Podcasts about Brink

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  • 3,180PODCASTS
  • 6,107EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
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  • May 13, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Brink

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Latest podcast episodes about Brink

Dit is de dag
Droogte en straatintimidatie (13 mei 2022)

Dit is de dag

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 30:00


Dit is de Dag is een stevig opiniërend programma van de EO met Tijs van den Brink. Op dinsdag en vrijdag hoor je Margje Fikse of Hans van der Steeg.

Dit is de dag
NAVO-uitbreiding en maken versoepelde exameneisen het diploma minder waard? (12 mei 2022)

Dit is de dag

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 30:00


Dit is de Dag is een stevig opiniërend programma van de EO met Tijs van den Brink. Op dinsdag en vrijdag hoor je Margje Fikse of Hans van der Steeg.

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio
The Celtics and Bruins are on the Brink of elimination Presented by @CityofBostonCU https://twitter.com/CityofBostonCU

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 47:33


Hour 2: Do the Bruins and Celtics have what it takes to win their series? Does Jayson Tatum have what it takes to bring the Celtics back?  The News with Coco 7:40

Celtics Talk
Bucks comeback pushes C's to the brink | with Chris Gasper

Celtics Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 16:10


Chris Forsberg is joined by Chris Gasper of The Boston Globe to break down the Celtics crushing Game 5 loss that pushes Boston to the brink of elimination heading into Game 6 in Milwaukee on Friday night.(1:30) What happened in Game 5(6:00) Gasper has a surprising person he'd put some of the blame on for the loss(9:30) The Celtics major in making it hard for themselves(11:30) What has to happen for the C's to force a Game 7(13:30) How will this season be seen if they lose the seriesWATCH ON YOUTUBE: https://youtu.be/fagj3aKU7X8See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Don't Shoot The Messenger
Ep 217 - Life, Love and Loss with Lisa Curry

Don't Shoot The Messenger

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 63:55


Join Caroline Wilson and Corrie Perkin for Ep 217. This podcast is proudly supported by Red Energy - most satisfied customers 12 years in a row. This week on the show Caro and Corrie's guest is Lisa Curry AO, MBE talking about her new memoir Lisa: A Memoir- 60 Years of Life, Love and Loss (with Ellen Whinnett). Lisa's book has just hit #2 on the indie bookstore's bestseller list. For more information head to www.harpercollins.com.au HERE.Books, Screen, Food· Lisa: A Memoir- 60 Years of Life, Love and Loss (with Ellen Whinnett).· The Offer on Paramount Plus· A Nice Plum Cake from Ostro (see recipe HERE or below)In the Cocktail Cabinet for Prince Wine Store Myles talks Cabernet· Jo perry Dormilona cabernet· A.Rodda Cuvee de Chaise Beechworth Cabernet Blend 2019The Cocktail Cabinet for Prince Wine Store – bringing Melbournians' the greatest wine in the world. Visit Prince Wine Store.com.auUse the promo code MESS at checkout instore or online to receive a listener discount - head to the dedicated Don't Shoot the Messenger page HERE.Plus this week Caro's Grumpy about the way the Liz Cambage saga has played out.In 6 Quick Questions we talk about the worst and best aspects of the federal election campaign, the best thing about the footy on the weekend, viewing highlights including On the Brink on Australian Story. We mark Daphne du Maurier's birthday and Corrie has an amazing fact!To receive our weekly email which includes recipes SIGN UP HERE.For videos and pics make sure you follow us on Instagram, Facebook or TwitterEmail the show via feedback@dontshootpod.com.au.Don't Shoot the Messenger is produced by Corrie Perkin, Caroline Wilson and produced, engineered and edited by Jane Nield for Sports Entertainment Network.A Nice Plum Cake – adapted from Julia Bustuttil Nishimura from Ostro. This version adapted by Sweet Treats by the Sea (recipe HERE). Ingredients for cake150 g softened unsalted butter150 g castor sugar2 eggs at room temperature1 vanilla pod split and seeds scraped100 g almond meal150 g plain flour, sifted1 tsp baking powder100 ml full cream milkAbout 300 g plums, washed, cut in half, stones removedIngredients for crumble topping40 g plain flour40 g brown sugar30 g flaked almonds40 g chilled unsalted butter1. Preheat oven to 180°C (less for a fan forced oven). Brush a deep round 22 cm spring-form or loose bottomed cake pan with melted butter and line the base and sides with baking paper.2. In a large bowl, use electric beaters to beat the butter and sugar and vanilla seeds together until pale and fluffy.3. Add the eggs one at a time and beat after each until well combined.4. Stir in the ground almonds.5. Add half the milk and stir to incorporate.6. Add half the sifted flour and baking powder and stir gently until just combined. Then add remaining milk, stir, followed by remaining flour and stir to combine.7. Spread the mixture into the prepared cake pan and top with the plums cut side up, pressing them into the mixture just a little.8. Combine the dry ingredients for the crumble topping in a bowl; add the butter, cut into small pieces and rub together to a crumbly mixture.9. Scatter over the top of the plums and bake for around 45 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean.10. Remove from the oven and leave in pan for 15 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool completely.11. Can be served slightly warm with cream or ice-cream or as a cake with tea or coffee.

Locked On Celtics - Daily Podcast On The Boston Celtics With Rainin' J's
4th quarter collapse pushes Boston Celtics to brink. Can they recover?

Locked On Celtics - Daily Podcast On The Boston Celtics With Rainin' J's

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 39:52


Everything was going according to plan for the Boston Celtics in Game 5 against the Milwaukee Bucks. They'd built a 14 point 4th quarter lead and everything was going their way, but then the old Celtics showed up and ruined the fun. John Karalis of Boston Sports Journal discusses the collapse, why Milwaukee did a lot lose this game but simply worked harder than Boston, and the Celtics still coming off as pretty confident after the game. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! PrizePicks Check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “NBA” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Athletic Greens To make it easy, Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/NBANETWORK Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Inside Sports with Reid Wilkins
Oilers pushed to the brink, Nurse suspended for Game 6

Inside Sports with Reid Wilkins

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 19:27


Guest: Drew Remenda, Analyst, San Jose Sharks Hockey, Sharks Audio Network and Co-host, The Green Zone, CJME Radio Regina.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Peter Hart's Military History
Ep121: 2nd Fife & Forfar Yeomanry - On the Brink

Peter Hart's Military History

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 43:06


Pete and Gary continue telling the story of the the 2nd Fife & Forfar Yeomanry, a WW2 tank unit.Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary BainPublisher: Mat McLachlanProducer: Jess StebnickiBecome a member to listen ad-free for only £2 per month: https://plus.acast.com/s/pete-and-garys-military-historySupport the show with a one-off contribution: www.buymeacoffee.com/pgmhFor more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/pete-and-garys-military-history.

brink ww2 fife forfar livinghistorytv
Net Front Presence
Net Front Presence: Tarasenko leads Blues to brink of series victory

Net Front Presence

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 35:20


Post-Dispatch Blues reporter Jim Thomas joined columnist Jeff Gordon to discuss the Blues' 5-2 victory in Game 5 against the Minnesota Wild and the challenge ahead in Game 6. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Felger & Massarotti
Bruins on Brink of Elimination // Celtics vs Bucks // Giannis and the Bucks - 5/11 (Hour 2)

Felger & Massarotti

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 41:27


(0:00) Felger, Jim Murray, and Joe Murray open the second hour with the callers weighing in on the Bruins loss in game 5.  (11:31) Thoughts on the Celtics and Bucks Eastern Conference semifinal series.  (23:16) The callers weigh in on the Bruins and Celtics.  (32:42) Who needs to step up and help Giannis on the Bucks?

JeffJeffs Bizarre Adventure
JeffJeff's Bizarre Adventure 07: Very nice, Caesarino!

JeffJeffs Bizarre Adventure

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022


The gang enters a creepy old hotel to discover its weird secrets that include flesh chimneys. (Episodes covered in this episode are: 19 - A Race Towards the Brink, 20 - Caesar's Lonely Youth, 21 - The 100 vs 2 Strategy)

Straight From The Source with Michael Russo: A show about the Minnesota Wild
Minnesota Wild on the brink of elimination, Tim Army on Wild prospects playing in Iowa

Straight From The Source with Michael Russo: A show about the Minnesota Wild

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 69:21


Russo updates the Minnesota Wild's disappointing game 5 loss to St. Louis, the teams inability to take advantage of home ice and Marc-Andre Fleury's struggles in the net. Plus Dean Evason's reluctance to make any changes to the line combo's or lineup changes. Iowa Wild coach Tim Army joins SFTS in the 2nd segment to talk about prospects Marco Rossi, Adam Beckman, Calen Addison, Connor Dewar, Alex Khovanov, other prospects, the leadership of Cody McLeod and the hectic life as an AHL coach ("I love it"). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

77 Minutes in Heaven: A Podcast About the Dallas Mavericks
Mavericks-Suns game 5 postgame - Dallas' sloppy play leads to a blowout & the brink of elimination

77 Minutes in Heaven: A Podcast About the Dallas Mavericks

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 29:34


Tim Cato and Dave DuFour react to the Mavericks' game 5 loss at Phoenix, from the inability to hit shots, to the turnovers, frustration and more. Can Luka and the Mavs pull it together back in Dallas to force a game 7? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dit is de dag
Uitzending van 11 mei 2022

Dit is de dag

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 30:00


Dit is de Dag is een stevig opiniërend programma van de EO met Tijs van den Brink. Op dinsdag en vrijdag hoor je Margje Fikse of Hans van der Steeg.

Dale & Keefe
Bruins on the brink of elimination after Game 5 loss to Hurricanes

Dale & Keefe

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 41:48


Hour 1 - Gresh and Keefe opened up the show breaking down the Boston Bruins 5-1 Game 5 loss to the Hurricanes in Carolina.  The guys also got into the Boston Celtics, the matchups in tonight's Game 5 against the Milwaukee Bucks, and checked in on the 76ers-Heat series.  Finally, Gresh and Keefe discussed the comment made by New England Patriots wide receiver Nelson Agholor.

London Review Podcasts
Women on the Brink

London Review Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 40:41


Azadeh Moaveni talks to Tom about the situation on the Polish border, where women and children fleeing Ukraine face numerous dangers, including kidnapping, trafficking and forced labour. Moaveni describes the way social media has changed the way traffickers work, the dramatic range of conditions refugees face in Poland, and how this displacement crisis compares to others she's seen.Read Azadeh's piece: https://lrb.me/moavenipodSubscribe to the LRB from just £1 per issue: https://mylrb.co.uk/podcast20bTitle music by Kieran Brunt / Produced by Anthony Wilks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Toucher & Rich
Stinky Uber Driver // Bruins on Brink of Elimination // Red Sox Actually WON A Game?? - 5/11 (Hour 1)

Toucher & Rich

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 42:24


(00:00) Fred gave his first negative Uber review because he smelt so bad. (21:19) WHAT HAPPENED LAST NIGHT: Antti Raanta finished with 34 saves to help the Hurricanes beat the Boston Bruins 5-1 for a 3-2 lead in the best-of-seven series. Now the Bruins are on the brink of elimination. Don't look now but your Boston Red Sox have WON a game and snapped a five-game losing streak.   CONNECT WITH TOUCHER & RICH Twitter:@Toucherandrich|@fredtoucher|@KenGriffeyRules Instagram:@Toucherandrichofficial |@fredtoucher Twitch:twitch.tv/thesportshub 98.5 The Sports Hub:Website|Twitter|Facebook|Instagram

Morning Bru with Jaffe & Razor
Bruins Pushed To The Brink Despite McAvoy Return From COVID Protocol, Lose GM5 5-1 | Ep. 137

Morning Bru with Jaffe & Razor

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 36:43


In this episode, Jaffe & Razor discuss the Bruins inability to muster a comeback after giving up 2 goals in the 1st period. They break down Swayman's game, McAvoy's unexpected return, the possibility of Lindholm returning for GM6, how that impacts the lineup & more!

Sports Day Tampa Bay
Lightning On Brink Of Elimination, Rays No-Hit In Anaheim & Tom Brady's Post-Playing Career Plans

Sports Day Tampa Bay

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 46:02


Rick Stroud and Steve Versnick on a dark day in Tampa Bay sports as the Lightning blow a 3rd period lead and face elimination on Thursday night in Game 6, the Rays are no-hit by Reid Detmers who only faced 1 batter over the minimum and Tom Brady announced his post-football career plans as an analyst for Fox Sports. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Liberty Ballers: for Philadelphia 76ers fans
Out of Site, Episode 85: The Heat crush the Sixers in Game 5 putting Philly on the brink of elimination. With Jas Kang.

Liberty Ballers: for Philadelphia 76ers fans

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 34:20


The Miami Heat dominated the Sixers in Game 5 to take a 3-2 series lead. Jas Kang joins Adio Royster to recap the loss, discuss Joel Embiid's tough night, what adjustments the Sixers can make in Game 6, Philly's lack of bench depth and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Adam Jones Show
Instant Reactions: Bruins on Brink Of Elimination

The Adam Jones Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 9:33


Jones And Joe Murray react to the Bruins 5-1 loss to the Hurricanes on Tuesday

WFAN THE KID
Rangers back in the postseason, but 2 rough road games put them on the brink of elimination.

WFAN THE KID

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 10:55


All the details about how The Rangers playoff Series is going and how they got here.

The Athletic Hockey Show: A show about the NHL
Colorado Avalanche advance to 2nd round, Barry Trotz possible landing spots, NY Rangers on the brink of elimination and the NHL Draft Lottery is tonight

The Athletic Hockey Show: A show about the NHL

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 75:31


Craig and Sean discuss the New York Islanders surprising decision to fire Barry Trotz after four seasons behind the bench for Lou Lamoriello's team. The guys take a look at possible landing spots for Trotz, with all signs pointing to Winnipeg and who Lamoriello might have in mind to guide the Islanders next season. Peter Baugh joins from Nashville with his new cowboy hat, on the heels of the Colorado Avalanche sweeping the Predators and advancing to the second round of the Stanley Cup playoffs. Plus the guys ask, why hasn't Mike Sullivan won a Jack Adams Award yet, with the Penguins led by third stringer Louis Domingue on the brink of eliminating Igor Shesterkin and the New York Rangers, they praise the TNT intermissions and we look ahead to what franchise desperately needs to win the draft lottery tonight. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The North Shore Drive
From the Point: How the Penguins have pushed the Rangers to the brink of elimination

The North Shore Drive

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 26:52


Insiders Matt Vensel and Mike DeFabo break down the Penguins' 3-1 series lead heading into Madison Square Garden on Wednesday. How have the Penguins shaken the unbreakable Igor Shesterkin to push the Rangers to the brink of elimination? Plus, we discuss the Sidney Crosby and Jake Guentzel show, the emergence of secondary scoring and more. Music from https://filmmusic.io "RetroFuture Clean" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

The 4&3 Podcast
250 - Actor on the Brink of Suicide Gives His Life to Jesus and Jordan Peterson's Powerful Words on Faith

The 4&3 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 18:28


Today on the 4&3 Podcast, Faithwire's Billy Hallowell and Tré Goins-Phillips break down the biggest stories of the day:Actor Kel Mitchell overcome struggles and finds ChristJordan Peterson talks "courage" and faithPlus: Victim's incredibly kind gesture to the man who stole from her

Other Voices
Neil Gifford — bringing butterflies back from the brink of extinction

Other Voices

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 30:06


While many of us think of fire solely as a destructive force, Gifford understands that it is essential to enriching the ecosystem of a pitch pine barren.Gifford, the conservation director for the Albany Pine Bush Preserve, got his first job at the preserve literally setting fires, controlled burns.Fire, he explains in this week's Enterprise podcast, recycles nutrients in a way that benefits rare plants.“You can think of wild fire almost like instant decomposition,” he said, likening it to what happens in a compost pile — but almost instantly.“Fire is taking nitrogen in particular, but also phosphorus, calcium, potassium, and other nutrients and releasing them into the soil and making them available for plant uptake,” he said.Read the full story at https://altamontenterprise.com/05092022/neil-gifford-brings-back-birds-and-butterflies-brink-extinction See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

On the Brink with Andi Simon
314: George Swisher—What Can AI Do To Help Your Company Change?

On the Brink with Andi Simon

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 42:22


Hear how your organization should embrace change to grow   George Swisher is a former marketing entrepreneur and management consultant. He has a 15-year track record of improving company performance and shifting cultures to effective change management. He currently is co-founder and CEO of www.changeforce.ai, a software platform that helps leaders manage organizational change more precisely by analyzing the sentiment of company conversations in real time. A really interesting platform. Remember, I'm a corporate anthropologist who, like George, helps companies change, so I loved this interview. So will you. Watch and listen to our conversation here When you begin to change, things aren't all changing at the same time And you're not quite sure if it's moving at all, and sometimes you're moving a battleship with an oar. You're just hoping it's moving somewhere. But the technology which George has developed can identify where a culture is moving, which areas are strong and which are not.  First, he gathers data about what your culture is currently so you can make smarter decisions, whether you're a frontline employee, manager, director or executive entrepreneur. Then his software analyzes this data to help you scale what you are doing to do it faster, and save money. In essence, he helps you build better change processes of how you get things done so you can inform that process with meaningful information. In our podcast, we talk a great deal about George's own personal journey. You will love this conversation. Then come and share your own new ideas and see how they can soar. For a deeper dive into how to change your corporate culture so you can soar Blog: Need To Change Your Organization's Culture? 6 Best Ways To Do It. Blog: How's Your Culture? Doing Fine Or In Drastic Need Of An Overhaul? Podcast: Tristan White—A Great Place To Work Starts With A Great Culture Additional resources for you My award-winning second book: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business My award-winning first book: On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights Simon Associates Management Consultants    Read the transcript of our podcast here Andi Simon: Welcome to On the Brink With Andi Simon. I'm Andi Simon, and as you know, I'm your host and your guide. And my job is to help you get off the brink. I go looking for interesting people who are going to do just that. They will help you see, feel and think in new ways so that you can begin to soar again. These have been unusual times. I used to say, if you want to change, have a crisis or create one. I never expected a crisis of this sort. But I also preach, don't waste a crisis. Because it's a time where people will let you change, they will blame it on unexpected things. You'll never know where it can take you. So today I have with me George Swisher. Let me tell you about George just a little bit, because we have some very interesting and important conversations about technology and transformation to share with you. George is a former marketing entrepreneur and management consultant. He has a 15-year track record of improving company performance, and shifting cultures to effective change management. He currently is a co-founder and CEO of Changeforce.ai. You should look it up. It's a software platform that helps leaders manage organizational change more precisely by analyzing the sentiment of company objectives in real time. It's really an interesting platform. Remember, I'm a corporate anthropologist, and I like to help companies change. The question is, when you begin to change, things aren't all changing at the same time. And you're not quite sure if it's moving at all. And sometimes you're moving a battleship with an oar and you're hoping it's moving somewhere. And the technology that George has is very interesting as a way of identifying where it's strong or it's not. But today, we want to talk about culture, technology and business so we can see what's happening and where we're going. George, thanks so much for joining me. George Swisher: Thanks for having me, I'm really excited. Andi Simon: We are too. Tell the listeners about your own journey, because it's a perfect setup for where you are and where you're going. Who is George? And what's your journey?  George Swisher: That's great. It's a great way to start. I think you know, in talking today, my hope was to help people understand how technology can really help them. So it's less about the software. It's more about, where were the pivotal points in my personal path that got me to where I realized that I needed to have technology as a utility to make better decisions or be more effective in the work that I was responsible for. And so I was actually lucky to be a guest lecturer last night at Columbia. My co-founder, Dr. Nabil Ahmad, teaches a class on organizational strategy. He had a young group in there last night. And when I got home, I was taking the train home, and it reminded me of the moment, I remember exactly where I was, how old I was, when there was a huge tipping point where I said, Wow, if technology isn't a part of what I'm doing, I'm not going to be able to succeed at the path that I want. And, this group was really intelligent. So a lot of great questions reminded me of when I was about 19 years old. So I was young. Luckily, I went into the workforce young, I was going to school and working at the same time. So at 19, you can imagine you're doing all kinds of different things, trying to do studies, trying to get a job done. And I was working for one of the largest railroad companies in the country. I was sitting there and I was a part of a team of about 20 people. It was an operational management and customer service, not the most innovative departments usually. So they had hired a tech consultant who came in and he developed a basic Microsoft access database with a pretty front end on it. That pretty much took the team from 20 people to two people. And I was lucky enough to be one of the two people that got to stay. And what he ended up doing was figuring out a way to make managing customer service more efficient with less people. Some people thought it was bad. I thought it was brilliant. And that became the moment I was like, Wow, this person just came in and what I thought was my job today just completely changed in less than 24 hours. And it really made him look like a superhero to the company. Now of course the people who lost their jobs, it wasn't great for, but in terms of an organization and leadership, and what they were trying to do, here was this very simple thing that he did that completely changed that organization. And then this was a billion dollar company, right? This was a big, big deal. And it's when I realized that I needed to have a superpower like that if I was going to be able to go from a supervisor, which I was at the time, a young supervisor, to manager to director to executive to leadership. If I didn't have that kind of utility belt where I can just bolt on different pieces of technology to be my superpowers, I was gonna have to go at a much slower pace than I was willing to do. And that just became that time where it was. It was scary because I just watched 18 people lose their jobs because of technology. So I was a little bit fearful of it. But I was very intrigued by that. If I can use it the right way, it will help me beat out other people, bcause that's what I was at that age, that's all I was looking to do was build a career. Fast forward about five years, I ended up moving up in that company, by using that strategy. So I actually dropped out of school, and decided to spend that same time discovering different technologies, and what could I not do physically, that some type of software or technology could help me either gain information that I didn't have readily available to me, and that can be in many different ways, or to make something more efficient. If it can make it more efficient, it has that ripple effect of scale, speed, cost, efficiency and savings. And I knew if I can do that, that I could beat out a lot of other people who may have more formalized education. Five years later, I was running about a $50 million business unit at the age of 24, which is crazy to me at times. And that was almost 20 years ago, because I had beat out candidates who had MBAs, who had more work experience, but really couldn't understand how to create that speed and scale and cost effectiveness that I was able to do. And that's how I got into that position. And so last night just reminded me of how many leaders didn't get the luxury that I had to figure that out, as they've been moving through their careers. And what's always funny is when we have these conversations, a lot of times people ask so many questions about the physical technology, like, are you building it? Are you building artificial intelligence? What is machine learning? They get so into the details, which happened last night with these young leaders. My advice to them was, It's not about learning how to be an engineer, it's more of understanding what can't you do today? Is there some type of technology that can help you do that better, faster, more informed? If you can do that, you'll win the battle, right? If you go to hold it down into the hole, you get lost into the engineering world, which you don't want to. And so, I think that timeframe was really the moment where I just never looked back. Everything that I did, every career decision I made, hinged on the fact that I could constantly explore, and eventually I got into building our own technologies if we couldn't find them. So if there wasn't something out there, and we knew that we could have efficiency, I ended up becoming an entrepreneur at 25 and built a service organization. In consulting, you had technology enabling IT services, where we progressed really quickly. And that was the first time I had sold a company at the age of 30. And so I always come back to what enabled me to do all that was the fact that I was constantly trying to find ways to have superpowers beyond what I was able to do in a human capacity. And it ended up being some form of technology that did it. And that's why I feel like it's important to listeners. Andi Simon: Let me ask you a question as if I'm your audience asking you the question. Let's assume that we are like your Columbia students last night. What would be three things that are important for the listeners? Let's assume they're on the brink and they too want to soar. What is it they should look at and what should they see? How should it feel? What are we thinking about here, because you made an important point. It's not about being an engineer, it's not about the details of AI or machine learning or robots. It's a bigger picture that you're preaching. And if I hear you, which is that society is going through a great transformation, it's almost as big as the introduction of farming or fire or in the transformation. But if my audience is like your students, some of your observations would be very helpful to share your thoughts. George Swisher: So I will try to do three. One would be understanding what information you can not get your hands on today? I always love this idea of this concept, and there's a company that's called What If. They've done a great idea just to sit in a room and go, What if I could gain access to this information? And whatever that is, right? Information we hear now is data or big data, just get rid of the words. Just think about information, if you could figure out what information would inform you to make better decisions so it doesn't matter what role you're in. If I can get information about currently, it's going to enable me to actually make a smarter decision whether I'm a frontline employee, manager, director, executive entrepreneur, it doesn't matter. So I think number one it is to focus on that: what information do you need that you currently can't get today? And then try to find where you can get that. And the reality is, there most likely is some way to get that. You don't always have to build it. But there is some way that you most likely can put two softwares together. That's where you work with your engineers and go, Hey, take these two things, and put them together and give me the output because that output is going to allow me to make a decision that's going to scale what I'm doing, do it faster, save money. I think that's that one piece of finding information. Two is kind of the next step to that, which is, Is there a way that I can be more efficient in what we are trying to do. So if I'm a leader in an organization, I have one departmental kind of view, and then I understand what the company objectives are. How do I ladder up to that? Most of the people in the organization don't know how that works. There's huge limitations and where you can have efficiency. And I think efficiency is such a great, powerful tool, if you can figure out a way to get things done faster, more cost effectively, at a larger reach, you can have a greater impact. I think that is where you can turn information into a viable use. And so no matter what role you're in, if you can take those two things, and apply it before you make your decision and go, Is there information that I don't have access to? Can I get it? And then where's the efficiency in what I'm trying to do? Are there things out there that can help me do it more efficient, because then when you make your decision, you'll invest time, money, and resources behind those two things. Getting more information makes me make better decisions, being more efficient in the way we're trying to do something, which has a greater impact. I think the third part I was mentioning before and the advice that we gave the group last night is actually at the same company that I had that technology awakening. After that happened, and I stopped, I told my general manager at the time, Hey, I'm going to leave school, I want to invest more time in learning technology. And I said, You know, how does my job affect you and your job and what the company is trying to get done? Because I want to make sure that I don't go anywhere. I just watched 18 people be let go and I don't want to be let go. So as innocent as that was, my general manager at a very big business said, Have a seat. I got to learn how my job fit in as one of the cogs of the whole big picture. So as I continue to make decisions, I learned how this contributes to the bigger picture. Whether I agree with it or not, I think this is the ego you have to almost put aside. How do I fit into that bigger picture? Because I'm trying to fight my way up the ladder, how do I know what that ladder is and where I connect the dots? So I think that's the third advice. Third point that I would make is, If you can master those three things, you can become an incredibly effective leader, entrepreneur, decision-maker, which is where I personally believe that's where you want to invest your time. There are skills that you need to learn. But if you can master those three things, and know that technology fits into two of them, you can really move in the direction you want, better and faster. Andi Simon: Let me ask you my slightly burning question. A number of years ago, I taught several times for healthcare strategists, Your data is talking to you, can you hear it? As I'm listening to you, the challenge that leaders have is understanding what the data is telling them, the information and insights. The challenge was an abundance of data, not necessarily at the time the tools to analyze it for them. It wasn't artificial intelligence that was doing data analytics and telling you what to do as a result. There was just raw stuff. And part of that was, How do I turn it into the right stories for the right people to listen to so that they could make the right decisions and act in the right way? Think of a healthcare system. The stories they had to tell the C-suite were different from the ones they told the doctors, which were ones that were going to be different from facilities management, or from people who are going to be taking care of patients. They didn't understand that it wasn't one story. This was one pie chart. Those were the stories that they told, that affirmed what they already knew, not what the data was telling them. And they only found the data that conformed to that mind-story as opposed to transformed it. So I found it was very challenging to help them understand that the data was telling them something different from what they believed to be true. The expression, The only truth is, there's no truth. Like you are now opening up a whole, I won't call it a can of worms, but an interesting opportunity for leaders to understand what the data, the technology, can provide for the things that you mentioned: scale faster, and save money. That's a whole new strategy. So how do we help them as leaders understand what's upon them? I bet you were having that conversation with your general manager when you said, I don't want to leave, what do I have to do? You're smiling at me. So share with the listeners your thoughts about how they really warm up to this new stuff? Don't be afraid?  George Swisher: I think bravery is an incredibly powerful emotion that can help you overcome a lot of things. And I think I feel that I was lucky because I was mentored that way to have that bravery and just go at things and take the risk. I think this is not an uncommon theme that leads to just being okay with failure. Sometimes you're gonna make mistakes and you can fail fast and fix it fast and learn from it. You know that speed is the critical part. And I agree with you in the sense that we are in information overload. There are so many different sources of data that people don't necessarily know what to do with that, and it's kind of just thrown at them. This is what you don't have access to, you figure out what to do with it. I think if you haven't been trained to look at data, it's difficult. I feel like this kind of led me to the current path of doing work similar to yourself and the consulting side. The more I could understand how people were feeling or what was going on, specifically related to my objectives, the more informed I would be. If I give a tangible example, think of employee engagement surveys. This has been a hot button for five, six years: post surveys, all that stuff. It's great, but it is a ton of information. And a lot of times I feel like teams are getting that information from a manager for a department that came from the HR team and so forth. They're having to interpret it and relate it to what they're actually responsible for as the decision maker. This to me is the breaking point. That can we're opening up to say, information is important, but I want information specific to what I'm responsible for. And if I'm in a role that's connected to also what the company is trying to achieve, get rid of the noise and just give me that information so I can make effective decisions. So in a professional setting, I think that is where we have gotten to a stage. Let's take the healthcare example. What if something could actually tell you if you had an objective, which was to improve patient care. But as broad as that is, which is usually what objectives look like, super, super broad, there was a defined what is considered a good outcome and a bad outcome. If I'm the leader that's responsible for improving patient care, if I define that improving patient care, a good scenario, and outcome would be that our patients are so happy when they leave here that they make sure that their family members come back here, as basic as that sounds. A bad outcome is people check out of your hospital early and file lawsuits against us because they think that we are not treating them correctly. Let's just say that that's the two ranges we're working with. If I was the person responsible for putting tactics in place, so hiring people, putting new tools in place, better processes and procedures, if I could know how all of the people who affect that decision, so think of the facilities teams, think of the technology teams, they took the doctors and the patients, these are data streams, if I could analyze those data streams and say, Wow, within this specific hospital versus this other hospital, we're scoring on the negative side of that outcome. But in this facility, we're scoring on the positive side. Where would I concentrate my money and my resources and my time? The facility that had the positive information vs. the one that had the negatively reporting information coming back? This is what technology has advanced us to today that we can actually figure out by looking at different communications how relatable that communication is to a specific objective that I'm responsible for. And it can rate that communication. And if it's closer to the good or the bad outcome, you can get that instantly. Andi Simon: I love what you're saying. It isn't about that individual who is attempting to make sense out of the data, turn it into information and make insights out of it. The technology is able to assess the data information and create the insights so that you're wiser. Because then the technology now is your partner in this, not simply a servant delivering raw stuff, that you've got to cook, am I correct?  George Swisher: You're right. You have the ability now as a leader to tell the technology what you lead. An example of that was like an objective and a good outcome and a bad outcome. If I tell the technology to only give me information back contextually related to that, and then tell me what's good and bad, because I already told you what the range was, how powerful would that be? In any decision that you were making? Andi Simon: Well, it takes away all of the complexity and uncertainty as long as you trust the data collected. The endless agony in healthcare we're having is that the doctors are very fast at discounting the data. And now the technology has to build the trust that it's great data and not bad data. Because I've been with too much poor data, people who are trying to convince not just the doctors, but the leadership, that the story that they're crafting is correct, not just "trust me." The uncertainties and unknowns become threatening to people who have very different stories in their minds about what the data ought to look like and what they believe to be true. You are developing content. We talked a little bit about what you've developed because I do think it offers a very powerful solution since I work with companies that need to change. One of the challenges is how we are changing. Talk a little bit about your platform because I think change force has enormous power, and people should be aware of it and people should start to think about how to use it.  George Swisher: Let's talk about the mission that we're trying to do and I think it relates back to what we were just saying. Let's use a different topic other than something in healthcare. Your book you wrote about women progressing in the business and leadership role, I think is a great, great topic. Our mission is to help leaders be more informed of the sentiment around the objectives they are trying to achieve in a very specific lane. There are all different ways that companies like yours, persons like yourself, and companies, are trying to help build better change processes of how you get things done. We just want to be able to inform that process with very meaningful information. So the way that we have focused that mission as the starting point has been where we can analyze communication platforms such as Slack, Microsoft Teams, employee engagement, survey data, emails, things like this, where our software, using artificial intelligence, natural language processing, is able to contextually understand the messages that are inside of those Slack channels, and how relatable they are to the objectives you're trying to achieve. So let's just say that we know that diversity, equity inclusion is a huge topic inside most organizations. Let's just say they have one of those objectives around empowering women to be better leaders and availability of being leaders inside the organization. You define a good outcome and a bad outcome. A good outcome is we are open and have every resource available to empower women to get through the ranks and become leaders in the organization. A bad outcome is we have complete roadblocks, biases and all these things are going on. Our software can actually analyze all those communication channels, contextually map and say, These are the conversations that are related to that specific objective around empowering women to become leaders in the organization. And it will read it from a score of A to F. Just go back to grade school above where those communications sit. So you have the ability to understand the specific contextual sentiment, not just negative positives. It's hard to kind of figure out what that means. If I know that good has a specific, measurable piece, and bad has a measurable indicator, and this is sitting in that range, I can understand what that means, as the decision maker. And the way that we've done it is, we allow our customer to compare that set of information across all different types of indicators. For example, you know locations, or, you know roles within the organization, employee type, almost any type of information stored in the human capital management software. It's like the workdays of the world. You can slice that data and go, Okay, well, I can see in this empowering women to be leaders in our organization, our scoring has been over in this region, or this department, or this age range of our company. And over here we are scoring an F. So the idea is that we're just trying to figure out what's going on.  What we've been able to see now is, especially with the pandemic, it's forced people to use more digital communications. Some companies are upwards of 90% of their communications that used to be verbal and in person is now some form of digital communication. We now can read that communication, and just give you some indication of where the barometer is today, and then track it over time. So if you make decisions to say, Okay, well, this one department is scoring in the D level around this. We need to put some training in place or some new processes or some new people in place. Our software actually does that analysis over a period of time so we can tell you whether it got better or worse. As you made a decision today, 30 days from now, it can see if that contextual sentiment got better or worse as you put those changes in place. Andi Simon: George, let me ask you to clarify just for my sake. Way back in Algebra 101 many, many too many years ago, the professor said, Out of context, data does not exist. And what I hear you saying is that we've been able to take through the technology that artificial intelligence, machine learning, all of the communication being done, and contextualize it. So we understand its meaning, and can give you insights into the conversations taking place around diversity, equity and inclusion, using that example. Am I correct to what I just said? And that is powerful, because data by itself has no meaning. So now the question is, an individual isn't contextualizing it. Artificial intelligence is putting it into context. And you're comfortable that it's doing it in a very accurate and insightful fashion. George Swisher: How fascinating. And this came back to your healthcare example, which is the trust of the data coming in. And so from today's state, the biggest advance that we've seen is the ability for natural language processing to start to truly contextualize data. Whether it's images, whether it's audio, whether it's text...doesn't matter. And that's what we are leaning into. Now, that is only as smart as the sources of data it's analyzing, where it's going in the future to continually build trust by adding more data. For example, within our software, connecting to communications is one kind of viewpoint. But if we then connect to task management software, we connect to Glassdoor reviews. We connect to company social media channels. We connect to performance reviews. So at every one of those data points, the great thing about the technology now is, it kind of works like our brain, where it can cross-reference multiple data points to come to the conclusion of what that sentiment score is. So it's almost validating what it believes. It thinks from the Slack message against what it read in a task inside of a task software and what it saw inside of the performance review. That to me is where the trust factor will just continually get better for humans under the realization that technology can process information and contextualize it faster and better than we can at some point because it can process so much information that we can't. Andi Simon: I sometimes get emails that I simply don't understand what they mean. And unless you understand that, meaning is not simply in the words or the sentence, but the underlying implications, meaning the feeling that's there. And so what you're telling me is that by pulling together all of these data points, we can in fact, contextualize the conversations going on and understand them. That is, maybe I will say, very true, very powerful, and weird. I mean, they're sort of like, I can't figure out what you just emailed me, I better call and find out what you meant. And I can't tell if you were angry, or happy or sad or frustrated. In the five words are the sentences that you put together, but the AI can do it better than I can. Now that is one powerful system. George Swisher: That's where the future state is. It will be able to contextualize it better than we most likely can. We're not there yet but it's getting there and it's advancing quickly. Part of what we do to train, if it's accurate or not, is to validate the response from a human. So in that same example of empowering women in leadership in an organization, let's say that it scrubbed all of the Slack or MSTN channels you have and it makes it a C. Well, we can actually open it up to let you know that leaders in the organization agree or disagree with that and score it with a B and it will train the model to get smarter the next time it tries to analyze another Slack message. And so you have this validation. That is where we will start to build trust as human beings without knowing it through the validating AI driven technologies. The biggest example of this is, most people have used some kind of support bot before. The support bots says, Did we answer your question? You say, No, you didn't. And here's what you didn't do. It is actually training the model to do an excellent contextualization that takes into account what you said. Andi Simon: I'm sitting here smiling. We're just about out of time, but I'm sorry, it's hard enough for humans to communicate well. Now we're adding something that might help us do a far better job of communicating well because we'll better understand. We all know the situation where I say one thing to you, and then I go and type something to someone else. The complexities of human beings in an AI world, and it is truly going to be a wonderful future. I was going to ask you what you see coming, but I have a hunch, I already know what's coming. In a sentence or two, what's your future prediction?  George Swisher: I feel like the future isn't that we're going to be replaced by robots or technology, I think that we will become almost like superheroes. We're going to be able to attach technology to us that will make us incredibly smart or powerful. And I think that's where this is going to meet. And there are some people who are trying to physically do that. You know, Elon Musk has got some interesting things going on. Whether we morally believe he should be doing it or not, but feeding these contextual data sources and things like this directly into our bodies, and our brains, I think is where it is actually going.  Andi Simon: The coevolution that's happening is making us realize that from the time we became meaning-makers, 50,000 years ago, we have been creating the environments in which we live. We're the only species that's completely global. But there's still one of us and 40,000 species of ants, but somehow we keep changing ourselves, and our minds and bodies are evolving. And this is going to be a really interesting next phase that we're unsure of. But we've always been unsure. And now the trick is, how do we stop for a moment and say what role do I want to play with this? You can't resist, you can get so attached to that shiny object, you won't leave it. But the world is changing. And it would really be cool if you let go and began to lead forward, because I do think we're going to need some real smart people to help us leap forward like yourself.  George Swisher: I think my last point would be, we went through this you mentioned earlier, it's kind of like industrial evolution. Think about if you were here, 150 years ago, when we had industrialization for cars.Imagine how afraid people were that it was turning the horse and buggy into a machine. And we're no different than that, we just evolve with it. I think that's the fear, we all just need to remember that we constantly have been in this state. This is just a different type of state. And we just need to be okay with that. Andi Simon: Well, and I do think once you get okay with it, it's really quite exciting. Then to your point, for 4,000 years, we rode horses, and then came this car. And next thing you knew, they were putting barbed wire and throwing rocks into it, they were terrified of this car. And now we're getting electric vehicles that are autonomous. Who knows where we're going next? So welcome to the world of humans. George, thanks so much for being here. I'm not going to ask you three things for people to remember. But I am going to ask you, How they can reach you if they'd like to know more about what you're doing. Because I think that the whole conversation today is about all the things that we don't want them to forget. And I do think this is a time where the technology, the person, and the way we live is all through great transformation. So you've got to pay attention and lead on. How can they reach you? George Swisher: I think the best way is to reach me at George Swisher on LinkedIn, or George@changeforce.ai. Those are the two best ways to get to me and I'm happy to continue this conversation with anyone. I think my effort is to help share what we've learned, not to sell software. So whatever we can do to help. Nabil and I both always have that same kind of educational angle. Andi Simon: You are a perfect guest on our podcast because our job is to get off the brink and help people soar by helping them see, feel and think in new ways. And to be honest with you, I don't think this is an incrementalist time. This is a transformational time. It's not doing a little better. And what we used to have, it's a battle, a whole new way of doing things. And I am excited to share your thoughts and to help people realize that they don't have to just get stuck. People keep asking when they're going to go back to what was. And I tell them, They're just not coming back. But neither are we sure what's coming next. So enjoy the journey. It's a great time to be alive and enjoying a whole new way of seeing things. Thanks again. For all of my listeners, thanks for coming to On the Brink. My job is to help you get off the brink to help you see, feel and think in new ways. You can read my books: On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights on Amazon as well as Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business. To George's point, our job is to help us smash those myths that are holding people back, women in particular, and open up the door because we are transforming the way our society both embraces women or not, and then begins to realize that the world is changing. So let's all get behind it and move forward. You can reach me at info@Andisimon.com. And I love your emails. We're in the top 5% of global podcasts. Thank you. Thank you for coming. Refer more people to us like George. They are great and they bring us great joy. Thanks, George for being here today.

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Aasif Mandvi [The Daily Show, The Brink, Million Dollar Arm, Evil] talks with Anna about moving from England to Florida at 16 and dreaming his life would be like an episode of Flipper, his rollercoaster of a prom experience, hosting his new show Would I Lie To You and whether actors make good liars, breeding unicorns and much more…Today's Unqualified segment begins with a call from Danika who, after the abrupt ending of a friendship, wonders how or even if it's possible to repair the damage. Next to call in is Cynthia who, after leaving her partner after years of ignoring his infidelity, discovered that her father has also been having an affair. Now Cynthia is trying to navigate these new emotions and wondering how to rebuild her faith in the opposite sex. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Seattle Mennonite Church Sermons
Singing Before the Miracle

Seattle Mennonite Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 24:37


We zoom in on the powerful image of Paul and Silas, political prisoners, behind bars, surrounded by other prisoners listening to them, as they SING HYMNS to God. They are singing before the miracle. They are singing as strategy, as prayer, and as soul-nourishment individually and collectively. We hear stories from some Mennonite sisters in the contemporary Jesus Uprising, as we ponder our own singing before the miracle, joining the Spirit's groaning with sighs too deep for words.Sermon begins at minute 7:23Acts 16:16-34Image: Jailed civil rights protesters, Tuscaloosa AL, 1964.Hymns: Come Now, O God: Words - ©2018 GIA Publications, Inc., Contributors: David BjorlinMy Life Flows On: Music - ©1989 MennoMedia Inc., Contributors: Brethren PressPermission to podcast the music in this service obtained from One License with license #A-726929. All rights reserved.ResourcesMother God, by Teresa Kim Pecinovsky, ill by Khoa Le; read just before the recording“Expanding our identity in worship,” Sarah Augustine, Vision: A Journal for Church and Theology, Spring 2022: “Music and the arts”“Music and inclusion in Mennonite worship and peace-justice work,” an interview with Sarah Nahar, Vision: A Journal for Church and Theology, Spring 2022: “Music and the arts”BibleWorm podcast: Episode 341 – Of Jailers and Slave Girls, Amy Robertson and Robert Williamson, Jr.“Black and Indigenous Solidarity in the Haudenosaunee Confederacy: Stopping the Narrative Violence of Columbus in Downtown Syracuse, New York,” Sarah Nahar, Stories of Repair: A Reparative Justice Resource toward Dismantling the Doctrine of Discovery (2021).Porter's Gate, whose music from their album Justice Songs we used  in our time of response.“Ramadan Nights Provide Cherished Pause in a Sudan on the Brink,” by Declan Walsh, The New York Times, April 28, 2022.

Consortium News
CN Live! S3E7 - ASSANGE ON THE BRINK

Consortium News

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 85:01


There have been two dramatic developments in the U.S. case against imprisoned WikiLeaks publisher Julian Assange within the past two weeks. The Icelandic newsmagazine Stundin on June 26 revealed that a key U.S. witness in the indictment of Assange for conspiracy to commit computer intrusion had changed his story. And on Wednesday the High Court in London allowed the U.S. to appeal a Jan. 4 magistrate's decision against extraditing Assange to the U.S. because of his mental health and the harsh conditions of U.S. prisons, making him a threat for suicide. The High Court said, however, that the U.S. could not appeal the judgement of Assange's health but only that of U.S. prisons. The U.S. promised it would not put Assange under special measures of isolation if he were extradited and if convicted, would allow him to serve his sentence in Australia. The U.S. has a history of broken promises in such cases. For example, in the September 2020 Assange extradition hearing, lawyer Lindsay A. Lewis testified that the UK had imposed this condition for humanitarian reasons on Abu Hamsa, a prisoner who had lost both hands, but once on U.S. soil, Hamsa was placed in isolation. Joining us to discuss these two major developments will be WikiLeaks Editor-in-Chief Kristinn Hrafnsson; ex-Icelandic Interior Minister Ögmundur Jónasson (on how he resisted an FBI sting against Assange); Stundin journalist Bjartmar Oddur Þeyr Alexandersson (on his piece about Siggi Thordarson); Australian MP Julian Hill; Consortium News legal analyst Alexander Mercouris and radio host and CN columnist John Kiriakou, who was imprisoned for blowing the whistle on the CIA's torture program. Produced by Cathy Vogan, watch it here live with your hosts Elizabeth Vos and Joe Lauria at 9 am EDT; 1 pm in Iceland (GMT); 2 pm BST in the U.K. and 11 pm AEST in Australia

State of Belief - Religion and radio done differently.
May 7, 2022 – Reproductive Rights on the Brink

State of Belief - Religion and radio done differently.

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 51:39


The fight to preserve religious freedom and reproductive access reached a dangerous turning point this week. A leaked draft of the Supreme Court's decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization revealed that conservative justices are poised to strike down Roe v. Wade – the culmination of a decades-long campaign by the Religious Right to […]

Bloomberg Law
Roe v. Wade on the Brink of Extinction

Bloomberg Law

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 35:10


Constitutional law experts Stephen Vladeck, a Professor at the University of Texas Law School, and Katherine Franke, a Professor at Columbia Law School and Director of the Center for Gender & Sexuality Law, discuss the bombshell leak of a draft Supreme Court opinion which would reverse Roe v. Wade, leaving it to individual states to decide whether abortions are allowed. June Grasso hosts. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

After the Fact
Ocean, People, Planet: A Wildlife Refuge On The Brink

After the Fact

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 29:29


Stat: 2.1 feet—Scientists have forecast an increase of as much as 2.1 feet in the Chesapeake Bay by 2050. Story: In this episode, we travel to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland, where the refuge is losing ground to climate change and rising sea levels. Through interviews with experts—including Joseph Gordon, who directs Pew's work on coastal marine life in the U.S.; Marcia Pradines Long, manager of Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge; Kristin Thomasgard,  program director with the Department of Defense; Julie M. Schablitsky, chief archaeologist at the Maryland Department of Transportation; and Kate Larson, a historian and author—we explore the threats facing this refuge because of the changing climate, and the path ahead for its environmental, cultural, and economic future.

Studio 9 - Der Tag mit ... - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Länderreport: Vor der Wahl in Schleswig-Holstein

Studio 9 - Der Tag mit ... - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 70:21


Brink, Nana; Frenzel, Korbinianwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, Studio 9 - Der Tag mit ...Direkter Link zur Audiodatei

This Is Your Brain With Dr. Phil Stieg

Near-death experiences may seem like the stuff of supermarket tabloids, but there are real patterns to what people report after coming close to departing this life.   Dr. Bruce Greyson has been studying near-death experiences for decades and has stories to tell about out-of-body phenomena, that light at the end of the tunnel, and a near-universal finding of new meaning in life after coming close to death. Plus... a glimpse of what happens to your brain after death. https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250265869/after 

In the Weeds with Dexter Johnson
481: Resources for abortion care with Roe v. Wade on the brink..

In the Weeds with Dexter Johnson

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 4:17


Their body, their choice (just like with the covid vaccine right??). No woman should be demeaned or persecuted for seeking an abortion. I support you. Go here to learn more: https://gizmodo.com/10-online-resources-for-people-seeking-abortion-care-1848873173 –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Let's continue our discussion! Follow me on Twitter at @dexter_johnson and visit http://DexJohnsPC.com to stay on top of my latest blog posts about the world of technology. Follow my tech news Twitter list: https://twitter.com/i/lists/1407003582264655878 Share this podcast with a friend! Links from this episode: Intro music details: –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– RETRO Xcape by Lahar https://soundcloud.com/musicbylahar Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0 Free Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/retro-xcape Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/eHHMlcSVBgE –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Outro music details: –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Reloaded by Savfk - Music https://soundcloud.com/savfk Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 Free Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/_reloaded Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/IlUSKojxLxU ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

The Money Show
Aspen's Covid-19 vaccine plant on the brink of shutting down?

The Money Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 78:54


State employees demand a 10% wage increase despite the Treasury's intentions to curb the public salary wage bill, Isaah Mhlanga, Chief Economist at Alexander Forbes why the effects of the high wage increase demand.  President Cyril Ramaphosa is "hatching a plan" with three other African presidents to save South Africa's Aspen Covid-19 vaccine plant.  Warren Ingram, Personal Financial Advisor and Executive Director at Galileo Capital shares some advice on temptations of  aggressively buying global markets now that they are down. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio
The Bruins are on the brink of disaster

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 6:31


The Bruins are down 2-0 in the series against the Carolina Hurricanes... Do the Bruins have a chance to come back?

Real Talk JavaScript
Episode 182: GitHub Actions with Lars Gyrup Brink Nielsen

Real Talk JavaScript

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 51:35


Recording date: 04/14/2002John Papa @John_PapaWard Bell @WardBellDan Wahlin @DanWahlinCraig Shoemaker @craigshoemakerLars Gyrup Brink Nielsen @LayZeeDKBrought to you byAG GridIonicResources:GitHub ActionsWebhooksYAMLGitHub Actions SDKLinux command line cheat sheetGitHub MarketplaceGitHub AppsAzure Static Web AppsGitHub Self Hosted RunnerGitHub Hosted runnerAWS for GitHub ActionsGitHub Actions for Google CloudLumberjack4 ways we use GitHub Actions to build GitHub: Turn weekly team photos into GIFs and upload to READMEActionsflowThis is Learning's automated Twitter feed using Actionsflow and GitHub actionsGitOpsWhat is GitOpsAzure Kubernetes ServiceDockerOCIGitOps OperatorArgo CDKubernetes Zero Downtime DeploymentsA system for learning new disciplinesNubesGenGitHub Learning LabTimejumps01:21 Guest introduction01:58 What is GitHub Actions?04:14 How do Actions differ from Web Hooks?05:55 Sponsor: Ag Grid06:57 How do you glue together GitHub Actions?09:44 What languages work best for GitHub Actions?14:46 How did you get into working with GitHub Actions?21:58 Where are GitHub Actions happening?24:32 Sponsor: Ionic25:10 What are common use cases for GitHub Actions?27:17 What are the strangest GitHub Actions?35:37 What is GitOps?43:28 Final thoughtsPodcast editing on this episode done by Chris Enns of Lemon Productions.

The Socialist Program with Brian Becker
At the Brink: Global Food Crisis

The Socialist Program with Brian Becker

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 31:52


On today's episode Brian Becker and Prof. Richard Wolff discuss the global food crisis that is taking shape with major price rises already being felt around the world – a grave situation that is expected to deepen. As the war in Ukraine drags on and as the western countries attempt to cut Russia off from the global economy, disruptions to supply chains and shortages are becoming even more severe. The global capitalist market is yet again proving to be incapable of ensuring something as basic as food to the world's population. Professor Richard Wolff is an author & co-founder of the organization Democracy at Work. You can find his work at rdwolff.com. Please make an urgently-needed contribution to The Socialist Program by joining our Patreon community at patreon.com/thesocialistprogram. We rely on the generous support of our listeners to keep bringing you consistent, high-quality shows. All Patreon donors of $5 a month or more are invited to join the monthly Q&A seminar with Brian.

Open Goal - Football Show
CELTIC ON THE BRINK OF TITLE & CAN RANGERS MAKE EUROPEAN HISTORY? | Keeping The Ball On The Ground

Open Goal - Football Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 78:23


The boys react to the weekend's huge game between Celtic and Rangers and look ahead to an enormous game at Ibrox with a place in the Europa League Final up for grabs. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Open Goal - Football Show
CELTIC ON THE BRINK OF TITLE & CAN RANGERS MAKE EUROPEAN HISTORY? | Keeping The Ball On The Ground

Open Goal - Football Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 78:23


The boys react to the weekend's huge game between Celtic and Rangers and look ahead to an enormous game at Ibrox with a place in the Europa League Final up for grabs. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

This Is Your Brain With Dr. Phil Stieg
Coming This Friday - The Brink of Death

This Is Your Brain With Dr. Phil Stieg

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 0:59


Near-death experiences may seem like the stuff of supermarket tabloids, but there are real patterns to what people report after coming close to departing this life.   Dr. Bruce Greyson has been studying near-death experiences for decades and has stories to tell about out-of-body phenomena, that light at the end of the tunnel, and a near-universal finding of new meaning in life after coming close to death.

The WAR RAW Podcast hosted by Wayne Allyn Root
ON THE BRINK OF WW3 AND WHOSE HUNGRY

The WAR RAW Podcast hosted by Wayne Allyn Root

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 34:08


Wayne discusses the thought of the United States being on the brink of Nuclear War with Russia and the commentary of a relative or Nikita Kruchev saying it is worse than October of 62. Then Wayne discusses Covid with Dr. Zelenko and the Manic Markets with Kip Herriage.

Library of Mistakes
Ep 4 Back from the Brink (with Lord Darling)

Library of Mistakes

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 54:25


Lord Darling opens the new Library of Mistakes in Edinburgh, and explains to business journalist and author Ray Perman what it was like to be Chancellor of the Exchequer during the global financial crisis, as the UK banking system teetered on the edge of collapse. A highly entertaining listen for anyone interested in banking, politics and people.

Prosecco Theory
99 - On the Brink

Prosecco Theory

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 28:11


Megan and Michelle ponder road rage, rights of way, terrible parenting, overcrowding, thingifying, road annoyance, and the school drop-off line.

On the Brink with Andi Simon
313: Melissa Copeland—Customers Want Great Experiences. How Can You Deliver Extraordinary Ones?

On the Brink with Andi Simon

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 32:57


Hear why a great customer experience means everything I am always excited to share a great woman's story with you, our audience. Melissa Copeland is a great woman to know. She had a wonderful career, as so many women have had, only to discover that flying all over the world was not great for her family, or even herself. She pivoted and launched Blue Orbit Consulting, which allowed her to refocus her attention on clients closer to home and on projects dear to her heart—like improving customer interactions for her customers. Our conversations roam all around the challenges she, and I, see among our clients as their customers are changing, service expectations have dramatically shifted (where fast means right now), and staffing has become an uphill climb, to say the least. What to do? Call Melissa, who brings her expertise in organizational transitions and interpersonal growth and development to the task at hand. Clients love her approach, and I think you will as well. Enjoy.  Watch and listen to our conversation here At SAMC, the topic of culture change is one we know a great deal about What I enjoy when I have someone like Melissa on the podcast is how we can share our ideas, experiences and know-how and continue to learn from each other. You can certainly read in my book, On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights, how frustrating it is for companies, then and now, to address the core service imperative of their organization's business. My hope is that you take away some great ideas and great learning around how to step back and look at your own business with fresh eyes, and see where you need to make some changes that will make all the diference. If you'd like to reach out to Melissa, you can connect with her on LinkedIn or her website BlueOrbitConsulting.com, or email her at melissacopeland@blueorbitconsulting.com. More about culture change and how to motivate your employees to love their jobs Blog: How's Your Culture? Doing Fine Or In Drastic Need Of An Overhaul? Podcast: Marcella Bremer—Build a Better Business With an Amazing, Positive Culture Podcast: Lisa McLeod—If You Want To Succeed, You Must Find Your Noble Purpose Additional resources for you My award-winning second book: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business My award-winning first book: On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights Simon Associates Management Consultants    Read the transcript of our podcast here Andi Simon: Welcome to On the Brink with Andi Simon. Hi, as you know, I'm Andi Simon, I'm your host and your guide. My job is to get you off the brink and I go looking for people who have really interesting ideas to share with you to help you see, feel and think in new ways. That's why today I have Melissa Copeland. And Melissa is here to talk about the customers of tomorrow, and how to serve them. But what's really interesting is her own journey and what she sees going on in the market, and how she can help you see it through that fresh lens that I want you to have. Remember, time to get off the brink, and the times they are changing. So let's soar together. Melissa, thank you for joining me today.  Melissa Copeland: Thanks for having me.  Andi Simon: Share with the listeners, who is Melissa and when and how did you get to where you are now? And why are you so interested in it? Please share your story.  Melissa Copeland: Sure, it's a wandering path, but I think many people have those nowadays. It was less common when I started working, but I actually started as a documentary producer producing travel documentaries and traveling around the globe doing that which I love. It didn't take long, about two years, for me to learn that it was really hard to afford my rent and lunch and a bus pass on the salary a documentary producer makes. So I went to business school, and business school wasn't at all what I expected. It was much more of a structured education versus some of the intellectual inquiries that I was expecting to find. So if there is such a thing, it sounds like an oxymoron, but I was a bit of a countercultural business school student coming out of grad school. I landed in a job in strategy at what was then Ameritech, now AT&T. I was sent to one of the wholesale divisions. So think of the really technical engineering, kind of in the more old-fashioned parts of the company. And here I was, this kid who had been a documentary producer. And my background was in history and writing. And I learned to speak engineering, and I learned to speak pension. I had more fun than I ever thought I would in the corporate world. So I was rotated in the seven years that I was there, through almost every functional area. I got a taste of strategy, sales, marketing, and wound up doing two types of international assignments. One was a startup based in Chicago. And the second was an assignment based in Brussels, Belgium for two years. And those were amazing. A couple of the things that I really learned was that the language of business is really one of figuring out how to connect with people, and how to define problems, and then organize toward a solution, whether it's through collaboration, whether it's through directing, or self-directed teams, or any of those pieces. And so one of the things I didn't expect that I've used my entire career since then, was during that time in Brussels, the techniques that you learned growing up in the United States to influence people with money, or sales incentives, or performance incentives, didn't work the same way in a different culture and context. And that notion of what is my culture and context? And how do I get the results I need? One of the things I learned was, in the US, if you wanted to get something done, you have a meeting, you divide up the tasks, and everybody goes in, does it. In the situation I was in, in Brussels, if you had a meeting, the way to get people engaged was to give everybody the opportunity to participate in the brainstorming, right? So no matter what it was, if you call it brainstorming, people were highly engaged, because everyone wanted a piece of the ideas and to really feel like, what would they be called, an influencer, but to really be part of the solution, and then folks would happily go and participate in terms of behavior change. So that has actually become a signature part of the consulting I do today. Some from that role, I moved through a couple of different roles, but I stayed in that arena of really working on customer experience and employee experience, and helping folks move through changes that almost always benefit customer experience and customer loyalty. And that's when I would say my love affair with customer service and contact center organization started.  Andi Simon: You formed your company Blue Orbit Consulting in 2014. Typically, I would start any interview like this and read your résumé. But I really prefer you to talk about this journey because it's a setup for what's happened since you set up your own company. So how did you come about? Your insights are extremely valuable today. We don't motivate people by giving them more money that doesn't do anything for the research work. You can give them more money, but it doesn't mobilize them. It doesn't motivate them. It's not what makes them work. There's something that took you from being inside to being a consultant having your own company. What was the catalyst?  Melissa Copeland: So I worked for many years for a consulting firm called The Northridge Group and helped build the firm, and was able to be the generalist moving across a lot of areas. The firm had tremendous success. And I have one of those hard learnings. After about 12 years there, my kids were eight and five, and I was continuing to travel almost every week. And no matter where I was, I was on the wrong continent for somebody. And we got to a point where more often than not, it was my kids, you know, or team members or clients. But it really became a challenge that it was my kids that were on the wrong side of that. So I left and I wasn't sure what I was going to do. And that lasted, that break lasted about two months. And we learned that I was terrible at carpooling, that I hated doing laundry, and got rid of all of our household help. But, former clients and colleagues started calling with projects and saying, hey, you've always been really good and helped me think through hard problems, will you come help me do this global technical support? Will you come take a look at this process problem in my organization? And that's fundamentally how Blue Orbit was born. So in 2014, I formed Blue Orbit. It was just me, and a couple of high school and college babysitters taking care of my kids, you know, before and after school. And as the firm grew, I really drove more focus around not just taking  every phone call, though anyone that calls and says, can you help me think through this hard problem, I really enjoy hard problems. So I'm happy to help think them through, but really, drove more focus around the pieces that I think are really important as businesses grow and move forward. And that is thinking through not just the customer journey, and some of the buzzwords around that, but also thinking through the service design for how you support that customer journey, and more recently, a lot of emphasis around employee engagement. So how do you make it easier on the employees to deliver the service design and a fantastic customer experience. So little by little, as the firm grew, it started being engagements with me and then I started building more team-based engagements to be able to implement at large organizations. Then we land where we are today where the business supports both some startup companies that are just starting on that journey. It's tons of fun when we have a blank slate, and you're starting with the service design from the beginning. And then the large organizations where you might have hundreds or thousands of people that you're trying to orchestrate. And then it's really more that collaboration and building a funnel of ideas for how can we accomplish the goals we need to get to.  Andi Simon: You and I both understand the complexity of human interaction and conversations. And the question is, what do we say to whom in what way to get what done? And that's not casual, and every culture is different. The culture is inside each one of these, small, large and otherwise, whether in Belgium or in the States, or whatever they are, and just do things differently. And your description of the Belgium folks who wanted some autonomy, mastery and purpose, which is what we're talking about these days, was quite different than here where command and control tell you what to do, and tactical and practical, and not much gets done. So it's an interesting time. So some of the insights that you're pulling together, working over the last years, 2014 was a short long time ago. And between the pandemic and all the things going on with technology and customer transformation, there's some key themes that you and I chatted a little bit about. Can you share them with our listeners or our audience? I do think they are going through them and they want to know, what do I do now? How do I do this? Some thoughts?  Melissa Copeland: Sure. I love how you you reference the autonomy and the mastery. One of the pieces that I first tried to size up is that culture and context and organization. I do feel compelled typically to look at data, because you always have people in your team or your organization that need to be data driven. And then we also have to look at some of the more qualitative aspects of what does it take to drive change, like, are we talking about a jello situation where you're going in and going back out? Are we talking about a situation where people are highly receptive to doing things differently? Some of the themes and particularly changes since 2020, a big one affecting a lot of organizations, whether we call it the great resignation or not, but the balance of power has shifted in terms of employees making choices about where they want to be. And so I challenge that many large organizations and in particular contact centers are dealing with the vacancy rate in roles that may be as high as 30%. So I have two clients right now that are down about 30% of people. And that puts enormous pressure on the organization and its ability to serve customers. To that end, there are two big themes that I've been working with a lot of clients on. One is the theme around, what if the customer isn't always right? And so how do you handle that? The first studies I've seen in years, probably as long as I've been working in customer experience, started coming out in the fall, illustrating a significant change in customer behavior, meaning, historically, customers really cared about that the agent I spoke with was friendly, were they pleasant, so we'll call that friendliness. And then they care about, is my question answered, or has my problem been resolved? The shift in the research over the past six months is that customers care much more about how fast something happens. So the friendliness isn't at the top anymore, although I'd say it's table stakes in most organizations, it's really how quickly can you get to my question, or get me an answer. And can you do it in the media that I choose to interact with you in? So can you do it by voice? Can you do it by self service? Can you do it by chat? What are the different ways that I can connect with you? So that's one huge arena. The second that combines the two, getting answers quickly, and then struggling with kind of making the workplace attractive for employees and making their roles easier. And so I'll call that the employee engagement or employee enablement tools. So in customer service, and contact center, lots and lots has been written and talked about around how artificial intelligence or AI is used in bots and self service so customers can do things themselves. The real frontier that I've been working with clients on for the past year, and I think it'll become bigger in the next two years, is really around how do you use that power to enable human-to-human interaction? So how do I help an agent, right, be as quick and effective with a customer that wants to interact by voice? Or they have a question or a challenge that's too complicated for the self service arena and so how do you deploy those tools on the market in a way that really makes the agent's job easier, and makes employees feel like they can succeed in a difficult environment, or ultimately make that environment better? So I'd say those are the two big ones that I've been working with folks on that I think are the trends that are here to stay for at least 2022 to 2024.  Andi Simon: As a culture change expert, I'm curious, because I had one client who had a very bad help desk. And we actually suggested they go and make their folks remote before the pandemic. They were in a fabulous position when the pandemic hit. But the remote gave their staff a much better work environment and they lost the turnover. They speeded up the responses and they realized that having them come in and sit and wait and have to get things done in place was dysfunctional for this particular organization. They were an outsourced service provider, but what was important was that the people thought about it in terms of what mattered to them. Where did it matter that they work? What hours could they work, as opposed to a box that they had to fit into, and that autonomy and mastery. They needed something to motivate them to mobilize them to want to do this as opposed to being forced into it. And so that became interesting. My second point is that both consumers and employees are people. If you think of them as the same as very important people, then your customer and your staff are connected. It's not separate. And so now, if we step back and look at them as one ecosystem, it's no longer what the customer wants, it's how the employee and my customer can solve a problem together, collaboratively, as opposed to I'll do it in my time. You can't. It's really less adversarial or competitive and much more collegial. Are you seeing some of the same things?  Melissa Copeland: Absolutely. So I think one of the really interesting takeaways is, remote work is something that has been talked about for a long time. And then companies that explored it particularly for contact centers or tasted different pieces of it in very targeted areas. The pandemic forced folks to do it on a mass scale. And what many organizations found was no productivity was lost. What they had to do, though, was figure out how to recreate some of the cultural aspects that existed when you brought people together. It's a great example you give around the IT help desk because one of the bigger satisfiers for folks that work in centers are being able to have hours that they can manage more effectively. And so for a center, the benefit is that they can have more people working part time or split schedules or different approaches. And for employees, you've removed the transit piece. So they're more open to working. So I think those are often terrific solutions. And it's interesting to see organizations work through what's here to stay because when folks flipped the switch on March 2020, right, all the old processes went with them. There's a really interesting opportunity for organizations that are willing to take a hard look. It's one, I'll be honest, I thought it was going to happen in 2021 and it didn't happen that much around getting rid of some of the low value processes and activities. But I'm optimistic that this year will be the year that many organizations step back and say, we really need to do it that way, or can I make it easier on everybody. And then I don't think I can say it better than you did around the collegial approach to problem solving. So it's typically a terrific scenario, when you can have an agent empowered to conduct a conversation the way they want to. And that requires a couple of things. It requires organizational trust, and having the metrics or ways to measure the effectiveness of a conversation that go beyond process compliance. So a traditional way of doing it was, here's the process and you're measured on how you follow it that doesn't drive the autonomy and mastery of that process. But it doesn't drive mastery of the customer interaction. And so seeing more organizations move toward some of the enablement tools that in order to allow agents to have the conversation that they want and need to have with a customer, you have to solve the problem.  It's very different to achieve the same goal. So an example of some of the cooler new tools that are coming into play is some of the same artificial intelligence technology that makes self service bots work can be deployed to help agents. So the bot can be sort of listening, if you will, to the conversation and picking up key words and tone from the customer. And then prompt the agent. Here are some documents that might help you. Here are the links and the reference material so that the agent can focus on the conversation, not zooming through multiple apps, or wikis or web links, to find the information they need. And that goes toward your point around, you can really drive a collegial situation more than you can an adversarial one. You give the employee a great shot at success versus the employee feels like they're on the front line. Andi Simon: You raised a very important question. How do we evaluate, assess and appraise our employees? There was a great article that talked about how I never see them. I used to evaluate them based upon how I felt about it. I mean, some of the reaach proves that's how you evaluated them. It wasn't on their performance, per se, it was how you liked them or not. And so now they're having a difficult time knowing what to evaluate. It's not just compliance with a rigorous help desk script, or how fast you answer the phone, or how fast you solve the problem, or how the customer evaluated you. This is all experiential, and it's richer in many ways and more challenging to evaluate another. I'm not quite sure how to tap into the customer satisfaction. What does that mean? l'll give you one little speed thing. One of the CEO groups I was doing my research with, a gentleman in fertility centers said, it used to be that we could set up an appointment with someone interested in our methodology with a doctor, you know, over time. Now they want it immediately. And if I can't get the doctor to contact them immediately, however fast that is, they go somewhere else. And I say welcome to a world of instantaneous gratification. You know, they're ready right now. I want that conversation. And he said, I don't know how to put a young person in charge of it now, so they can appreciate what that young person is looking for because I can't figure it out at all. So now, my question for you is, as you're looking at this, how do we appraise the success of our customer service system? And what should people think about as they are evaluating their evaluation system?  Melissa Copeland: Those are great questions. So the first one is relatively straightforward. So when looking at the success of a customer service organization, or the customer experience, many of those metrics don't change, what changes is how you use them. So in terms of data, one of the fun things about contact centers is they usually have an overwhelming amount of data. So you can see how quickly our customers connect to the answer that they want. And you should be able to calculate how many times you're getting the customer the right answer the first time. If you can't calculate it, that's a great subject for us to talk about and brainstorm how to get to it. But you should know how often the agent is able to satisfy the customer. And when they can't, you need to divide into two groups, the things that are agent specific, and the things that are systemic. So right, no agent could have solved it, because of other other reasons. So there's an overall framework for looking at how quickly am I serving the customer? And then, was the customer satisfied? And I would argue, most importantly, was their issue solved on the first call? That does push by the wayside some old metrics. So an older metric would be looking at how long it took. I, Melissa, typically, I don't care how long it took, if you did it right the first time and the customers were happy, we've avoided future calls and interactions that become more expensive and more time consuming. And we've made that customer of tomorrow happy because they have patience for very little and certainly not for mistakes or ongoing back and forth about the same issue when it comes to appraising the individual. That also is something that I love, your example that is shifting, right. So it was always something where, when people were in the same place, you would see someone at their desk, you would see if they were working, and that vision that I can see you isn't there anymore. So that does drive more dependence on metrics. And it does drive more conversation with the individual. So one of the things that I'm seeing is more and more trends toward talking to people about how they feel. Yes, I've never had so many conversations about feelings. You know, I'm working with one client right now and we're doing a large transformation program. And a lot of our conversations are, do you feel competent? Do you feel empowered? What are the things you're struggling with? And how can I help you? So it is a much more honest move toward what I would call true coaching and development and away from some of the performance management. And some of those organizations wind up being my favorite clients because they're really interested in elevating the business's performance and the people providing it. That doesn't mean you don't have to deal with some specific performance situations. But it's a very different philosophy around, let's look at your metrics, and let's talk about how to make them better. As opposed to, here's the threshold and that's where you have to be.  Andi Simon: I love what you're talking about. A great transformation, isn't it? Because slowly we are recognizing what can mobilize people. We're learning so much from the neurosciences, the cognitive sciences, everything from the curiosity quotient, and the emotional intelligence and all the ways the amygdala and the brain works and what really gets people excited about what they're doing. You couldn't have done this without the pandemic, generating this great transformation. And now we're changing how we're managing people, asking them to feel the way we'd like them to. People didn't know what those words meant before but now we decide with the heart and the eyes, and how it feels. How does it look? And then intellectually, we can look at the numbers that come out of that. It's interesting. One of the podcasts I did with Lisa McLeod was about purpose. And Joey Ryan's work on purpose, purpose-driven companies. If you have purpose with mastery and autonomy, you mobilize people to do far better, and any other kind of ratcheting down to data-driven metrics, the data comes from being happy. And that's not so terrible.   Melissa Copeland: I would add, though, that for many organizations, it's a really difficult shift. People have been rewarded for a long time for complying with the process, doing the right things, and being where you're supposed to be. There's enormous opportunity in this transformation. But there's also a lot of fear and support required. And so, I think the other interesting trend is, many organizations, whether you call it change management or organizational change management, or you just call it transformation, or I have been known to call it whatever I need to call it to get it done so we can call it process work. But really thinking through, how do you help people through that difference? Because particularly tenured employees will have a lot of trouble making the move.  Andi Simon: I want to add something and then we'll wrap, because the points you're raising for our audience are very important. We live the story in our mind. The way humans survive is that we create a story in our mind and that becomes our reality. And Melissa says something very important because the tenured employees have a story that registered well for them in the past. They really knew how to do that and keep their jobs and keep the boss satisfied. They played it really well, it was like a role on stage, where they knew how to play Macbeth really, really well. And now they have to play Hamlet. And they don't have a clue what the script is or how to perform. And it isn't that they resist the change, they don't really know how to. If you put them on stage and told them to play a new role, they don't know what to say or how to say it. They don't know how to behave with each other. They don't know what to expect. It's very scary legitimately. And the brain hates to change, it's got a lot of cortisol floating around up there. So as you're looking at your employees, don't get angry. Figure out how to hire Melissa to come help you invent new ways to show them how to come to the new. We used to say, if you want to change, have a crisis or create one, because if not, your brain doesn't pay attention. I never expected this kind of crisis. I don't really want another one. But don't waste it. It's a great time. Listen, this is such fun, tell the listeners two or three things that you don't want them to forget.   Melissa Copeland: Number one, whether or not the customer is right, finding that collegiality and collaboration is critical to customer experience moving forward. So figuring out your service design and how to deliver it is absolutely paramount. The second point would be employee enablement, and letting employees lead but giving them the tools to do so. So freeing them from some of the process compliance of prior iterations is a terrific tool to do it. And you know, I'm happy to brainstorm or chat with anyone about those. And then one more item that your last comment made me think of is, I myself had one of these epiphanies in November. My daughter and I went from Chicago to New York, and we saw Six on Broadway. And so for those that aren't familiar with Six, it's about the wives of Henry the Eighth, many of whom wound up decapitated or died of illness, had all these extraordinary adventures. And we brought my aunt with us. So we covered multiple generations, and my aunt knew the history better than anyone and loved the show for the history. My daughter loved the pop music, and the takeoffs of Beyoncé and Adele, and the music that was there, and I got about half of each, and still loved it. And so I think of that as inspiration for listeners. You don't have to be at any one extreme, but you do have to find a way to find some of the fun in it. And if you can find the fun, then you can move the culture forward.  Andi Simon: That's a beautiful metaphor for everything you do for life, in fact, because it is the same experience seen through very different eyes. The lenses were completely different. The story was exactly the same. You all sat in the same seats and watched it and had very different experiences. How better can we wrap up our conversation today? If they'd like to reach you, what's the best way to get ahold of you?  Melissa Copeland: I'm easy to find on LinkedIn, you can find me, Melissa Copeland, or my firm Blue Orbit Consulting, or by the website, theblueorbitconsulting.com.  Andi Simon: That's terrific. And we'll put all of this together on our blog. This is such fun, you and I could talk a great deal about the dilemmas and the opportunities. Remember, don't waste a crisis and you're coming out of a very unusual one, but this is a time that has pushed us to transformation, great transformations. Some of us love it and others can't figure out how to get back to what was, but you can't. I doubt we'll ever see what was, we don't even remember what it was. So it's hard to go back. But instead, it's a time to create your future. So don't waste it. It's a great time to do it. And this has been terrific today. For all of you who come, thank you for joining us. You come from around the globe. I mean, we're ranked in the top 5% of global podcasts. I'm honored. You send me great people to interview. info@andisimon.com is where you can get to me. But the most important thing today that I'd like to share is, buy my books.On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights and Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business. You can get them on Amazon or Barnes and Noble or wherever you like to buy books. But the point of the books is to help you see, feel and think in new ways. And this podcast is here to do the same. My job is to help you get off the brink and soar. And sometimes you need a little catalyst, a little push, a little nudge because as we know, we get attached to that shiny object and we don't want to let go but the times are changing. So enjoy the trip. Stay well and enjoy your day. Have a good one. Bye now.

The Brink of Sanity
Episode 380: Too Much Juice

The Brink of Sanity

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 77:31


Martin, The Doc, Marc, and Jay talk about their newest idea to get listeners, twitter, listener questions, NFT's and the Metaverse, movie length, a bar with no alcohol, making Jay a slave, and much more

Conservative Daily Podcast
The World is on the Brink, Stay Ready...

Conservative Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 78:16


It is time to reclaim our republic. The cabal is trying their best to take away the last options from the American people and cover their tracks in the process. Be on guard as these events come to a head but have faith in the process. We are winning and we will win this war of good and evil. If you want to support the show, you can donate here: http://bit.ly/cd-donate Become a Conservative Daily member right now for massive savings on Faxblasts, discounts at Joe's Depot, and more perks like backstage time with the hosts of Conservative Daily! Use the link and sign up today! https://conservative-daily.com/forms/Step1b Liberty Cigars is a Patriot owned business with an extensive line of historically themed individual cigars and cigar collections including the Commander Series, Founders Series, and the Presidents Series. All packaging is proudly made in the USA by American workers. A truly unique gift for both cigar and history lovers. All orders over $76 will receive a free Patrick Henry cigar, the perfect gift for anyone who says, "Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death" this holiday season. Use code BEFREE at www.libertycigars.com If you want to support Mike Lindell and our show, use promo code CD21 to get up to 66% off at https://www.mypillow.com/radiospecials or by placing your order over the phone at 800-872-0627. When you use promo code CD21, a Queen Sized MyPillow is just $29, the cheapest it has ever been! Make sure you Like, Comment, and Share! Text FREEDOM to 89517 to get added to our text list to receive notifications when we go Live! Please make sure you join our newsletter to receive our action alerts: https://bit.ly/joinconservativedaily Conservative Daily is on Rumble! https://rumble.com/user/ConservativeDaily We are now also going to be streaming on dlive! Check us out here: https://dlive.tv/ConservativeDaily Click here to donate: http://bit.ly/cd-donate Subscribe to our daily podcast at Apple Podcasts: http://bit.ly/ConservativeDailyPodcast on Google Podcasts (for Android users): https://bit.ly/CDPodcastGoogle We are also available on Spotify! https://open.spotify.com/show/2wD8YleiBM8bu0l3ahBLDN And on Pandora: https://www.pandora.com/podcast/conservative-daily-podcast/PC:37034 And on iHeart Radio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/256-conservative-daily-podcast-53710765/ on TuneIn: https://tunein.com/radio/Conservative-Daily-Podcast-p1350272/ And on Podbean: https://conservative.podbean.com/ And now also on Audible! https://www.audible.com/pd/Conservative-Daily-Podcast-Podcast/B08JJQQ4M Support Joe Oltmann in his legal battle against Eric Coomer: https://givesendgo.com/defendjoeoltmann