot of basic leadership stuff.And it was fun to bring the ASIM stuff to us, and we did it through Counterstrike first. That's how we introduced it to the organization, but we brought in the Sheriff's Department and other law enforcement agencies in the county. And that brought us all together, where they weren't playing in the sandbox prior to me getting there for multiple reasons, but this was something we could all gather around and actually embrace.And that really helped build relationships and, "Hey, we're not that bad. Hey, the people across the hall, hey, they're not that bad. They wear a brown uniform, we wear a blue uniform." So but it's also a rule. What we had is what we had, and help was a long way away. So we introduced it through Counterstrike, and then we did ASIM and the checklist, and we recurred training on it, and it was a success.Bill Godfrey:Sheriff, your first implementation was at Jacksonville, which, contrasting to Brownwood, is about as big as ... it's a big job. What was your strategy there? I know you had to play the long game. It took a while, but talk a little bit about what you did at Jacksonville.Michelle Cook:Sure. So in Jacksonville, the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office actually, at the time, was the 25th largest agency in the country, so a large agency. And what we decided to do is offer the ASIM class to those who wanted it first, because we thought if we could get those folks who are interested in it to buy into it, then they could go out and help sell it to the rest of the agency. And that really, for us, worked out good, because we ended up with ASIM disciples, is what I call them, and those are folks who were all in, who, on the street, if somebody had a question, they could speak to what ASIM was, and the benefits of it, and stuff like that.So it took us several years. We had to get through about 1,400 people trained, so it took us several years, several training cycles, to get everybody through. Contrast that to ... Let me go back. In Jacksonville, we also had a really close relationship with the fire department, and so they were in on the training from the beginning with us, and that was very, very beneficial.In fact, I think it was in Jacksonville, we started using rescue task forces at special events, and that was a chance for us to practice a concept with our police and fire working together on all of our pre-planned special events, so when the the day did come that we had an active shooter, we would be prepared to ... and we wouldn't have to stop and explain to people what a rescue task force was, so that worked out really well.And we had the active shooter incident at The Landing, and we got fortunate that day because there was actually a fire department unit training a block away. But if you go back and you listen to the radio broadcast, and you listen, and you read the after-action reports, it was very clear that not only the active shooter tactical training that we had been practicing and training so hard for worked, but also, the Active Shooter Incident Management portion of that trained, and people fell right into place.And so it was really ... I had just left when that happened, but it was very gratifying to see all that hard work going into saving people's lives. So move forward to Atlantic Beach, again, much like Terry, a very small agency. We had 30 people total, including myself, and for me, I incorporated not only some of the fire department folks again in this, but public works. Our public works folks had a big presence out there in the city of Atlanta Beach, and so they were pulled into some of the safer jobs, and we trained with public works on these things, and safety...Bill Godfrey:Okay, well, we're not going to let you get away with that that easy. You're going to have to tell a little bit about what you did, and why, and how it worked out.Michelle Cook:So what we did is we got the public works guys because ... specifically the school, but other locations as well, we had ... Atlantic Beach is a beach town, so there's lots of roads leading in, and one of the concerns we had is that when something happened, that traffic would be backed up and blocked so bad that we would not be able to get mutual aid or fire rescue into the scene.So we train the public works guys on how to use their big trucks to hold traffic positions until relieved by a law enforcement officer, and again, they were instrumental and vital to our plan out there, and talking about building relationships and everybody being on the same page. So that worked out really good. Small agency, limited resources. We-Bill Godfrey:Did you get any pushback from the public works guys and gals, or were they pretty excited about it?Michelle Cook:Oh, they were having a blast. We also incorporated them, just on a side note, in our search for missing people. As soon as we had a missing person call go out in the city of Atlantic Beach, our publics works people would getting notified on their phones that we were looking for missing persons, and so they would also help us look for missing people. So it was really just, you go back to, if you have limited resources, if you're in a jurisdiction then you have limited resources, there are other groups that you can pull in safely to help augment or supplement your agency.Bill Godfrey:Sure, sure.Michelle Cook:Yeah, so that...Bill Godfrey:So how did your approach ... Other than the public works, what was the big glaring differences for you implementing it at Atlantic Beach, versus implementing ASIM at the Atlantic Beach versus Jacksonville?Michelle Cook:You know, Jacksonville, there was always the potential for over-convergence just from get go, just because of the sheer number of resources in Duval County. In Atlantic Beach, it was the exact opposite. How long do we have to wait until help gets here, and then how do you manage so much mutual aid? Because in Atlantic Beach, we would have Neptune Beach, Jacks Beach, Jacksonville, Mayport police, all potentially responding, all with different communication, radio channels.And so we had to make sure that when we developed our plan in Atlantic Beach, that all those surrounding agencies knew what our plan was, so that if and when something did happen, they would know what radio frequency to go to. Where would staging be? We preset all those ahead of time so that would be no question day of, and that's the value of a smaller jurisdiction, is you can do a lot of that ahead of time.Bill Godfrey:Yeah, you really regionalized your approach, which Terry mentioned even at Brownwood and bringing some of the others in. Terry, when you went over to Seguin, what did you do a little bit differently there at that one? And talk a little bit about how you stepped outside of the city to bring in your regional partners, similar to what Michelle was just talking about.Terry Nichols:Yeah, pretty much the same thing. The good news is we had a great relationship with the fire department there. It's a larger organization. I say larger. We had 60 sworn at the time, but we're a lot closer ... San Antonio's, a rock throw away, Austin's an hour away, San Marcos is close. So we have a lot of resources, and in the Braunfels real close to us if we need them.One thing that this community had lived through was Sutherland Springs. We had first responders ... Sutherland Springs was literally 15 miles, 20 miles, from Seguin, so we had first responders that actually went down there that day. So it was very close to Seguin, meaning and close to their heart. They did not have ASIM, though. They did not have any training. Most of them had been through Alert or some level of tactical training. The tactical piece of it, the sheriff mentioned, but nobody had the management piece.So I took what I did in Brownwood, and we invested in the Counterstrike and they ran everybody through Counterstrike first. Then we brought in an ASIM advance class, and that's when we really got the buy-in. There were already a group going on countywide, they met monthly. An integrated response group, it was run by the county Fire Marshal's Office, and they would meet monthly, and they would meet, and they would sit around and talk about the same thing over and over and over. And then I became chief there, and they all look at me like, "Oh my God, look what just walked in the door. We've got somebody that"-Bill Godfrey:Fresh meat.Terry Nichols:"That knows what they're doing, that'll come rescue us." So we started getting some synergy going there with that, and then the ASIM advanced that we hosted not long before I left, we were lucky enough to get really solidified, because we filled that class. It was great to see so many people.And I got a text on July 4th from the assistant fire chief saying that, "We have a huge parade July 4th in Seguin," and that's largest one in Texas. But, just what the sheriff mentioned, they had rescue task forces stood up, an IEP, the whole thing that ... I'd been walking them through, doing this slowly, baby steps, but they had done it for the parade, and he was so proud of himself, and I'm so proud of them.He said, "Look at your legacy, what you've left behind." I was like, I didn't do anything. I just came and got the ball rolling. You guys now go with it. But it's come time for both places to test, and that I think that, we'll talk about some challenges in a minute, but it's come time to start to test it. Don't wait for game day. We need to start testing these things.Bill Godfrey:Yeah, and it's funny, both of you have talked about opportunities to exercise and practice, I shouldn't use the word exercise, but to practice some of these concepts in your special events and pre-planned events, and I know that that's a huge part of socialization and absolutely a best practice.And before I move on, I do want to comment for the audience, if you're wondering why these two both had ASIM advances, they were both leaders who contacted us and said, "If you ever have a last-minute cancellation, all I need is two weeks notice and I can make it work," and that's how both of them got ASIM classes. They picked up cancellation slots that came in from others on short notice.But sheriff, I know that you started off by doing the RTFs, and the idea of contact teams in your IEPs for special events, and for the football games, and things like that in Jacksonville, but not too long after that, you took that a step further, certainly at clay county, I know you've began incorporating some of these practices into other calls not active shooter. Can you talk a little bit about that?Michelle Cook:Sure. So it actually ... the guys in Atlantic Beach started it, and it's carried forward to Clay County, and I really think this is going to end up being a best practice. And so what we've done is, on priority-one calls, where we have an active scene that's dynamic and fluid, whoever is tactical declares tactical, and they have command of the hot zone.So whether it's a burglary in progress to a store, or a fire at a house, or a gas leak, the person that's going to drive the resources to specific tasks based on an overall strategy declares tactical, and then our incident commander goes down the road and declares command, and then supports tactical.And this is really ... like I said, this happened organically in both agencies, but I think it's going to end up being a best practice for us, is this allows the men and women in uniform to use the terminology, use the concepts, and it won't be foreign to them, God forbid, if something ever happened. So they're using it on priority-one calls now.Bill Godfrey:I think that's fabulous, and the history of the fire service, and I know we all like to make fun, the fire department will set up incident command on a barking dog call. And yeah, true, but that's actually how we got everybody to understand it. When the ICS structure first started coming out in the late 70s and then rolled into the 80s, and people started stepping up and taking notice, the way we got it indoctrinated culturally was we used it on everything.Overkill? Yeah. Was it necessary? Probably not, but did it expedite the cultural integration and locking that in? And it really did. And I know we've had some conversations about the idea of morphing the Active Shooter Incident Management checklist process into something that's a little more generic, like a generic response posture to violent events or potentially-violent events, and I wonder if you could comment on that?So on the fire service, we have alarm levels. So what we send to a residential structure fire is different than what we send to a commercial structure fire, and when we escalate that and call for more resources, and so that's that standard package. And it seems to me like there might be a real good argument and a logical application for something like that, a standard response protocol for hostile events or potentially-violent events on law enforcement. What are the two of you think about that?Terry Nichols:You know, I can agree. I think that's a great best practice, sheriff, and I commend you for it. I think Seguin, we could have certainly done that in Seguin, and hopefully a little more naturally; like you said, organically. What I think we saw that the cops have been missing, the officers have been missing, is the actual practical application of ICS. Everybody's done the 100, the 200, 300, all of the classes, and we all...Bill Godfrey:Nobody shared answers.Terry Nichols:Yeah, they never share answers, but they never seen the practical application of it, and that's what ASIM brings you, or that's what the Counterstrike tool brings them, is a practical application? "Okay, I see how this is supposed to work now," but you've got to go out and now practice it, and if you can incorporate it into your priority-one-type calls or something like that, I think that's brilliant to be able to do something like that, because it just further ingrains that it should be second nature. when the big one, when that day happens, it's already ingrained in the organizational culture.Bill Godfrey:Good point. Sheriff, what are your thoughts?Michelle Cook:You know, I would agree. The challenge we have in law enforcement is ... because every call that we go on is so different, and to broad brush, saying, "Okay, all of these types of calls, you have to do this," it can be a double-edged sword. So I liked the fact that, at least in my agencies, it happened organically, and when the troops buy in, then you don't have to ram it down their throat; it's better all the way around.But I would love to see some sort of standardization, maybe at each state level, and using the lingo of each state to implement a standard hostile encounter response, or priority-one response, or whatever you want to call it. The challenge for us is, a priority-one call can be somebody shot, to a burglary in progress, to a car crash, to ... So I like it. I'm just not quite sure on how to execute it yet.Bill Godfrey:Yeah, I think it's one of those ideas that we ... Let's face it. Both of our industries are not necessarily known for changing quickly. In the fire service, and you guys have heard me say this before, we have a saying, "200 years of tradition unimpeded by progress," and we mean that. But I think this is one of those places where it's an idea, but we need to take time. I think we need to see what begins to develop organically, what works. Where's the stickiness in an organization? What types of incidents or responses does it make sense, and where doesn't it make sense?think we just have to take our time with it, but it's an interesting idea that I want to keep talking about as we move forward. So let me ask both of you this. What, if anything, when you were implementing the ASIM process at any of either of your agencies, what caught you by surprise, or were some lessons learned, or advice that you would give to other law enforcement leaders like yourself, who are wanting to go down this path? Sheriff, you want to start?Michelle Cook:Sure. My advice would be find ASIM disciples first. Let them buy in and help sell it, versus forcing everybody to go to classes right off the bat. Understand that ASIM is a perishable skill, so if you're not using it on the street for your priority-one calls, you have to find other ways to continue the dialogue.And that can include using some of the concepts on pre-planned events. For us, it includes ... we have written out manuscripts, responses, for some of our larger churches and mall, and our personnel read them. And we got this idea from, actually, the Blue Angels, and before every flight, they sit down and they verbally talk about what they're going to do during flight. And so we sit down and we verbally articulate, "If my role is tactical, this is what I'm doing. If I'm a contact team, this is what I'm doing," and that seems to keep the skills fresh.We've also put together some PowerPoints where we have little pieces moving, kind of like the Counterstrike board moving, and then we have people talking about what's happening; again, pushing the concepts out. So my advice would be find ASIM disciples, then push it out to everybody, and then find creative ways to keep the conversation going regularly. And before we get off this podcast, Bill, I want to talk about something exciting that's happening in Clay County right now as we speak, so don't let me forget that.Bill Godfrey:Okay, I'm going to make myself a note. Terry, how about you? What were the surprises or lessons learned or advice that you would offer something to another law enforcement leader?Terry Nichols:In Brownwood, I walked into, I mentioned earlier, a, I won't say adversarial community, but everybody wasn't getting along, and I used it as a tool to bring everybody together. So I thought it was very useful that way. Now see, the fire department, they got along, but they didn't work together. They knew each other, but they didn't get ... that was it. They was the fireman, we're the police officers. But I used it as a unique tool to bring everybody together, and I thought that was unique.I agree with the disciples, or ambassadors, as I often refer to them, as somebody that will go out there and carry that brand. They're passionate about it. They're just passionate as I am, as you are, as the sheriff is, and so many other folks around. Our new ... Our. The city's new assistant fire chief is one of those ambassadors. He was a hire about eight months before I left, and he came from a neighboring agency, and he is an absolute ambassador.He told me at my retirement reception, he's like, "You're part of the reason I came over here, and now you're leaving." He's relating, "I'm passionate about this Active Shooter Incident Management stuff, and you were here, and I was like, 'All right, what a great opportunity.'" I said, "Sorry, dude, it's that time. 33 years is enough time."And I have to agree with you, we did not have the practice at either organization down, like the sheriff explained. We did not have that ongoing, and I learned that the hard way in Brownwood. When we get to that story, I'll tell you that later on, that it is a perishable skill, and you've got to figure out some ways, some unique ways, to continue to get the information out and rehearse, refresh, that going on. And with the events in Texas in the past couple months, I don't think that's going to be hard to do to get that refresher stuff going.Bill Godfrey:Yeah, do you want to go ahead and talk about what you learned in Brownwood about the retention in perishable skills?Terry Nichols:Yeah, so we ran Counterstrike. We did not have the ASIM yet, but we ran Counterstrike. Everybody through the Sheriff's Department, third-party ambulance provider, the hospital, staff attended, everybody. And then a month later, we held an exercise at the school. No SIMS, nothing like that, it was all moulage. We had actually role-players, Moulage, and the hospital was involved.So we did transports, they tested their MCI surge capability. It worked great, and I think our out-the-door time for the first patient was like 20 minutes. It was remarkable. For having only done it, and we had just trained the month before, so it was great, the sad part, we had lost an officer the week before that to an off-duty traffic collision, and I almost canceled the event simply because of that. We had a lot of trauma we were going through as an organization. We didn't, I'm glad we didn't, because it really brought us all back together focused on our mission.The next year, my intentions are always great, but you're not judged by your intention. My intention was to do followup training the following year, that spring, and do another exercise at the school, change it up slightly, and get the hospital, everybody, involved. We never got around to the refresher training. This happened, the world happened, everything happened, but we still did the exercise. My fire chief had pretty much checked out mentally. He just wasn't that engaged. Our out-of-the-building time for our first casualty was like 50 minutes. It was 50 minutes.Bill Godfrey:50? Five zero?Terry Nichols:Yeah, five zero, which, to me, was absolute failure, catastrophic failure. It's like, what happened? And it was a lack of recurring training, is what boils down to. People had forgotten their roles, they'd forgotten ... they had the checklist, they had in front of them, but they'd forgotten how to do the basic fundamental things, the basic fundamental piece of this.So the good lesson learned, keeping that buy-in from those ambassadors, especially the agency heads, I would think that I could sit across from my fire chief, and I could in Seguin, and have a very candid conversation. It was not quite that same way in Brownwood, as it turned out to be. That was part of the issue I faced.The other issue is my own, I had to own it, that I did not continue to push the training. Life happened, other things happened, and I did not make it a top priority as it should have been, and we saw the outcome of that during that exercise, and I was just as mad as a hornet. I was just absolutely furious at myself, not at the performance of my troops, because they did the best they could. It was at me for not doing that refresher training.Bill Godfrey:Powerful story. Sheriff, anything that you want to add on that before I come back to what's going on there at Clay County?Michelle Cook:I'm with Terry. This is a perishable skill all day long, and you've got to find creative ways to continue the conversations. To think that you're going to bring in a class one time, and somehow people are going to retain it, that's just not going to work. You got to continue the conversations, whether it's the Counterstrike board. For us, it's reading scripts and PowerPoints, and handling priority-one calls using ASIM concepts. Also, the preplanned events, using as many concepts as we can during the preplanned event, and that's how you keep the conversations fresh.Bill Godfrey:Yeah, I completely agree. So tell us a little bit about what's going on there at Clay that you're excited about.Michelle Cook:So really thrilled about this. We were actually having these conversations before Uvalde, and Uvalde really just cemented our commitment to them. So in Clay County, like all school districts across America, our school board came up with a reunification plan, which sounded great on paper. It looks fantastic in this big ring binder that nobody's ever going to look at. So I brought in the county emergency manager, the safety director for the school board, and the school board police chief, and said, "Guys, we have our plan, you have your plan, the schools have their plan. None of us know each other's plan."So right now, what we're doing is we're hosting, I think we're up to 51 meetings. We're bringing school administrators in; the superintendent; fire rescue; the police agency if it's in a municipality, and we bring that jurisdiction in; the school resource officers; the school board police; the safety director for the school board; my patrol division; my special events division, and my traffic division. And we'll have anywhere from 20 to 30 people in the room, and we put the school up on the board and we say, "Okay, this is Clay High School. All right, so school administrators, what is your lockdown ... what is your policy?"So they tell us what their policy is, and then we talk about what to expect from us. "You're going to have solo officer response. You may see something called a contact team. What do you ... We've made an agreement on where we're going to keep extra weapons and other items locked in the school, so where is that location? How do we turn off your alarms in your school?" And then we challenge our traffic guys, "What intersections do you have to own to lock this school down?"And then to the school people, "How are we going to ... Let's talk about reunification. What does that look like?" And then we tell them, "Hey, this is what our contact teams are going to be doing. This is what our rescue task forces are going to be doing. There's a position called tactical, and if you can find that person safely and provide information on who the suspect is, where they're at, go find that person. This is what's going to be happening at the command post."So we tell them all of that, and really, what we've done is we've taken the individual school plans, we've taken the school board police response plan, we've taken the fire response plan, we've taken our plan. We've really molded it into a document, and since I've been driving the conversations from the beginning, they're very ASIM-centric. And the documents are just a few pages, and I could literally ...We've identified, for example, all the intersections in the area that we need to control. "I'm not telling you on game day which direction to push traffic, but these are the intersections that we have to control." So we have a single sheet of paper, it lists each intersection, and then how many deputies it takes to control that intersection. So if Terry's coming in for mutual aid, and I can pull off this sheet of paper and hand it to Terry and say, "You've got traffic."So we've done this with our schools. We're about 12 or so schools in now that we've been holding these meetings, and I tell you, the sense of cooperation, coordination, the understanding of ASIM, because we tell them, "You guys locking down and us neutralizing the bad guy is really just the beginning. There's going to be so much more that has to happen," and opening their eyes of what to expect from us, what we can expect from them, and we're calling it the Clay County CHIRP plan, CHIRP, Clay Hazard Immediate Response Plan, and it just gets all the special interests together in a room to talk about each individual school individually, instead of trying to cover all the schools with one giant plan.Bill Godfrey:That is so fantastic, and more than I've heard going on in other organizations. Once again, you're always on the cutting edge of making new stuff happen. So I-Terry Nichols:It is, it's brilliant. I'm sorry, Bill.Bill Godfrey:No, go ahead, Terry.Terry Nichols:It's great. It's absolutely brilliant, it really is, especially countywide. One thing I left out of the Brownwood, the exercises we did, the school district did their own little reunification exercise once we finished. So we did our piece of it, but they had staff that was working through the summer, and they worked on their reunification process. They actually brought up school buses, and took them to another facility, and worked and walked through the standard reunification method that they utilize.So again, we did not get involved in that because we were taxed already, as far as the number of bodies we were pulling from the street through the tactical piece of all this, but they were doing it themselves. So it was nice to see them doing that. I know the superintendent out there, I know he's continuing that kind of stuff. It's very important to them. Seguin will be very similar, I'd have no doubt in my mind.Bill Godfrey:That's fantastic. So here's my last question for the two of you. Just within the last two weeks, NTOA, the National Tactical Officers Association, has announced that they're endorsing the Active Shooter Incident Management checklist as a national standard. And as I said on one of the previous podcasts, for our fire-EMS audience, NTOA is to law enforcement what the NFPA, the National Fire Protection Agency, is to the fire service. How do the two of you see that changing the conversation as we try to get people aware, trained, and implementing ASIM?Terry Nichols:It would certainly help. Having their endorsement and their stamp of approval is huge. I've been an NTOA member for years, got on their training, I've been to their active assailant training, active shooter training many years ago, back in the early days of Alert. It adds a lot of validity to it, not that it didn't already have it, because it does, but you may be reaching a whole different audience that, especially for your larger agencies that have full-time SWAT teams, and they say, "If we don't do an active shooter training, we've got this stuff done, it's gone ... y'all have to solve long before we get there."But now, they get introduced ugh, or through their structure or their training in the tactical world, they get introduced to the ASIM model and the process that way now. Again, most of the country part-time teams, collateral duty, job, that kind of stuff, but your Los Angeleses, and your New York, and your Houstons, and your Austins and Bostons, and all those big places that may not get ASIM another way, may see it this way now. So I think it's a big deal, Bill.Bill Godfrey:Sheriff, how about you? How does it change things, or does it change things, for you at home there in Clay and in your surrounding areas?Michelle Cook:I'm not sure if it changes things. It doesn't surprise me, though, that NTOA would be one of the first to step up and acknowledge this. The NTOA has trained thousands and thousands and thousands of SWAT operators and SWAT leaders, and on a SWAT call-out, there's a process. And you think about, you call the SWAT team when it's really, really bad, and the SWAT team follows a chain of command, there's one talk, there's one commander.So it doesn't surprise me that NTOA would see the value of a checklist like this, and understand that the checklist is really for those dynamic, ongoing ... those calls that are happening right then when we don't have time to wait for the SWAT team. Now, with that being said, my only concern, and this is something that, as a leader, you have to be cognizant of, is the checklist is not the answer. The answer is training with the checklist.Bill Godfrey:Yes, yes.Michelle Cook:So passing the checklist and saying, "Okay, now we have ASIM," that would be my only concern, because I'm thinking firemen are probably like this too, but cops, "Just make it easy for us. Give us a checklist."Bill Godfrey:Yeah, we're all much more alike than we would like to admit.Michelle Cook:Yeah. That would be my only caution, is that the piece of paper is not the answer. It's training to the piece of paper that will help you get to the answer.Bill Godfrey:Yeah, and I think certainly in my conversations with the NTOA leadership, I think they're keenly aware of that, and we're having some very positive conversations about things that we are hoping to do with their organization to begin to push this out. I think we're probably going to start with some webinars, some announcement material, and things like that, but obviously, we've got to get into the training. You got to get into the hands-on training.And I've said this before, and I will say it again, you can sit in a classroom and you can get lectured at, you can watch a video, but until you get up and put yourself in the moment and actually practice this under pressure, you just don't get it. You've got to give responders the opportunity to practice, hot wash it, and then let them practice again, and that's when they they build the competency.I feel like it's a little bit of a trite analogy, but I've said it before, and I don't think there's anything quite better than that, you're not going to get to the Super Bowl with one practice. You've got to practice over and over again, and in a lot of ways, the quarterback on the field is a lot like tactical triage and transport, and then the coaches on the sideline are like the incident command post.Everybody's working together, but how the heck are you going to pull that off on game day if nobody ever bothered to practice? It seems obvious, and when you break it down in those terms, everybody goes, "Oh yeah, I guess that makes sense," but making it a priority for agencies, it's tough. We got, what, 20 pounds of training requirements to fit into a one-pound day? Something's-Terry Nichols:In Texas, you're about to see that get a lot heavier, because again, after Uvalde, I think you're going to see this come to the forefront at the state level. So every state has mandated training for peace officers that we all have to go through every year. You will see we will be heavy on active shooter response, active assailant response, and it'll hopefully give those agencies that already bought in, that have ASIM training, that have the knowledge of it, to give them a chance to actually go out and practice it now, to check that box with the state, as it were.And one of my leadership mentors, Dave Anderson, he says about working out, "How can you expect to go in the gym and squat 500 pounds if you've never squatted 100 pounds? So yeah, you got to practice, practice, practice, repetition, repetition, repetition. So what you said is spot on, but we've got to ... To have a piece of paper, laminated or not, just to pull out of your zipper shirt or out of your visor, is not the answer. You've got to use it.Bill Godfrey:Or on your phone. We've got it as the phone app too. Yeah, I completely agree, and the one thing I would say, in a perfect world, we would get everybody trained so competently and so passionately, and that, God forbid, the day comes that they're called upon, they would nail it and perfect it, and that would be wonderful. But a little goes a long way. A little bit of organization, a little bit of incident management, having a handful of leadership who understands the process and understand what needs to get done, to be able to organize the rest of the troops or the mutual aid people coming in, a little can go a long way. And yes, one day I would like to believe that we'll get every law enforcement, firefighter, EMT, and paramedic in the United States fully trained and competent in this material. But in the meantime, let's do a little something, because as we've seen more than once, a failure on the incident management side can just produce an unacceptable result.Terry Nichols:It's catastrophic, it's catastrophic, and witnessed recently, unfortunately, and it just ... and you're right, small pieces, and the sheriff's got it right. She's hitting it on the head, using it the priority-one calls, and get it ingrained, indoctrinated. And before we went live and started recording, I was joking with you, Bill, about, we have so much to learn from the fire service; we, being law enforcement.Yeah, we may joke all day long about this incident command stuff. There's a cat up in a tree, and y'all set up incident command, there's no one-shot. But there's something to be said for this, and I tried it. I think both Seguin and Brownwood are better ... they are today than when I got there when it comes to this type of stuff. Not just the tactical piece of it, but the incident management piece of it. I hope they are. And it was a great challenge, and I'm an ambassador of it, and hopefully we got much more to learn, even if it's one at a time, one person at a time.Bill Godfrey:Yeah, and I think, Terry, between you and, certainly, Michelle, who is a very, very strong leader in the law enforcement community, and very sophisticated and forward-looking, I'm optimistic. I think we're going to get there. I think that this can happen, and we can get it done. And I'll share this one story with you, Terry, in fairness, coming back on the other side, because making fun of the cat in the tree, I always make fun of you law enforcement guys for the 540 degrees of coverage. I'm like, "Yeah, how does that math work? It's 360, and you start over again."And I was teaching a class one day with ... and I make that joke on a fairly regular basis, which I should have known. And one of our other instructors, Adam, he was waiting for it, and as soon as I said it, he goes, "Okay, let me explain it to you, Bill. You get in the recliner, you spin around 360 degrees, and then you pull the lever to kick your feet back and you look up over your head. That's 540 degrees of coverage," and I said, "Okay, I got it. I deserve that."Terry Nichols:I owe him a beverage. I owe him a beverage.Bill Godfrey:Sheriff, you have any other closing words or thoughts that you want to offer before we wrap up for today?Michelle Cook:Just wanted to say thank you for the opportunity, and if any law enforcement leader out there, anybody in law enforcement, is looking for any ideas, or suggestions, or support, or how to lead your organization or your agency through the the beginnings of ASIM, obviously, C3 Pathways is the expert in the training, but I can definitely help people navigate the politics of it if needed. So always available to assist.Bill Godfrey:Yeah, that's very, very gracious of you. I have a feeling we're going to have people reaching out wanting your contact information. Terry, any final thoughts?Terry Nichols:I echo exactly what the sheriff said, Bill. Thank you so much for the opportunity to come to share my story, anyway, what I've experienced, but same way. I've done it in a rural community with very limited resources, and now in a larger, not near as large as the Sheriff for Jacksonville, but in a larger agency with ... And there are politics to navigate, there are egos to navigate.Bill Godfrey:Always.Terry Nichols:They're in ... I don't have all the answers, but I'll certainly give you my experience. So yeah, C3 Pathways is the point. Anybody listening or watching, reach out to C3, and if you want to talk to me directly, obviously, Bill will gladly share my contact information, and I will answer any question with anybody at any time about any issue as it relates to this, and my successes and my obvious failures as well.Bill Godfrey:Well, Terry, Michelle, thank you both so much for taking the time out of your day. I think what you've shared can be extremely valuable to those that need to walk in the same footsteps that you guys have already forged ahead, and I just can't thank you enough for continuing to support and be ambassadors, and for the work that both of you have accomplished. So thank you for being with us today on the show. Ladies and gentlemen, that's a wrap for our show today. Thank you for tuning in, and until we talk to you next time, stay safe.

Church Safety Guys
134. Handling an Active Shooter

Church Safety Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 67:21


Join the Church Safety Guys as they talk about best practices for your church or place of worship! Special Guest: Aaron Wesley Hannah; SHERPCO See us at the NOCSSM Conference in Dallas! Get tickets for the Conference Here: https://nocssm.org/.../conferences.../2022-conference/ For more resources and great information, visit- ChurchSafetyGuys.com Download our free- Church Security App @ ChurchSecurityApp.com. #ChurchSafetyGuys #SHERPCO #churchsecurity #churchsafety #churchleadership #church #churchonline #semperdisciplina #csg #churchleaders #ActiveShooterResponse #ActiveShooterTraining #ActiveShooter

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 9a - LA County Sheriff's Department conducts ‘active shooter' training

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 29:41


LA County Sheriff's Department conducts ‘active shooter' training at Rosemead High School – Steve Gregory was thereMark Cuban started a pharmacy to make drugs less expensive, but experts say it's solving the wrong problem

Always Bev - The Ripple Effect
There's a Shooter

Always Bev - The Ripple Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 38:01


A survivor from the July 4th, Highland Park mass shooting shares her events from the first time she heard the gun shots to the support she has received following that tragic day.  

Music City 911
Greenwood Park Mall Active Shooter

Music City 911

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 34:01


The Greenwood Park Mall Active Shooter is the topic of today's episode. My appearance on Court TVhttps://youtu.be/2y2brw-pk9k Get your Y'all Have A Good'n shirt at the NEW MERCH STORE!!!https://my-store-b06a85.creator-spring.comHave a listen to the new bonus content over at Patreon!https://www.patreon.com/join/MusicCity911Repod:https://joinrepod.com/musiccity911Check our our social media pages and groupshttps://www.facebook.com/musiccity911podhttps://www.facebook.com/groups/2948819398513001/https://twitter.com/MusicCity911https://www.instagram.com/musiccity911/The following music was used for this media project:Music: Mjolnir by Alexander NakaradaFree download: https://filmmusic.io/song/6213-mjolnirLicense (CC BY 4.0): https://filmmusic.io/standard-licenseArtist website: https://www.serpentsoundstudios.com/

Texas Law Dawgs Podcast
S2 Ep 6 Active Shooter, The Customer is Always Rite, and "Deep in the Heart of TEXAS"

Texas Law Dawgs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 34:24


TEXAS LAW DAWGS!!!  So lets talk about it.....Uvalde.  Is anyone ever really ready? We train and train and hope we would do the rite thing! Did they?  Would love to know the whole story.  All speculation and no intentional Monday morning quarterbacking! Its a tragic situation that occurred and we need to learn from this! We all have active shooter training  and its been a hot topic for sometime.  Listen as we dive into what we have "heard" and what we think we know!  A more serious episode, kinda, but no surprise that one of us is still getting complained on.  "The stars at night, are big and bright...."   

PokerNews Podcast
2022 WSOP Main Event Final Thoughts; Interviews w/ Main Event Final Three

PokerNews Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 68:06 Very Popular


In the latest edition of the PokerNews Podcast, Sarah Herring, Chad Holloway, and Jesse Fullen bring you one final update from the 2022 World Series of Poker (WSOP) at Bally's and Paris Las Vegas. That includes a recap of the Main Event, which was won by Espen Jorstad for $10,000,000! Sarah chats with the new WSOP Main Event champion as well as runner-up Adrian Attenborough and third-place finisher Mickey Duek. They also feature interviews w/ recent bracelet winners Julien Martini and Lawrence Brandt. Other stories they cover are the WSOP being affected by the “Active Shooter” false alarm, Dan Zack finally winning WSOP Player of the Year, Robert Mizrachi taking down the WPT Venetian, Paul Tedeschi blinking the 2022 Wynn Summer Classic $1,600 Mystery Bounty, and WSOP bracelet wins by Gregory Jensen and MSPT Hall of Famer Rich Alsup. Time Stamps *Time|Topic* 00:30 | Welcome to the show 00:45 | Recovering from the 2022 WSOP 01:45 | WSOP affected by “Active Shooter” false alarm 09:00 | 2022 WSOP Main Event wraps up – What did you think? 14:50 | Does becoming the WSOP Main Event champ make you notable? 16:22 | Who is your favorite Main Event champion within the last 10 years? 19:22 | How can a WSOP champ take advantage of their big win? 21:08 | Winner interview w/ 2022 WSOP Main Event champ Espen Jorstad 23:49 | Interview w/ runner-up Adrian Attenborough 28:22 | Interview w/ 3rd-place finisher Mickey Duek 31:00 | Dan Zack finally wins WSOP Player of the Year 34:30 | Sarah forgot the POY race stopped including WSOP Europe 35:52 | Gregory Jensen Wins 2022 WSOP Event 86: $10,000 6-Handed Championship for $824,649 37:30 | Lawrence Brandt wins second bracelet in $3,000 H.O.R.S.E. for $205,139 38:18 | Winner interview w/ Lawrence Brandt (Reporter: Mike Patrick) 41:19 | Jesse's take on Brandt's winner photo 43:00 | Julien Martini wins 4th bracelet in Razz Championship for $328,604 43:50 | How prestigious is it to win a 4th WSOP gold bracelet? 48:05 | Winner interview w/ Julien Martini  52:17 | MSPT Hall of Famer Rich Alsup ships his first WSOP bracelet 53:13 | Sponsor: Global Poker 53:30 | Final thoughts on the 2022 WSOP – Props to Jack Effel, Ty Stewart, Greg Chochon & Co. 58:50 | Robert Mizrachi wins WPT Venetian 1:00:20 | Sponsor: WPT Global 1:02:02 | Paul Tedeschi binks 2022 Wynn Summer Classic $1,600 Mystery Bounty for $232,474 1:035:25 | Chad is moving to Las Vegas!

The Off The X Podcast
Rob Young, Police Sergeant of Stockton Unified School District and Active Shooter Survivor

The Off The X Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 88:38


Listen in to this SPECIAL EDITION of the Off The X Podcast where I speak to Rob Young. Rob is a Police Sergeant in the Stockton Unified School District where in 1989 at Cleveland Elementary he was a victim in one of the first ever Active Shooter events in a school. Rob survived and thrived and has made it his life's mission to keep our children safe in school. Tune in to his amazing story on the Off The X Podcast. 

Connections with Evan Dawson
Monroe County Legislators on active shooter preparedness training

Connections with Evan Dawson

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 51:20


In the first hour of "Connections with Evan Dawson" on Wednesday, July 20, 2022, Monroe County Legislators and community members discuss their thoughts on the now-cancelled ReAwaken America tour stop in Rochester, as well as active shooter preparedness training.

Music City 911
Uvalde

Music City 911

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 44:24


This episode will detail the new findings from the Uvalde active shooter. Listener discretion highly advised on this one. My appearance on Court TVhttps://youtu.be/2y2brw-pk9k Get your Y'all Have A Good'n shirt at the NEW MERCH STORE!!!https://my-store-b06a85.creator-spring.comHave a listen to the new bonus content over at Patreon!https://www.patreon.com/join/MusicCity911Repod:https://joinrepod.com/musiccity911Check our our social media pages and groupshttps://www.facebook.com/musiccity911podhttps://www.facebook.com/groups/2948819398513001/https://twitter.com/MusicCity911https://www.instagram.com/musiccity911/The following music was used for this media project:Music: Sad Expressive Piano by MusicLFilesFree download: https://filmmusic.io/song/8601-sad-expressive-pianoLicense (CC BY 4.0): https://filmmusic.io/standard-licenseArtist website: https://cemmusicproject.wixsite.com/musiclibraryfiles

Bill Handel on Demand
Handel on the News [EARLY EDITION]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 31:22


Bill Handel is joined by Wayne Resnick and Jennifer Jones Lee for the Early Edition of Handel on the News. The three of them discuss news topics that include: A forum was held regarding the Uvalde school shooting as the community demands transparency and accountability, an armed citizen who killed an active shooter at an Indiana mall is receiving praise from officials, and the suspects involved in the 7-Eleven shootings are facing capital murder charges.

Do the thing
Michael Julian: This Security Professional And Best-Selling Author Says You Must Do These Things To Survive The Next Active Shooter Event

Do the thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 45:56


Sometimes bad people do unthinkable things to good people. Active shooters are a harsh reality in today's society. But do you know how to react during a mass-killing event? Today, I got to speak with Michael Julian—President and CEO of National Business Investigations, creator of A.L.I.V.E. survival training, and best-selling author—to learn why everyone needs a well-thought-out self-defense and response plan. Here's how Mike does the thing to educate and train others on how to get out alive. In this episode, Mike explains how you should use these points of the Do The Thing formula to react to any situation: Assessing Visualization Educating yourself Empowerment Setting goals Overcoming fear Want to take action and learn more about A.L.I.V.E.? Visit activeshootersurvivaltraining.com to sign up for Mike's in-person, live virtual, online, or instructor training courses. Be sure to pick up a copy of 10 Minutes To Live: Surviving an Active Shooter Using A.L.I.V.E. while you're there.

The CJ Bronson Show
#095 | Active shooter barges in & opens fire in Comedy Club feat. “the Office” star Craig Robinson

The CJ Bronson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 21:41


You bring your date to see your favorite comedian from “the Office,” Craig Robinson at the Comedy Zone in NC, when a active shooter enters and fires his gun. Was the situation handled properly? Could it all have been prevented? Please like, rate, subscribe/follow Show some love: https://cash.app/$CJBronsonShow Check out my future best selling book: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09V8D9ZL3 Cjbronsonshow.com Twitter: @cjbronsonshow source: https://www.foxnews.com/us/active-shooter-storms-the-office-star-craig-robinsons-comedy-show-opens-fire Tags: news, comedy, entertain, reaction, opinion, insane, funny, smart, laugh, lol, hilarious, outrageous, ridiculous --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-cj-bronson-show/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-cj-bronson-show/support

Police Off The Cuff
Uvalde school active shooter surveillance

Police Off The Cuff

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 67:49


Uvalde school active shooter surveillance

Police Off The Cuff
Traits of the Active shooter 18-22 years old #ActiveShooter #MassShootings #HighlandPark #Shooter

Police Off The Cuff

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 61:26


Traits of the Active shooter 18-22 years old #ActiveShooter #MassShootings #HighlandPark #Shooter Traits of the Active shooter 18-22 years old #ActiveShooter #MassShootings #HighlandPark #ShooterMass shootings have increased significantly in the United States, according to the most recent data available from the FBI. Statistics show that from 2000 to 2007, mass shooting incidents averaged 6.4 incidents annually, while from 2008 to 2013, they increased to 16.4. As a result of this increase, several studies have looked at the individual motivations and psychological “micro-foundations” that drive targeted violence–everything from video games to religious beliefs–in an effort to help law enforcement officials understand mass shooting, hate crimes, terrorism, and violence not only in the United States but also abroad. A 2015 study published in Behavioral Sciences and the Law, “The Concept of Identification in Threat Assessment,” examines the relationship between psychological “identification”–or the process by which an unstable person subsumes his or her own identity and models themselves after a violent aggressor–and acts of targeted violence. The researchers are based at the University of California-San Diego and the State University of New York Upstate Medical University as well as the San Diego Psychoanalytic Center, the firm Operational Consulting International and the Institute of Psychology and Threat Management in Germany. The authors drew on information from reviews and indirect assessment of evidence of criminal cases, as well as consultation with psychiatrists, psychologists and judicial officials who had direct access to primary investigative evidence on the cases. They also examined four detailed case studies on perpetrators of targeted violence: Antares Wong, Seung-Hui Cho, Joseph Paul Franklin and Anders Breivik. In analyzing the psychology of the four “active shooters,” the study authors drew on the work of psychiatrists Sigmund and Anna Freud and Erik Erikson on psychosocial development. The study's findings include: The four perpetrators committed different acts of targeted violence, at different points in time, killing and injuring innocent people in the United States and abroad. Despite their differences, they all evidenced common expressions of “identification.” “In the context of threat assessment, identity becomes embedded in aggressive identifications, if not extremely violent images of the self in action, most often apparent in the fantasies of the young adult as a perpetrator of homicide against another.” Identification is characterized by one or more of five characteristics: pseudo-commando, warrior mentality, close association with weapons or other law-enforcement/military paraphernalia, identification with other attackers/assassins, and becoming an agent to advance a particular cause or belief system. Authors identified eight warning behaviors, including: Pathway warning behavior: research, planning, preparation, or implementation of an attack Fixation warning behavior: an increasingly pathological preoccupation with a person or a cause Identification warning behavior: a psychological desire to be a “pseudo-commando,” have a “warrior mentality,” closely associate with weapons or other military or law enforcement paraphernalia Novel aggression warning behavior: an act of violence that appears unrelated to any targeted violence pathway behavior which is committed for the first time Energy burst warning behavior: an increase in the frequency or variety of any noted activities related to the target Leakage warning behavior: the communication to a third party of intent to do harm to a target through an attack Last resort warning behavior: evidence of a violent “action/time imperative” Directly communicated threat warning behavior: the communication of a direct threat to the target or to law enforcement before at attack.

#ITSNEEDED
155. What Do You Do in an Active Shooter?

#ITSNEEDED

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 63:16 Very Popular


Shea Degan, founder and CEO of 88 Tactical will join us today to talk about what to do if ever involved in an active shooter.