Podcasts about Incidents

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,036PODCASTS
  • 1,843EPISODES
  • 29mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Aug 12, 2022LATEST
Incidents

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Incidents

Show all podcasts related to incidents

Latest podcast episodes about Incidents

Carlton Fields Podcasts
High Crimes and Misdemeanors: Unruly Passengers on Flights

Carlton Fields Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 29:38


Incidents involving unruly passengers are skyrocketing. As a result, the FAA has adopted a zero-tolerance policy for passengers who engage in unruly behavior. In this episode, Carlton Fields aviation attorney Ed Page discusses the penalties for such behavior – both civil and criminal – and the types of cases rising in the unfriendly skies.

Felger & Massarotti
Chris Sale's Unexplained Incidents // Patriots First Preseason Game // Final Word! - 8/9 (Hour 4)

Felger & Massarotti

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 35:40


0:00 – Chris Sale has too many unexplained incidents.  6:43 – What did Chris Sale hit on his bike?   18:35 – Will Bill Belichick play his first-team in the preseason game against the New York Giants?  30:54 – Final word!

RTÉ - News at One Podcast
Six rescued by RNLI in two separate incidents in north Dublin

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 2:00


Howth RNLI inshore lifeboat helm Ian Martin was among the rescue crew and he tells us about the separate rescues

RTÉ Radio Player: Latest Podcasts
News At One: Six rescued by RNLI in two separate incidents in north Dublin

RTÉ Radio Player: Latest Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 2:00


Howth RNLI inshore lifeboat helm Ian Martin was among the rescue crew and he tells us about the separate rescues

Vermont Edition
Why black bear incidents are increasing in Vermont

Vermont Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 34:02


This hour, host Mikaela Lefrak speaks with a game warden and a biologist from Vermont's Fish and Wildlife Department about human-bear encounters.

News Updates from The Oregonian
All Oregon high school coaches, leaders must take training to interrupt, prevent racist incidents at games

News Updates from The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 5:24


Tina Kotek is coming to your TV with a big ad buy. Man charged with killing woman on Eastbank Esplanade deemed unfit for trial. Oregon Ducks say Shalane Flanagan will join running program as assistant coach. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Podcast Veirano
#82 Cybersecurity: navigating incidents through multiple jurisdictions

Podcast Veirano

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 23:01


O sócio Filipe Oliveira, do nosso time de cybersegurança, conversa com Vijay Bange e Chris Recker, sócio e associado do escritório Duane Morris em Londres, sobre respostas jurídicas a incidentes de cybersegurança envolvendo múltiplas jurisdições. Partner Filipe Oliveira, from our cybersecurity team, talks to Vijay Bange and Chris Recker, partner and associate of Duane Morris in London, about legal responses to cybersecurity incidents involving multiple jurisdictions.

Good News Church of Ocala
Incidents In Philippi

Good News Church of Ocala

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 45:06


Part 5 of "Life of Paul - Series 2," Acts 16:11-40. Paul & his mission's team travel to Philippi and encounter three incidents that help establish the first church in Europe.

War Of The Rebellion: Stories Of The Civil War
Chapter Seventeen: Appomattox Incidents. -- Homeward March (P2)

War Of The Rebellion: Stories Of The Civil War

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 34:31


 Grand  Review In Washington. — Farewell  Address  of  General  Meade  to  Army  of Potomac. — Return  of  One  Hundred  and  Fifty-fifth  to  Pittsburgh. — Public Reception  and  Dinner. — Parade  and  Public  Exhibition  and  Drill  in  Allegheny Parks. — Regiment  Mustered  Out  of  Service.

The Pro America Report with Ed Martin Podcast
Liberals Are Hunting Conservatives? | 07.28.2022 #ProAmericaReport

The Pro America Report with Ed Martin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 41:24


What You Need to Know is that the liberals are hunting us conservatives. In the last 5 months, after the Supreme Court leak on the Dobbs decision, someone flew across the country hoping to influence the decision by trying to assassinate Justice Kavanaugh. This is not a one-off case. Incidents like this have been going on for the last 5 years, and the left is edging us closer and closer to open season on conservatives. Carrie Severino is a lawyer, author, head of the Judicial Crisis Network (JCN), and former clerk for Clarence Thomas. Carrie joins Ed Martin to discuss the recent JCN poll regarding intimidation and violent tactics after the Dobbs decision. They also talk about the wild contrast between conservatives and liberals when they disagree with the Supreme Court. Stefano Gennarini is the Vice President for Legal Studies at the Center for Family and Human Rights (C-Fam). Stefano joins Ed to discuss his recent article Netherlands Human Rights Record Criticized Because of Euthanasia and Abortion. The Netherlands are under review in Geneva for their use of abortion for eugenic purposes, particularly targeting children with Down's Syndrome. Stefano and Ed also discuss the way that the end of life is treated in Nordic countries and their use of euthanasia on the elderly. Wrap up: Liberals are transparent if you can see it. Liberal professor at Georgetown sees problems with the Supreme Court (NOW that it is conservative) — so we have to cut it back! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Heartland POD
Flyover View: July 29, 2022 - Heartland News & Views

Heartland POD

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 17:27


HEADLINE 1: Manchin and Schumer announce deal for energy and health care bill - CNNSenate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Sen. Joe Manchin on Wednesday announced a deal on an energy and health care bill, representing a breakthrough after more than a year of negotiations that have collapsed time and again.But it will face furious GOP opposition.The agreement contains a number of Democrats' goals. While many details have not been disclosed, the measure would invest $369 billion into energy and climate change programs, with the goal of reducing carbon emissions by 40% by 2030, according to a one-page fact sheet. For the first time, Medicare would be empowered to negotiate the prices of certain medications, and it would cap out-of-pocket costs at $2,000 for those enrolled in Medicare drug plans. It would also extend expiring enhanced subsidies for Affordable Care Act coverage for three years.The announcement comes at a crucial time for Congress, as the Senate is a little over a week away from starting a monthlong recess, when many Democrats will campaign for reelection. Manchin's support is notable given his stance earlier this month that he "unequivocally" wouldn't support the climate or tax provisions of the Democratic economic package, which appeared to torpedo any hope Democrats had of passing legislation to fight climate change in the near future. But Schumer and Manchin have been in revived talks since July 18 and locked down a deal Wednesday, according to a source familiar with the matter. Manchin had thrown cold water on doing tax and energy provisions as part of the deal, but ultimately agreed to it.The White House has signed off on this deal, Biden said in a statement.The deal still faces multiple hurdles before it can make it to Biden's desk, including the parliamentarian and having to pass both chambers of Congress, where practically any Democrat could sideline or delay passage.In a statement, Schumer's office said the bill would reduce US carbon emissions by roughly 40% by 2030. Clean energy tax credits would drive the majority of those emission reductions, a Democratic aide said.Tax credits for electric vehicles made it into the new deal, according to two Senate Democratic aides. Electric Vehicle tax credits will continue at their current levels, up to $4,000 for a used electric vehicle and $7,500 for a new EV. However, there will be a lower income threshold for people who can use the tax credits -- a key demand of Manchin's. Manchin had been staunchly opposed to electric vehicle tax credits throughout negotiations.The deal keeps the prescription drug prices changes that Manchin had previously agreed to, including empowering Medicare to negotiate the price of certain costly medications administered in doctors' offices or purchased at the pharmacy. It would also redesign Medicare's Part D drug plans so that seniors and people with disabilities wouldn't pay more than $2,000 a year for medication bought at the pharmacy. And, the deal would require drug companies to pay rebates if they increase their prices in the Medicare and private-insurance markets faster than inflation.Altogether, the drug price provisions would reduce the deficit by $288 billion over a decade, according to the Congressional Budget Office.The agreement also calls for extending the enhanced Affordable Care Act subsidies for three years. An earlier deal would have continued the beefed-up subsidies for two years, which meant they would have expired just after the 2024 presidential election -- a scenario that congressional Democrats did not want to encounter.The subsidies were expanded through this year as part of Democrats' $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package, known as the American Rescue Plan, which was enacted in March 2021. They have made health care coverage on the Obamacare exchanges more affordable, leading to record enrollment this year.Enrollees pay no more than 8.5% of their income toward coverage, down from nearly 10%. And lower-income policyholders receive subsidies that eliminate their premiums completely. Also, those earning more than 400% of the federal poverty level have become eligible for help for the first time.Extending the enhanced subsidies would cost $64 billion over a decade, according to the CBO.To raise revenue, the bill would impose a 15% minimum tax on corporations, which would raise $313 billion over a decade. While details on the current deal remain scant, the House version of the Build Back Better package would have levied the tax on the corporate profits that large companies report to shareholders, not to the Internal Revenue Service. It would have applied to companies with more than $1 billion in profits and yielded a similar revenue-raising figure.The current deal also aims to close the carried interest loophole, which allows investment managers to treat their compensation as capital gains and pay a 20% long-term capital gains tax rate instead of income tax rates of up to 37%. Eliminating this loophole, which would raise $14 billion over a decade, has been a longtime goal of congressional Democrats.The package also calls for providing more funding to the IRS for tax enforcement, which would raise $124 billion.Democrats say families making less than $400,000 per year would not be affected, in line with a pledge by Biden. Also, there would be no new taxes on small businesses.In total, Democrats say the deal would reduce the deficit by more than $300 billion.HEADLINE 2: TRUDY BUSCH VALENTINE, NOT READY FOR PRIME TIME - ADVOCATETrudy Busch Valentine has been in the news a lot lately, largely a push near the primaries from her supporters but not every report lately has bode well for the billionaire candidate. After months of being largely unavailable for comment on the issues beyond simple platitudes she has started answering questions, and it's left many Missouri Democrats asking if we are actually serious about putting her forth in a general.At a recent town hall for the Chesterfield Township Dems TBV was asked questions about campaign finance reform, specifically regarding Citizen's United. Her response? Just tell me again what Citizens United is doing? Forgive me but a candidate for senate better damn well know what Citizens United is and how it affects campaign finance.On July 23rd A bizarre video posted by a St. Louis ward committeewoman shows Busch Valentine struggling with her position on transgender rights, rambling and stumbling over her words.“I respect the dignity of every human person. And transgender, I respect,” Busch Valentine says in the video. “If a man feels that they're a woman and wants to become a woman, I respect that. And I respect it the opposite way too. Those are things that have to be solved amongst families and amongst parents.”She then asserted that doctors should refrain from providing gender-affirming care to children until they're adults, something right-wing pundits and politicians have been asserting.“I only would say, wait until 18, when a person is an adult, to do everything that wouldn't allow going back to being maybe the sex that you were,” she said. “But I totally, totally support transgenders without a doubt and the LGBT community.”To be clear, Gender-affirming care for young people usually consists of puberty blockers and hormone treatment, with most of the effects reversible, contrary to what anti-trans politicians claim. Genital surgery is not performed on minors.And on Monday Trudy Busch Valentine was asked whether she supports a law prohibiting instruction on gender identity and sexual orientation.Specifically referencing Florida, where such teaching is forbidden in grades K-3 and restricted in later grades, and opponents say it has a chilling effect. LGBTQ+ teachers may be afraid to mention their identity or to display pictures of their partners in the classroom because they may be fired or sued by parents. She made a spontaneous reference to critical race theory, a theory about systemic racial injustice taught in law schools, which right-wing politicians wrongly claim is taught in elementary and secondary schools to make white children feel shame. Here is her word salad response in full: “I think there are so many things out there, including critical race theory, that just tries to take away the history of our country and the good things we've done and the bad things we've done,” Busch Valentine said on St. Louis CBS affiliate KMOV.Now, nearly all of these statements were adjusted in post by her team, but the damage was done. Is she capable of standing on her own two feet as a senator or is she to be propped up by a team? It sure seems to me she isn't prepared for this job. Personally I'm a Spencer Toder man, you can count this as an official endorsement. I can understand Kunce supporters though. TBV supporters I can't get behind, I've seen nothing to support she can win this thing or do the job once hired.HEADLINE 3: EXPLAINING KANSAS' CONFUSING ABORTION AMENDMENT - VOXNext week in Kansas, abortion rights will face the first test at the polls since the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.In 2019, Kansas's Supreme Court ruled that the state's constitution protects the right to an abortion. On Tuesday, voters will be asked to weigh in on a proposed amendment that would explicitly remove that right, opening the way for Kansas's Republican-controlled legislature to further restrict or ban abortion, just as neighboring Texas, Oklahoma, and Missouri have done.You'd be forgiven if you had trouble making sense of the amendment's text, which would add a paragraph to the state's constitution that says both “Kansas does not require government funding of abortion” and that people, through their elected officials, “may pass laws regarding abortion, including, but not limited to, laws that account for circumstances of pregnancy resulting from rape or incest, or circumstances of necessity to save the life of the mother.”The language could trip up your average voter, said Neal Allen, a political scientist at Wichita State University. “You could read it and think you were voting to eliminate state funding of abortion when there is no state funding to abortion,” he told Vox. “And there is language that refers to exceptions to preserve the health of the mother, and for rape and incest, but there's nothing about the amendment itself that would create those exceptions.”Supporters of the amendment, organizing under the banner of “Value Them Both” — a reference to valuing “women and unborn children” — have been working to convince votersthat a “yes” vote on the amendment would not lead to an abortion ban and would simply allow lawmakers to regulate the procedure.Many of their claims have been dubious at best, and have generated significant confusion. Value Them Both supporters have stressed in their advertisements that the amendment “restores our ability to place basic regulations on the abortion industry.” In fact, abortion remains highly regulated in Kansas. They say the amendment would merely allow lawmakers to impose rules like requiring parental consent, “stopping painful late-term abortions,” and barring public funding of abortion. But Kansas already requires parental consent, already bans public funding of abortion, and already bans abortion after 22 weeks.The language of the amendment is confusing, likely purposefully. So, Let us be clearIf the amendment passes, nothing could stop Republican lawmakers from passing a total or near-total abortion ban, and political experts say the likelihood of such restrictions moving forward in that context is very high.It will be a tight vote. A public poll of the campaign released last week found 47 percent of likely primary voters planned to vote for the amendment, and 43 percent planned to vote against it. But the pollsters also found Democrats were significantly more likely than Republicans to say the abortion amendment “increased the importance of voting in this upcoming election” — suggesting differences in motivation. Past political science research has found a “status quo bias” when it comes to abortion-related ballot measures; voters are more likely to reject measures on Election Day they otherwise tell pollsters they support. These dynamics bode well for advocates who want to keep the state constitution unchanged.For my Kansas listeners, do NOT rest on your laurels here. Vote NO on this amendment.Headline 4: Veterans and their spouses can now teach in Florida with no degree. School leaders say it 'lowers the bar'https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2022/07/21/florida-education-program-military-veterans-teach/10117107002/ https://www.fldoe.org/teaching/certification/military/ Governor Ron DeSantis recently signed into law a bill that would give military veterans teaching certificates on a temporary basis in Florida. This ability to apply for temporary certification does not only apply to the veteran, but also their spouses as well. The law was passed with the hope of easing the strain of the 9000 open teaching positions around the state. According to the Florida Department of Education, to apply for the five year temporary certification, the applicant must have the following:Minimum of 48 months of military service with an honorable/medical dischargeMinimum of 60 college credits with a 2.5 grade point averagePassing score on a Florida subject area examination for bachelor's level subjectsEmployment in a Florida school district, including charter schoolsMany school leaders have been outspoken in opposition to this move. "There are many people who have gone through many hoops and hurdles to obtain a proper teaching certificate," said Carmen Ward, president of the Alachua County teachers union. "(Educators) are very dismayed that now someone with just a high school education can pass the test and can easily get a five-year temporary certificate." Alachua County school board members expressed their distaste for the new law at a recent workshop where the details were presented.While a subject area test may prove that these applicants may know the content that they are hired to teach, what it does not do is prove that the applicants know the intecencies of lesson planning, instruction, and assessment. These are all things that are taught in college and that teachers leaving a four year degree program are verse in before stepping foot in a class to student teach, let alone teach on their own. While FLDOE says that each person that is given the temporary certification will be put with a mentor, this mentor is another teacher from the building, usually in the same grade level or subject area. Mentor meetings with new teachers are historically quick check-ins where the new teacher can bounce ideas and problems off of the mentor. A mentor will not have the time to teach these skills to the new teacher in the meeting. This will increase the load again on experienced teachers or lead to them handing lesson plans to inexperienced, unprepared “educators” to teach students.There is also a worry around the state that these temporary certifications will be highly concentrated in the more underfunded, underperforming school districts. The worry from school officials is that higher paying, well performing schools will have the ability to attract traditionally certified teachers with experience. This would leave the bulk of the openings to be in the poorer districts, leaving an even more inexperienced staff in these schools.With many other states also facing teacher shortages, the Florida law could become a template for plans that are implemented in other states around the country.LAYOVER: Candidate Bethany Mann. Democratic Candidate for Missouri's 3rd Congressional District. LIGHTNING ROUND:LR 1 - Historic flooding in St. Louis - Washington PostTorrential downpours sparked flash flooding in St. Louis and surrounding areas Tuesday, killing at least one person and stranding residents in their cars and homes as the rainfall shattered a record set more than a century ago. The city had received more than 9 inches of rain by the afternoon, the most ever recorded there in a calendar day and about 2 inches more than the record of about 7 inches set in August 1915, when remnants of a hurricane that came ashore in Galveston, Tex., passed through the area. Firefighters had responded to about 70 rescues by late Tuesday morning On behalf of Gov. Mike Parson (R), who was out of the country Tuesday, Lt. Gov. Mike Kehoe (R) declared a state of emergency to assist local authorities in handling the disaster. Extreme precipitation events have increased substantially over the past century and are tied to warming from human-caused climate change. The heaviest such events increased by 42 percent in the Midwest between 1901 and 2016, with additional increases expected as the climate continues to warm, according to the U.S. government's National Climate Assessment.LR 2 - The attack on McMorrow backfired - PoliticoIn a fundraising email, Michigan State Sen. Lana Theis of Brighton said colleagues like McMorrow were “outraged” that they couldn't “groom and sexualize kindergartners.” The charge prompted McMorrow to make a spirited speech in the Senate in her own defense — a speech that went viral and made her a political celebrity on the left. The result? Theis' fundraising stunt netted her less than $300 while McMorrow went on to raise more than 1 Million dollars. LR 3 - Kansas City's Zero Fare Transit Program Shows Major Success - Next CityKansas City, Missouri, made national headlines in the fall of 2019 when its city council voted unanimously to become America's first large city to make public transportation free citywide. Now, two and a half years later, anyone living anywhere in the city can ride buses without paying a fare.Recently, A study conducted as part of the Urban League of Greater Kansas City's annual “State of Black Kansas City” report last year asked 1,686 riders for their feedback on what Zero Fare has enabled them to do. The responses show how a Zero Fare policy makes a big difference in these riders' ability to exercise the so-called “right to the city.”Almost 90% of the riders surveyed said they rode the buses more as a result of Zero Fare. About 92% said it allowed them to shop for food more often; 88% said they could see their .healthcare providers more easily or more often; 82% said it allowed them to get or keep a job; and 86% said it made them feel like city leadership is concerned about their needsBesides the increased mobility and financial benefits, nearly 80% of the residents surveyed also said Zero Fare increased their sense of safety on the bus. That points to one of the more counterintuitive benefits of eliminating fares: The buses became safer to ride. The total number of incidents where supervisors were called fell 39% in the first year of full Zero Fare transit, according to a 2021 Zero Fare impact analysis by the Mid-America Regional Council (MARC), the Kansas City area's metropolitan planning organization. Incidents per 100,000 riders fell 17%LR 4 - Justice Department files lawsuit against poultry producers in the US - Fox BusinessThe Justice Department filed a lawsuit Monday against some of the largest poultry producers in the U.S. along with a proposed settlement seeking to end what it claims have been longstanding deceptive and abusive practices for workersThe suit, filed in federal court in Maryland, names Cargill, Sanderson Farms and Wayne Farms, along with a data consulting company known as Webber, Meng, Sahl and Co. and its president.In its lawsuit, the Justice Department alleges the companies have been engaged in a multiyear conspiracy to exchange information about the wages and benefits of workers at poultry processing plants to drive down employee competition in the marketplace. The companies did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment.The government contends the data consulting firm helped to share the information about the workers' compensation with the companies and their executives. By carrying out the scheme, officials allege, the companies were able to compete less intensely for workers and reduce the amount of money and benefits they had to offer their employees, suppressing competition for poultry processing workers across the boardThe suit is the latest example of the Justice Department's antitrust enforcement targeting companies the government believes engage in anticompetitive behavior to stifle workers or harm consumers. It also comes as the department continues a broader investigation into labor abuses in the poultry industry.LR 5 - Foot of hail stacks up in parts of Colorado mountain town, snowplows used for removal-OUT THERE COLORADOAs storms pounded parts of Colorado on Wednesday evening, Estes Park got hit hard. Not only did the mountain town, found outside of Rocky Mountain National Park, get a lot of moisture in the form of heavy rain, about a foot of hail also stacked up on some local streets.While the hail that fell appears to be in the form of small pellets based on images and footage from the scene, thus less likely to cause impact damage, the hail can be seen covering roadways and reportedly caused travel concerns. In order to clear the roads, snowplows were called in.monsoonal precipitation continues through and Friday is still supposed to bring even more intense weather to the state, increasing flash flooding concerns around the state, especially in burn scar areas found along the Front Range.LR 6 - Lastly folks, go voteAugust 2nd will be a day for voting across much of the midwest. It is important to get out there and exercise your right to determine who represents you and what ballot measures pass. Be mindful of your polling places, they may have changed. Take time off work if need be, they have to allow it. Now, Get out there and vote!Outro: That's all the time we have this week, thank you for joining us. If you have a story you feel I should look into and possibly highlight on the show, please tweet me throughout the week @KevINMidMo or The Pod's parent account @TheHeartlandPODThis week's episode featured reporting and information from Out there Colorado, Fox Business, Politico, Next City, Washington Post, Usa Today, The Florida Department of Education, CNN, Vox, and The Advocate. https://heartlandpod.com/Twitter: @TheHeartlandPOD"Change The Conversation"

Kelly Cutrara
Hockey Canada has paid out $8.9M over 21 sexual misconduct incidents

Kelly Cutrara

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 8:53


Kelly talks to Kevin Waugh, MP for Saskatoon-Grasswood and a member of the committee looking into the allegations against Hockey Canada.

RTÉ - News at One Podcast
Estimate of over 20,000 alleged war crime incidents since Ukraine conflict

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 6:38


We talk to Human Rights lawyer Anya Neistat, who is also legal director of the Clooney Foundation for Justice war crime's investigations unit called The Docket.

Radio Boston
U.S. Attorney Rachael Rollins will soon launch hotline for hate incidents

Radio Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 48:05


Plus, with increased private patrols alongside the DA's drug diversion efforts at 'Mass. and Cass', what else is needed to fix the drug and housing situation there? And two veterinarians answer our questions about cats and how to care for them.

SpiceRadioVan
Lower mainland has seen a number of gang related incidents we talk about how to address the issue

SpiceRadioVan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 12:21


Jag Khosa, police officer and gang expert

Radio Boston
What to make the MBTA right now as safety incidents pile up

Radio Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 16:32


A fire on the Orange Line last week and a runaway Red Line train this week are the latest in a string of incidents the beleaguered MBTA has experienced.

War Of The Rebellion: Stories Of The Civil War
Chapter Seventeen: Appomattox Incidents.-- Homeward March (P1)

War Of The Rebellion: Stories Of The Civil War

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 40:18


Incidents Of Flag Of Truce.-- Sergeant Shore's Reception Of Truce Bearer.-- Return Of Army To Washington.-- Fifth Corps Reviewed In Petersburg By General Warren.-- March Of Troops Through Richmond.My Paypal for donations - PayPal.Me/rebellionstories My Patreon for Patrons- https://www.patreon.com/waroftherebel... My Regimental History Podcast - https://rebellionstories.buzzsprout.com My Discord for all - https://discord.gg/zUGJ7uJN My Website for the latest news - https://rebellionstories.com/ My Twitter for chatting - https://twitter.com/WarRebellion 

Black Authors Audiobooks Podcast - Black Lives Content Black History | Black Ethics | Black Power

Martin Luther King - But if Not - Full Sermon Black Authors Audiobooks Podcast - Black Lives Content Black History | Black Ethics | Black Power Black Authors Audiobooks Podcast Uploads Audiobooks and Lectures By The Best Black Authors In Audio Format To Download. All Authors Wrote Stories From Their REAL Life, Not Fiction. We also added Martin Luther King Speeches, Insights and Historical Background to the Podcast. Please Download and Share the Martin Luther King Speeches. X X X X please support with 2$ or 8$ per month we try to stay alive and pay for the content to remain online

3AW Breakfast with Ross and John
CSI Melbourne: Geelong police release CCTV images following spate of rock throwing incidents

3AW Breakfast with Ross and John

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 4:12


Geelong police have released CCTV images of three people they would like to speak to as they continue to investigate a series of rock throwing incidents from overpasses along the Geelong Ring Road.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

880 Extras
Shark incidents continue in New York waters

880 Extras

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 1:13


Sean Adams reports from the Rockaways

Paranormal Mysteries Podcast
REWIND EP76: The Westall & Broad Haven UFO Incidents | Paranormal Mysteries

Paranormal Mysteries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 44:50 Very Popular


TELL YOUR STORY Email: paranormalmysteriespodcast@gmail.com Voicemail: https://www.speakpipe.com/paranormalmysteries Website: https://www.paranormalmysteriespodcast.com/ Forum: https://www.paranormalmysteriespodcast.com/forum SUPPORT THE SHOW Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/join/paranormalmysteries? BuyMeACoffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/paranormal PayPal: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=MG24QCZBAWRRN Merchandise: https://www.zazzle.com/store/paranormalmysteries SOCIAL MEDIA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/paranormalmysteriespodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paranormalmysteriespodcast YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ParanormalMysteriesPodcast Twitter: https://twitter.com/ParaMysteryPod EPISODE REFERENCES Alien UFO Research (alien-ufo-research.com) / BBC1 John Craven's Newsround / BBC (bbc.com) / Best of Wales (bestofwales.co.uk) / Mysterious Universe (mysteriousuniverse.org) / News.com.au / Queensland UFO Sightings and Research (youtube.com/channel/UCMUzTnkxjPfLyaJNfsQxMTg) / Studio 10 (10play.com.au/studio-10) / Swansea UFO Network (sufon.co.uk) “David Davies speaks at the Broad Haven Conference” (youtube.com/watch?v=vDYMFX4vbIA) MY WIFE'S “SLEEP AND RELAXATION PODCAST” Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/3aOsZoy Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3zwS29T Pandora: https://bit.ly/3xjB1NX Google Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3NNmsZW iHeartRadio: https://ihr.fm/3HgoS0F MUSIC & MEDIA PROVIDED BY https://www.paranormalmysteriespodcast.com/stock-music-media PODCAST SOURCE https://www.spreaker.com/show/paranormal-mysteries-podcast © 2022 Paranormal Mysteries Podcast. All Rights Reserved.

L'After Foot
François Noël Buffet (sénateur et co-auteur du rapport sur les incidents du Stade de France) invité de l'After. Daniel pointe un mensonge d'Etat – 13/07

L'After Foot

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 16:09


L'After foot, c'est LE show d'après-match et surtout la référence des fans de football depuis 15 ans ! Les rencontres se prolongent tous les soirs avec Gilbert Brisbois et Nicolas Jamain avec les réactions des joueurs et entraîneurs, les conférences de presse d'après-match et les débats animés entre supporters, experts de l'After et auditeurs. RMC est une radio généraliste, essentiellement axée sur l'actualité et sur l'interactivité avec les auditeurs, dans un format 100% parlé, inédit en France. La grille des programmes de RMC s'articule autour de rendez-vous phares comme Apolline Matin (6h-9h), les Grandes Gueules (9h-12h), Estelle Midi (12h-15h), Super Moscato Show (15h-18h), Rothen s'enflamme (18h-20h), l'After Foot (20h-minuit).

Cyber.RAR
Protecting Vulnerable Populations in Cyberspace

Cyber.RAR

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 35:02


How do we better protect our most vulnerable populations from cyber incidents? Michaela leads the conversation and posits that instead of thinking about it as a domain of war, we should use a climate analogy to think about the increasing vulnerability of our digital ecosystem. This could help us understand the disaggregated impacts on different communities and change the way we think about building resilience. If you'd like to reach out to us, send an email to cyberRAR.podcast@gmail.com!Dusseldorf University Hospital Ransomware Attack: https://www.wired.co.uk/article/ransomware-hospital-death-germanyCISA alert on the increased threat of ransomware: https://www.cisa.gov/uscert/ncas/alerts/aa22-040aDarknet Diaries Episode: https://darknetdiaries.com/transcript/106/Cuckoo's Egg: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cuckoo%27s_Egg_(book)Resources for vulnerable populations:--EFF: https://www.eff.org/pages/tools--Access Now: https://www.accessnow.org/help/--Department of Homeland Security: https://www.ready.gov/cybersecurity--Consumer Reports: https://securityplanner.consumerreports.org/

Le 13/14
Incidents du Stade de France : Les raisons du fiasco

Le 13/14

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 59:40


durée : 00:59:40 - Le 13/14 - par : Bruno DUVIC - Le Sénat a rendu ce midi son rapport sur cette soirée du 28 mai 2022 qui a viré au scandale.

Stacey Norman
"My heart breaks for those that have been affected by these tragic incidents" - J Sbu

Stacey Norman

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 6:24


A number of heartbreaking incidents have been shocking families all over South Africa. The tavern tragedies are contributing to the ongoing safety concerns around KZN. Listen to hear J Sbu's insight: LISTEN: J Sbu addresses the tavern tragedies in South Africa

My Thought Traffic
The Void Of Words, Park Incidents and Life Crisis

My Thought Traffic

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 23:06


Man, hello I am so tired right now because editing this episode was a pain. I spoke a lot and went through a rollercoaster lol. In this episode, I talk about my published book, some random park incidents, books I am reading, and a mini existential life crisis I faced a few days ago. I hope you like listening to me ~ramble~. Here are the links to my booooook: Amazon Flipkart E-Book Thank you for being a great listener. Also rate my podcast on Spotify and Apple Podcasts lol See you soon (in the monsoon, yes it's raining as I type this) Saniya

Black Authors Audiobooks Podcast - Black Lives Content Black History | Black Ethics | Black Power

Martin Luther King - (Speech) With Inspirational Music Black Authors Audiobooks Podcast - Black Lives Content Black History | Black Ethics | Black Power Black Authors Audiobooks Podcast Uploads Audiobooks and Lectures By The Best Black Authors In Audio Format To Download. All Authors Wrote Stories From Their REAL Life, Not Fiction. We also added Martin Luther King Speeches, Insights and Historical Background to the Podcast. Please Download and Share the Martin Luther King Speeches. X X X X please support with 2$ or 8$ per month we try to stay alive and pay for the content to remain online

Screaming in the Cloud
Incidents, Solutions, and ChatOps Integration with Chris Evans

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 33:28


About ChrisChris is the Co-founder and Chief Product Officer at incident.io, where they're building incident management products that people actually want to use. A software engineer by trade, Chris is no stranger to gnarly incidents, having participated (and caused!) them at everything from early stage startups through to enormous IT organizations.Links Referenced: incident.io: https://incident.io Practical Guide to Incident Management: https://incident.io/guide/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: DoorDash had a problem. As their cloud-native environment scaled and developers delivered new features, their monitoring system kept breaking down. In an organization where data is used to make better decisions about technology and about the business, losing observability means the entire company loses their competitive edge. With Chronosphere, DoorDash is no longer losing visibility into their applications suite. The key? Chronosphere is an open-source compatible, scalable, and reliable observability solution that gives the observability lead at DoorDash business, confidence, and peace of mind. Read the full success story at snark.cloud/chronosphere. That's snark.cloud slash C-H-R-O-N-O-S-P-H-E-R-E.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's promoted guest is Chris Evans, who's the CPO and co-founder of incident.io. Chris, first, thank you very much for joining me. And I'm going to start with an easy question—well, easy question, hard answer, I think—what is an incident.io exactly?Chris: Incident.io is a software platform that helps entire organizations to respond to recover from and learn from incidents.Corey: When you say incident, that means an awful lot of things. And depending on where you are in the ecosystem in the world, that means different things to different people. For example, oh, incident. Like, “Are you talking about the noodle incident because we had an agreement that we would never speak about that thing again,” style, versus folks who are steeped in DevOps or SRE culture, which is, of course, a fancy way to say those who are sad all the time, usually about computers. What is an incident in the context of what you folks do?Chris: That, I think, is the killer question. I think if you look at organizations in the past, I think incidents were those things that happened once a quarter, maybe once a year, and they were the thing that brought the entirety of your site down because your big central database that was in a data center sort of disappeared. The way that modern companies run means that the definition has to be very, very different. So, most places now rely on distributed systems and there is no, sort of, binary sense of up or down these days. And essentially, in the general case, like, most companies are continually in a sort of state of things being broken all of the time.And so, for us, when we look at what an incident is, it is essentially anything that takes you away from your planned work with a sense of urgency. And that's the sort of the pithy definition that we use there. Generally, that can mean anything—it means different things to different folks, and, like, when we talk to folks, we encourage them to think carefully about what that threshold is, but generally, for us at incident.io, that means basically a single error that is worthwhile investigating that you would stop doing your backlog work for is an incident. And also an entire app being down, that is an incident.So, there's quite a wide range there. But essentially, by sort of having more incidents and lowering that threshold, you suddenly have a heap of benefits, which I can go very deep into and talk for hours about.Corey: It's a deceptively complex question. When I talk to folks about backups, one of the biggest problems in the world of backup and building a DR plan, it's not building the DR plan—though that's no picnic either—it's okay. In the time of cloud, all your planning figures out, okay. Suddenly the site is down, how do we fix it? There are different levels of down and that means different things to different people where, especially the way we build apps today, it's not is the service or site up or down, but with distributed systems, it's how down is it?And oh, we're seeing elevated error rates in us-tire-fire-1 region of AWS. At what point do we begin executing on our disaster plan? Because the worst answer, in some respects is, every time you think you see a problem, you start failing over to other regions and other providers and the rest, and three minutes in, you've irrevocably made the cutover and it's going to take 15 minutes to come back up. And oh, yeah, then your primary site comes back up because whoever unplugged something, plugged it back in and now you've made the wrong choice. Figuring out all the things around the incident, it's not what it once was.When you were running your own blog on a single web server and it's broken, it's pretty easy to say, “Is it up or is it down?” As you scale out, it seems like that gets more and more diffuse. But it feels to me that it's also less of a question of how the technology has scaled, but also how the culture and the people have scaled. When you're the only engineer somewhere, you pretty much have no choice but to have the entire state of your stack shoved into your head. When that becomes 15 or 20 different teams of people, in some cases, it feels like it's almost less than a technology problem than it is a problem of how you communicate and how you get people involved. And the issues in front of the people who are empowered and insightful in a certain area that needs fixing.Chris: A hundred percent. This is, like, a really, really key point, which is that organizations themselves are very complex. And so, you've got this combination of systems getting more and more complicated, more and more sort of things going wrong and perpetually breaking but you've got very, very complicated information structures and communication throughout the whole organization to keep things up and running. The very best orgs are the ones where they can engage the entire, sort of, every corner of the organization when things do go wrong. And lived and breathed this firsthand when various different previous companies, but most recently at Monzo—which is a bank here in the UK—when an incident happened there, like, one of our two physical data center locations went down, the bank wasn't offline. Everything was resilient to that, but that required an immediate response.And that meant that engineers were deployed to go and fix things. But it also meant the customer support folks might be required to get involved because we might be slightly slower processing payments. And it means that risk and compliance folks might need to get involved because they need to be reporting things to regulators. And the list goes on. There's, like, this need for a bunch of different people who almost certainly have never worked together or rarely worked together to come together, land in this sort of like empty space of this incident room or virtual incident room, and figure out how they're going to coordinate their response and get things back on track in the sort of most streamlined way and as quick as possible.Corey: Yeah, when your bank is suddenly offline, that seems like a really inopportune time to be introduced to the database team. It's, “Oh, we have one of those. Wonderful. I feel like you folks are going to come in handy later today.” You want to have those pathways of communication open well in advance of these issues.Chris: A hundred percent. And I think the thing that makes incidents unique is that fact. And I think the solution to that is this sort of consistent, level playing field that you can put everybody on. So, if everybody understands that the way that incidents are dealt with is consistent, we declare it like this, and under these conditions, these things happen. And, you know, if I flag this kind of level of impact, we have to pull in someone else to come and help make a decision.At the core of it, there's this weird kind of duality to incidents where they are both kind of semi-formulaic and that you can basically encode a lot of the processes that happen, but equally, they are incredibly chaotic and require a lot of human impact to be resilient and figure these things out because stuff that you have never seen happen before is happening and failing in ways that you never predicted. And so, this is where incident.io plays into this is that we try to take the first half of that off of your hands, which is, we will help you run your process so that all of the brain capacity you have, it goes on to the bit that humans are uniquely placed to be able to do, which is responding to these very, very chaotic, sort of, surprise events that have happened.Corey: I feel as well—because I played around in this space a bit before I used to run ops teams—and, more or less I really should have had a t-shirt then that said, “I am the root cause,” because yeah, I basically did a lot of self-inflicted outages in various environments because it turns out, I'm not always the best with computers. Imagine that. There are a number of different companies that play in the space that look at some part of the incident lifecycle. And from the outside, first, they all look alike because it's, “Oh, so you're incident.io. I assume you're PagerDuty. You're the thing that calls me at two in the morning to make sure I wake up.”Conversely, for folks who haven't worked deeply in that space, as well, of setting things on fire, what you do sounds like it's highly susceptible to the Hacker News problem. Where, “Wait, so what you do is effectively just getting people to coordinate and talk during an incident? Well, that doesn't sound hard. I could do that in a weekend.” And no, no, you can't.If this were easy, you would not have been in business as long as you have, have the team the size that you do, the customers that you do. But it's one of those things that until you've been in a very specific set of a problem, it doesn't sound like it's a real problem that needs solving.Chris: Yeah, I think that's true. And I think that the Hacker News point is a particularly pertinent one and that someone else, sort of, in an adjacent area launched on Hacker News recently, and the amount of feedback they got around, you know, “You're a Slack bot. How is this a company?” Was kind of staggering. And I think generally where that comes from is—well, first of all that bias that engineers have, which is just everything you look at as an engineer is like, “Yeah, I can build that in a weekend.” I think there's often infinite complexity under the hood that just gets kind of brushed over. But yeah, I think at the core of it, you probably could build a Slack bot in a weekend that creates a channel for you in Slack and allows you to post somewhere that some—Corey: Oh, good. More channels in Slack. Just when everyone wants.Chris: Well, there you go. I mean, that's a particular pertinent one because, like, our tool does do that. And one of the things—so I built at Monzo, a version of incident.io that we used at the company there, and that was something that I built evenings and weekends. And among the many, many things I never got around to building, archiving and cleaning up channels was one of the ones that was always on that list.And so, Monzo did have this problem of littered channels everywhere, I think that sort of like, part of the problem here is, like, it is easy to look at a product like ours and sort of assume it is this sort of friendly Slack bot that helps you orchestrate some very basic commands. And I think when you actually dig into the problems that organizations above a certain size have, they're not solved by Slack bots. They're solved by platforms that help you to encode your processes that otherwise have to live on a Google Doc somewhere which is five pages long and when it's 2 a.m. and everything's on fire, I guarantee you not a single person reads that Google Doc, so your process is as good as not in place at all. That's the beauty of a tool like ours. We have a powerful engine that helps you basically to encode that and take some load off of you.Corey: To be clear, I'm also not coming at this from a position of judging other people. I just look right now at the Slack workspace that we have The Duckbill Group, and we have something like a ten-to-one channel-to-human ratio. And the proliferation of channels is a very real thing. And the problem that I've seen across the board with other things that try to address incident management has always been fanciful at best about what really happens when something breaks. Like, you talk about, oh, here's what happens. Step one: you will pull up the Google Doc, or you will pull up the wiki or the rest, or in some aspirational places, ah, something seems weird, I will go open a ticket in Jira.Meanwhile, here in reality, anyone who's ever worked in these environments knows that step one, “Oh shit, oh shit, oh shit, oh shit, oh shit. What are we going to do?” And all the practices and procedures that often exist, especially in orgs that aren't very practiced at these sorts of things, tend to fly out the window and people are going to do what they're going to do. So, any tool or any platform that winds up addressing that has to accept the reality of meeting people where they are not trying to educate people into different patterns of behavior as such. One of the things I like about your approach is, yeah, it's going to be a lot of conversation in Slack that is a given we can pretend otherwise, but here in reality, that is how work gets communicated, particularly in extremis. And I really appreciate the fact that you are not trying to, like, fight what feels almost like a law of nature at this point.Chris: Yeah, I think there's a few things in that. The first point around the document approach or the clearly defined steps of how an incident works. In my experience, those things have always gone wrong because—Corey: The data center is down, so we're going to the wiki to follow our incident management procedure, which is in the data center just lost power.Chris: Yeah.Corey: There's a dependency problem there, too. [laugh].Chris: Yeah, a hundred percent. [laugh]. A hundred percent. And I think part of the problem that I see there is that very, very often, you've got this situation where the people designing the process are not the people following the process. And so, there's this classic, I've heard it through John Allspaw, but it's a bunch of other folks who talk about the difference between people, you know, at the sharp end or the blunt end of the work.And I think the problem that people are facing the past is you have these people who sit in the, sort of, metaphorical upstairs of the office and think that they make a company safe by defining a process on paper. And they ship the piece of paper and go, “That is a good job for me done. I'm going to leave and know that I've made the bank—the other whatever your organization does—much, much safer.” And I think this is where things fall down because—Corey: I want to ambush some of those people in their performance reviews with, “Cool. Just for fun, all the documentation here, we're going to pull up the analytics to see how often that stuff gets viewed. Oh, nobody ever sees it. Hmm.”Chris: It's frustrating. It's frustrating because that never ever happens, clearly. But the point you made around, like, meeting people where you are, I think that is a huge one, which is incidents are founded on great communication. Like, as I said earlier, this is, like, a form of team with someone you've never ever worked with before and the last thing you want to do is be, like, “Hey, Corey, I've never met you before, but let's jump out onto this other platform somewhere that I've never been or haven't been for weeks and we'll try and figure stuff out over there.” It's like, no, you're going to be communicating—Corey: We use Slack internally, but we have a WhatsApp chat that we wind up using for incident stuff, so go ahead and log into WhatsApp, which you haven't done in 18 months, and join the chat. Yeah, in the dawn of time, in the mists of antiquity, you vaguely remember hearing something about that your first week and then never again. This stuff has to be practiced and it's important to get it right. How do you approach the inherent and often unfortunate reality that incident response and management inherently becomes very different depending upon the specifics of your company or your culture or something like that? In other words, how cookie-cutter is what you have built versus adaptable to different environments it finds itself operating in?Chris: Man, the amount of time we spent as a founding team in the early days deliberating over how opinionated we should be versus how flexible we should be was staggering. The way we like to describe it as we are quite opinionated about how we think incidents should be run, however we let you imprint your own process into that, so putting some color onto that. We expect incidents to have a lead. That is something you cannot get away from. However, you can call the lead whatever makes sense for you at your organization. So, some folks call them an incident commander or a manager or whatever else.Corey: There's overwhelming militarization of these things. Like, oh, yes, we're going to wind up taking a bunch of terms from the military here. It's like, you realize that your entire giant screaming fire is that the lights on the screen are in the wrong pattern. You're trying to make them in the right pattern. No one dies here in most cases, so it feels a little grandiose for some of those terms being tossed around in some cases, but I get it. You've got to make something that is unpleasant and tedious in many respects, a little bit more gripping. I don't envy people. Messaging is hard.Chris: Yeah, it is. And I think if you're overly virtuoustic and inflexible, you're sort of fighting an uphill battle here, right? So, folks are going to want to call things what they want to call things. And you've got people who want to import [ITIL 00:15:04] definitions for severity ease into the platform because that's what they're familiar with. That's fine.What we are opinionated about is that you have some severity levels because absent academic criticism of severity levels, they are a useful mechanism to very coarsely and very quickly assess how bad something is and to take some actions off of it. So yeah, we basically have various points in the product where you can customize and put your own sort of flavor on it, but generally, we have a relatively opinionated end-to-end expectation of how you will run that process.Corey: The thing that I find that annoys me—in some cases—the most is how heavyweight the process is, and it's clearly built by people in an ivory tower somewhere where there's effectively a two-day long postmortem analysis of the incident, and so on and so forth. And okay, great. Your entire site has been blown off the internet, yeah, that probably makes sense. But as soon as you start broadening that to things like okay, an increase in 500 errors on this service for 30 minutes, “Great. Well, we're going to have a two-day postmortem on that.” It's, “Yeah, sure would be nice if we could go two full days without having another incident of that caliber.” So, in other words, whose foot—are we going to hire a new team whose full-time job it is, is to just go ahead and triage and learn from all these incidents? Seems to me like that's sort of throwing wood behind the wrong arrows.Chris: Yeah, I think it's very reductive to suggest that learning only happens in a postmortem process. So, I wrote a blog, actually, not so long ago that is about running postmortems and when it makes sense to do it. And as part of that, I had a sort of a statement that was [laugh] that we haven't run a single postmortem when I wrote this blog at incident.io. Which is probably shocking to many people because we're an incident company, and we talk about this stuff, but we were also a company of five people and when something went wrong, the learning was happening and these things were sort of—we were carving out the time, whether it was called a postmortem, or not to learn and figure out these things. Extrapolating that to bigger companies, there is little value in following processes for the sake of following processes. And so, you could have—Corey: Someone in compliance just wound up spitting their coffee over their desktop as soon as you said that. But I hear you.Chris: Yeah. And it's those same folks who are the ones who care about the document being written, not the process and the learning happening. And I think that's deeply frustrating to me as—Corey: All the plans, of course, assume that people will prioritize the company over their own family for certain kinds of disasters. I love that, too. It's divorced from reality; that's ridiculous, on some level. Speaking of ridiculous things, as you continue to grow and scale, I imagine you integrate with things beyond just Slack. You grab other data sources and over in the fullness of time.For example, I imagine one of your most popular requests from some of your larger customers is to integrate with their HR system in order to figure out who's the last engineer who left, therefore everything immediately their fault because lord knows the best practice is to pillory whoever was the last left because then they're not there to defend themselves anymore and no one's going to get dinged for that irresponsible jackass's decisions, even if they never touched the system at all. I'm being slightly hyperbolic, but only slightly.Chris: Yeah. I think [laugh] that's an interesting point. I am definitely going to raise that feature request for a prefilled root cause category, which is, you know, the value is just that last person who left the organization. That it's a wonderful scapegoat situation there. I like it.To the point around what we do integrate with, I think the thing is actually with incidents that's quite interesting is there is a lot of tooling that exists in this space that does little pockets of useful, valuable things in the shape of incidents. So, you have PagerDuty is this system that does a great job of making people's phone making noise, but that happens, and then you're dropped into this sort of empty void of nothingness and you've got to go and figure out what to do. And then you've got things like Jira where clearly you want to be able to track actions that are coming out of things going wrong in some cases, and that's a great tool for that. And various other things in the middle there. And yeah, our value proposition, if you want to call it that, is to bring those things together in a way that is massively ergonomic during an incident.So, when you're in the middle of an incident, it is really handy to be able to go, “Oh, I have shipped this horrible fix to this thing. It works, but I must remember to undo that.” And we put that at your fingertips in an incident channel from Slack, that you can just log that action, lose that cognitive load that would otherwise be there, move on with fixing the thing. And you have this sort of—I think it's, like, that multiplied by 1000 in incidents that is just what makes it feel delightful. And I cringe a little bit saying that because it's an incident at the end of the day, but genuinely, it feels magical when some things happen that are just like, “Oh, my gosh, you've automatically hooked into my GitHub thing and someone else merged that PR and you've posted that back into the channel for me so I know that that happens. That would otherwise have been a thing where I jump out of the incident to go and figure out what was happening.”Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on-premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully-managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word. Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half-dozen managed databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications—including Oracle—to the cloud. To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: The problem with the cloud, too, is the first thing that, when there starts to be an incident happening is the number one decision—almost the number one decision point is this my shitty code, something we have just pushed in our stuff, or is it the underlying provider itself? Which is why the AWS status page being slow to update is so maddening. Because those are two completely different paths to go down and you are having to pursue both of them equally at the same time until one can be ruled out. And that is why time to identify at least what side of the universe it's on is so important. That has always been a bit of a tricky challenge.I want to talk a bit about circular dependencies. You target a certain persona of customer, but I'm going to go out on a limb and assume that one explicit company that you are not going to want to do business with in your current iteration is Slack itself because a tool to manage—okay, so our service is down, so we're going to go to Slack to fix it doesn't work when the service is Slack itself. So, that becomes a significant challenge. As you look at this across the board, are you seeing customers having problems where you have circular dependency issues with this? Easy example: Slack is built on top of AWS.When there's an underlying degradation of, huh, suddenly us-east-1 is not doing what it's supposed to be doing, now, Slack is degraded as well, as well as the customer site, it seems like at that point, you're sort of in a bit of tricky positioning as a customer. Counterpoint, when neither Slack nor your site are working, figuring out what caused that issue doesn't seem like it's the biggest stretch of the imagination at that point.Chris: I've spent a lot of my career working in infrastructure, platform-type teams, and I think you can end up tying yourself in knots if you try and over-optimize for, like, avoiding these dependencies. I think it's one of those, sort of, turtles all the way down situations. So yes, Slack are unlikely to become a customer because they are clearly going to want to use our product when they are down.Corey: They reach out, “We'd like to be your customer.” Your response is, “Please don't be.” None of us are going to be happy with this outcome.Chris: Yeah, I mean, the interesting thing that is that we're friends with some folks at Slack, and they believe it or not, they do use Slack to navigate their incidents. They have an internal tool that they have written. And I think this sort of speaks to the point we made earlier, which is that incidents and things failing or not these sort of big binary events. And so—Corey: All of Slack is down is not the only kind of incident that a company like Slack can experience.Chris: I'd go as far as that it's most commonly not that. It's most commonly that you're navigating incidents where it is a degradation, or some edge case, or something else that's happened. And so, like, the pragmatic solution here is not to avoid the circular dependencies, in my view; it's to accept that they exist and make sure you have sensible escape hatches so that when something does go wrong—so a good example, we use incident.io at incident.io to manage incidents that we're having with incident.io. And 99% of the time, that is absolutely fine because we are having some error in some corner of the product or a particular customer is doing something that is a bit curious.And I could count literally on one hand the number of times that we have not been able to use our products to fix our product. And in those cases, we have a fallback which is jump into—Corey: I assume you put a little thought into what happened. “Well, what if our product is down?” “Oh well, I guess we'll never be able to fix it or communicate about it.” It seems like that's the sort of thing that, given what you do, you might have put more than ten seconds of thought into.Chris: We've put a fair amount of thought into it. But at the end of the day, [laugh] it's like if stuff is down, like, what do you need to do? You need to communicate with people. So, jump on a Google Chat, jump on a Slack huddle, whatever else it is we have various different, like, fallbacks in different order. And at the core of it, I think this is the thing is, like, you cannot be prepared for every single thing going wrong, and so what you can be prepared for is to be unprepared and just accept that humans are incredibly good at being resilient, and therefore, all manner of things are going to happen that you've never seen before and I guarantee you will figure them out and fix them, basically.But yeah, I say this; if my SOC 2 auditor is listening, we also do have a very well-defined, like, backup plan in our SOC 2 [laugh] in our policies and processes that is the thing that we will follow that. But yeah.Corey: The fact that you're saying the magic words of SOC 2, yes, exactly. Being in a responsible adult and living up to some baseline compliance obligations is really the sign of a company that's put a little thought into these things. So, as I pull up incident.io—the website, not the company to be clear—and look through what you've written and how you talk about what you're doing, you've avoided what I would almost certainly have not because your tagline front and center on your landing page is, “Manage incidents at scale without leaving Slack.” If someone were to reach out and say, well, we're down all the time, but we're using Microsoft Teams, so I don't know that we can use you, like, the immediate instinctive response that I would have for that to the point where I would put it in the copy is, “Okay, this piece of advice is free. I would posit that you're down all the time because you're the kind of company to use Microsoft Teams.” But that doesn't tend to win a whole lot of friends in various places. In a slightly less sarcastic bent, do you see people reaching out with, “Well, we want to use you because we love what you're doing, but we don't use Slack.”Chris: Yeah. We do. A lot of folks actually. And we will support Teams one day, I think. There is nothing especially unique about the product that means that we are tied to Slack.It is a great way to distribute our product and it sort of aligns with the companies that think in the way that we do in the general case but, like, at the core of what we're building, it's a platform that augments a communication platform to make it much easier to deal with a high-stress, high-pressure situation. And so, in the future, we will support ways for you to connect Microsoft Teams or if Zoom sought out getting rich app experiences, talk on a Zoom and be able to do various things like logging actions and communicating with other systems and things like that. But yeah, for the time being very, very deliberate focus mechanism for us. We're a small company with, like, 30 people now, and so yeah, focusing on that sort of very slim vertical is working well for us.Corey: And it certainly seems to be working to your benefit. Every person I've talked to who is encountered you folks has nothing but good things to say. We have a bunch of folks in common listed on the wall of logos, the social proof eye chart thing of here's people who are using us. And these are serious companies. I mean, your last job before starting incident.io was at Monzo, as you mentioned.You know what you're doing in a regulated, serious sense. I would be, quite honestly, extraordinarily skeptical if your background were significantly different from this because, “Well, yeah, we worked at Twitter for Pets in our three-person SRE team, we can tell you exactly how to go ahead and handle your incidents.” Yeah, there's a certain level of operational maturity that I kind of just based upon the name of the company there; don't think that Twitter for Pets is going to nail. Monzo is a bank. Guess you know what you're talking about, given that you have not, basically, been shut down by an army of regulators. It really does breed an awful lot of confidence.But what's interesting to me is the number of people that we talk to in common are not themselves banks. Some are and they do very serious things, but others are not these highly regulated, command-and-control, top-down companies. You are nimble enough that you can get embedded at those startup-y of startup companies once they hit a certain point of scale and wind up helping them arrive at a better outcome. It's interesting in that you don't normally see a whole lot of tools that wind up being able to speak to both sides of that very broad spectrum—and most things in between—very effectively. But you've somehow managed to thread that needle. Good work.Chris: Thank you. Yeah. What else can I say other than thank you? I think, like, it's a deliberate product positioning that we've gone down to try and be able to support those different use cases. So, I think, at the core of it, we have always tried to maintain the incident.io should be installable and usable in your very first incident without you having to have a very steep learning curve, but there is depth behind it that allows you to support a much more sophisticated incident setup.So, like, I mean, you mentioned Monzo. Like, I just feel incredibly fortunate to have worked at that company. I joined back in 2017 when they were, I don't know, like, 150,000 customers and it was just getting its banking license. And I was there for four years and was able to then see it scale up to 6 million customers and all of the challenges and pain that goes along with that both from building infrastructure on the technical side of things, but from an organizational side of things. And was, like, front-row seat to being able to work with some incredibly smart people and sort of see all these various different pain points.And honestly, it feels a little bit like being in sort of a cheat mode where we get to this import a lot of that knowledge and pain that we felt at Monzo into the product. And that happens to resonate with a bunch of folks. So yeah, I feel like things are sort of coming out quite well at the moment for folks.Corey: The one thing I will say before we wind up calling this an episode is just how grateful I am that I don't have to think about things like this anymore. There's a reason that the problem that I chose to work on of expensive AWS bills being very much a business-hours only style of problem. We're a services company. We don't have production infrastructure that is externally facing. “Oh, no, one of our data analysis tools isn't working internally.”That's an interesting curiosity, but it's not an emergency in the same way that, “Oh, we're an ad network and people are looking at ads right now because we're broken,” is. So, I am grateful that I don't have to think about these things anymore. And also a little wistful because there's so much that you do it would have made dealing with expensive and dangerous outages back in my production years a lot nicer.Chris: Yep. I think that's what a lot of folks are telling us essentially. There's this curious thing with, like, this product didn't exist however many years ago and I think it's sort of been quite emergent in a lot of companies that, you know, as sort of things have moved on, that something needs to exist in this little pocket of space, dealing with incidents in modern companies. So, I'm very pleased that what we're able to build here is sort of working and filling that for folks.Corey: Yeah. I really want to thank you for taking so much time to go through the ethos of what you do, why you do it, and how you do it. If people want to learn more, where's the best place for them to go? Ideally, not during an incident.Chris: Not during an incident, obviously. Handily, the website is the company name. So, incident.io is a great place to go and find out more. We've literally—literally just today, actually—launched our Practical Guide to Incident Management, which is, like, a really full piece of content which, hopefully, will be useful to a bunch of different folks.Corey: Excellent. We will, of course, put a link to that in the [show notes 00:29:52]. I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time. Really appreciate it.Chris: Thanks so much. It's been an absolute pleasure.Corey: Chris Evans, Chief Product Officer and co-founder of incident.io. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me why your latest incident is all the intern's fault.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

This Day in Esoteric Political History
Harriet Jacobs, Budding Author (1853)

This Day in Esoteric Political History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 17:47


It's July 7th. This day in 1853, Harriet Jacobs, a formerly enslaved woman, writes her first letter to the editor, and begins to work on her memoirs. Her story, published almost ten years later under a pseudonym as “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl,” would paint a picture of slavery and sexual violence that was often not represented. Jody, Niki, and Kellie discuss Jacobs's story, the impact of her work, and why it was lost to history for many years until fairly recently. Sign up for our newsletter! Find out more at thisdaypod.com And don't forget about Oprahdemics, hosted by Kellie, out now from Radiotopia. This Day In Esoteric Political History is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. Your support helps foster independent, artist-owned podcasts and award-winning stories. If you want to support the show directly, you can do so on our website: ThisDayPod.com Get in touch if you have any ideas for future topics, or just want to say hello. Our website is thisdaypod.com Follow us on social @thisdaypod Our team: Jacob Feldman, Researcher/Producer; Brittani Brown, Producer; Khawla Nakua, Transcripts; music by Teen Daze and Blue Dot Sessions; Julie Shapiro and Audrey Mardavich, Executive Producers at Radiotopia

The CyberWire
Quantum computing and security standards. Cyber war, and the persistence of cybercrime. DPRK ransomware versus healthcare. Cyber incidents and credit, in Shanghai and elsewhere.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 30:31


Quantum computing and security standards. Notes on the cyber phases of a hybrid war, and how depressingly conventional cybercrime persists in wartime. Pyongyang operators are using Maui ransomware against healthcare targets. Malek Ben Salem from Accenture looks at the security risks of GPS. Our guest is Brian Kenyon of Island to discuss enterprise browser security. Shanghai's big data exposure. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/128 Selected reading. NIST Announces First Four Quantum-Resistant Cryptographic Algorithms (NIST) Winners of NIST's post-quantum cryptography competition announced (Computing)  NIST unveils four algorithms that will underpin new 'quantum-proof' cryptography standards (SC magazine)  NIST Identifies 4 Quantum-Resistant Encryption Algorithms (Nextgov.com) Prepare for a New Cryptographic Standard to Protect Against Future Quantum-Based Threats (CISA) Quantum-resistant encryption recommended for standardization (Register) Keeping Phones Running in Wartime Pushes Kyivstar to the Limit (Bloomberg) The Ukraine war could provide a cyberwarfare manual for Chinese generals eyeing Taiwan (CyberScoop) Ukrainian police takes down phishing gang behind payments scam (ZDNet) Cyber Police of Ukraine arrested 9 men behind phishing attacks on Ukrainians attempting to capitalize on the ongoing conflict (Security Affairs)  North Korean State-Sponsored Cyber Actors Use Maui Ransomware to Target the Healthcare and Public Health Sector (CISA)  Reports (Moody's) Clarion Housing ‘cyber incident' affects thousands of tenants (Cambs Times)  In a big potential breach, a hacker offers to sell a Chinese police database. (New York Times) Nearly one billion people in China had their personal data leaked, and it's been online for more than a year (CNN)  China data breach likely to fuel identity fraud, smishing attacks (ZDNet)  China Tries to Censor What Could Be Biggest Data Hack in History (Gizmodo)  Here are four big questions about the massive Shanghai police leak (Washington Post) Shanghai Data Breach Exposes Dangers of China's Trove (Bloomberg)

Ray Appleton
Hour 2 - July 4TH Incidents And Illegal Fireworks Citations. Biden Announces Final Piece Of His American Rescue Plan. Should Fireworks Be Illegal

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 36:51


City officials said Tuesday that illegal fireworks caused a blaze that burned three homes in central Fresno on the Fourth of July. President Biden Live from Ohio. KMJ Listeners call in to awnser the question of, Should Fireworks be illegal? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Wild Thing
S3 E8: Risky Business

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 29:00 Very Popular


Incidents like Chernobyl and Fukushima are often what comes to mind when we think about nuclear energy. Thankfully, events like these actually very rare. So does that mean the risks we associate with atomic power are as bad as we think? How good are we at actually assessing those risks? And can we make things even less risky by removing humans from the equation? That's how some next generation projects hope to make nuclear energy safer. *Become a premium subscriber to Wild Thing! Premium subscribers get each new episode early, and exclusive access to all bonus episodes, not to mention the warm fuzzy feeling that comes from supporting the show. Go to https://wildthing.supportingcast.fm/ to find out more! *Season 3 of Wild Thing is produced by Laura Krantz and Scott Carney. Editing by Alicia Lincoln. Music and mixing by Louis Weeks. *Find us on social media - @wildthingpod - and on our website https://wildthingpodcast.com/

Compliance Perspectives
Susan Freccia on Small Compliance Programs [Podcast]

Compliance Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 14:04


Posted by Adam Turteltaub Being a compliance department of one can be a lonely job, but not for Susan Freccia, Director of Compliance at Oregon State University. Working in a small compliance department doesn't feel like a challenge. For one, she is not fully alone. There are compliance partners – professionals who have at least some compliance responsibilities – across the campus. More importantly, rather than focusing on her lack of a compliance team of her own she works at creating collaborative relationships far and wide. That includes the compliance partners, staff, HR, legal and audit. For others in solo situations she advises not falling into the temptation of thinking, “If only I had X or Y the compliance program could be better.” Instead, she recommends focusing on how to work effectively and continue to improve processes. She has also found success comes from the ability to help others get “unstuck” in their efforts.  She frequently meets with various individuals and teams to help figure out what the challenge is and to find a solution. She also may serve as a bridge between departments who may share responsibility in an area, helping them to collaborate more effectively. Susan also advises against seeking perfection. It's unattainable. Incidents will always occur. She notes that even the Sentencing Guidelines reflect that reality with several elements addressing how a program responds to the inevitable problems. In sum, to make a small program work, take a collaborative, problem-solving approach. It will be more effective and help people see compliance not as the cause of problems but the solutions to them.

The Jaipur Dialogues
Udaipur, Amravati Incidents are very Common Prakhar Srivastava and Sanjay Dixit

The Jaipur Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 48:07


If you thought killing for blasphemy was a rare occurrence, go back to the 20th century if not back to the Islamic Rule. Prakhar Shrivastava recounts the famous instances and the contribution of MK Gandhi to all those killings.

The Grindhouse Radio
WBS: Can't Take Much More #164 7-5-22

The Grindhouse Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 44:34


Can't Take Much More #164. Within Brim's Skin -- Brimstone is joined by his wing man Alex DaPonte and guest Megan Suss as they talk about lots of things including why gun control is needed immediately and how there was no WBS last week in protest of the decision to reverse Rowe v Wade. Brim discusses the weekend signing at Eternal Con as well as his experience at K'Pacho and explains how Joey Chestnut took down a protestor. Brim chats about a few firework related incidents that went up in smoke and how The Rock just got a few new siblings. Essentially - he explains what gets Within Brim's Skin.

Within Brim's Skin
WBS: Can't Take Much More #164 7-5-22

Within Brim's Skin

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 44:34


Can't Take Much More #164. Within Brim's Skin -- Brimstone is joined by his wing man Alex DaPonte and guest Megan Suss as they talk about lots of things including why gun control is needed immediately and how there was no WBS last week in protest of the decision to reverse Rowe v Wade. Brim discusses the weekend signing at Eternal Con as well as his experience at K'Pacho and explains how Joey Chestnut took down a protestor. Brim chats about a few firework related incidents that went up in smoke and how The Rock just got a few new siblings. Essentially - he explains what gets Within Brim's Skin.

Weird Darkness: Stories of the Paranormal, Supernatural, Legends, Lore, Mysterious, Macabre, Unsolved
“LITERALLY DYING OF FRIGHT” and More True Stories – PLUS BLOOPERS! #WeirdDarkness

Weird Darkness: Stories of the Paranormal, Supernatural, Legends, Lore, Mysterious, Macabre, Unsolved

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 65:15


Click here to find Weird Darkness in your favorite podcast app: https://linktr.ee/weirddarkness IN THIS EPISODE: It has been scientifically proven that we can truly be scared to death – but some of the situations of people dying of fright might surprise you. We'll look at a few newspaper headlines and stories from the past where people were deemed to be scared to death. (Incidents of Death By Fright) *** The tragic death of 11-year-old Darius Flinders could quite possibly be one of the strangest deaths ever recorded. It wouldn't seem so at first, but it gets that way as the possible explanations come forth. (The Strange Death of Darius N. Flinders) *** Last month a group of disgruntled TikTok witches reportedly got together and combined their online powers to cast a negative spell on the moon. Not a sentence I thought I'd ever read aloud, but that's just the kind of year we're having, isn't it? (Disgruntled Witches Curse the Moon) *** Weirdo family member Chris Harrell feels something hop onto the end of his bed… and it wasn't his dog. (Zombie Paralysis) *** Philadelphian Dorothy Cooper Forstein appeared to be happily married, comfortably well-to-do, a loving mother, and well-liked. She was, in short, one of the last people anyone would imagine as a victim of one of the creepiest disappearances in American history. (The Disappearance of Dorothy Forstein) *** Allan Pinkerton started the nation's first P.I. firm, saved Abraham Lincoln's life, and led Union spies behind Confederate lines during the Civil War. We'll look at the formation of the Pinkerton Agency. (America's First Private Eyes)
(Dark Archives episode from August 08, 2020)SOURCES AND ESSENTIAL WEB LINKS…“Incidents of Death by Fright” by Chris Woodyard for The Victorian Book of the Dead: https://tinyurl.com/yyojesk6“The Strange Death of Darius N. Flinders” by Jennifer Jones for The Dead History: https://tinyurl.com/y2ulwdfv “The Disappearance of Dorothy Forstein” posted at Strange Company: https://tinyurl.com/y295teyk “Disgruntled Witches Curse The Moon” by Rob Schwarz for Stranger Dimensions: https://tinyurl.com/y4etwyck “Zombie Paralysis” by Weirdo family member Chris Harrell: https://tinyurl.com/yydgjgye “America's First Private Eyes” by Grace Srinivasiah for The Line Up: https://tinyurl.com/yxo4akj3 Subscribe to the podcast by searching for Weird Darkness wherever you listen to podcasts – or use this RSS feed link: https://www.spreaker.com/show/3655291/episodes/feed.Weird Darkness theme by Alibi Music Library. Background music provided by Alibi Music, EpidemicSound and/or AudioBlocks with paid license. Music from Shadows Symphony (https://tinyurl.com/yyrv987t), Midnight Syndicate (http://amzn.to/2BYCoXZ), Kevin MacLeod (https://tinyurl.com/y2v7fgbu), Tony Longworth (https://tinyurl.com/y2nhnbt7), and/or Nicolas Gasparini/Myuu (https://tinyurl.com/lnqpfs8) is used with permission. 

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =(Over time links seen above may become invalid, disappear, or have different content. I always make sure to give authors credit for the material I use whenever possible. If I somehow overlooked doing so for a story, or if a credit is incorrect, please let me know and I will rectify it in these show notes immediately. Some links included above may benefit me financially through qualifying purchases.)= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = ="I have come into the world as a light, so that no one who believes in me should stay in darkness." — John 12:46Visit the Church of the Undead: http://undead.church/ Find out how to escape eternal darkness at https://weirddarkness.com/eternaldarkness Trademark, Weird Darkness®, 2022. Copyright Weird Darkness©, 2022.= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =00:30:41.574, 00:46:36.191,

BakerHosts
2022 DSIR Deeper Dive: Vendor Incidents

BakerHosts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 18:13


The Data Security Incident Response Report features insights and metrics from 1,270+ incidents that members of the firm's DADM Practice Group helped clients manage in 2021. This episode takes us deeper into vendor incidents. Questions & Comments: lsessions@bakerlaw.com and sferrari@bakerlaw.com

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes
‘Why People Are Acting So Weird' with Olga Khazan

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 48:57 Very Popular


More incidents of road rage. People are now smoking on the subway. Early 2021 saw the highest number of “unruly passenger” incidents in airline history, according to the FAA. It seems people are acting stranger than ever. But what's behind all of this? Olga Khazan, a staff writer at The Atlantic, wrote about this very topic. She joins WITHpod to discuss the role that the pandemic has played in increased disruptive behavior, why mental health issues aren't the only factor to blame, and more.

The Shit No One Tells You About Writing
Writing Memoir, Planting Curiosity Seeds & Choosing Inciting Incidents

The Shit No One Tells You About Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 71:42 Very Popular


In today's Bonus Episode, CeCe chats with Zibby Owens, podcaster, publisher, CEO and author of Bookends: A Memoir of Love, Loss, and Literature. They play two truths and a lie (the writing version); discuss a  strategy for turning memories into memoir; and Zibby's writing and publishing advice for emerging writers. After which, Bianca chats with Samantha M. Bailey, bestselling author of Watch Out for Her about sewing curiosity seeds; writing messy first drafts; being aware of your writing crutches;  choosing your tenses intentionally; and what it's like to be a bestselling author. Finally, Bianca chats with Natasha Omokhodion-Kalulu Banda, award-winning author of No Be From Hia, about the challenges of writing a multi-POV, multi-timeline debut novel; ensuring the voice grows with the character from child to adult; inciting incidents—on and off the page; and working with editors before you query. Find us on our socials:Twitter: @TSNOTYAW @BiancaM_author @carlywatters @ceciliaclyraInstagram: @biancamarais_author @carlywatters @cece_lyra_agent @ the_shit_about_writingFacebook: @tsnotyawWebsite: www.biancamarais.com and www.theshitaboutwriting.comZibby can be found at @zibbyowens on Twitter and Instagram, and at www.zibbyowens.comSamantha can be found at @sbaileybooks on Instagram and Twitter, and at www.samanthambailey.caNatasha can be found at @tashomokhodian on Instagram

Bavarian Football Works: For Bayern Munich fans
Bavarian Podcast Works S4E36: Should Bayern Munich extend Brazzo? Mané, Lewandowski, and more incidents examined

Bavarian Football Works: For Bayern Munich fans

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 52:14


For the first time ever, BFW is doing a three-person show! Hasan Salihamidzic has been a perennial subject of controversy at Bayern Munich, and with his contract set to run out next season, we decided to do a deep dive on his record and what he has achieved in his tenure as sporting director. With the Sadio Mané saga fresh in everyone's minds, it seemed like a good time to finally tackle this issue. In this episode, INNN, Tom, and Schnitzel discuss: Our opening thoughts about Brazzo and how he has conducted his business at Bayern Munich. Does Brazzo deserve the flack he gets for failing to extend certain contracts? Talking about the communication issues at Bayern, especially the Robert Lewandowski saga. The Niklas Sule incident — what happened there? Going through everything from top to bottom. Criticism of Herbert Hainer and Oliver Kahn. How much of their failings are being blamed on Brazzo? INNN tries to come up with some redeeming points for Brazzo. Maybe he learned his lessons this season? What happened between Hansi Flick and Brazzo? Final question: Has Brazzo earned his contract extension yet? What more should he do? As always, thanks for your support and let us know what you think! Be sure to stay tuned to Bavarian Podcast Works for all of your up to date coverage on Bayern Munich and Germany. Follow us on Twitter @BavarianFBWorks, @jeffersonfenner, @TheBarrelBlog, @tommyadams71, @bfwinnn, and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

FBI Retired Case File Review
263: Craig Arnold – Shooting Incidents, FBI Medals Program

FBI Retired Case File Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 76:08


In this episode, retired agent Craig Arnold reviews two shooting incidents he was involved in, one which resulted in saving the life of an FBI informant and another where, during a fatal shootout, he saved the life of a cooperating witness by taking the life of a subject. As a certified peer support counselor, Craig traveled all over the country to speak with and offer support to other FBI agents and police officers involved in shooting incidents. As the recipient of the FBI Medal of Valor, the FBI's highest honor, and two FBI Shields of Bravery, Craig was a member of the FBI's Honorary Medals selection panel. At the time of his retirement, Craig was one of the most highly decorated agents in the Bureau's history. Craig Arnold served in the FBI for 22 years. Check out episode show notes, photos, and related articles. https://jerriwilliams.com/263-craig-arnold-shooting-incidents-fbi-medals-program/ Buy me a coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JerriWilliams   Join my Reader Team to get the FBI Reading Resource - Books about the FBI, written by FBI agents, the 20 clichés about the FBI Reality Checklist, and keep up to date on the FBI in books, TV, and movies via my monthly email. Join here. http://eepurl.com/dzCCmL  Jerri Williams, a retired FBI agent, author and podcaster, attempts to relive her glory days by debunking FBI cliches. Visit her website to check out her books, available as audiobooks, ebooks and paperbacks wherever books are sold. https://jerriwilliams.com/books/

Mile Higher Podcast
207: Dark Side Of Seaworld & The Long Deadly History Of Orca Trainer Incidents

Mile Higher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 95:36 Very Popular


Support our Sponsors! Favor http://heyfavor.com/milehigher | Modern Fertility http://modernfertility.com/milehigher | SimpliSafe http://simplisafe.com/milehigher | Hello Tushy http://hellotushy.com/milehigher | Stamps.com http://stamps.com enter code: milehigher Mile Higher Merch Is Here! http://milehighermerch.com Check out our vlog channel https://www.youtube.com/c/Kendaily Check out our other podcasts! The Sesh https://bit.ly/3Mtoz4X Lights Out https://bit.ly/3n3Gaoe Planet Sleep https://linktr.ee/planetsleep Higher Love Wellness Co https://higherlovewellness.com/ Get 10% Off by entering code: homies Higher Love Wellness IG: @higherlovewellnessco Higher Love Wellness TW: @higherlovecbd MHP Merch: http://milehighermerch.com Join our official FB group! https://bit.ly/3kQbAxg Join our Discord community, it's free! https://discord.gg/hZ356G9 MHP YouTube: http://bit.ly/2qaDWGf Are You Subscribed On Apple Podcast & Spotify?! Support MHP by leaving a rating or review on Apple Podcast :) https://apple.co/2H4kh58 MHP Topic Request Form: https://forms.gle/gUeTEzL9QEh4Hqz88 Merch designer application: https://forms.gle/ha2ErBnv1gK4rj2Y6 Episode Sources:  https://controlc.com/1eed9e62 You can follow us on all the things: @milehigherpod Twitter: http://twitter.com/milehigherpod Instagram: http://instagram.com/milehigherpod YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/milehigherpodcast Hosts: Kendall: @kendallraeonyt IG: http://instagram.com/kendallraeonyt TW: https://twitter.com/kendallraeonyt YT: https://www.youtube.com/c/kendallsplace Josh: @milehigherjosh IG: http://instagram.com/milehigherjosh TW: https://twitter.com/milehigherjosh Producers: Janelle: @janelle_fields_ IG: https://www.instagram.com/janelle_fields_ TW: https://twitter.com/janelle_fields_ ✉ Send Us Mail & Fan Art ✉ Kendall Rae & Josh Thomas 8547 E Arapahoe Rd Ste J # 233 Greenwood Village, CO 80112

3HL
Tom Crean on 3HL - We Will See More Incidents Like Jimbo and Saban

3HL

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 27:04


Former Georgie Coach Tom Crean joined 3HL to talk about the NIL, how coaches are adjusting, and coaching against Ron Slay plus more See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Early voting begins in New York today. Two separate drowning incidents occurred last night in Far Rockaway. A Queens man has been arrested after an alleged two-week crime spree. A live look at the Coney Island Mermaid Parade. There were two separate anti

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 5:58


The Safety Pro Podcast
EP 153: Precursor Incidents w/Alexander Paradies

The Safety Pro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 72:30


Join the Community of Safety Pros today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! In this episode, I speak to Alexander Paradies from System Improvements, Inc., also known as The TapRooT® Folks, about precursor incidents. Do we need to deep dive into ALL of them? How do we know? All of this and more in this episode. Please listen and share this episode with others. If you want to go more in-depth on this and other topics - become a SafetyPro Community member (FREE to join). Premium Community members can access exclusive content like episode videos, video courses, templates/downloads, participate in live streams, and direct message/live chat with the Safety Pro. Become a PREMIUM member today! Join the Community of Safety Pros today! **Visit MightyLine Tape for all of your floor marking and facility sign needs**

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Hundreds of flights are being cancelled ahead of the long weekend. Mayor Eric Adams wants to go back to the 1980's to solve the problems in the subways. The NYPD is looking for several suspects involved in separate groping incidents in Brownsville, Bro

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 4:31


Before the Lights
Frank Calabrese Jr.

Before the Lights

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 53:45


The show consists of:Frank's life as a child that includes robbery and learning about the street. What his father (Frank Sr.) was like?The violent bombing period from 1971-1986The murders of Mad Sam DeStefano, Sam Giancana, & Tony Spilotro. Who killed Sam? The phrases they used to talk to each other. Incidents that happen to Frank by the hands of his father and time he thought his father was going to kill him. Mailing the letter to the FBI, when his father found out he wrote it and testifying against him. Was there something harder than putting his father in prison for life?Advice for those fearing a family memberHis book and tours he is doing.Links: Buy “Operation Family Secrets”: https://www.amazon.com/Operation-Family-Secrets-Mobsters-Murderous/dp/0307717739Family Secrets Tours: https://www.familysecretstours.com/ Buy Tommy a glass of vino: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=94FXFEN6E2MB2Become a BTL Member: https://www.beforethelightspod.com/supportHire Tommy to Speak: https://www.beforethelightspod.com/public-speaking

Overheard at National Geographic
Celebrate Juneteenth with Into the Depths

Overheard at National Geographic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 45:29 Very Popular


In this special episode of Overheard in celebration of Juneteenth, we reconnect with now Rolex/National Geographic Explorer of the Year Tara Roberts, who upends her life—including leaving her job—to join a group of Black scuba divers searching for the wrecks of ships that carried enslaved Africans to the Americas. Tara is inspired by the stories of the Clotilda, a ship that illegally arrived in Mobile, Alabama, in 1860, and of Africatown, created by those on the vessel—a community that still exists today. The archaeologists and divers leading the search for the Clotilda lay out the steps it took to find it. As Tara talks to the living descendants of those aboard the ship, she admires their enormous pride in knowing their ancestry, and wonders if she can trace her own ancestors back to a ship. She hires a genealogist and visits her family's small hometown in North Carolina, where she celebrates the nation's first federal Juneteenth holiday. The spirit of community she finds at the celebration, as well as the surprising results she receives from the genealogist, bring Tara a sense of belonging to a place that she never could have imagined. Want more? Check out our Into the Depths hub to learn more about Tara's journey following Black scuba divers, find previous Nat Geo coverage on the search for slave shipwrecks, and read the March cover story. And download a tool kit for hosting an Into the Depths listening party to spark conversation and journey deeper into the material. Also explore: Dive into more of National Geographic's coverage of the Clotilda with articles looking at scientists' ongoing archaeological work, the story that broke the discovery of the ship, and the documentary Clotilda: Last American Slave Ship. Meet more of the descendants of the Africans trafficked to the U.S. aboard the Clotilda, and find out what they're doing to save Mobile's Africatown community in the face of difficult economic and environmental challenges. Read the story of Kossola, who later received the name Cudjo Lewis, in the book Barracoon: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo,” by author and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston. Learn more about the life of abolitionist Harriet Jacobs, author of “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl,” who escaped Edenton, N.C., through the Maritime Underground Railroad. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Into the Depths
Celebrate Juneteenth with Into the Depths

Into the Depths

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 45:29


In celebration of Juneteenth, we revisit the final episode of Into the Depths with National Geographic Explorer Tara Roberts. Tara is inspired by the stories of the Clotilda, a ship that illegally arrived in Mobile, Alabama, in 1860, and of Africatown, created by those on the vessel—a community that still exists today. The archaeologists and divers leading the search for the Clotilda lay out the steps it took to find it. As Tara talks to the living descendants of those aboard the ship, she admires their enormous pride in knowing their ancestry, and wonders if she can trace her own ancestors back to a ship. She hires a genealogist and visits her family's small hometown in North Carolina, where she celebrates the nation's first federal Juneteenth holiday. The spirit of community she finds at the celebration, as well as the surprising results she receives from the genealogist, bring Tara a sense of belonging to a place that she never could have imagined. Want more? Check out our Into the Depths hub to learn more about Tara's journey following Black scuba divers, find previous Nat Geo coverage on the search for slave shipwrecks, and read the March cover story. And download a tool kit for hosting an Into the Depths listening party to spark conversation and journey deeper into the material. Also explore: Dive into more of National Geographic's coverage of the Clotilda with articles looking at scientists' ongoing archaeological work, the story that broke the discovery of the ship, and the documentary Clotilda: Last American Slave Ship. Meet more of the descendants of the Africans trafficked to the U.S. aboard the Clotilda, and find out what they're doing to save Mobile's Africatown community in the face of difficult economic and environmental challenges. Read the story of Kossola, who later received the name Cudjo Lewis, in the book Barracoon: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo,” by author and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston. Learn more about the life of abolitionist Harriet Jacobs, author of “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl,” who escaped Edenton, N.C., through the Maritime Underground Railroad. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices