Podcasts about EMS

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Best podcasts about EMS

Show all podcasts related to ems

Latest podcast episodes about EMS

Idle Chatter: Hot Rod Farmer
The special service needs of emergency vehicles. Aired 5/14/22

Idle Chatter: Hot Rod Farmer

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 29:58


Rural America has the heart of a servant. This week, the Hot Rod Farmer, Ray Bohacz, provides insight to the special service requirements for the vehicles employed by rural EMS and fire departments. The importance of pulley alignment is explored in the Under the Sheetmetal segment.

Prehospital Emergency Care Podcast - the NAEMSP Podcast
Prehospital Emergency Care Podcast Ep. 114: Rising to the Challenge

Prehospital Emergency Care Podcast - the NAEMSP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 42:06


EMS Week: Rising to the challenge As EMS week comes to a close, NAEMSP, the PEC podcast, and the But Why EMS podcast would like to highlight a NAEMSP member who has Risen to the Challenge of the war in Ukraine.  Dr. Kasia Hampton (@kasiahamptonmd) & her medical student daughter Livia Van Humbeeck (@doclivia) have been helping their home country Poland and their neighbor Ukraine during this horrendous time in history.  We talk to Dr. Hampton and Livia about their initial experiences and their continued plans to aid Ukraine. Click here to check it out today! As always THANK YOU for listening. Hawnwan Philip Moy MD (@pecpodcast) Scott Goldberg MD, MPH (@EMS_Boston) Jeremiah Escajeda MD, MPH (@jerescajeda) Joelle Donofrio-Odmann DO (@PEMems) Maia Dorsett MD PhD (@maiadorsett) Lekshmi Kumar MD, MPH (@gradyMED1)

Off The Box
Season 2 - We Are Back!!!

Off The Box

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 95:26


Holy cliff hangers.  Garrett and John left ya'll hanging with Dr. Lilja of the Offspring at the end of season 1.  Will they come back?  What happened to those guys?Turns out the guys had actual jobs with real work and needed some time to balance life as  podcast hosts downloaded almost as many times as Joe Rogan's and their actual duties working for the HCA San Jose Market.  Almost, John still can't do math very well so almost is probably more like to the tune of 1 download to everyone million of Rogan's, but, hey, it's a better ratio than before we started the podcast.  See?  Cause then it would be zero....Oh boy.At any rate, we have a great season planned for you guys.  Two are already in the books to be issued in the coming weeks.  Today, it's just John and Garrett talking EMS, life after Covid in healthcare, thoughts on healthcare, and the fame they acquired as podcast mega stars.  Tune back in, the guys missed you as much as you missed them.  Follow us on IG and you can reach out via email at offtheboxpodcast@gmail.com.-John

The County 10 Podcast
SageWest thanks EMS teams – Celebrating EMS Week May 15–21

The County 10 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 15:32


"Our patients count on us when they need us most. And we count on EMS professionals to provide treatment and transport when an emergency strikes. As first responders, you are on the frontlines, providing compassionate, individualized and often lifesaving care. On behalf of the doctors, staff and administration, we offer you our heartfelt thanks and appreciation. Today and every day." Guardian EMS Team on the Morning Show with Jerrad & Charene. Pictured left to right: Amy Hanson, Flight RN; Lauri Wempen, Flight Paramedic and Amanda, Flight RN Listen to the Guardian EMS interview here:

Prehospital Emergency Care Podcast - the NAEMSP Podcast
Prehospital Emergency Care Podcast Ep. 113

Prehospital Emergency Care Podcast - the NAEMSP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 57:08


Ouch-less Pediatrics For CAPCE Credit click here! Happy EMS Week: Pediatrics Day! The PEC Podcast team would like to highlight NAEMSP's newest podcast to our family  The Pediatric EMS Podcast In their first episode, hosts Dr. Joseph Finney and Dr. Joelle Donofrio Odmann talk about Safely and effectively managing pain in our pediatric patients. Medical directors and prehospital clinicians must be able to identify gaps in pediatric pain management and provide the necessary QA/QI to close those gaps. In this episode, we focus on exactly that, with several experts in EMS joining us to offer their knowledge and critical appraisal of the evidence in order to identify and close the gaps in the management of pain in children. As always THANK YOU for listening. Hawnwan Philip Moy MD (@pecpodcast) Scott Goldberg MD, MPH (@EMS_Boston) Jeremiah Escajeda MD, MPH (@jerescajeda) Joelle Donofrio-Odmann DO (@PEMems) Maia Dorsett MD PhD (@maiadorsett) Lekshmi Kumar MD, MPH (@gradyMED1) Disclaimer The Emergency Medical Services for Children Innovation and Improvement Center is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award (U07MC37471) totaling $3M with 0 percent financed with nongovernmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov To learn more about the Emergency Medical Services for Children Innovation and Improvement Center visit https://emscimprovement.center Email km@emscimprovement.center Follow on Twitter @EMSCImprovement Sources: International Association for the Society of Pain Subcommittee on Taxonomy  WT Zempsky NL Schechter 2003 What's new in the management of pain in children Pediatrics Rev 24 10 337 347 16  SJ Weisman B Bernstein NL Schechter 1998 Consequences of inadequate analgesia during painful procedures in children Arch Pediatrics Adolescent Med 152 2 147 149 17  JT Pate 1996 Childhood medical experience and temperament as predictors of adult fu Educational Module on Prehospital Pain Management in Children (Targeted Issues Grant): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tn3MF_4-9iQ&feature=youtu.be Lorin R. Browne, Manish I. Shah, Jonathan R. Studnek, Daniel G. Ostermayer, Stacy Reynolds, Clare E. Guse, David C. Brousseau & E. Brooke Lerner (2016) Multicenter Evaluation of Prehospital Opioid Pain Management in Injured Children, Prehospital Emergency Care, 20:6, 759-767, DOI: 10.1080/10903127.2016.1194931

But Why EMS Podcast
But Why EMS Ep. 22 Peds EMS Podcast

But Why EMS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 58:11


For paramedics, click here for CAPCE credits.  Brought to you by Urgent Admin which is an intuitive one-touch solution that connects in-field clinicians and medical directors in real-time, Ouch-less Pediatrics Happy EMS Week: Pediatrics Day! The But Why EMS Podcast team would like to highlight NAEMSP's newest podcast to our family  The Pediatric EMS Podcast In their first episode, hosts Dr. Joseph Finney and Dr. Joelle Donofrio-Odmann talk about Safely and effectively managing pain in our pediatric patients. Medical directors and prehospital clinicians must be able to identify gaps in pediatric pain management and provide the necessary QA/QI to close those gaps. In this episode, we focus on exactly that, with several experts in EMS joining us to offer their knowledge and critical appraisal of the evidence in order to identify and close the gaps in the management of pain in children. Click here to check it out today! Thank you for listening! Hawnwan Philip Moy MD  Gina Pellerito EMT-P John Reagan EMT-P Please subscribe and review our podcasts on: Apple Amazon Google Podcast Stitcher   Disclaimer The Emergency Medical Services for Children Innovation and Improvement Center is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award (U07MC37471) totaling $3M with 0 percent financed with nongovernmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov.     To learn more about the Emergency Medical Services for Children Innovation and Improvement Center visit https://emscimprovement.center   Email km@emscimprovement.center Follow on Twitter @EMSCImprovement   Sources: International Association for the Society of Pain Subcommittee on Taxonomy  WT Zempsky NL Schechter 2003 What's new in the management of pain in children Pediatrics Rev 24 10 337 347 16  SJ Weisman B Bernstein NL Schechter 1998 Consequences of inadequate analgesia during painful procedures in children Arch Pediatrics Adolescent Med 152 2 147 149 17  JT Pate 1996 Childhood medical experience and temperament as predictors of adult fu Educational Module on Prehospital Pain Management in Children (Targeted Issues Grant): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tn3MF_4-9iQ&feature=youtu.be Lorin R. Browne, Manish I. Shah, Jonathan R. Studnek, Daniel G. Ostermayer, Stacy Reynolds, Clare E. Guse, David C. Brousseau & E. Brooke Lerner (2016) Multicenter Evaluation of Prehospital Opioid Pain Management in Injured Children, Prehospital Emergency Care, 20:6, 759-767, DOI: 10.1080/10903127.2016.1194931

Repórter Unicamp
Semana gelada: pesquisadora explica onda de frio que afeta parte do país

Repórter Unicamp

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 5:41


Esta semana deve ser a mais gelada do ano segundo os meteorologistas. Em São Carlos, assim como em todo o interior de São Paulo, os termômetros podem chegar a 4ºC. Kelly Cristina Tonello, pesquisadora do Grupo dePesquisa sobre Hidrologia em Ecossistemas Florestais da UFSCar em Sorocaba, explica o porquê dessa queda brusca de temperatura.___Alessandra Kuna (Rádio UFSCar)

Dear Chiefs Podcast
First Responders; You Need A Day Off

Dear Chiefs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 71:31


This episode is a conversation with James Boomhower of Stay Fit 4 Duty about the importance of taking days off. We also dive into a short conversation about how to give and receive constructive criticism on duty. James Boomhower, BS, FP-C, NR-P, C- NPT, CCISM has been involved in EMS for over 15 years in a variety of health systems throughout New England. He currently functions in the role of Critical Care Transport Specialist-Paramedic/Lead Peer Support Director with Boston Medflight in Bedford, Massachusetts. He is the founder of Stay Fit 4 Duty. Where he works to reduce the stigma of mental health and peer support in healthcare and civil service. James helps create and run peer support teams throughout the country and is currently obtaining a master's degree in clinical psychology.Reading List"I Used To Be A Miserable FCK" by James Kim: https://amzn.to/3wCupcT"Get It Done: Surprising Lessons from the Science of Motivation" by Ayelet Fishbach: https://amzn.to/3Nk0I7bOther Podcasts MentionedMedic MindsetInstagram Influencers MentionedElyse MyersFollow James Boomhower website: https://linktr.ee/stay_fit4dutyinsta: https://www.instagram.com/stay_fit4duty/Follow Dear Chiefswebsite: http://www.dearchiefs.comInstagram: http://www.instagram.com/dearchiefspodcastfacebook: https://www.facebook.com/dearchiefspodcastfacebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/dearchiefspodcast

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health

Miles Mendoza is an author and freelance writer living in New York City. His writing often draws upon experiences as a veteran and various other emergency service roles he's occupied. His poetic essay, “Escape From Harlem,” was published in The Void magazine's December 2020 edition. Another, “Exotic Fruit,” was featured in the AT THE PITH art exhibit at the Nook Gallery in Oakland, California. Most recently, the author collaborated with artist and Professor Tiffany Lin to develop a satirical news story highlighting workers' rights issues (www.tlinart.com/fight-santorg). In September of 2021, Miles published his first book. "Speaking in Midnight Tongues and Other Symptoms of Neon Fever" is a collection of poetry, essays, and short stories that address themes of addiction, trauma, and creativity. When not freelancing, the author maintains a poetry and fiction website: www.MilesWrites.Blog. His work can also be found on his Instagram account: @mileswrites. Today he's sharing about hyper-vigilance, a different- maybe more observant side/speed of the ADHD brain, and advice on how your anxiety can kind of direct you towards being more efficient, if not productive. Enjoy!   In this episode Peter and Miles discuss:     1:17 - Intro and welcome Miles Mendoza! Ref: “Escape From Harlem” 3:20 - What's it like to be a freelance writer and be working on everything all the time & have ADHD? 5:49 - Ref: Ten Ways to be Happier When You Live/Love Someone Diagnosed With ADHD 6:09 - When were you diagnosed? 8:00 - upon joining the military 9:20 - What did you learn in the Marine Corps that you still apply to your daily routines? 11:00 - Ref: FTN episode with Jack Walston 12:25 - on processing everything at the same time 12:33 - on processing speeds 14:05 - on hyper vigilance 15:10 - about the effectiveness of flash cards 16:24 - Tell us more about how you processed the Will Smith slap? 17:42 - How can people find more about you and what you're doing? Web: [17:42 - How can people find more about you and what you're doing? Web: www.MilesWrites.Blog  Socials: @mileswrites on INSTA  18:21 - Thank you Miles! Guys, as always, we are here for you and we love the responses and the notes that we get from you; so please continue to do that! Tell us who you want to hear on the podcast, anything at all; we'd love to know.  Leave us a review on any of the places you get your podcasts, and if you ever need our help I'm www.petershankman.com and you can reach out anytime via peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterNormal on all of the socials. It really helps when you drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse!  18:55 - Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits — TRANSCRIPT: Oh, hellooooo-Ladies and gentlemen my name is Peter Shankman and this is Faster Than Normal. Welcome to another episode! I am your host. I said that already. I am exhausted. I flew in last night from Montana. Boy are my arms tired. It was a three-hour delay on the flight. Um, I got home around 2:00 AM. I had to be up at six to get my kid to school. Um, oh. And by the way, I'm in the middle of an 120 hour water fast. So I am about 60 hours in and I am just exhausted. So don't come near me. I will kill you. But that being said, we have a phenomenal guest.  Y'know.. there are some sites out there on the internet that are just amazing in terms of knowledge and things you can learn. And then there are sites that are just cesspools of filth and depravity. And I was on the cesspool side of the coin a few a month ago or so, and I was on Reddit and I was reading about it. It was right around the time of the Chris Rock Will Smith slap. And I was reading an article about it or a story about it, and I read it and I saw this quote that came from a guy and ran into his quote, said, dude, I have ADHD. So maybe this is just a me thing, but do you know how many of my day-to-day interactions slash reactions are autopiloted while my brain is working on a delay to process what was actually said. So.. what that told me, first of all, the brothers from another mother type thing, but what was amazing about that is that there really are two types of ADHD. There's the ADHD that says, oh my God, someone's not even halfway through their sentence, but I know I have to respond. I know what they're gonna say. And let me just respond right now and lemme interrupt. And then there's the other half. That says I'm just going to watch this because I, my brain has to catch. Everything is moving so fast and my brain moves so fast. But in this situation, I'm going to catch up and make sure I know all the facts. That is what our guest was talking about on Reddit. His name is Miles Mendoza and Miles is an author and a freelance writer. He's living in New York city. We met on Reddit. He lives like 20 blocks for me and his writing draws upon experiences and various other emergency service roles he's occupied. His poetic essay Escape from Harlem was published in The Void magazines' December 2020 edition. And another exotic fruit was featured at the, At the Pith Art exhibit at The Nook gallery in Oakland, California. He's from the Bay area. He lives in New York city and in September of 2021, he published his first book Speaking in Midnight Tongues and Other Symptoms of Neon Fever: Poetry & Essays, which is a collection of poetry, essays, and short stories that address themes. Trauma and creativity; pretty much sounds ADHD to me. Every single theme in that, in that, uh, book of short stories is something that we've all dealt with as ADHD and that whole brain thing- we're in talk about it. Miles. Welcome. Glad to finally have you on the podcast, buddy.  Nice to meet you.Thank you for having me.  So talk let's let's go back. So you live in New York city. You're married. Um, you're a journalist slash a freelance writer slash author. Let's talk for starters about what it's like to be freelance and to be working on any given thing at any given time when you have ADHD.  Well in many ways, it's great. You, um, you're working on a bunch of different things. Your brain is stimulated on a bunch of different subjects all the time. I wouldn't be able to do this 10 years ago though, because I had to develop a bunch of different skills that I.. like to overcompensate for what would have been a very messy approach to business. So I, I, I work off of, I think I have multiple to do lists every single day and in a lot of those to do lists, uh, have to do with like, Take my dog out for the second time today, you need to go up three times. So I need to put that on the list. You need to go up three times. So every single, I didn't hear everything from like haircut to have lunch is on this to-do list. And if there's not enough yellow check marks on that list at the end of the day, I know I did a bad job. Uh, so, but then there's the great thing of like, I get to research different subjects which is. Essentially, I've tried to commodify what I did with my days anyways. So I I'm the kind of person who falls into, um, an obsession on a new subject every other day, I'll fall down rabbit holes. So I try to like, to really kind of take that momentum and just try to commodify it. And, uh, for my own business, it has worked to a certain degree. Um, I do get myself into a lot of situations where I am, uh, I over-packed myself at work because I feel best when I don't have any idle hands, idle parents for at least myself, as some of the ADHD tends to lead to trouble. And, uh, and that's what I was kind of writing about. Um, I wrote a, uh, an essay about, um, what it's like to live with a wife who does not have ADHD in any way, in fact, a very, she's a great student. She's about to finish her, um, nurse anesthesiology master's program. And when she picks up a book, that's what she's going to read until it's time to put it down. Whereas I have hundreds of books I've read most of them, but I have not finished..most of them, you know, that's, that's just kind of how my brain works.  It's funny. You mentioned that I wrote, uh, one of them when I was going through my divorce success at 16, one of the most read articles I published on medium was, um, Ten Ways to be Happier When You Live/Love Someone Diagnosed With ADHD. You know, it was, it was the whole premise that, you know, there'll be times when I have this great experience and all I want to do is share it with the person I love and I'll call and they'll be in a meeting, but they're not answering their phones so obviously it's because they know that I'm calling they don't want to talk to me and they hate me and in my mind I've already broken up gotten divorced moved on with my life um, you know, and then they call me back and they're like, you know, th'f*ck's wrong with you? So yeah, I totally, I totally get that. But. When were you diagnosed? You know, interesting story on that. I, uh, I came, I come from that generation where like, it seemed like every other kid in the class was diagnosed, uh, right about right about when I was in middle school. So what was that; in the late nineties, early two thousands. And I was already. I clearly had it, but I don't think it was just coming into the national conversation um, so, you know, I, I did well on tests. I was a nice enough kid with my family. I just didn't do my homework. I'd either forget about it or just could not get up to the point of performing it. And as I got older, that became more and more of an issue. And so I think that somewhere around fifth or sixth grade, I went to a doctor. And that was a pediatrician, but the problem was that I was? able to keep up with  conversation with him. He put me down in like the lower range. He was like, if he has ADHD that he's like, I, I can give you the prescription, um, on the diagnosis, but he's on the lower range. And so I remember getting Ritalin when I was a child and it, it, I, it didn't react well with me. I, I don't know if you've ever seen the episode of the King of The Hill where Bobby gets a Ritalin.  Oh my God favorite show!  Yeah, exactly. So like, it was pretty much that I was like, I was just sitting, staring at a wall. My parents freaked out. They were like, no, get him off of this. Uh, so I never really thought about it too much.I kind of knew that I had, it was in the back of my head. Um, but it really didn't become an issue for me because, uh, my approach to school was all over the place, but, uh, it didn't become an issue until I impulsively joined the Marine Corps. And then suddenly having your ducks in order is very, very important. And yeah. And there were a lot of moments where to this day, I think back to bootcamp, I, I'm not a religious guy per se, but, uh, I almost turned to Jesus in that sense, because there were these moments where. I did not know, like you have to have your things, like, they will tell you, you need, you know, here's the 10 things on the gear list and you have to have them when you had asked for. And I was like, cool, I've got my 10 things. And then there would just be nine things and like, okay, now w where is it? And like, I need this right now. And then something would just appear. So I, I, I remember at one point I was like, there is a supernatural force looking out for me. I now realize it was probably some dude next to me going, I got to help this idiot. But, yeah, so I thought  I want to stop. I let's stop and talk about that for a minute.  Of course.  So you joined the military, [[microphone rustles across entire frequency spectrum]] and I have said multiple times on this podcast that if I was smarter about what was actually going on in my brain when I was younger, because ADHD didn't exist when I was a kid. Right. You're disturbing the class did.. and I have a feeling that if I had been smarter about this and been more knowledgeable, I might've done the same thing because today my life is entirely based on rituals calendars alarms, set ups, do this, then do this. Then, you know, when COVID hit and I had, I would give a speech on zoom and then have the three days of travel that I'd normally be traveling busy to do nothing it was, it was hard, right? The calendar had to be full. So it seems me like Tell me what you learned. I'm fascinated by this. Tell me what you learned in the military that you were able to then apply, especially in the Marines, they were able to apply to life everyday. I mean, is that where you got the concept of the to-do list and the calendars and all that? Yeah, exactly. So what the military does is it creates like a huge amount of consequences for when you screw up. So suddenly you're kind of always in a fight or flight reflex, and I'm not just talking, I'm not talking about combat or anything. I'm just talking about day-to-day life about living in the fleet is you need to, you need to be places 15, sometimes 30, 45m early. And so you start building buffers into your life and you start realizing like, okay, I don't want to spend my weekend on duty, or I don't want to get my ass chewed out by a staff Sergeant or something like that. So you start to like build in all these things, so you can live a decent life and not everything comes out of the military with you. You do relax a bit. I certainly relaxed quite a bit, but, um, And you do keep these certain things. Like I have like internal timers that tell me like, Hey, you're getting close to that meeting per se for like for today, I knew I had to be at a certain place to do a certain thing. And I started having like internal alarm clocks go off before and it's like, you should be ready 15 minutes beforehand, because what if, you know, you get mugged on the way back to your apartment and you're, you know, now you're late for the worst thing possible is to be late. And you start to worry about how you appear to the world around you because that perception and military.. is often “perception is reality”.  Right? Wow. Okay. Interesting. We do a lot of the same things and, and it, it, it, it. Back in 2001, a former Navy seal who's since passed away a man named Jack Walston, I've had him on the podcast. Very, very, influential man in my life, he started a course, uh, for civilians, uh, where he'd come to.. he was based in Houston and he'd bring it to New York for two weeks or two weeks, four times a year where you'd basically just go and play in central park from 4:00 AM to 7:00 AM and get your ass kicked. Right. It was basically bootcamp. And, you know, for someone who you know, up until the early two thousands, you know, only ran by pressing X on a joystick, um, you know, and to the store for cigarettes, like wanting to do this and actually enjoying it and needing it in my life and doing it like 15 times was massive for me. And, you know, they're totally unexpected, but I get it now. And then the more I talked to the people like you, the more, I totally understand it. You, these rituals, these things that, you know, I'm a free spirited, are actually what ground you and what allow you to be creative because you're not worried about, okay, I'm going to miss this meeting or that miss this appointment or go down this rabbit hole. Uh, absolutely. It's uh, to me, I, I think we live in a pretty anxious society and I I'm sure part of that internally. Uh, but I it's like weaponizing your anxiety. Like let that anxiety kind of direct you towards being productive, or at least being efficient.  Very cool. So let's talk for a second about sort of that slower brain.  Do you think that the concept of ADHD is faster than normal? It's faster brain? The, the, the, the premise that we are always thinking 20 steps ahead and, and that's what we need to control because otherwise, you know, we're going to crash into a tree, um. In your, from what I'm hearing from you, you're actually sitting and processing the reason you might have a, you mentioned something that, where you said, uh, you know, there'll be times when when you know, you've been called out or you're about to get into a fight and you don't, you don't even flinch and everyone thinks that oh wow, he's so, he's so brave, but no, you just haven't really processed what's been going on yet. Yeah. So for me, it is still an issue of like doing too many things too fast. A lot of times when I'm having a conversation, I, I have like, uh, I've been diagnosed with hyper vigilance, so I'm paying attention to everything in the room. I'm listening to conversations next to me. I'm watching people walk into the room. Uh, and, and I know that that sometimes comes with ADHD. You don't necessarily have to have like, Uh, trauma necessarily to spark this, but it is, it's an over-processing, it's like more Ram than, than hard drive. It's operating with one and not the other. So it's, I am, I am paying attention, but it is possible that I may have rehearsed inter-reaction already. So like, I mean, you know, I'm going to go meet with a friend for lunch. Uh, I know how long it's been since I met that friend. I know the questions that I should ask. I am then applying like I am, I'm now deploying that social plan or that social plan while interacting with them.  And then as I'm doing that, I am also getting dragged, congratulating myself for deploying that correctly and not listening to the answers. It's not that I don't want to; it's not that I don't value what they have to say; it's just that my brain is sometimes applying more focus on some background things that are going on as well.  Well, I think that happens in, in terms of, you know, we're constantly, when you're able to see a lot of what you're doing also is figuring out what the next question you ask is what the next, where the conversation is going. Um, and I've noticed that happens to me when I meet someone for the first time and I ask them to name right as they're about, tell me the name I've already moved on to think about what I'm gonna say next and I will never remember the name. Ever. Absolutely. Uh, the names, uh, spouses names. If I, I I'm sorry. A lot of my friends is, uh, third spouses.. I probably will never truly know their names. I will always be asking other friends or my wife, what is that person's, uh, girlfriend or boyfriend's name, you know, or before we even get there.  That's funny. You're very fortunate to have a wife who's a, who's got your back like that.  Oh, she's incredibly tolerant for someone who just learns.. that's what I've noticed is that, um, a lot of ADH deers are, I don't know how we describe ourselves. Um, we, we absorb information. We can interact with it very intensely and then five years later, have no idea how to do that again, like our brain dumping abilities are quite impressive almost. Uh, and, and.  No. It's funny, many times I remember in school, one of the things that was was, you know, I hated tests and things like that, but when I had one, I would sit down.. once I discovered flashcards, right  my life changed. I'd sit down. I've learned it. I get tested on it, I'd pass and then puke it up. It's gone, right?  Right? It's like, it's like your brain does a deep fragmenting and it just like just tosses it and there might be shreds of it there, and you can fall back on it. But for me, I, it, it meant that I needed for a career to rely on internal skills that were actual, like baseline talents that I would always kno. For me, that was always writing so I that's what I, what I ended up going to ultimately, I also have, had I had a very adventurous personality. So for a long time emergency services for EMS, all of that, I loved it because I was just excited to be out there on the street and see what was going on right now that I'm, I'm calming down a little bit and I want a little bit of a safer career choice it's I had to go back again to the thing that never left me. It was my ability to write, edit and whatnot, but, uh, learning actual new skills and then just holding onto them for years at a time. Never really been my forte.  Interesting. Tell us about more about the slowing brain. You, you can use Will Smith as an example. You're watching it happen in real time and yet  you weren't processing. I, I think in all fairness, millions of us watching in real time didn't process it.  Uh yeah.. It's one of those things where it's like, I, I identified mostly because like in real life, when, when events like that happen, they don't, they don't make sense. And they don't make narrative sense. If you're making a movie, the first thing you're going to do is show Will Smith, like getting angry at the joke. Right. But in real life, yeah. He's going to laugh with you. Uh, people react to things illogically sometimes. And I just identified with that for me. When I, when my wife's telling me a story, I sometimes I I'm trying to process and keep in mind everything that's going on. And it makes what her words coming out of her mouth it's a little like watching a washout VHS tape. And it's you kind of, you know it because you've seen the, you've seen that video so many times, but you're not getting grasping all the details in the weight of everything that's going on. So you kind of have to say either stop or say that to me again, or in my case, I often am able to replay back events. So I'm just operating on like a 15 to 22nd delay before I fully understand what's going on.  Very, very interesting. Tell us, uh, I know you have a website that I mentioned earlier. Tell us again, tell us where people can find you things like that.  [17:42 - How can people find more about you and what you're doing? Web: https://www.nontradaccelerator.com/academic-coaching Socials: @mileswrites on INSTA www.tlinart.com/fight-santorg ]  In September of 2021, Miles published his first book. "Speaking in Midnight Tongues and Other Symptoms of Neon Fever" is a collection of poetry, essays, and short stories that address themes of addiction, trauma, and creativity. When not freelancing, the author maintains a poetry and fiction website: www.MilesWrites.Blog.] Oh, uh, Myles writes DOB blog is where I post, uh, I try to curate the best of my material at the mind, poetic essays, um, poetry, uh, some fiction I write in a broad spectrum. And then, uh, you can also find me at miles writes on. Instagram, uh, which is where I usually, that's more of my, my rough draft contents are, you'll hear me scream about some political opinions here or there, but for the most part, you can find all my best material on mileswrites dot blog right.  Awesome. Very cool. Well Miles, thank you so much for taking the time!  Guys. You've listened to Miles, man. I really appreciate you coming in and being so honest and you know, that's, I guess that's the one, my one, you get one shot a year where you find something worthwhile on Reddit. So I guess that was it, um, for this year. So I appreciate you taking the time, man. Thank you so much. Of course, thank you.  Guys, listening to Faster Than Normal as always you know the drill. If you like what you hear then leave us a review. If you want more info or advanced a dog just jumped in my lap oh hello Waffle. And we would love to know more, feel free to share uh what you're thinking. We will see you next week with a brand new interview. Thank you for listening. Stay safe, stay well. — Credits: You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play and of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman and you can find me at petershankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews, the more the podcast has shown, and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were composed and produced by Steven Byrom who also produces this podcast, and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week!

Hacks & Wonks
The State of Public Safety in Seattle with Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 63:13


On this midweek show, Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell joins Crystal for an extensive conversation about public safety in Seattle. Their discussion ranges from how to handle an officer shortage with a long hiring pipeline, the Harrell administration's approach to encampment sweeps, how safety involves more than just policing, and the thought process on creating a third department (beyond Fire and Police). The importance of negotiating the SPOG contract in removing obstacles to progress is covered, as well as the thinking behind hotspot policing and strategic use of limited public safety resources. The show wraps up with what steps we can all take to help create positive change and make our streets safer. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell at @RuleSeven.   Resources “Seattle clears Woodland Park homeless encampment after months of trying to place people into shelter” by Greg Kim from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/homeless/seattle-clears-woodland-park-homeless-encampment-after-months-of-trying-to-place-people-into-shelter/   “Harrell Outlines Public Safety Strategies: Expanding Policing, ‘Hot Spots' Focus, Police Response Alternatives” by Elizabeth Turnbull from the South Seattle Emerald: https://southseattleemerald.com/2022/02/04/harrell-outlines-public-safety-strategies-expanding-policing-hot-spots-focus-police-response-alternatives/   Community Police Commission (CPC) - Police Accountability Recommendations Tracker (PART): https://www.seattle.gov/community-police-commission/our-work/recommendations-tracker   Community Police Commission (CPC) - Accountability Ordinance Tracker: https://www.seattle.gov/community-police-commission/our-work/accountability-ordinance-tracker   Washington State Office of Independent Investigations - Final Bill Report for ESHB 1267: https://lawfilesext.leg.wa.gov/biennium/2021-22/Pdf/Bill%20Reports/House/1267-S.E%20HBR%20FBR%2021.pdf?q=20220517001510   “Harrell Touts Arrests at Longtime Downtown Hot Spot in ‘Operation New Day' Announcement” by Paul Kiefer from PubliCola: https://publicola.com/2022/03/04/harrell-touts-arrests-at-longtime-downtown-hot-spot-in-operation-new-day-announcement/   “Harrell says he ‘inherited a mess,' will solve crime issues by putting arrests first, social services second” by Sarah Grace Taylor from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/harrell-says-he-inherited-a-mess-will-solve-crime-issues-by-putting-arrests-first-social-services-second/   One Seattle Day of Service - May 21: https://www.seattle.gov/mayor/one-seattle-initiatives/day-of-service Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Well today, I'm pleased to welcome Senior Deputy Mayor of Seattle, Monisha Harrell, back to the program. Welcome back. [00:00:47] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Thanks for having me. [00:00:48] Crystal Fincher: Thanks for coming. Well, I suppose this is your first time as the Senior Deputy Mayor - your many, many previous roles and titles and accolades from before this proceeded you - but now you're in the role of Senior Deputy Mayor of Seattle in the Bruce Harrell administration. And how's it going? [00:01:12] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: It's been a fast four and a half months - I think it's a little bit like dog years - each week feels like a year, and there's nothing like on-the-job learning. [00:01:27] Crystal Fincher: Nothing like on-the-job learning. Now, what are you doing? What are you responsible for? [00:01:33] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: So my portfolio includes Fire, Police, Office of Emergency Management, Office of Intergovernmental Relations, Budget, and HR. [00:01:51] Crystal Fincher: And nothing else - that's it? [00:01:55] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: I have a few things. I have a few things in the - I say anything that'll wake you up in the middle of the night is in my portfolio. It's helpful to have all those things in one place, and we're trying to envision the future of the City. There's a lot of work that has followed me from my previous experiences that I now have an opportunity to be able to put some of that visioning into practice in helping to lead the City, so it's exciting. I like it. It's a new take on some work that I've been doing for a long time. [00:02:32] Crystal Fincher: Well and you've certainly worked in several areas of the public safety spectrum in several different roles. Now this is part of your portfolio in this role. So I do want to talk about just the - a number of things - starting in terms of public safety and the conversations that we're having - that are lively and starting off conversations, just this week, with regard to staffing in SPD and moving forward. And I think, as we're looking about it, certainly we've talked on the program before about it - whether or not people agree with the need for more SPD officers, the City is moving forward with hiring more SPD officers and talking about that being part of the solution, or your plan for helping to make people safer. But with that, even if we were to hire 50 people today, that is actually a really long pipeline and those folks aren't going to be making it onto the streets for a while. So if we're talking about public safety, that might be a solution for the fall or next year, but what - short of adding more officers, which can't happen - can be done right now to help intervene in the rising crime levels. [00:03:58] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Yeah, that's a good question. We have to prepare for the short-, mid-, and long-term. And so one of the things that we've been doing in the short-term is civilianizing some positions that were previously certified positions. And so that helps us to be able to spread out our resources a little bit more - taking some internal positions, be they administrative or other, where we've asked - does this position need to be a law enforcement officer, a certified law enforcement officer, or can this be a civilian or a civilianized position and moving those to civilianized positions? So that is a short term solution - we are currently working on that, the chief has currently been working on that for the last several months. And so we're working through extending our resources through that. And that's a great long-term solution as well - analyzing what has to be a certified position and what can be a civilianized position. In the midterm, we do have to recruit folks to be willing to go into the academy. And policing across the country - there's a shortage of officers across the country. I don't know one department right now that is fully subscribed, that has all of the officers that it needs. We have seen a lot of people, especially officers, leaving the workforce over the course of the last couple of years. It's been a toll. It's been a toll on absolutely everybody. And in particular, as we've been having discussions - deep, deep discussions - around policing and the future of policing, some people in the profession have taken a look at whether or not they want to continue in that line of service. Some have been retirement age and some have decided that they want to take different paths - but those are all culminating in this moment. We have people - good people - who have reached an inflection point in their life and want to do something different. Some of them may turn towards policing, many of them have turned to other ways to support and help the community. So we have to talk to - and on the long end of the pipeline, it's talking to a lot of our young folks and seeing if there are people who want to be part of the future of what policing will be. And not looking at what it is now, but looking at what it could be for the future - and being a part of that, and being willing to step into something that is wholly uncertain at this moment. What policing is today is different than it was 10, 20 years ago, will be different than what it will be 10, 20 years from now. And so there has to be a willingness to embrace some of the uncertainty and wanting to be - and be willing to be - a part of what it could be in the future and shaping that. [00:07:15] Crystal Fincher: So is it possible to make people safer in the existing staffing footprint that we're going to be dealing with for the near term? [00:07:25] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Safer is - I think safer involves more than just policing. Safer involves getting more mental health support, safer involves better conflict resolution solutions beyond guns, safer is never going to be a police-only solution - and so we have to, candidly, be able to walk and chew gum in terms of yes, working on our policing shortages and working on shoring up our mental health systems, our physical health systems. Acknowledging that even if we have community members who had food on their table, a roof over their heads, jobs to attend to, their financial needs - the last couple of years haven't left many people in better mental and physical health than they were prior to 2020. And so even those who have had all of the means are still going to be unstable in some way and need help and need support. So safety really looks like - how do we build a larger support system and safety net to even catch those who wouldn't otherwise be considered vulnerable? [00:09:12] Crystal Fincher: Well, you know I agree with that. And I guess that's why it has been confounding in some of the actions that have been taken, whether it's some of the hotspot policing or the sweeps of encampments, where there certainly has been a lot of talk about having those kinds of supports and interventions and people reaching out to be there, but that being absent in so many of those situations where we are seeing predominantly public safety-led, and some of those situations only law enforcement-led, sweep or intervention. And looking at whether that can effectively address the problem and whether that's really delivering on the vision that you laid out. How do you explain that? [00:10:06] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Absolutely. So I think that people only see a portion and it's really hard. People only see a portion of what we're doing - of what any administration or any government agency is doing. Some of the things that are not as readily accessible is how much transitional housing we have actually opened up and made available over the course of the last few months - we have done an amazing job in terms of making transitional housing available and getting people into that transitional housing. In terms of some of the encampment removals, we've made a tremendous number of referrals and we've gotten people help and support that have been on the streets for years. Some of these stories of people being living on the streets for five years - that is never going to be a success. It's not a success that somebody lives in the street in the same spot for five years. That is an absolute dead end, and we should never be satisfied with somebody having that as an outcome and that as an option. And we have done quite a bit, this administration has done quite a bit, in terms of getting resources to many of those folks. [00:11:27] Crystal Fincher: So are you disputing that some of those have taken place without that outreach taken, done at first? Are you saying that that has occurred with all of them? [00:11:39] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Every person has been given the opportunity for support services - they're offered that. They don't always take it, and some people might not be in a place to be able to take it at that time period. I will talk a little bit about the Woodland Park encampment removal. There were, I think, 85 referrals made from the Woodland Park encampment. And those are real offers of help that we're getting out to folks in that we're making spaces available for them to be able to come indoors. Not everybody is ready for that, and certainly there were - there have been more people who have come on site who have needed help and support, and we're still working on getting supports for those folks. But when we have something open, we're trying to get people in it. [00:12:41] Crystal Fincher: So would it then be a fair characterization to say, in the case of an encampment sweep or a hotspot enforcement, if - or I guess that's a different situation - looking at encampment sweep. If a person there hasn't had contact with a, whether it's a caseworker or service provider - someone with a connection to services available to them if they are ready to go, that meet their circumstances, that they meet the qualifications to go into. If that doesn't happen, that is not your policy, that would be something going wrong in the process and not what you had ordered to be carried out? [00:13:32] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: So we don't have as many resources to allow people to pick their exact type of transitional housing. There have been times where we've said, there is a tiny home available and people might decline that because they would rather have a hotel, or there might be a tiny home available within a particular village and they don't want to go to that area of town. We don't have control over all of the inventory available, but we make something available. [00:14:09] Crystal Fincher: So something is always available for someone? [00:14:13] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: When we are doing - when we are doing removals, we make offers of support. There is a crew that goes out in advance that makes an offer of support prior to the removal. [00:14:26] Crystal Fincher: And so one of the issues, and it's been covered - in looking at offers of support. There seem to be some disconnects in what is available and what people need. And some really understandable and justifiable reasons why people may not be able to go to a shelter. Sometimes the situation may be - hey, shelter requires people be in by 7:00 or 8:00 PM, I have a job that requires me to be there later or to leave earlier. And so I can't keep my job and both go into the shelter. Obviously, keeping the job is something that preserves a pathway into housing. In those situations, does the City have a responsibility to find something more suitable, or to wait on sweeping them until there is something more suitable available? [00:15:25] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: So the removals are based on a number of different criteria and we'll be sharing more about that criteria in the coming weeks. There are some occasions where there is a safety reason to need to engage in a removal. And some of those safety reasons might be if there is a lot of - if there are some gun violence in that area or if there has been - and I'm just going off of specific instances that have increased the need for removals - if there was a sexual harassment, sexual assault incident within an encampment. There are any number of reasons - a number of fires that have been occurring in an encampment - those might be public safety reasons where we would prioritize dispersement in those cases. And so we use all of the resources that we have available - doesn't mean that we're going to have exactly what they need at that moment. We do our absolute best. Some people will be able to tell us what they are hoping for and if there's a match, we will try to match it. But this is also where the Regional Homelessness Authority comes in. This is part of taking the regional solution - we have 84 square miles in the City of Seattle to be able to accommodate folks. There is more housing available outside the region, and we want to make sure that there are options available for folks all over. That's part of why, when I refer to something like the Woodland Park encampment - we had services for everybody that was at Woodland Park during the time that we took the inventory of the area. Those people received housing and new people came in because they knew that the people at that encampment were able to access housing. And so we're trying to get to as many places and as many people as we possibly can, and we need the support and the help of the regional authority to be able to bring their resources to bear, to be able to get more transitional housing faster. [00:18:05] Crystal Fincher: Gotcha. In terms of just community-based interventions overall, certainly some of those are useful in and addressing some of the issues that the unhoused population is dealing with, others are direct interventions to help prevent crime and people from being victimized - with lots of evidence to show that they're very effective interventions. And the Harrell administration - you have talked about the intention to establish that - it looks like the last place where that left off was Mayor Harrell saying that there was an evaluation of some of the partners and service providers that you would potentially be working with. Where does that stand and what is that evaluation based on? [00:18:58] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Yeah, we're asking a lot of our providers to share with us what they've been doing with the resources that they are being provided by the City. And we're looking at the effectiveness rate - the rates with which people are able to support the community based on the resources provided. We had two - I don't want to call them necessarily summits, they weren't really summits - but they were information fact-gathering sessions with the providers who are doing that work - to be able to let them tell us how they're able to use their resources, and what else we could do to support them in their work. [00:19:53] Crystal Fincher: So what are you hearing from that? [00:19:56] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: We are hearing a lot of need, quite candidly. There is a lot of need, particularly in and around as we spoke about earlier, mental health supports, emotional supports. Some folks are meeting communities' need to just be connected with one another in order to better manage their challenges. And we're really trying to assess who has set up systems to be able to make greater advances with more resources if they were provided to them. There are certainly some services that I think people have heard quite a bit about that have had pretty good levels of success, and we're trying to figure out how to get some of those organizations more resources. And there are some organizations candidly that didn't fare as well through the pandemic, where their organizations might not be as strong as they were before and they may be in a position where they have to regroup before they're ready to receive more supports from the City. So we're evaluating all of those things, but we've seen a lot of really good things out there. Organizations like JustCare, for example, they've been able to remain pretty steady and and do some great work across the City. And certainly they've been resourced to do some great work, but we're looking at all of the, all of our providers out there who have a part of the puzzle piece that we need in this moment. [00:21:51] Crystal Fincher: So in short - taking a look at, hey, you've had resources. Have you demonstrated that you have used the tax dollars that you've received to further the mission and deliver results, when it comes to tangible increases in prevention of crime, interventions, reduction of recidivism - metrics like that. [00:22:18] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Absolutely. And then also looking at whether or not we've got the right mix. Do we have enough across the spectrum of the needs that are required? Do we have enough in the healthcare arena, both mental and physical? Do we have enough in the internship and apprenticeship arena to ensure that particularly folks have access to being able to set up their futures for themselves? Those are all of the things that we have to look at because we have a finite number of resources - as a city, we have to manage and take care of all of our basic functions. And then what we have, we have to be really - we have to really pay attention to - are we using these dollars effectively because we don't have the endless pot that we would want. [00:23:11] Crystal Fincher: Right. So basically, are you getting a bang for your buck, is the money that you're spending resulting in safer streets? [00:23:20] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Exactly. And not just safer streets, but prosperity for those who have access. Part of safer streets is - there are components of economic justice that are related to that. I don't think people - if they have to resort to any sort of stealing, I don't think they do it because they want to do it. I think they do it because there is a need that's not being met, so how else can we meet that need? Is it through additional education? Is it through apprenticeships? So stronger work opportunities, better paying jobs, access to education - we have to look at that whole ecosystem because it's not one lever. If it was one lever, somebody would've pulled it a long time ago. [00:24:13] Crystal Fincher: That makes sense. And as I look at it, especially with - looking at the money that we're putting into community-based interventions, it is not an unlimited budget, need to make sure that that money is delivering a result. It makes sense to do the same thing with the police department, doesn't it? Are you using that same kind of evaluation to determine if the police department should receive more funding, if we should pull back and redirect to other areas? [00:24:42] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: And that's exactly what we were doing when I mentioned earlier - looking at positions and seeing which positions can be civilianized, looking at the job functions and trying to evaluate whether or not those job functions need to be certified in order to be effective. And so we're looking at the whole ecosystem of that. One of the things that I think we talked about before was the third department that would be on par with Police and Fire. What does that third department look like? What services still need to be met in an emergency situation that we need to dispatch, where Police or Fire are not the solution in that instance? We've talked about the history of EMTs and EMS, where you would no longer send police to a heart attack, but there was a time period where that's exactly what you did. And so we're looking at what are the calls that don't need a a law enforcement response or a fire response? What are the needs that are not being met and how do we put that department together? We're working on that - our goal, our hope is to have a white paper and structure for that third department by the end of this year, that we would then begin to structure in 2023 for a 2024 deployment. [00:26:16] Crystal Fincher: So then am I hearing that it's a possibility that some of those community-based interventions, non-law enforcement-based interventions may be made functions of the City within a public safety department that doesn't have a sworn officer. So you're looking to build up that infrastructure. So that actually may not occur from service providers that you're partnering with today? That may be an internal thing? [00:26:45] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Absolutely. It's also part of - what I will say is - we are looking at the functions that are provided and of course, if that's the case, the third department will be just, will be a professional entity, just like fire and law enforcement - where there will be a curriculum and a program and the proper certifications for whatever is needed within that body of work. It will be a professionalized entity that is able to respond to 911 calls that meet their unique skillset. [00:27:20] Crystal Fincher: Okay. Have you received - which makes sense - have you received pushback from SPD on civilianizing parts of it? There were some - there was a recent report about responses to 911 calls potentially being handled by alternate responders that they recently pushed back on. Are you hearing that, and how are you working through that? [00:27:44] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: I think that's natural and I think that's to be expected. It is part of - would I want that? No, I want everybody to work together and I think by and large people are working together. But it's the job of their police union to push and try to negotiate and try to get as much for their members as they possibly can. We know that some of it is founded, and some of it is just part of what they have to do in trying to negotiate for their next upcoming contracts. What they see is - they might see - well, that used to be a body of work that pertained to us, and we don't want to lose that body of work. But the truth of the matter is policing is many different professions rolled under one title. They're not all the same. Somebody who is on a beat isn't necessarily trained to be an effective detective. Somebody who might be doing homicide might not be right for a domestic assault. There are different skillsets, there are different trainings - and depending upon the line that an officer wants to go into, they might need a different career development path. So we really have to look at the body of work and whether or not it fits in with solving some of those crimes and getting justice in that way and if not, there might be instances where the presence of a uniform could escalate a situation. And there's somebody who has not got a weapon on the other side - then we don't want to send a certified officer into that particular situation - that might not be a best fit for them. We know that labor will want to negotiate that and those are some things that we'll have to address. And there are some where labor might want to negotiate that and we say - but that's not, that's not within the purview of your scope anyway. So it's a conversation. [00:30:18] Crystal Fincher: It's a conversation. And as you just brought up, that conversation is about to be codified into a new Seattle Police Officers Guild contract, and you will be at the negotiating table. And there there's been lots of discussions in the greater conversation about the role that police officers have and the larger public safety conversation and how and whether their interventions do result in people being less likely to be victimized. Lots of conversations about what is appropriate, what's not appropriate to be in a contract, what oversight should be more independent and not internal. So I guess starting out, are there, especially in light of the prior public safety ordinance that had a lot of reforms in there - some of them rolled back with the contract - are you looking to reimplement those? What approach are you taking in this negotiation? [00:31:27] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: So our prioritization is absolutely on accountability. We have to move forward aggressively on accountability for many different reasons, not not the least of which is we have a consent decree that - at this moment, it's not benefiting the City or the people of the City to still have this as an operating standard or practice for the City. It reminds me of - there's this old Thomas Jefferson quote that kind of refers to - if you wear the clothes, if you try to wear the clothes that fits you as a boy as a man, it doesn't work. And to me, that's where we are with the consent decree - we are 10 years into this and those clothes no longer fit - we have moved well beyond that. And if we want to get to what the future of policing is, we need to move past this past that is not even close to the picture of where we want to be. And so it has to be a prioritization on accountability - that has to be everything. And I know some people - going back to the other part of what we were talking about - some people will want to jump ahead and say, well, let's negotiate what the third department looks like and the trading off of those roles. The police contract is only three years and we're already one year into a three-year contract. We can negotiate the roles of that next contract in the next cycle. We're one year into a three-year contract, so we have to focus on accountability - that has to be our number one goal. And then once we get the right accountability measures in place, within the next contract we can start negotiating roles and responsibilities as pertains to what might be a third public safety department. [00:33:45] Crystal Fincher: There've been several recommendations related to collective bargaining from lots of entities, including the CPC. Some of those including fully implementing the reforms in the accountability law, removing limits on civilianization of OPA and ensuring civilian investigators have the same powers as their sworn counterparts, removing clauses in the contract that take precedence over local laws including that accountability ordinance, the police being empowered to place an employee on leave without pay, and ensuring OPA has authority to investigate allegations of criminal misconduct. Do you agree that those should be implemented in this new contract? [00:34:37] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: You named so many that I just want to say that the answer is yes. But let me - that's bad radio to be like, the answer is just yes - but the answer is yes. And I'll just pull out a couple of them that are of particular interest - civilianization of investigators at OPA - I think that is something that we need to seriously explore for many different reasons, but let me just go on a couple. One of which is - the statewide Office of Independent Investigations that we'll eventually move to - it was envisioned to eventually be a civilianized body so that there were no conflicts of interest in those investigations. And we have to look at the same thing for SPD - that these are officers that are being forced to investigate their fellow officers. That can't be a good place to be. It can't be a good place to be to - you're working in one department and you're working alongside your team, and then you move and have a rotation to the next department. And in that next rotation, you're having to investigate the people that you were just working alongside of. And I use this example because - no matter how many firewalls you put up, there is always going to be the potential - and a strong potential - for conflict of interest. Crystal, you and I have known each other for a really long time and - we're not that old, we've known each other for a little while - and we would both do our jobs if we had to do an investigation. And yet I think that the way that we've crossed paths over the years, it would be really hard to be an absolutely unbiased independent investigator if something were to come up, because I know you're a good person. And I wouldn't believe that you would do anything terrible, so it would be hard for me to say and now I want to investigate you. And then when my rotation in this department is over, now I just want to go back to working alongside you. That's a tough place to be. And I think that exploring the civilianization of investigators at OPA - it protects us from some of those potential conflicts of interest, and we really have to take a hard look at that. [00:37:04] Crystal Fincher: And not just civilianization, but giving them - removing the limits to make sure that they have the same power and authority in all instances of investigation. Because I think that's been a frustrating part - to be like, well, I'm not part of the police department - even the elements that are civilians just being kneecapped and not having the authority to fully investigate or to make any recommendations that hold any weight. Is that part of your vision, and what you plan to negotiate is also providing them with that authority? [00:37:47] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Absolutely. And again, following the statewide model of the Office of Independent Investigations that will follow the same path. We'll see who races each other first to that finish line, but very much following the same model. And the one thing I want to just clarify for folks - sometimes people hear the term "civilianization" and they think sloppy or not as professional - we are talking about professional investigators that just may not be certified officers. And there are a ton of highly trained professional investigators in a lot of different professions that could have skillsets that apply to the work that would be needed for these types of investigations. I'll give you an example is - there's always forensic auditors for things like financial accounting crimes - they may not be law enforcement officers, but they are trained professionals in forensic accounting who can help with some of this criminal problem solving. There could be people who are forensic anthropologists or other such things, who know how to contain a crime scene and who know how to collect the evidence. When we say civilianized, we're not talking about anything less than the highest level of professionalism. It just means that they are not trained officers in the way that they would respond to an immediate and imminent crisis. [00:39:28] Crystal Fincher: That makes sense and is certainly valid. We've seen that operate very successfully in similar areas. And I think an even bigger deal - we're seeing the current system not working, so a change is in order. So is that a red line for you in this negotiation? Is that something that you're starting with as a foundational this is where we need to be? [00:39:54] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: It will probably take us, it will take us more than this contract to get to a fully civilianized team, investigative team at OPA, but we certainly want to begin to move in that direction where we have very professional civilian investigators available to us for that work. And I believe that there's going to be a bigger demand for that particular career going forward. I do believe that sometimes Seattle is on the frontline of a lot of this work, but where and how we make these things successful, we will see them roll out in other areas across the state and across the country. [00:40:44] Crystal Fincher: So it's possible that we walk out on the other side of this contract and there are still situations where the police are investigating themselves. [00:40:53] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: For certain things. So, as the Office of Independent Investigation gets set up, they will take all lethal use of force - that will go to the state regardless - that body of work will go to the state. As pertains to any accusations of sexual harassment or sexual assault, that will go to the state. So we are going to, we absolutely will honor state law. And quite honestly, I think folks should be grateful that the state is doing that work. I think that what they're setting up will be revolutionary in order to ensuring that we have unbiased, less-biased investigations. And do I believe you can eliminate bias 100% entirely? I would love to say yes, I don't know if that's ever completely possible, but I think we can get to a system that is more accountable and more transparent for everybody involved. [00:42:02] Crystal Fincher: As we look forward in the short-term and some of the interventions that are going, do you expect a continuation or more deployments of the hotspot policing strategy? [00:42:18] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: I think that while we have limited resources, we have to be really strategic about where and how we deploy them. And so, I wouldn't call it hotspot policing because it's a little more nuanced than that, but what I would say is when you have limited resources, you have to be really, really strategic about where and how you deploy them. And that's what we're having to do - we're having to look at the areas that are in the greatest need and providing resources to those areas in those moments. And so we look at things like - what are the big events coming up in and around the City and how do we deploy in order to make sure that yes, we can cover the Mariners game, the Sounders game, a concert at Climate Pledge, because we are short-staffed and that there's no quick way to make up for that. This has been a while in the making and even if we had all of the body signed up right now, we still only have one Criminal Justice Training Center to run all of the state's recruits through. So we're going to have to be strategic for a little while - we can't, we don't have the staffing at every precinct and in every neighborhood that we would want to have. And so that means looking at what is on our social calendars, trying to get people back to normal, right? This is - it has been many years since we've had a full cadre of parades and outdoor events, and we want people to be able to get back into life again and get back into life safely. So how do we have the Torchlight Parade with such a limited number of officers available to staff? How do we have one of my favorites, the Pride Parade, with a limited number of officers to staff? So we really have to be a lot more strategic and it means that we really have to look at the chess board. I think what people see are hotspots and it's not as much hotspots as we have to be more predictive about where we go and strategically plan for that. [00:45:01] Crystal Fincher: And I can see that - I guess the challenge, as you articulate that, the mayor certainly articulated certain spots that were spots of emphasis that were going to be receiving increased patrols and resources and have folks stationed basically there full-time to, I think as he talks about, calm the area. So it seems like there have been point - that kind of thing has been referred to by lots of different terms, whether it's a hotspot or an emphasis patrol or however we want to characterize it, we are focusing our admittedly limited number of resources in a concentrated area. And are we expecting, are you expecting to deploy resources in concentrated areas, not talking about surrounding events that may happen, but on day-to-day, as we saw before - Tuesday through Friday in a place - is that part of an ongoing strategy, or have we seen the last of that? [00:46:16] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: It has to be a little bit of both. And so I'll give you an example - some of where people have seen us focus have been in areas where there have been increases in gun violence - and so Third Avenue is an example. So what people saw is they saw us move the mobile precinct to the Third Avenue area right after we had two incidents - two pretty painful incidents - of gun violence deaths in that area. And what that additional patrol allowed us to do was to be able to add more investigative resources to both of those cases. And we've made - we have two suspects that have been arrested for both of those shootings on Third Avenue where - it was an area that there was an increased amount of gun violence. And two, all murders are painful. It is particularly challenging when one of them is really just a child, a 15-year old. And because of the police work that we - the police and the officers were able to put in that area - to be able to canvass and collect the camera information from in and around the area, we were able to bring forth two suspects in both of those murders. And so, that is part of the job. It's not just about patrolling for what is happening in the moment. It's also patrolling and doing the detective work to solve crimes that we know have been happening in that area, that families will want answers for. [00:48:14] Crystal Fincher: Well, I think that's an excellent point. I actually think there's a very strong case to be made for increasing the deployment of resources in investigative roles. It seems like that's actually an area of unique specialty and opportunity, and results that come from that can yield long-lasting results. So it feels like people in the City see that, it seems like that's been widely acknowledged. However, when we have these conversations about - hey, we're short staffing, the conversations are - we have to move people out of these investigative roles, these victim liaison and services roles - a lot of things that get at preventing behavior from people who are currently doing it. So does it make sense to continue to move people away from those investigative roles onto patrol, especially in these conversations as we continue to identify areas where patrol doesn't seem like the most effective intervention? [00:49:29] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Yeah, we need both. It's - this is the Catch-22. We need both. We have to find ways to be able to, in some ways, tamp down ongoing incidents. And sometimes the presence of a mobile precinct can do that, can be a little bit of what just helps take some of the fire out of the air. There's some things that we've done over the course of the last few years - back in the olden times when people used to go out, for example, and they talked about - well, instead of everything closing at the same time every night, what if we were to stagger release hours from some of the different clubs and bars? For the young people listening, who don't remember what clubs and bars are, and that was a way to not push everybody who might have a little bit of alcohol in their system out into the street at the same time. So we are having to do a little bit of column A a little bit of column B because we have imperfect resources. [00:50:40] Crystal Fincher: Well, and seem to be saying - we need to do all we can to meet patrol numbers, and we will take from other areas to deploy on patrol - that's what the chief was saying. Should we continue taking, or should we rebalance, because both are going to happen. Should we be deploying back in the detective arena and investing more in actually trying to solve some of these crimes and find some of the people who are doing them? [00:51:16] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: For those people who are trained to be detectives, we are doing everything we can to get them back to their primary functions. And in the meantime, taking a try to do-no-harm approach, which is in not letting people continue to get victimized as we're trying to do that. And that's why I said it's gotta be a little from column A and a little from column B, because we have to solve crimes that have occurred and we have to do what we can to prevent additional crimes from occurring. Not everybody is trained to be a detective, but for those who have those trainings and have those skills, we want to be able to give them all of the resources we can to get them back on those jobs. [00:52:05] Crystal Fincher: And you've been very generous with your time - we are just about to wrap up. I think the last question - we could cover a ton - but appreciate getting through the chunk that we did today. You talk about some of those emphasis patrols or areas where more resources are being deployed - whatever name it's going by. With those, there was a press conference that even Chief Diaz seemed to acknowledge that those increased patrols and having the mobile unit nearby does have an effect on that area during that time. But he brought up instances in this current iteration, and certainly we've seen in prior iterations, where the result isn't that the crime stops, it moves to other neighborhoods. And it sets up a situation where it looks like - for moneyed interests, for downtown interests, they're getting super special police deployments in the name of safety. And sure it may improve things on that block while those police are there, but it actually is moving that activity elsewhere in the City. And he said they were working on trying to track that. And are we succeeding? Is that the best expenditure of resources if that's the result that we're getting, which is seemingly - hey sure, maybe a win for those businesses on that block, but a loss for the neighborhood and the residents that are receiving that activity. Should we - is that the most effective way to address that? Is that the most equitable way to address that for everybody in the City? [00:54:03] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: I would say that there is still a benefit to having those resources visible and available. And think about when somebody - there might be an area where people are used to speeding and then they put up the electronic board that says you're going this fast, and it reminds people to slow down. Sometimes the visual cues that we use for some of the public safety is just - you're in this area and you might have something that might pop off, but just calm down. It's a visual reminder to calm down, a visual reminder. And that doesn't necessarily always move someplace else, but it can be a reminder to - this is not your time and this is not your moment. We can't stop every single incident from occurring, but we certainly want to be able to give people pause before they might do something that would be regrettable later. So, it's not the perfect system. It's certainly not the perfect system, but there are benefits across the board if we can get people to think about how they might seek help, or how maybe just the presence can calm people down, or how we can even regain a sense of normalcy to an area that might draw in more foot traffic - and where there is more foot traffic and more positive activity than in the absence of nothing which can create some negative activity. We're bringing people back to an area that would allow us to get some good activity back on the streets. One of the best approaches for public safety, quite candidly, is for people to start going out again - filling up those spaces with positive activity, filling up those spaces with positive engagement - because where you have more eyes and positive activity, you actually need less policing. [00:56:24] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely true. And I guess my question is, even in a situation where - okay, you do that, you intimidate someone away and they aren't doing that there. In the instance that they're then moving somewhere else, we have not necessarily successfully intervened in their activity, but have moved it. [00:56:49] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: I don't think it's a hundred percent though. I do think that there are places where you can put in positive activity and attract positive activity response. So I think about some of our young folks where the hours where they would get in the most trouble would be those immediate hours after school. If they are in a space that is filled with positive activity, then perhaps they will adopt and take on that positive activity. If they're in a space where there is negative activity, then they can take on that negative activity. That's the case where it's not just it would move to a different place. It's - you're giving idle hands an opportunity to do something more productive. And that's what I'm talking about filling that positive activity space - not everybody would necessarily fill that space with the sort of activity that we wouldn't care for if we get more more positive engagement in those areas. [00:57:47] Crystal Fincher: I certainly agree about the benefit of positive engagement. I am certainly hoping that maybe we can envision a time where we actually deploy resources surrounding positive activities and positive connection to opportunities - in that kind of emphasis patrol and intervention that we have. But I appreciate the time that you've taken to speak with us and help us understand better what's going on in the City and what you're up to, and certainly look forward to following as we continue to go along. [00:58:27] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Well, this is a conversation, it's a dialogue. We've got a lot of work to do. There's no one group that has all of the answers, and so I appreciate the opportunity to come on and speak with you. And I know we get a lot of feedback and that's good, because we listened to the feedback and we'll make adjustments as we go along, but we're trying to do everything we can to make sure that we get the City back on track. [00:58:54] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. Okay, I'm going to sneak in one more question. You talk about you get a lot of feedback - is there something that people can do, or a way to engage that you think is a great opportunity to get involved in making a difference, helping to create positive change, helping to keep our streets safer? Is there one thing that you would recommend that they could do to be a part of that? [00:59:14] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: I'm going to give you two things. So the first thing is I'm going to mention our One Seattle Day of Service on May 21st, and just say that it's more than about just cleaning up some aspects of our city and helping us put some positive activity out there. It's also about a sense of building community with one another - that we're really hoping that everybody who comes to the Day of Service will find somebody new that they haven't connected with, that they haven't built community with and be willing to reconnect with society in doing some positive work together. So I'll talk about that because I think that there are significant benefits to our mental health - to rebuild positive social skills and positive social relationships. So that's one thing that if people were like, I don't have a lot of time on my calendar, but I can commit to a couple hours on one day. And then the other thing that I would say is - we need to return to the old scripture - being our brother's keeper. And that may mean reaching out to nonprofit organizations that are doing this great work. We will help their dollar stretch farther when we provide them resources through serving on boards, through providing hands-on activity or volunteer opportunities to help them further their missions. And so anything that we can do to pitch in and to add - whether or not that is - maybe even it's reaching out and having lunch with a young person and providing them paths that they might not have otherwise thought of, letting them know young or old - quite candidly in this one - that somebody out there cares and will listen to them. We have a lot of - our older folks - and I know you are wrapping up, I'm sorry - but I'm just gonna make this one last pitch. We have a lot of older folks who've actually struggled through this pandemic. They have suffered from withdrawal because their social structures have been pulled from them, and older folks who withdraw from society have higher instances of high blood pressure and hypertension - all of those things that result from depression and not having a social network around you, can result in physical health loss as well as mental health loss. And so being a part of - I know it's a tough time period because COVID is still out there, but the ability to reconnect with one another as humans - social skills deteriorate a little bit when we're not with each other. And so just taking these moments to rebuild our social skills, having some patience with each other, but rebuilding them together. When our City gets healthier in all aspects, especially mentally healthier, we'll be able to help each other better. [01:02:26] Crystal Fincher: I agree with that. Thank you so much for your time, Monisha. [01:02:30] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Thank you. [01:02:31] Crystal Fincher: I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks & Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - we'll talk to you next time.

!Please Remain Calm!
Chief Kris Larson

!Please Remain Calm!

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 60:59


We're joined by LAFD Battalion Chief Kris Larson. An awesome guest who candidly tells us her super interesting life story. Sure she was the 1st black woman Captain, Task Force Commander, & Battalion Chief in the history of LAFD. But did you know she was a 3 time All American on the legendary UCLA track team in the late 80's with Olympic legends like Jackie Joyner Kersee? Strap in as she takes us on a journey that starts in a small town in Washington & goes thru multiple firefighter assignments, the riots, rookies taking selfies at fires, recruiting, fire camps for girls, drill tower instrcution, covid testing 10,000 people a day, almost crashing in the engine, & working with our dad. Yes, Chief Larson rode with our dad for a couple of years & tells us some funny and cool stuff about working with him. You get a lot of great advice for up and coming firefighters here.  

Alert Medic 1 - Podcast
The Shock Index #4

Alert Medic 1 - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 31:54


Ken and Mustafa discuss flow of consciousness EMS topics as they present themselves

Crime Beat
Hope in the darkness | 14

Crime Beat

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 48:08


On a beautiful September night in 2008, a young couple went out for dinner in downtown Calgary. They walked through a park on their way home and sat down on a bench to soak in the warm, late summer air. Around them, the trees were changing colours . Never once did it cross their mind that it would be the last time, as a couple, they would see those vibrant fall colours again. Moments later, the sound of screaming filled the air followed by sirens as police and EMS rushed to the scene. Find out what happened next on the latest episode of Crime Beat. Global News senior crime reporter Nancy Hixt shares one man's story of survival and inspiration in ‘Hope in the darkness.' See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ENA Podcast
Celebrating EMS Week With a Look at EMS-ED Nurse Connection

ENA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 16:33


The ENA Podcast recognizes EMS Week with a look at the connection between EMS providers and emergency nurses. Guest Jamla Rizek shares her experiences on both sides of this vital relationship and how communication is key in it to ensure the best outcomes for patients.

EMS World Podcasts
An EMS Approach to Community Risk Reduction

EMS World Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 24:06


What is community risk reduction, how can EMS providers become involved in it, and what should they understand about education to do so? These are big questions, but the answers can lead us toward safer and healthier communities. In our latest EMS World original podcast, host Mike McCabe explores with Columbia Southern University's Aaron Rhone, PhD, MPA. Sponsored by CSU.  Follow EMS World (EMSWorldOFCL) on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn. EMS World Expo is Oct. 10–14, 2022 in Orlando. 

wise athletes podcast
#66 -- Electrical Muscle Stimulation (EMS) for Training & Recovery w/Derek Hansen

wise athletes podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 51:44


Sponsor: RePowerU -- a free fitness practices assessment (a 10-minute questionnaire) Derek Hansen is one of very few expert in using electronic muscle stimulation. WiseAthletes talks to Derek to finally understand how to get real benefit from your EMS unit. Welcome back to the Wise Athletes podcast.  Today on episode #66, I talk with Derek Hansen, a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist who has been using EMS or Electronic Muscle Stimulation as a part of his work with athletes of all ages seeking to recover from injury and surgery as well as seeking additional performance advantage. I have owned and used an EMS device for years without really knowing what I was doing, so I decided to find out how it is done. Join me as Derek goes through the many ways EMS can be used by older athletes to deal with limited ROM, injuries, surgeries as well as simple recovery from exercise and as a substitute for exercise when traveling or otherwise unable to get it done the natural way. Derek is a NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist that has been working with athletes in speed, strength and power sports since 1988. Originally working with Track and Field athletes, Derek expanded his services to assist athletes in all sports with an emphasis on speed development. He has since worked with some of the top performers in the world as a coach and a consultant – including Olympic medallists, world record holders, Canadian National team athletes, professional sports organizations and professional athletes from numerous sports. Locally, Derek has produced some of the top sprinters in British Columbia and continues to work with some of the fastest athletes in various sports. Provided below are some of Derek's key qualifications, credentials and designations: NSCA Certified Strength & Conditioning SpecialistNSCA Provincial Director for British Columbia – 2006 to 2010NCCP Level 3 Track and Field Coach – Sprints and Hurdles EmphasisNCCP Level 2 Olympic Weightlifting CoachCourse Conductor for the National Coaching Institute (NCI) Vancouver for Strength & Conditioning and Recovery & RegenerationHead Strength and Conditioning Coach for Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, CanadaSport performance consultant, sport technology advisor and rehab specialist for a number of teams in the NFL, NBA, NHL, MLB, MLS and NCAA Division I college sportsPresenter, workshop leader and lecturer at major international conferences on various topics relating to sport performance, rehab and sport technologiesSpeed, strength & conditioning consultant – Cycling Canada – BMX and Track Cycling – 2013 to presentSpeed, strength & conditioning consultant – Speed Skating Canada – Long Track preparations for the 2010 OlympicsPast Recruitment & Athlete Development Coach – Vancouver Region – for Bobsleigh CanadaHead Coach – Metro Athletic Club – Track and Field – 2001-2009Head Strength & Conditioning Coach – Canadian Men's Field Hockey Team – 1999-2004Head Strength & Conditioning Coach – Canadian Olympic Women's Softball Team – 2001-2004Consultant – BC Basketball/Basketball Canada – Centre for Performance Youth Development – 2001-2008 If you would like more information on Derek's qualifications and experience, please e-mail him at derek@strengthpowerspeed.com and he would be happy to send you his curriculum vitae. Instagram: @derekmhansen

WarDocs - The Military Medicine Podcast
COL David R. King, MD, FACS- Trauma Surgeon Responds to the Boston Marathon Bombing and Provides and Innovates Surgical Critical Care for Special Operations and Civilian Trauma Patients.

WarDocs - The Military Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 70:38


  In this episode you will hear how Dr. King walked into a Boston Army Recruiting Office and said “Hey, I'm a Doctor and I want to join the Army”, a very uncommon scenario in the recruiting world!  He describes what drew him to a career in Trauma and Critical Care and how he was part of the initial discussions of developing an Army Trauma Training platform at Ryder Trauma Center in Miami.   He shares stories from his initial deployments on a Forward Surgical Team and working in a Combat Support Hospital in Iraq and how those experiences helped prepare him to care for casualties from the Boston Marathon bombing in April 2013 (after finishing the Marathon himself!).  He shares some important lessons learned from that episode which he helped translate into common practice.   COL King has supported the US Army Joint Special Operations Command for more than 8 years and describes a remarkable case of a critically wounded Army Ranger that required surgical repair of bleeding within the chest cavity (trauma thoracotomy) during a cardiac arrest in the most austere of conditions. This intervention saved the Soldier's life and allowed him to recover and later attend medical school.   Dr. King describes his research interests in stopping traumatic bleeding using novel technologies such as self-expanding foams and expanding the accessibility and familiarity with tourniquets within the EMS and civilian population.    He shares many insights and lessons learned over a distinguished career and provides some valuable advice for all listeners.  You don't want to miss this episode!   Find out more about Dr. King at wardocspodcast.com/guest-bios and visit our webpage and become part of Team WarDocs at wardocspodcast.com.                                              WarDocs- The Military Medicine Podcast is a Non-Profit, Tax-exempt-501(c)(3) Veteran Run Organization.  All donations are tax-deductible, and 100% go to honoring and preserving the history, experiences, successes, and lessons learned in military medicine. Please take a moment to follow/subscribe, rate and review WarDocs on your preferred Podcast platform.   Follow Us on Social Media Twitter: @wardocspodcast Facebook: WarDocs Podcast Instagram: @wardocspodcast

The Clydesdale, Fitness & Friends
Clydesdale Media Sequoia Barrera | Meet the Athlete - Former Teen Games Athlete with a new goal

The Clydesdale, Fitness & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 22:41


Sequoia talks about being a CrossFit Games Athlete as a teen, how she made Regionals in 2018 and then lost her way a bit, to find a new professional passion of doing EMS, with a goal of being a paramedic and then a firefighter. The Syndicate is just a fun opportunity on her way to her goals.

EMS: History, Myth and Media

Some common misconceptions persist about EMS and Emergency Departments. This first in the series discusses some of those myths.

AAEM: The Journal of Emergency Medicine Audio Summary

Podcast summary of articles from the March 2022 edition of the Journal of Emergency Medicine from the American Academy of Emergency Medicine.  Topics include asthma patients in need of ICU, EMS combitubes, high sensitivity troponins in heart failure, abscess I and D, STEMI trends, and ultrasound use in LVAD patients.  Guest speaker is Dr. Mitchell Skinner.

EMS Today
Bitter Justice: Why the Criminal Convictions of Clinicians May Be in Our Best Interests

EMS Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 37:21


The Case RaDonda Vaught was a 39-year old registered nurse serving as the "help-all" nurse (for which there is no specific job description) at Vanderbilt University Hospital on Dec. 26, 2017.  She also had an orientee. She was asked to go down to Radiology PET scan and administer the medication Versed to 75-year old Charlene Murphey who had been hospitalized for a subdural hematoma, because she was not able to tolerate the PET scan procedure or else they would have to send the patient back and reschedule it. She pulled the medication from the Pyxis and put the medication vial in a baggie and wrote on the baggie, "PET scan, Versed 1-2 mg" and went to Radiology to administer the medication to Murphey. Since she had never been to PET scan before, she had to ask for directions, and once she found it, she checked the patient for her identity, and told her she was there to give him/her something to help him/her relax. She administered the medication and then left the area without continuing to monitor the patient.  The Errors The facts currently understood in this case show that Vaught committed at least ten errors when administering the medication to her patient. These errors include, but are not limited to:  -Searching for the medication by trade name instead of generic, despite being trained to the contrary.  -Selecting vecuronium instead of midazolam or Versed, even though she reports that she was looking for Versed.  -Overriding the warning indicating a none-prescribed medication had been selected (potentially could be excused given the documented EMR issues at Vandy) five times -Ignoring a warning that the selected medication was a paralytic.  -Failing to note the red all-caps paralytic warning on the cap.  -Failing to note that the medication name on the vial did not match what was ordered or what she was looking for.  -Failing to take action to further verify the medication after noting that the medication was in powdered form when the prescribed medication should have been packaged in liquid form (by her own admittance, she found this “odd”).  -Following the instructions for reconstitution on the vial again without noting that the medication name did not match what was prescribed and that the concentration did not match what was commonly carried in the hospital.  -Actually administered the wrong dose of the wrong medication (1 mg vecuronium instead of the ordered 2 mg versed).  -And, last but not least, failing to monitor the patient, even briefly, for any adverse effect after administering the medication. The Outcome Within the hour, the Transporter found the patient unresponsive and the Radiology Technician called a rapid response and started CPR. By the time Nurse Vaught arrived, the patient had been intubated and the heart rate had returned to normal. Nurse Vaight told the team that she had administered Versed to the patient only a few minutes before.  Vaught stated RN #2 approached him/her and asked, "Is this the med you gave Ms. Murphey?" and Vaught responded "yes." Vaught then stated RN #2 said, "This isn't Versed, It's Vecuronium." Vaught then went into Murphey's room and informed Physician #2, and the NP that she had made a mistake and administered Vecuronium to Murphey instead of Versed. Murphey was declared brain dead on January 27th and removed from life support. She died a short time later. So....Why Might This Be a Good Thing? The "Go Along" Attitude Clinicians often violate the written policies of the organization because the organization does not want or expect the written policies to be followed.  Murphey's care alone required at least 20 cabinet overrides in just three days, Vaught said. "Overriding was something we did as part of our practice every day," Vaught said. "You couldn't get a bag of fluids for a patient without using an override function." https://www.wesa.fm/2022-03-22/as-a-nurse-faces-prison-for-a-deadly-error-her-colleagues-worry-could-i-be-next When peers face criminal charges for "going along," the willingness to "go along" comes to a screeching halt, and they will "work to rule".   Employees can force organizations to stop the "paper policy" model by simply demanding that they be allowed to comply with the actual written rules of the organization. If the policy says that you need to check out your truck before responding to a job, then refuse (yes, REFUSE) to take a job until you have completely checked out your truck. That's not insubordination, that's the policy of the organization. The Martyr Problem Clinicians also sacrifice their short- and long-term health and safety in order to try to correct long-standing system problems.  At several places where I once worked, the BLS crews would transport every patient, no matter how minor, to the hospital with red-lights-and-sirens in order to get available as soon as possible because the system did not have enough ambulances to respond to all of the jobs in the city in a reasonable time.   Worse, it is common in many places for clinicians to work for less-than-sustenance wages and meager or even non-existent benefits instead of EMS systems demanding that local government appropriately fund EMS costs that are not covered, BY DESIGN, by health insurance.  When peers face criminal charges for mistakes made (such as recently happened in Hamilton Paramedics Steve Snively and Christopher Marchant in Ontario), the willingness to be a Martyr dissipates once they see that the system does not value their sacrifice.  You're never going to get enough ambulances if you keep trying to fix the deficit by regularly risking your life. It is actually a compensatory mechanism that is working against your (and your community's) long-term interests. Plus, if you hit a kid going to the hospital with red-lights-and-sirens with a stable patient, what do you think your department will do- back you up or fire you because you "violated department policy?" References CMS Report on Event: https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/5346023-CMS-Report.html?fbclid=IwAR2xQsxlfKxis4mecgrCSt-6XvKnSmKDeN7Sb_20is2oBbFICt_9xUDkyvQ#document/p6 Vanderbilt's Corrective Action Plan: https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/6535181-Vanderbilt-Corrective-Plan.html Does Your Facility Have Your Back?: https://yournurseattorney.com/does-your-facility-have-your-back/ Vanderbilt Failed To Report Unnatural Patient Death: https://hospitalwatchdog.org/vanderbilt-med-center-cover-up/ At Least 10 Errors: https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/health/2019/03/27/radonda-vaught-vanderbilt-nurse-homicide-trial-vecuronium-versed/3216750002/ Nurses quitting after Vanderbilt Verdict: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2022/04/05/1090915329/why-nurses-are-raging-and-quitting-after-the-radonda-vaught-verdict Hamilton Paramedics Get 18-month term for conviction: https://globalnews.ca/news/8518655/hamilton-paramedics-to-be-sentenced-in-al-hasnawi-case/ Medical Errors: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_error The Checklist, by Awal Gagande: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2007/12/10/the-checklist Institute of Medicine's "To Err is Human" Report: https://nap.nationalacademies.org/catalog/9728/to-err-is-human-building-a-safer-health-system "Just Culture" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Just_culture#:~:text=Just%20culture%20is%20a%20concept,person%20or%20persons%20directly%20involved. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Network Resources: https://psnet.ahrq.gov/issue/just-culture-guide Wikipedia page for Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outliers_(book)  

Real Talk
May 12, 2022 - Palestinian Journalist Killed; Conservatives Debate; Alberta Provincial Police & EMS

Real Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 112:29


Sometimes, there's a day that demands Real Talk go into overtime. This is one of those days. We cover the stories making headlines, and make sure you know what's going on "off the radar," too. 3:14 | Described as a "cultural phenomenon" related to the war in Ukraine, the Saint Javelin brand has quickly become recognized as a symbol of Ukrainian resistance to the Russian invasion. Ryan talks to founder and CEO Christian Borys just moments after he announced a partnership with the World Ukrainian Congress to fund non-lethal military equipment for Ukraine. Learn more: https://www.saintjavelin.com/ and https://www.ukrainianworldcongress.org/ 14:52 | Is Twitter set to become even nastier if Elon Musk's purchase goes through? Christopher Bouzy, founder of BotSentinel.com, explains the role bots and trolls play in poisoning public dialogue.  32:38 | Speaking of Twitter, our most recent Question of the Week presented by Y Station shows many Real Talkers are cynical (or at least concerned) about the future of the social media platform. Ryan reviews the results of our most recent survey, and tees up the current one (about SCOTUS Roe v. Wade).  CHIME IN: https://ryanjespersen.com/question-of-the-week 38:18 | The killing of veteran Palestinian-American journalist Shireen Abu Akleh is described as  "deliberate and targeted" by Al Jazeera, the outlet she represented for many years. We review what we know at this point, including reports from journalists who were near Abu Akleh when she was shot, and criticism around "whitewashed" reporting and response from western media outlets and elected representatives.  47:17 | How much do you know about the political maneuvering happening in your own backyard? Ryan connects with Alberta Mayors Cathy Heron, Janet Jabush, and Trina Jones for an update on a potential Alberta Provincial Police Service, EMS in crisis, and changes to the Municipal Government Act.  Learn more about work being done by Alberta Municipalities: https://www.abmunis.ca/ 1:27:28 | Inspired by his conversation with the Mayors, Ryan shines light on a very personal Twitter thread from a BC-based family doctor, @drherrling.  1:31:09 | Hours after Conservative Party of Canada leadership candidates squared off in Edmonton, Ryan reviews highlights and themes of the official English language debate. What jumped out at you as you watched Wednesday's showdown? Send us an email: talk@ryanjespersen.com 1:41:14 | Federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh was targeted and harassed by self-identified "Freedom Convoy" supporters during a stop in Peterborough, ON. We take a look at public response to this heinous circumstance, including Mr. Singh's message to the public after the fact.

Victory Lane
Episode 147: Brad Gillie

Victory Lane

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 83:10


Brad Gillie of PRN and SiriusXM NASCAR Radio joins Davey Segal this week (5:40) to discuss how he got started in the broadcasting industry and his early passion for racing. He describes the racing scene in Texas and why despite a lack of asphalt short tracks, the vibrancy of motorsports was on display early and often. Working at Texas Motor Speedway shortly after its grand opening, Gillie worked as the PA announcer, ran the dirt track, fire and EMS teams, among other roles. He dives into his roles and responsibilities at TMS, working for and with Eddie Gossage and when broadcasting on a more regular basis came calling in the form of PRN and SiriusXM NASCAR Radio. He explains what his role as Program and Affiliate manager at PRN entails, how preparation for race broadcasts versus talk radio differ, recalls stories from years gone by, discusses working with legendary crew chiefs Jeff Hammond and Todd Gordon, his passion for motorcycles and more. Davey analyzes Joey Logano's move on William Byron for the win at Darlington, Formula 1's inaugural Miami Grand Prix and previews Kansas this weekend. Plus, Papa Segal pays homage to a pioneer when it comes to two-way radio communication in NASCAR.

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Wednesday May 11, 2022

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 8:54


Abortion rights remain top of mind in Texas - where care for women suffering from ectopic pregnancies and miscarriages is now thrown into doubt. Meanwhile, this Saturday will see a Donald Trump rally at the Austin Convention Center and a Planned Parenthood abortion rights protest at the Texas State Capitol - at the same time. This May has been the hottest for Austin on record, by a long shot - the unseasonably hot weather lately has led Travis County to issue a burn ban. Energy prices have been spiking along with high power demand, in the same effect that was seen during the February 2021 winter freeze. Texas gas prices have spiked again, reaching a record average price in Austin of $4.06 per gallon. Negotiations over pay for Austin EMS workers continue - the city is now offering $22 per hour, but the EMS union is insisting on $24.70. Not deja vu here - it's time to vote again, and you CAN vote in the primary runoff election even if you didn't vote in the primary last March. Early voting is underway now through May 20 and Election Day is May 24. The Austin City Limits Music Festival unveils its lineup for 2022, including the Red Hot Chili Peppers, P!nk, the Chicks, Kacey Musgraves, SZA, Paramore, and Lil Nas X as headliners. Tickets went on sale Tuesday at noon, and as of this morning are still available in all price levels. Last year's ACL Fest brought $369 million into the local economy. New research illustrates that yes, most newcomers to Texas are coming from California. A Dallas developer has submitted a plan to clean up and revitalize East Sixth Street. Cedar Park and Georgetown are among SmartAsset's new ranking of the best small cities in America. A space travel-themed brewery is opening soon in south Austin - its motif and beer names lead to speculation it may be tied to Elon Musk and SpaceX.

The Talk of the Town
Talk of the Town | May 9, 2022

The Talk of the Town

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 39:08


Mon County Del. Joe Statler talks about funding for a new EMS program at MTEC. Brad McElhinny discusses all things elections.

ems talk of the town brad mcelhinny
Rush The Bus
Robert Mcevoy

Rush The Bus

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 75:21


On this episode of Rush the Bus Pete and Julie speak with Paramedic Robert McEvoy. Rob and Peter were partners several years back but Rob's moved on to greener pastures in Long Island's Suffolk County. Take a listen to hear all about his EMS journey.

!Please Remain Calm!
Please No 911

!Please Remain Calm!

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 44:01


We're joined by social media star & content creator Yarema (@yarmatoocrazy) as he tells us about a nasty injury from a freak accident at home that he absoiutely needed to call an ambulance for and refused to, resulting in permanent nerve damage to his hand. He explains his whole reasoning to not call, & how long he wound up waiting for help. We go into how common this is, why people refuse to call, and why people refuse to go to the hospital even when facing death. We explain what AMA is, how to do it, and Danny explains the craziest situations where someone refused to go. I mean unbeliveable situations. Don't refuse this trip.

RAW Medicine
Episode 15: US Forest Service EMS

RAW Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 51:14


We're joined by Dr. Michelle Curry, the new EMS medical director of the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). As of this episode, the USFS EMS program is just now coming into its own, with a uniform set of policies, Local Emergency Medical Advisor (LEMA) physicians appointed for each USDA Region, patient care protocols, and a national credentialing system. However, there are some big differences between the USFS EMS program and that of the National Park Service, to which it is often compared.

Dark Side of Wikipedia | True Crime & Dark History
334: Mother Puts Healthy Newborn In Ziploc and Hides Him In Closet | True Crime Today

Dark Side of Wikipedia | True Crime & Dark History

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 3:27


Moira Akers, age 41, of Carved Stone in Columbia was found guilty today by a Howard County Circuit Court jury of second-degree murder and first-degree child abuse from an incident involving the birth of her child in the fall of 2018. On November 1, 2018, Howard County Police were called to Howard County General Hospital after Akers had been transported from her residence by paramedics. While being transported to the hospital, Akers did not disclose the birth of her newborn to Howard County Fire & EMS personnel who responded to treat her. Through investigation, it was determined that Akers had recently given birth inside her home. Investigators responded to the house to conduct a check on welfare and located a deceased, male newborn in a zipped plastic bag under a blanket in a closet with the door shut. Akers, when confronted with how the baby was found at that time, then responded that the baby was stillborn. On November 2nd, 2018, an autopsy was done on Baby Akers and a report was issued in March of 2019 by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner which classified the death as a homicide. The report stated the infant was a healthy, full-term baby and alive at birth. The cause of death was declared as asphyxiation and exposure. True Crime Today is a daily EXTRA feature of Dark Side Of. If you like Dark Side Of - Be sure to search and subscribe to "Dark Side Of" wherever you download podcasts! Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dark-side-of-wikipedia-true-crime-dark-history/id1504280230?uo=4 Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0GYshi6nJCf3O0aKEBTOPs Stitcher http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-ghost-stories-online-2/dark-side-of-wikipedia-true-crime-disturbing-stories iHeart https://www.iheart.com/podcast/270-Dark-Side-of-Wikipedia-Tru-60800715 Amazon https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/565dc51b-d214-4fab-b38b-ae7c723cb79a/Dark-Side-of-Wikipedia-True-Crime-Dark-History Google Podcasts https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hdWRpb2Jvb20uY29tL2NoYW5uZWxzLzUwMDEyNjAucnNz Or Search "Dark Side Of" for the best in True Crime ANYWHERE you get podcasts! Support the show at http://www.darksidepod.com

Impacting Life 24_7
Interview with John Yopp Candidate for Onslow County Sheriff

Impacting Life 24_7

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 66:29


My name is John Yopp and I am running for Onslow County Sheriff as a Republican Candidate. ​ I am a lifelong resident of Onslow County. I care deeply about the people that live in our community. My family has been living in Onslow County, NC since the 1790s.  We even have a road named after us, Yopp Road. We are known as a hardworking and reliable family willing to help and serve our fellow citizens.  For the past 20 years, I have faithfully dedicated my life to serving the people in this community. ​ On September 11th, 2001, I had an interview with the Onslow County Sheriff's Office. While in the waiting room, I watched the atrocious acts of terrorism unfold in New York City on the tv screen. Despite the chaos, danger, and imminent threat, I watched the selfless bravery of police officers, EMS workers, and firefighters, as they ran into doomed buildings to save people they didn't even know, and this strengthened my commitment and propensity to serve.  PRINCIPLED, CONSISTENT LEADERSHIP SERVING ONSLOW COUNTY In 2001, I began serving as a Correctional Officer in the Onslow County Jail. From there, I assumed the role of patrol deputy for the Onslow County Sheriff's Office and continued to work there for several years. I am currently a Sergeant for the North Topsail Beach Police Department. My entire law enforcement career has been spent working in Onslow County, doing my best to ensure the best possible outcome for each and every citizen I have been called to serve.

You Learn You Turn
Retired Deputy Sheriff Stephen Balzano Describes Life on the Front Lines

You Learn You Turn

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 35:44


The mental health support for First Responders needs to be greatly improved. First responders are at a greater risk for PTSD and suicide than most other occupations due to the trauma they witness every day. They face life or death on any given day and witness horrific situations. The need for resources and support for them has never been greater.Stephen Balzano is a retired Deputy Sheriff who openly discusses his experiences while on active duty. He painstakingly details the day he lost one of his "brothers in blue," and acknowledges the lasting effects of that trauma on many of his friends on the force. Stephen explains how difficult it is for police officers, or any First Responders to ask for help and says it needs to be a safe place outside of the system where they can get help.He is putting his experience to good use as, after being trained, he is now a coach on the Youturn Health platform. No doubt he will help many of his peers along the way.

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Friday, May 6th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 20:05


Disney’s not at all secret gay agenda… and more on today’s CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. My name is Toby Sumpter and today is Friday, May 6, 2022. We are just days away from the last stop of our CrossPolitic Liberty Tour in Phoenix, Arizona. I would love to meet you in person in Phoenix, on May 19th. I will be joined by Chocolate Knox, the Gabe Rench the Water Boy, Pastor Jeff Durbin of Apologia Church, and Political analyst Delano Squires, who’s made appearances on the Blaze, and the Tucker Carlson show. Tickets are only $20, and we’ll be talking about the Five Stones of True Liberty. Sign up now at crosspolitic.com/libertytour. While headlines have been understandably filled with the Russian-Ukraine War and the Leaked Supreme Court Opinion, signaling the possible overturn of Roe v. Wade, Dr. Peter McCollugh and Dr. Robert Malone are still thankfully on the warpath, to confront and unearth the growing corruption in our country related to medicine and the COVID vaccines. They recently spoke out insisting that Pfizer and the CDC committed fraud for willfully withholding critical data from the public resulting in harm and death to thousands. Dr. Malone recently noted that the CDC has become entirely politicized and is spreading medical misinformation. He says that What they have done is obscene: https://twitter.com/lakovosjustice_/status/1522001676508581889?s=21&t=ZEVdlpIPEtYnHPg3UpfwwQ Dr. Peter McCollough added that the FDA and Pfizer are being sued for failure to release crucial information regarding possible side-effects of the vaccines: https://twitter.com/LakovosJustice_/status/1522001827352432640?s=20&t=nejlukoUzJOyAmP7Eel0xA Play: 0:00-1:09 https://beckernews.com/fda-issues-warning-for-covid-vaccine-due-to-blood-clot-risk-restricts-it-to-adults-18-years-older-44908/ On Thursday The Food and Drug Administration has issued new restrictions on the single-shot Johnson & Johnson Covid vaccine. The Johnson & Johnson shots are now limited to adults 18 years and older or for whom other COVID-19 vaccines are deemed not accessible or clinically appropriate due to the risk of blood clots. “The FDA said its analysis had determined that the risk of thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome after the administration of the shot warrants limiting of the authorization,” CNBC reported. “We recognize that the Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine still has a role in the current pandemic response in the United States and across the global community,” said Peter Marks, director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. “Our action reflects our updated analysis of the risk of TTS following administration of this vaccine and limits the use of the vaccine to certain individuals,” “The FDA temporarily paused the administration of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine last year after several reported cases of blood clotting,” UPI News noted. “At the time, all six cases were found in women between the ages of 18 and 48. At least one died.” It is not the only serious side effect of Covid vaccines that has been verified this week. An MIT study found that there was an increased risk of side effects among 16-39 year-olds in Israel. “COVID-19 vaccination was ‘significantly associated’ with a 25% jump in emergency medical services (EMS) for heart problems in 16-39 year-olds in Israel, whose vaccination rate is among the world’s highest, according to a peer-reviewed study by MIT researchers,” Just the News reported. Keep your eye on that, folks. Not so long ago, the American dream was alive and well. Employees who worked hard were rewarded, and employers looked for people who could do the job, not for people who had the right political views. RedBalloon.work is a job site designed to get us back to what made American businesses successful: free speech, hard work, and having fun. If you are a free speech employer who wants to hire employees who focus on their work and not identity politics, then post a job on RedBalloon. If you are an employee who is being censored at work or is being forced to comply with the current zeitgeist, post your resume on RedBalloon and look for a new job. redballoon.work, the job site where free speech is still alive! www.redballoon.work https://trendingpolitics.com/watch-house-of-mouse-down-63b-since-going-to-war-with-desantis-dodii/?utm_source=ElWiz Disney’s epic fall from grace began in March when CEO Bob Chapek came out against Florida’s parental rights in education bill. He promised to fight the bill and be a better ally to the LGBTQ+ community. Previous to this, there was an internal call showing executives saying they had a not so secret gay agenda to expose children to homosexual people in their programming. On the call Latoya Reveneau discussed sneaking same sex couples in the backgrounds of shows in order to support this agenda. Watch: https://twitter.com/realchrisrufo/status/1508912865293619202?s=20&t=RPcrd49E17j2rHSTiIS1SA Play video “Not at all secret gay agenda: Adding queerness wherever she could?” Shortly after these comments, as expected, parents started canceling subscriptions left and right. This doesn’t bode well for the mouse economically. “Shares of Disney have plummeted 23.5 percent since the start of March, falling from $145.70. Market cap is down $62.6 billion, from $265.3 to $202.7 billion,” Breitbart reports. Disney is currently one of the worst performing stocks in the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Not willing to learn from its mistakes Disney doubled down on stupid. They took on the state of Florida and Governor DeSantis. They fought Florida’s HB 1557 and renamed it the ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill even though it was a parental rights bill. The company released a statement against the bill on March 28th 2022. Not content to be universally hated by conservative parents, Disney recently created a diversity and inclusion program called Reimagine Tomorrow. This program includes training on systemic racism, white fragility, white privilege, white saviors, microaggressions, and anti racism. Disney asked employees to fill out a privilege checklist during this program. They also launched racially segregated “affinity groups” at the company’s headquarters. It’s great that Christians and conservatives are finally pushing back, but it’s rather rich that for decades, Christians have supported the stories coming out of Disney. I call it the Disney gospel which is this basic storyline: disobey your parents and in the end they will apologize to you and you will live happily ever after. Christians have not understood the power of story, and then we wonder when our children have be discipled by these stories, why they grow up and leave the faith. They *have* been adding queerness for a while. That’s why this year’s Fight Laugh Feast Conference is called Lies, Propaganda, Storytelling and the Serrated Edge. This year our national conference is in Knoxville, TN October 6th-8th. Satan is the father of lies, and the mother of those lies is a government who has rejected God. We have especially been lied to these last two years, and the COVIDpanic has been one of the central mechanisms that our government has used to lie to us and to grab more power. Because Christians have not been reading their bibles, we are susceptible to lies and weak in our ability to fight these lies. God has given us His word to fight Satan and his lies, and we need to recover all of God’s word, its serrated edge and all. Mark your calendars for October 6th-8th, as we fight, laugh and feast with fellowship, beer and Psalms, our amazing lineup of speakers, hanging with our awesome vendors, meeting new friends, and more. Early bird tickets will be available starting in the middle of March. The Psalm of the Day: Psalm 23: THe King of Love My Shepherd is https://open.spotify.com/track/4hSikTuGUCsXgBuWrsPOPa?si=33c5bcf35d1f4884 0:20-0:54 Amen! This is Toby Sumpter with CrossPolitic News. Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. Or find them on our App: just search “Fight Laugh Feast” in your favorite app store and never miss a show. If this content is helpful to you, would you please consider becoming a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member? We are building a cancel-proof Christian media platform, and we can’t do it without your help. Join today and get a $100 discount at the Fight Laugh Feast conference in Knoxville, TN Oct. 6-8, and have a great day.

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Friday, May 6th, 2022

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 20:05


Disney’s not at all secret gay agenda… and more on today’s CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. My name is Toby Sumpter and today is Friday, May 6, 2022. We are just days away from the last stop of our CrossPolitic Liberty Tour in Phoenix, Arizona. I would love to meet you in person in Phoenix, on May 19th. I will be joined by Chocolate Knox, the Gabe Rench the Water Boy, Pastor Jeff Durbin of Apologia Church, and Political analyst Delano Squires, who’s made appearances on the Blaze, and the Tucker Carlson show. Tickets are only $20, and we’ll be talking about the Five Stones of True Liberty. Sign up now at crosspolitic.com/libertytour. While headlines have been understandably filled with the Russian-Ukraine War and the Leaked Supreme Court Opinion, signaling the possible overturn of Roe v. Wade, Dr. Peter McCollugh and Dr. Robert Malone are still thankfully on the warpath, to confront and unearth the growing corruption in our country related to medicine and the COVID vaccines. They recently spoke out insisting that Pfizer and the CDC committed fraud for willfully withholding critical data from the public resulting in harm and death to thousands. Dr. Malone recently noted that the CDC has become entirely politicized and is spreading medical misinformation. He says that What they have done is obscene: https://twitter.com/lakovosjustice_/status/1522001676508581889?s=21&t=ZEVdlpIPEtYnHPg3UpfwwQ Dr. Peter McCollough added that the FDA and Pfizer are being sued for failure to release crucial information regarding possible side-effects of the vaccines: https://twitter.com/LakovosJustice_/status/1522001827352432640?s=20&t=nejlukoUzJOyAmP7Eel0xA Play: 0:00-1:09 https://beckernews.com/fda-issues-warning-for-covid-vaccine-due-to-blood-clot-risk-restricts-it-to-adults-18-years-older-44908/ On Thursday The Food and Drug Administration has issued new restrictions on the single-shot Johnson & Johnson Covid vaccine. The Johnson & Johnson shots are now limited to adults 18 years and older or for whom other COVID-19 vaccines are deemed not accessible or clinically appropriate due to the risk of blood clots. “The FDA said its analysis had determined that the risk of thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome after the administration of the shot warrants limiting of the authorization,” CNBC reported. “We recognize that the Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine still has a role in the current pandemic response in the United States and across the global community,” said Peter Marks, director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. “Our action reflects our updated analysis of the risk of TTS following administration of this vaccine and limits the use of the vaccine to certain individuals,” “The FDA temporarily paused the administration of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine last year after several reported cases of blood clotting,” UPI News noted. “At the time, all six cases were found in women between the ages of 18 and 48. At least one died.” It is not the only serious side effect of Covid vaccines that has been verified this week. An MIT study found that there was an increased risk of side effects among 16-39 year-olds in Israel. “COVID-19 vaccination was ‘significantly associated’ with a 25% jump in emergency medical services (EMS) for heart problems in 16-39 year-olds in Israel, whose vaccination rate is among the world’s highest, according to a peer-reviewed study by MIT researchers,” Just the News reported. Keep your eye on that, folks. Not so long ago, the American dream was alive and well. Employees who worked hard were rewarded, and employers looked for people who could do the job, not for people who had the right political views. RedBalloon.work is a job site designed to get us back to what made American businesses successful: free speech, hard work, and having fun. If you are a free speech employer who wants to hire employees who focus on their work and not identity politics, then post a job on RedBalloon. If you are an employee who is being censored at work or is being forced to comply with the current zeitgeist, post your resume on RedBalloon and look for a new job. redballoon.work, the job site where free speech is still alive! www.redballoon.work https://trendingpolitics.com/watch-house-of-mouse-down-63b-since-going-to-war-with-desantis-dodii/?utm_source=ElWiz Disney’s epic fall from grace began in March when CEO Bob Chapek came out against Florida’s parental rights in education bill. He promised to fight the bill and be a better ally to the LGBTQ+ community. Previous to this, there was an internal call showing executives saying they had a not so secret gay agenda to expose children to homosexual people in their programming. On the call Latoya Reveneau discussed sneaking same sex couples in the backgrounds of shows in order to support this agenda. Watch: https://twitter.com/realchrisrufo/status/1508912865293619202?s=20&t=RPcrd49E17j2rHSTiIS1SA Play video “Not at all secret gay agenda: Adding queerness wherever she could?” Shortly after these comments, as expected, parents started canceling subscriptions left and right. This doesn’t bode well for the mouse economically. “Shares of Disney have plummeted 23.5 percent since the start of March, falling from $145.70. Market cap is down $62.6 billion, from $265.3 to $202.7 billion,” Breitbart reports. Disney is currently one of the worst performing stocks in the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Not willing to learn from its mistakes Disney doubled down on stupid. They took on the state of Florida and Governor DeSantis. They fought Florida’s HB 1557 and renamed it the ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill even though it was a parental rights bill. The company released a statement against the bill on March 28th 2022. Not content to be universally hated by conservative parents, Disney recently created a diversity and inclusion program called Reimagine Tomorrow. This program includes training on systemic racism, white fragility, white privilege, white saviors, microaggressions, and anti racism. Disney asked employees to fill out a privilege checklist during this program. They also launched racially segregated “affinity groups” at the company’s headquarters. It’s great that Christians and conservatives are finally pushing back, but it’s rather rich that for decades, Christians have supported the stories coming out of Disney. I call it the Disney gospel which is this basic storyline: disobey your parents and in the end they will apologize to you and you will live happily ever after. Christians have not understood the power of story, and then we wonder when our children have be discipled by these stories, why they grow up and leave the faith. They *have* been adding queerness for a while. That’s why this year’s Fight Laugh Feast Conference is called Lies, Propaganda, Storytelling and the Serrated Edge. This year our national conference is in Knoxville, TN October 6th-8th. Satan is the father of lies, and the mother of those lies is a government who has rejected God. We have especially been lied to these last two years, and the COVIDpanic has been one of the central mechanisms that our government has used to lie to us and to grab more power. Because Christians have not been reading their bibles, we are susceptible to lies and weak in our ability to fight these lies. God has given us His word to fight Satan and his lies, and we need to recover all of God’s word, its serrated edge and all. Mark your calendars for October 6th-8th, as we fight, laugh and feast with fellowship, beer and Psalms, our amazing lineup of speakers, hanging with our awesome vendors, meeting new friends, and more. Early bird tickets will be available starting in the middle of March. The Psalm of the Day: Psalm 23: THe King of Love My Shepherd is https://open.spotify.com/track/4hSikTuGUCsXgBuWrsPOPa?si=33c5bcf35d1f4884 0:20-0:54 Amen! This is Toby Sumpter with CrossPolitic News. Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. Or find them on our App: just search “Fight Laugh Feast” in your favorite app store and never miss a show. If this content is helpful to you, would you please consider becoming a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member? We are building a cancel-proof Christian media platform, and we can’t do it without your help. Join today and get a $100 discount at the Fight Laugh Feast conference in Knoxville, TN Oct. 6-8, and have a great day.

Criminal Justice Evolution Podcast  - Hosted by Patrick Fitzgibbons
Criminal Justice Evolution Podcast: Rowing Across The Altantic Ocean with LEO Mark Pfetzer

Criminal Justice Evolution Podcast - Hosted by Patrick Fitzgibbons

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 33:07


Hello and Welcome back to the Top Ranked Criminal Justice Evolution Podcast. Thank you for making this show very popular. If you would share with family and friends and give us a 5-Star Rating and Review we sure would appreciate it.  A big shout out and thank you to YOU, the Criminal Justice Professional. In this difficult time you continue to serve with honor and that doesn't go unnoticed by the majority of Americans. No matter what you read, see or hear remember that vast majority of people support you. Please be safe and keep up the great work.  If you or someone you know is suffering with depression, addiction issues or both, please reach out to FHE - Health. If you are suffering and you are a first responder please reach out to FHE - Health Shatterproof Program for First Responders at 844-650-1399 or reach out to me directly at 303-960-9819. So excited to have Mark Pfetzer on the show. Mark is a full time Law Enforcement Professional in New Mexico with many dedicated and honorable years of service. Mark is one of those individuals that is making an impact with First Responder Health and Wellness. Mark is so dedicated to this cause that he and a team of first responders at rowing across the Atlantic Ocean as part of the Talisker Atlantic Whiskey Challenge. All for raising awareness and action for First Responder Health and Wellness.  Mark is also part of Guardian Initiatives who's mission and dedication is below:  Each and every one of us are served by first responders in our communities.  These men and women voluntarily enter in to a profession that we all know to be dangerous.  Gunfire, ambushes, fires, search and rescue missions, and emergency driving are all dangers of the job that the general public hear about and can understand. However, lurking in the shadows of these high profile dangers is a lesser known, but just as deadly risk.  The psychological traumas experienced by our nation's police, fire, EMS, and 911 dispatchers can lead some down a destructive and all too often deadly path.  The consequence of seeing tragedy on a regular basis can contribute to depression, substance abuse, and other effects of post traumatic stress.  Tragically, for some, a false sense of hopelessness results in suicidal behavior.  The number of first responders who die by suicide is alarming and heart-breaking.  While data is available, it is believed to be incomplete as researchers predict the number to be far more than what is reported.*  More powerful than the problem is the reality that the effects can be prevented and the damage treated.  Through awareness, training, and treatment by culturally competent clinicians, first responders affected can move on to live full and satisfying lives.  It is the hope of Team Guardian, through this initiative, to make as big of an impact in this as  possible.    Such a great show!!   You can find Mark here: https://www.facebook.com/guardianinitiatives/    https://guardianinitiatives.org/resources    https://guardianinitiatives.org/2022-crew    Stay tuned for more great guests on The CJEvolution Podcast   www.cjevolution.com   Patrick

Bráðavarpið
Fyrsti Dagur EMS 2022

Bráðavarpið

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 35:57


Bráðavarpið er á EMS 2022 í Glasgow í Skotlandi. Í þessum þætti fengium við þá Arnar Pál Gíslason bráðatækni og nýjan formann fagdeildar sjúkraflutningamanna og Sverri Örn Jónsson bráðatækni til þess að fara yfir atburði dagsins með okkur.

What’s Your Emergency
Everything's Bigger in Texas...Except Cop's Waistlines.

What’s Your Emergency

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 32:35


Yes, you read that right. Everything is bigger in Texas, except your belt, apparently. Wyoming says no.We all know slugs on the job in Fire, Police and EMS but can we really judge a person's fitness simply by the size of their waistline? Texas DPS says yes.Listen in to see what the guys think and take a peek at this article which lists law enforcement as the most obese profession in America. Before you laugh too hard, fellow firefighters, we tied for second along with Security Guards.Underlying point about all this? Sometimes rules are stupid and sometimes we need to take a hint and maybe skip the 2800 calorie “coffee” drink in the morning and walk the dog an extra day this week.Support the show

EMS World Podcasts
The Extra Mile: Lenco Gets Lifesaving Care Where It's Needed

EMS World Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 23:06


Responders who have answered large-scale acts of violence may be familiar with Lenco's BearCat tactical armored vehicle for military and law enforcement operations. For a more medical slant on such situations, the company also offers the the BearCat Medevac, also known as the MedCat, to meet the combined requirements of SWAT and tactical EMS teams. In this new podcast host Mike McCabe gets a primer from Lenco's Jim Massery.  Follow EMS World (EMSWorldOFCL) on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn. EMS World Expo is Oct. 10–14, 2022 in Orlando. 

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Tuesday May 3, 2022

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 7:26


Austin's Public Safety Commission is calling on the city to make its EMS workers a better offer for a pay increase, while reporting shortages of police and EMS staff and an increase in aggravated assaults and property crimes. Kyle Rittenhouse, the teenager who was acquitted after killing two people during George Floyd protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin in 2020, is considering attending Texas A&M. Austin's job market has been named the "hottest" in America by the Wall Street Journal for the third year in a row - we're also leading most other top U.S. metros in professionals leaving remote work behind to return to the office. Several UT-area businesses, including historic burger joint Dirty Martin's, are in the crosshairs of Project Connect redevelopment on Guadalupe between 27th and 29th Streets. Barton Springs Pool continues operating under a limited schedule as Austin city lifeguards, especially those tasked with overseeing Barton Springs, continue their fight for a $22 per hour minimum wage. Meanwhile, Hamilton Pool is set to re-open for swimmers, but good luck getting a reservation. Texas Longhorns baseball looks to recover from a sweep by Oklahoma State last weekend, hosting Houston Baptist at Disch-Falk Field tonight. And some wild weather may be on the way in the form of a significant and much-needed rain event Wednesday night through Thursday, followed by potentially record-setting heat by next weekend that could push the vulnerable Texas power grid to its limits.

Alert Medic 1 - Podcast
The Shock Index #3

Alert Medic 1 - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 37:18


Ken and Mustafa discuss flow of consciousness EMS topics as they present themselves

Medic Class Citizen
| 31 | The Anatomy of Ultrasound, Featuring Paul Braum

Medic Class Citizen

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 69:18


In this episode, we sit down with an expert cardiac sonographer of more than 40 years, Paul Braum, to discuss the history, development, and future of ultrasound. Listen as Paul walks us through the beginnings of ultrasound, and how we have reached the point of potentially viewing ultrasound as a pre-hospital diagnostic tool. Paul is a champion of EMS, and believes with the right training, EMS can certainly make a huge impact on successful patient outcomes through the use of point of care ultrasound (POCUS) testing in the field.    If you like what you hear-  Make sure to download, subscribe, and share with your friends and co-workers.  Find us on all major platforms and podcast providers, as well as our socials! | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Linked-In | YouTube | www.medicclasscitizen.com |  MERCHANDISE NOW AVAILABLE! https://www.medicclasscitizen.com/shop 

Real Ghost Stories Online
EMS Workers Have A Shocking Paranormal Encounter | Best of RGSO

Real Ghost Stories Online

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 31:57


What happens on the job for one EMS worker is anything but “routine”, its paranormal! Here is a preview of the story. “I've always been a light sleeper and especially had trouble falling asleep on shift, so, past midnight if I ever did sleep it was fitful at best. One night, around 2 am, while I was lying awake at the station, I got a call from the dispatcher asking me to come to the dispatch, which was connected to crew quarters at station 3. When I got there, she was clearly shaken and asked me if there were any other crews there. I said I hadn't seen or heard any. She claimed to have looked up and, through the windows separating dispatch from the hall outside, seen a crew member, in uniform, facing away from her, studying the bulletin board. She had glanced away, not immediately recognizing that anything was out of place, as a crew member being at the main station getting supplies or something was not terribly uncommon even at that time of night. A moment later when, having realized that the crew member in question was neither my partner nor me, when we were the only crew that had checked in at the station in the last few hours, she looked up and the figure was gone. She had not heard him leave, though he would have had to walk right past her window, nor had enough time elapsed for him to sneak past. When I first started working there a few years before, my very first day was a tragic one. One of the employees had committed suicide the night before. Though I had not worked with him, I had done clinical ride-outs with the service during EMT school, and he had been one of my preceptors. Years later the dispatcher, who had not worked there at the time and would not have known this employee, in describing the figure she saw, seemed to be describing the deceased paramedic. Granted this was done from a brief glance at his back, but she got the hair color and the general build just right.” The day after this happened, my son and his family had to go home. I was sitting in my favorite spot outside after they left; it was a beautiful sunny day with no wind - and I'd only been sitting there alone for a few minutes when I saw movement out of the corner of my eye - a beautiful white feather was descending to the ground in a circular movement as in a straight down coil, about 3 feet from me - I looked up - there were no birds. There was no breeze. there were no trees over me. But I saw that feather and I felt good. In my head, I felt the words "thank you."” Watch more at: http://www.realghoststoriesonline.com/ If you have a real ghost story or supernatural event to report, please write into our show or call 1-855-853-4802! If you like the show, please help keep us on the air and support the show by becoming an EPP (Extra Podcast Person). We'll give you a BONUS episode every week as a "Thank You" for your support. Become an EPP here: http://www.ghostpodcast.com/?page_id=118 or at or at http://www.patreon.com/realghoststories

PICU Doc On Call
Approach to Calcium Channel Blocker Overdose

PICU Doc On Call

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 21:06


Welcome to PICU Doc On Call, A Podcast Dedicated to Current and Aspiring Intensivists. I'm Pradip Kamat and I'm Rahul Damania. We are coming to you from Children's Healthcare of Atlanta - Emory University School of Medicine. Welcome to our Episode about a 14- year- old female who presented with hypotension after a suicide attempt. Here's the case: A 14 yo F with PMH of depression and oppositional defiant disorder presents with dizziness. Her mother states she was in her normal state of health when on the day of admission she noticed the patient to be dizzy, slurring speech, and pale. The mother became very concerned about the dizziness as the patient was stumbling and a few hours prior to presentation, became increasingly sleepy. The patient does have a history of depression and is controlled on sertraline. Other medications in the home include Metformin, Amlodipine, and Clonidine. The patient denies ingesting any substance. She does have a prior attempt two years prior, after an argument with her mother; however, her mother was able to “stop” her prior to the attempt. She presents to the ER via EMS. Her vital signs are notable for HR 50 bpm with occasional PACs and non-conducted QRS complexes on telemetry; BP of 75/40. A physical exam is notable for AMS and GCS of 10. She is noted to have clear breath sounds, with a cardiac exam notable for slowed and delayed pulses. Initial laboratory work is notable for serum glucose 180 mg/dL and B HCG negative. Initial resuscitation is begun with IV fluids and atropine. Serum acetaminophen and ASA levels are sent and upon stabilization, the patient presents to the PICU for admission. To summarize key elements from this case, this patient has: A history of depression with prior attempt An acute bout of altered mental status Bradycardia, hypotension, and hyperglycemia. All of which brings up a concern for an acute ingestion Let's take a step back and talk about the approach to ingestions in the PICU. What are key aspects to consider in the work-up of these patients? History and physical are key: Stratifying acute or chronic ingestions Baseline prescription medications a patient may be taking or have access to in the household Whether the ingestion involves a single drug or co-ingestants are all first steps in evaluating your patient. In an undifferentiated patient, management is paramount. Initial management is focused on pattern recognition and acute stabilization. A brief initial screening examination should be performed on all patients to identify immediate measures required to stabilize and prevent deterioration of the patient. Assess the airway, vital signs, mental status, pupil size, and skin temperature and moisture. These components of your physical exam should help allude to a toxidrome, and these syndromes are frequently tested on board examinations. Any time a patient has hypotension and bradycardia other drugs that should be considered include beta blockers, digoxin, clonidine, as well as ingestion of barbiturates, opioids, and even benzodiazepines. What are some diagnostic studies you will want to send immediately in a patient with suspected ingestion? Immediate diagnostic studies to be performed include pulse oximetry, continuous cardiac monitoring, an electrocardiogram (ECG), and a capillary glucose measurement (in altered patients). Intravenous (IV) access should be obtained in all cases of serious ingestion. You also want to send beta-hcg and acetaminophen and salicylate levels. an extended toxicology screen may be required on a case-by-case basis. One study found detectable serum acetaminophen concentrations in 9.6 percent of all overdose patients; almost one-third of this subset denied ingestion of acetaminophen. Now that you've focused on ABCs are there more detailed laboratory studies to send in patients with toxidromes? Symptomatic patients and those with an unreliable or unknown history should, at a minimum, undergo...