Podcasts about Emergency management

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Dealing with all humanitarian aspects of emergencies

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Emergency management

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Best podcasts about Emergency management

Show all podcasts related to emergency management

Latest podcast episodes about Emergency management

Last Born In The Wilderness
#326 | Hot As Hell: The Quickening Of Incredible, Deadly Weather Events w/ Nicholas Humphrey

Last Born In The Wilderness

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 70:21


Meteorologist and geoscientist Nicholas Humphrey returns to the podcast, sharing his insights into the various catastrophic, record-breaking heatwaves and weather events currently playing out in numerous regions across the planet. He explains how the complex dynamics of anthropogenic climate disruption is quickening the pace of these events, and in turn, how ill adapted and ill prepared we are in addressing the realities of this predicament. Nicholas Humphrey is a meteorologist and geoscientist, with the focus on extreme weather events and their connection to our destabilizing climate. Nick's goal is to communicate, in an interdisciplinary fashion, the serious risks from climate tipping points, extreme weather events, and ecological collapse. He graduated with a BS in Interdisciplinary Studies with a focus in societal impacts of extreme weather from South Dakota State University in 2013, and earned a MS in Geosciences - Applied Meteorology from Mississippi State University in 2016. He is a second year PhD student in Emergency Management and Disaster Science at North Dakota State University. He currently lives in Fargo, North Dakota. Episode Notes: - Follow and support Nick's work: https://www.patreon.com/MeteorologistNickHumphrey - Follow him on Facebook and Twitter: https://www.facebook.com/wxclimonews / https://twitter.com/NickHum89508601 - I reference the article ‘India Isn't Ready for a Deadly Combination of Heat and Humidity' by Kamala Thiagarajan, published at Wired: https://bit.ly/3I5iJVt - Sounds by Midnight Sounds. WEBSITE: https://www.lastborninthewilderness.com PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/lastborninthewilderness DONATE: https://www.paypal.me/lastbornpodcast / https://venmo.com/LastBornPodcast BOOK LIST: https://bookshop.org/shop/lastbornpodcast EPISODE 300: https://lastborninthewilderness.bandcamp.com BOOK: http://bit.ly/ORBITgr ATTACK & DETHRONE: https://anchor.fm/adgodcast DROP ME A LINE: Call (208) 918-2837 or http://bit.ly/LBWfiledrop EVERYTHING ELSE: https://linktr.ee/patterns.of.behavior

Disaster Tough Podcast
#114 Emergency Management on Campus - Interview with Debbi Fletcher

Disaster Tough Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 35:41


“A boring day is a good day” is a mantra that campus Emergency Managers like Debbi Fletcher live by every day. Debbi joins the Disaster Tough Podcast from Indiana University in Bloomington where she is the Director of Emergency Management and Continuity.She brings more than a decade's worth of experience to the field from the campus side of things along with the government perspective in her previous role with the City of Indianapolis.In this episode, Debbi discusses the differences between Emergency Management on campus and off. With multiple IU facilities under her watch throughout the state, Debbi also discusses the differences in response and coordination depending on where the situation occurs. Doberman Emergency Management owns and operates the Disaster Tough Podcast. Contact us here at: www.dobermanemg.com or email us at: info@dobermanemg.com.We are proud to endorse L3Harris and the BeOn PPT App. Learn more about this amazing product here: L3Harris.com/ResponderSupport.The Readiness Lab is trailblazing disaster readiness. Early access for the highly anticipated course emergency management response for dynamic populations is currently live. Think you have what it takes? Join us in Atlanta for an immersive experience. Space is limited to 40. Go to thereadinesslab.com/training to learn more.

KANE 1240 AM
Positively Iberia - June 23, 2022

KANE 1240 AM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 35:52


Positively Iberia is produced as an on-going initiative of your Greater Iberia Chamber of Commerce, sponsored by Iberia Medical Center, in cooperation with "Teche Matters" here on KANE 107.5FM/AM1240 and with support from the Daily Iberian. Along with host Marti Harrell this week: Prescott Marshall, Director of Emergency Management and 911 for Iberia Parish Government and Zack Mitchell, President and Mike wattigny, co-coordinator of the Iberia Parish Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program will help you be better prepared for storms and other public emergencies.

Dave and Dujanovic
Be Ready Utah: Preparing your home for evacuation during wildfire season

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 7:26


It is the first official day of summer and wildfire season is among us! Today for our Be Ready Utah Coverage.. one of the biggest concerns of fire season is being in the uncontrollable path of fire.. forced to leave your home. Randall Jeppson, Executive Producer of Utah's Morning News joins the show to share his experience of an evacuation in 2020.Wade Mathews with The Division of Emergency Management shares tips on preparing your home for an evacuation.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pensacola Expert Panel
06/22/22 - Escambia County Emergency Management

Pensacola Expert Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 24:14


Emergency Manager, Travis Thompkins and Public Information and Education Officer, Davis Wood join PEP Talk to discuss hurricane readiness, knowing your zone and home, and being weather aware. Hurricane season is here. We want YOU to BE READY! www.myescambia.com/beready has so much information for our community to be prepared and...

The Current of Emergency Management
Exercise Planning and quick recap of previous episodes

The Current of Emergency Management

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 55:12


On this episode, we spend a few minutes recapping previous episodes before talking about planning for exercises. Specifically, we spend time talking about how to train OEM Staff and those who respond to the EOC often, and how the EMC is able to train without being part of developing the exercise. We also talk about our thoughts on being able to train to find the breaking point without setting your team up for failure. Video referenced in this episode:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKA4w2O61XoSupport the show

First Class Fatherhood
#612 Mayor Tony Perry

First Class Fatherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 39:38


Episode 612 Mayor Tony Perry is a First Class Father and Mayor of Middletown, New Jersey. My family moved to Middletown 12 years ago and it is a wonderful place to raise a family. I invited Mayor Perry to join me on the podcast for a special Father's Day edition of First Class Fatherhood. After graduating from Temple University, Mayor Perry joined the Sandy Recovery Division of the Governor's Office coordinating recovery efforts with FEMA, the Office of Emergency Management, the Department of Community Affairs and the Department of Environmental Protection. He also served as Chief of Staff to Senator Joseph M. Kyrillos from 2014-2018. He has been the Mayor of Middletown since 2019. I had the pleasure of sitting with Mayor Perry to record this interview live during a book signing event at Barnes & Noble in Holmdel, NJ. In this Episode, Mayor Perry shares his Fatherhood journey which includes two children. He discusses the new school curriculum scheduled to begin in New Jersey this fall which includes teaching sexual orientation to first, second and third graders. He describes the importance of getting families back to the kitchen table. He talks about the recent school shooting in Uvalde and how Middletown NJ is responding to keep children safe. He tells us why Middletown NJ is such a great place to raise a family. He offers some great advice for new or about to be Dads and more! First Class Fatherhood: Advice and Wisdom from High-Profile Dads - https://bit.ly/36XpXNp Watch First Class Fatherhood on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCD6cjYptutjJWYlM0Kk6cQ?sub_confirmation=1 Watch on Rumble - https://rumble.com/user/FirstClassFatherhood More Ways To Listen - https://linktr.ee/alec_lace Follow me on instagram - https://instagram.com/alec_lace?igshid=ebfecg0yvbap For information about becoming a Sponsor of First Class Fatherhood please hit me with an email: FirstClassFatherhood@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/alec-lace/support

This Is Nashville
Keeping cool during Nashville's record-breaking heat wave

This Is Nashville

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 50:34


If you've stepped outside in Nashville this week, you know the heat right now is no joke. The fire department has responded to dozens of heat sickness-related calls just this week. Residents are being asked to conserve energy to reduce strain on the grid. Forecasters expect things to cool down just a bit over the Juneteenth weekend, but then we could hit 100 degrees next week. How long has it been since that happened? We pose that and more burning questions to a meteorologist. We also talk with Nashvillians who spend most or all of their time outdoors about how they're coping, and with service providers who are working to provide relief to those who are most vulnerable. At the top of the hour, we talk with WPLN senior health care reporter Blake Farmer about harm reduction efforts at music festivals, including Bonnaroo, which gets under way this weekend. Guests: Sam Shamburger, lead forecaster at National Weather Service Nashville Maurice Ballard, vendor for The Contributor Phoenix, unhoused Nashville resident Alex Smith, outreach worker Carrie Gatlin, vice president of ministries at Nashville Rescue Mission Hot weather resources: The Metro Action Commission Fan and Air Conditioner program provides fans and air conditioner window units to those in need at no cost. To apply or to make a contribution, call 615-862-8860, ext. 70120, or go to the agency's website. The Metro Office of Emergency Management has published a list of heat precautions on their website Heat safety tips from The National Weather Service

Let's Talk Dallas County
Let’s Talk Dallas County Dallas County Emergency Management Specialist Josh Heward Part 2

Let's Talk Dallas County

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 6:14


Dallas County Emergency Management Specialist Josh Heward continues his conversation about warm weather and severe weather reminders.

High Reliability, The Healthcare Facilities Management Podcast
What's the Why? A Healthcare education podcast

High Reliability, The Healthcare Facilities Management Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 68:24


High Reliability, the podcast that focuses on healthcare facilities management, presents the third episode in the Abraham Lincoln Employment Series, titled What's the Why? A Healthcare education podcast. Our guest is Jim Smith,  Director of Engineering & Emergency Management at Springfield Hospital in Springfield, VT.   Jim is well qualified to discuss the topic of education and healthcare management. Jim has both his Bachelor's and Master's degrees, but he joined the Navy out of high school and achieved his first healthcare facilities management job without a college degree. Jim had to convince Rutland Regional hospital to hire him for the Manager of Engineering role, a story he tells in the podcast. Jim has an interesting perspective on the degree. He joined the Navy from high school, then transitioned into the commercial nuclear industry. He then became a Pastor with his church, a true career transition. Each stop on Jim's career journey prepared him well for his healthcare facility management roles. Topics discussed with Jim include:Discussing the Navy's Nuclear Power School and program (4:00);A career transition to Pastoral work (22:00);Leaving the ministry and finding a path into healthcare facilities management (32:00);On the need for a college degree at the management level of healthcare facilities (34:00);Converting life and work experience to college credits, and some encouraging words for those seeking a degree while working full-time (47:30);Transitioning military experience to healthcare facilities management (58:00).Read more about the Lincoln Employment Series here.G/MA NuggetsFor a full listing of jobs we are recruiting for, see here

Tip of the Spear - Missoula County
Preparing for wildfire: Which areas are at risk and how to protect your home

Tip of the Spear - Missoula County

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 26:12


Wildfire has been a natural phenomenon in Missoula County forever; however, with climate change and a growing population leading to more houses in fire-prone areas, our community needs to prepare itself in the event of a fire.  In this episode, the commissioners speak with Max Rebholz, the Office of Emergency Management's wildfire preparedness coordinator, to learn which areas of Missoula County have the potential to be impacted by wildfire, how people can prepare their homes ahead of wildfire season, where and how a person can obtain burn permits and financial reimbursement for wildfire mitigation efforts, and more.  Visit the following sites to learn more about how you can prepare for a wildfire: WildfireRisk.org Fire Adapted Missoula County Missoula County Fire Protection Association United Way Wildfire Preparedness and Cost-Share Program Office of Emergency Management Department of Natural Resources and Conservation  

Let's Talk Dallas County
Let’s Talk Dallas County Dallas County Emergency Management Specialist Josh Heward Part 1

Let's Talk Dallas County

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 6:45


Dallas County Emergency Management Specialist Josh Heward talks about hot weather reminders along with severe weather reminders.

Houston Matters
Jan. 6 hearings, and a billion-dollar bond proposal from Harris County (June 15, 2022)

Houston Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 49:57


On Wednesday's show: We discuss the House select committee hearings on the Jan. 6 capitol insurrection and learn what some Harris County Commissioners hope to convince voters to spend around a billion dollars on in a proposed November bond referendum. Then, we walk through results and analysis from four state primaries and talk about the framework for a proposed bipartisan Senate bill to address school safety and guns. We take on those and other topics in a double dose of our weekly political roundup. Also this hour: We visit Harris County's Emergency Operations Center at Houston TranStar, which is where local officials converge when the Houston area is under threat of a storm or other emergency.  And, ahead of Father's Day this Sunday, three sons talk about their famous fathers.

KRDO Newsradio 105.5 FM • 1240 AM • 92.5 FM
Lonnie Inzer Pikes Peak Regional Office of Emergency Management - June 14, 2022 - KRDO's Afternoon News

KRDO Newsradio 105.5 FM • 1240 AM • 92.5 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 2:22


Residents of the Rockrimmon area will be evacuating their homes next week. But no cause for alarm - it's just a drill!. The Deputy Director of the Pikes Peak Regional Office of Emergency Management, Lonnie Inzer, is here today to tell us more.

RESET
Chicago Office of Emergency Management issues a heat advisory

RESET

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 9:29


Summer hasn't officially started yet but you can expect an almost record breaking heat index this week. Reset talks through what to expect and how to stay cool. Host: Sasha-Ann Simons Producer: Brenda Ruiz Guest: Scott Collis

Teller County Sheriff Podcast
TCSO Podcast - Welcome to the New DIrector of the Offfice of Emergency Management

Teller County Sheriff Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 32:17


In this episode, we welcome Jay Teague as the new Director for the Office of Emergency Management and talk about the roles and responsibilities of the office.

Slam the Gavel
Sandra Speer, Ph.D. Explains Why Parental Alienation Could Be Your Worst Enemy

Slam the Gavel

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 58:26


Slam the Gavel welcomes Sandra Speer, Ph.D. to the show. Her experience includes having a Ph.D. in Public Safety and 30+ years of experience in the Domestic Violence and Emergency Management industries with research concentrations in abuse, leadership, narcissism, parental Alienation, and interpersonal communication. I am a published author of the book The Remains of Hurricane Katrina, a chapter in the textbook Terrorism Inside America's Borders, and various articles, coupled with having been a broadcaster for 20+ years Her specialty is investigating CPS/ high conflict divorce cases for origins of abuse, what types are being committed, and communicating as a consultant or as an expert witness to sources within the system to send children to their safe homes. She assists through every step of a case and have helped many leave wrongful placements, physically abusive situations, grooming to be trafficked, etc. Our discussion defined Parental Alienation and talked about why it should be viewed as an abuse and what is Parental Alienation Language. Also we discussed why do so many parents find that they are wrongfully accused of Parental Alienation and why Practitioners misunderstand Parental Alienation. It is important to allow yourself to go through recovery to become strong enough to fight the horrendous legal abuse many Narcissists commit. In closing, Sandra Speer, Ph.D. wanted to say that she is proving that dreams can come true with what she is doing today. As a Legal Advocate, not an attorney, she works with her clients throughout their cases doing whatever it takes to achieve their goals. Because she is not an attorney, there are no legal limits to whom she can approach for assistance. Sandra also helps her clients emotionally become strong enough to fight their abuser without becoming accused of being a Narcissist or Parent Alienator.

Slam the Gavel
Sandra Speer, Ph.D. Explains Why Parental Alienation Could Be Your Worst Enemy

Slam the Gavel

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 59:41


     Slam the Gavel welcomes Sandra Speer, Ph.D. to the show. Her experience includes having a Ph.D. in Public Safety and 30+ years of experience in the Domestic Violence and Emergency Management industries with research concentrations in abuse, leadership, narcissism, parental Alienation, and interpersonal communication.  I am a published author of the book The Remains of Hurricane Katrina, a chapter in the textbook Terrorism Inside America's Borders, and various articles, coupled with having been a broadcaster for 20+ years      Her specialty is investigating CPS/ high conflict divorce cases for origins of abuse, what types are being committed, and communicating as a consultant or as an expert witness to sources within the system to send children to their safe homes.       She assists through every step of a case and have helped many leave wrongful placements, physically abusive situations, grooming to be trafficked, etc.      Our discussion defined Parental Alienation and talked about why it should be viewed as an abuse and what is Parental Alienation Language.  Also we discussed why do so many parents find that they are wrongfully accused of Parental Alienation and why Practitioners misunderstand Parental Alienation. It is important to allow yourself to go through recovery to become strong enough to fight the horrendous legal abuse many Narcissists commit.     In closing,  Sandra Speer, Ph.D.  wanted to say that she is proving that dreams can come true with what she is doing today.  As a Legal Advocate, not an attorney, she works with her clients throughout their cases doing whatever it takes to achieve their goals.  Because she is not an attorney, there are no legal limits to whom she can approach for assistance. Sandra also helps her clients emotionally become strong enough to fight their abuser without becoming accused of being a Narcissist or Parent Alienator.To reach Sandra Speer, Ph.D. : http://www.lifesanswers.netHer  company website offers information about herself, her company, Legal Advocacy and Life Coaching packages that she offers. https://www.facebook.com/groups/abusemewhyhttps://www.facebook.com/groups/287113156545220This public Facebook group, “Legal Advocate for You, Not Family Court,” offers general information about legal issues that accompany leaving an abuser and 24/7 Legal Advocacy advice.Support the show(https://www.buymeacoffee.com/maryannpetri)https://monicaszymonik.mykajabi.com/Masterclass  USE CODE SLAM THE GAVEL PODCAST FOR 10% OFF THE COURSEhttp://www.dismantlingfamilycourtcorruption.com/Music by: mictechmusic@yahoo.comPullbackPullback digs into the everyday ethics behind goods and services, consumer movements,...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify F*ck The Rules"Fuck The Rules" podcast is about folx who set out to achieve something in their lives...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Kerre McIvor Mornings Podcast
Francesca Rudkin: A sensible reshuffle from the Prime Minister

Kerre McIvor Mornings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 4:59


A minor shuffle eh? Not quite so much.There was more on offer at yesterday's press conference than expected; actually, the announcement was pretty sensible. It's a good time for the Prime Minister to be making sure the right person is in the right job, shift the Opposition's focus by moving along a few folks, and attempting to arrest a slide in the polls.The shuffle was instigated by a couple of resignations, and the timing couldn't have been better for the Prime Minister.Minster for Immigration and Broadcasting Kris Faafoi announced he was leaving to spend time with his young family. He'd had wanted to resign at the last election but Ardern had convinced him to stay on, taking on portfolios undergoing major reform in broadcasting and immigration.I don't think it was a secret that he was keen to move on, especially when the man who was once regarded as the Minister of Everything went AWOL during Covid, and moved slowly to deal with immigration issues. Michael Wood picks up immigration, and let's hope he hits the ground running, and brings some relief for the many sectors crying out for migrant labour.Speaker of the House Trevor Mallard has also resigned, ending a 35-year parliamentary career in August to take up a diplomatic post in Europe, a nice reward for some average behaviour of late. This is good timing for the Prime Minister, in a recent poll only 17 percent of New Zealanders thought he was doing a good job, and after the headlines about false sexual assault claims and unhelpful antics over dealing with the Covid protest, this is nice neat solution for the Government.Chris Hipkins, who is fast becoming Labour's fix it man, takes over Police and passes Covid-19 Response to Ayesha Verrall. We now have a person with a criminology degree in charge of the police – not a bad idea, but Hipkins' ability to manage complex portfolios, deal with opposition, and communicate well with media might be more behind this move rather than a degree he did in the late 90's.Basically, he's competent.The Prime Minister said that she felt the focus for the police portfolio had changed since 2020, and the focus on what was needed for police now had been lost, but added that Poto Williams is a capable minister and retains her confidence, and stays in Cabinet as Conservation and Disabilities Minister.Hipkins is very fond of his education portfolio, but to free him up a large part of his education portfolio will go to Associate Minister Jan Tinetti – who as a former principal and teacher seems to have a good handle on the job.It's also worth noting Poto Williams lost the Building and Construction portfolio which has been handed to Megan Woods, who is the Minister of Housing. Things are not settling down in the construction sector, and this could be an issue leading into the election next year. Best to move the portfolio into more capable hands now.This reshuffle is a sign of things to come. A chance to give talent an opportunity to step up and shine before the Prime Minister undertakes a major reshuffle at the beginning of next year. It is unlikely Labour will have a caucus of 65 MPs next election, so it's also important for the party to make sure their best talent will be retained.Those given the nod are Kiri Allen, who picks up Faafoi's Justice portfolio and Adrian Rurawhe who has been nominated as Speaker. Kieran McAnulty becomes a Minister outside of Cabinet with a focus on regional issues - picking up Emergency Management, Racing, and associate minister for Local Government assisting Nanaia Mahuta with Three Waters. He's a good choice, and no doubt will be out and about around the country selling this infrastructure policy in an attempt to get it back on track.As I said, these seem like very sensible appointments, but whether any of these politicians are up to the job, depends on results so it's a 'wait and see' situation.

Building Hope With Purple Thoughts
SPECIAL GUEST: Ron Breland

Building Hope With Purple Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 38:56


Ron Breland - Retired Soldier and Warfighter Nation Chaplain U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Ron Breland (Ret.) served in the United States Army from 1990 to 2005 as a DoD Certified Firefighter and a Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Specialist. As a third generation firefighter, Ron realized early that his destiny was to serve. In 1993, Breland volunteered for the humanitarian-turned-combat mission in Mogadishu, Somalia where he engaged the enemy on their own ground. Unbeknownst to Breland at the time, he suffered a minor Traumatic Brain Injury after a truck explosion. He was also a Quick Reaction Force Member at Swordbase, and thwarted a surprise attack on his basecamp by two Somali insurgents, which he quickly dispatched during the evening of October 3rd. A tour to the war torn region of Kosovo would come later, in 1999, where then Sergeant Breland was hand-picked by the XVIII Airborne Corps Command Staff and named the Task Force Falcon Fire Chief, serving under then Brigadier General Carlos Sanchez. Breland successfully ran fire stations on three base camps in two countries while forging mutual aid agreements between the United States and other Balkan nations. During this tour, Breland's specialized team responded to a Special Forces Team that was killed after driving over an anti-tank mine, which seriously affected Breland's morale. Ron would not be diagnosed with PTSD until 2001, just before 9-11-01. As a Squad Leader serving in Ar Ramadi, Iraq from 2003 through 2004, Breland led his Quick Reaction Force on over 300 missions outside the wire during their tenure in the Sunni Triangle. His Battalion, having taken heavy casualties throughout the year, the most of any single Battalion level unit at that time during OIF, Breland sank deeper into his PTSD symptoms and depression. SSG Breland was medically retired in July of 2005. The experiences and positions held both in the Fire Service and as a combat-proven leader would serve the nation's First Responders well as he transitioned into the next phase of his professional life. After medically retiring from the United States Army in 2005, Ron Breland served as the New Mexico State Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Coordinator, a division of the New Mexico Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. There, Breland also served as the Program Manager of New Mexico Task Force-1, a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) National Task Force under the Federal Emergency Management Agency's Emergency Support Function - 9, and personally trained thousands of Military and First Responders in the fields of Incident Command (ICS), Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD), Improvised Explosive Devices (IED), Vehicle-Borne IEDs, and Suicide Bomber Prevention Training in only two years. Breland was also selected as a member of the Department of Homeland Security's focus group to examine and establish response actions of First Responders; a cumulative report which directly served in the development of Homeland Security Presidential Directive-19 (Combating Terrorist Use of Explosives in the United States). This elite group was derived from an International community of Bomb Squad Commanders, Hazardous Materials professionals, and other response personnel. Ron also taught Counter-Terrorism Courses for the Department of Homeland Security's Center for Domestic Preparedness, New Mexico Tech, and the Nevada Test Site; all members of the National Domestic Preparedness Consortium. Ron now serves as a Chaplain through a unique Military Outreach Ministry; his wife's 501 (c)(3) - Warfighter Ranch. This organization exists to help heal the invisible wounds of the heart, mind, and soul through Jesus Christ! A unique Military Artist, Ron uses parachute cord to reach out to over 20,000 Warfighters individually over the last 13 years. Ron believes each and every piece is "a sermon for one". Ron is the author of four books; most notably ”Ghost Nation – Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Society”, which he co-wrote with his wife, Helen, to offer different vantage points of PTSD and to help others understand this debilitating condition. The Breland family currently resides in Glendale, Arizona, have 5 children and 3 grandchildren! Warfighter Ranch www.warfighterranch.org Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ron.breland.7 Please stop by and give our page a Like and help grow this amazing Military Outreach Ministry - Warfighter Ranch! https://www.facebook.com/warfighterranchactual/ And the Outreach arm of Warfighter Ranch - the Isaiah 6:8 Military Outreach Ministry! https://www.facebook.com/isaiah68actual/ YouTube https://youtube.com/c/Isaiah68Actual #NextMissionTimeNow #WarfighterNation #WarfighterRanch #IsIahSixEight #SendMe #ReturnWithHonor #BetterTogether #WarfighterNation #UniversityOfMogadishuClassOf93 #JesusIsMyJumpmaster

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Emergency Minister to discuss flood recovery strategy

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 14:20


The cold snap along Australia's east coast is being felt keenly in communities devastated by record flooding earlier this year Murray Watt, Minister for Emergency Management is heading to Lismore, where he will hold a series of roundtable conversations with community leaders, business leaders and insurers.

Tidal Flooding Talk
Emergency Management with Chuck Labarre

Tidal Flooding Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 44:13


Margate City Municipal Emergency Management Coordinator and Margate City Beach Patrol Captain Chuck LaBarre, joins hosts Meteorologist Dan Skeldon and Dr. Bill Thomas for this episode of Tidal Flooding Talk, recorded live Thursday, May 26 on Twitter Spaces. LaBarre, a former firefighter and longtime lifeguard, talks about his history with flooding, storms and the preparedness and response by municipalities and residents. Join us live 10:30 a.m. Thursdays for Tidal Flooding Talk on Twitter twitter.com/NJresiliency Follow us online: njri.org/ twitter.com/NJresiliency www.instagram.com/njriorg/ www.facebook.com/NJRI-111068718252735/

BC Today from CBC Radio British Columbia
Flood preparation in B.C.; pay equity in Canadian soccer

BC Today from CBC Radio British Columbia

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 56:12


The River Forecast Centre has put multiple communities under flood warning advisories. We're taking B.C.'s Emergency Management update live, and talking about flood preparation with Tamsin Lyle of Ebbwater Consulting. In our second half, the Canadian women's national soccer team wants equal pay with their male counterparts. We'll talk to a former player and a professor in sport management about how the team could get there.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 629 (6-6-22): The 2022 Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Season Begins with a Re-formed Pacific Storm

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:52).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-3-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks June 6 and June 13, 2022. MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental. That's part of “Driving Rain,” by the Charlottesville- and Nelson County-based band, Chamomile and Whiskey.  The storm-themed music sets the stage for our annual preview of a potential bunch of rainy, windy, and storm-surge-causing summer and fall visitors.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds to some more of the music accompanying 21 names that we hope will NOT become infamous this year. MUSIC and VOICES ~36 sec – Music lyrics: “In the driving rain”; then instrumental.  Voices: “Alex.  Bonnie.  Colin.  Danielle.  Earl.  Fiona.  Gaston.  Hermine.  Ian.  Julia.  Karl.  Lisa.  Martin.  Nicole.  Owen.  Paula.  Richard.  Shary.  Tobias.  Virginie.  Walter.” Those were the names planned for storms that may occur during this year's Atlantic basin tropical cyclone season.  The Atlantic basin includes the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic tropical cyclone season runs officially from June 1 through November 30.  Most Atlantic tropical cyclones occur within this period, but not all of them do.  In fact, 2022 is the first year since 2014 in which there was NOT a named Atlantic basin storm before June 1, although it was close: as of June 3, the remnants of Pacific basin Hurricane Agatha, which formed in late May and made landfall in southern Mexico, were predicted to re-form in the Gulf of Mexico as the Atlantic basin's first named storm. [Editor's note, not in the audio: Pre-June named Atlantic storms in the previous seven years were Ana in 2015, Alex in January 2016 and Bonnie in May 2016, Arlene in April 2017, Alberto in May 2018, Andrea in May 2019, Arthur and Bertha in May 2020, and Ana in May 2021.  The first named storm in 2014 was in July.  The National Hurricane Center upgraded Potential Tropical Cyclone One to Tropical Storm Alex around 2 a.m. EDT on June 5, 2022.]Tropical storms and hurricanes are two categories of tropical cyclones, which are rotating storm systems that start in tropical or sub-tropical latitudes.  A tropical cyclone is called a tropical storm—and gets a name—when sustained wind speeds reach 39 miles per hour; at 74 miles per hour, a tropical cyclone is considered a hurricane.  Tropical depressions—with wind speeds below 39 miles per hour—don't get named if they never reach tropical storm wind speed,* but they can still bring damaging rainfall and flooding.  Hurricane-force storms are called typhoonsin northwestern areas of the Pacific Ocean. [Editor's note, not in the audio: A tropical system that never gets above the tropical depression wind-speed level won't be given a name, but a lingering tropical depression that previously was at the wind speed of a tropical storm or hurricane will have a name associated with it.]Before a tropical system of any speed or name barges into the Old Dominion, here are five important preparedness steps recommended by the National Weather Service.1.  Know your zone – that is, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation area by checking the Virginia Department of Emergency Management's “Hurricane Zone Evacuation Tool,” available online at  vaemergency.gov/prepare, or by contacting your local emergency management office. 2.  Assemble an emergency kit of food, water, flashlights, first aid materials, a battery-powered radio, and other items that would be useful in a power outage.3.  Have a family emergency plan, including plans for evacuating and for getting in touch with one another in an emergency. 4.  Review your insurance policies to ensure that you have adequate coverage for your home and personal property. And 5.  Establish ways to stay informed, especially if the power goes out. Detailed safety tips for hurricanes and other severe weather are available from the “Safety” link at the National Weather Service Web site, www.weather.gov; from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, online as noted earlier at vaemergency.gov/prepare; and from various other sources. Thanks to eight Blacksburg, Va., friends for lending their voices to this episode.  Thanks also to Chamomile and Whiskey for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Driving Rain.” MUSIC – ~21 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Driving Rain,” from the 2012 album “The Barn Sessions,” is copyright by Chamomile and Whiskey and by County Wide Records, used with permission.  More information about Chamomile and Whiskey is available online at http://www.chamomileandwhiskey.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 579, 5-31-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Satellite photo of Tropical Storm Alex off the southeastern Atlantic Coast of the United States at 2:51 p.m. EDT (18:51 Z), on June 5, 2022.  Photo from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “GOES Image Viewer: GOES-East/U.S. Atlantic Coast/Band 1 (Blue Visible)”, online at https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/goes/sector.php?sat=G16§or=eus; specific URL for the photo was https://cdn.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/GOES16/ABI/SECTOR/eus/01/20221561851_GOES16-ABI-eus-01-500x500.jpg, as of June 6, 2022.Predictions for the 2022 Atlantic tropical storm season.  Graphic from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “NOAA predicts above-normal 2022 Atlantic Hurricane Season; Ongoing La Niña, above-average Atlantic temperatures set the stage for busy season ahead,” May 24, 2022, online at https://www.noaa.gov/news-release/noaa-predicts-above-normal-2022-atlantic-hurricane-season.Map showing the names, dates, and tracks of named Atlantic basin tropical cyclones (tropical storms and hurricanes) in 2021. Map from the National Hurricane Center, “2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season,” online at https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/data/tcr/index.php?season=2021&basin=atl.“5 Things to Know About Having and Evacuation Plan” poster from the National Weather Service, “What to Do Before the Tropical Storm or Hurricane,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-plan.  The site also has posters with “5 Things to Know About…” hurricane hazard risks, strengthening one's home, getting information, and insurance. EXTRA INFORMATION ON TROPICAL CYCLONE PREPAREDNESS The following information is quoted from the National Weather Service, ‘Hurricane Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane, as of June 6, 2022. Plan for a Hurricane: What to Do Before the Tropical Storm or Hurricane(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-plan) “The best time to prepare for a hurricane is before hurricane season begins on June 1.  It is vital to understand your home's vulnerability to storm surge, flooding, and wind.  Here is your checklist of things to do BEFORE hurricane seasons begins.Know your zone: Do you live near the Gulf or Atlantic Coasts?  Find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation area by contacting your local government/emergency management office or, in Virginia, by visiting https://www.vaemergency.gov/hurricane-evacuation-zone-lookup/. Put Together an Emergency Kit: Put together a basic emergency kit; information to do so is online at https://www.ready.gov/kit.  Check emergency equipment, such as flashlights, generators, and storm shutters.Write or review your Family Emergency Plan: Before an emergency happens, sit down with your family or close friends and decide how you will get in contact with each other, where you will go, and what you will do in an emergency.  Keep a copy of this plan in your emergency supplies kit or another safe place where you can access it in the event of a disaster.  Information to help with emergency plan preparation is online at https://www.ready.gov/plan. Review Your Insurance Policies: Review your insurance policies to ensure that you have adequate coverage for your home and personal property.Understand NWS forecast products, especially the meaning of NWS watches and warnings.Preparation tips for your home are available from the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes, online at https://www.flash.org/. Preparation tips for those with chronic illnesses are available from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, online at https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/infographic/emergency.htm. Actions to Take When a Tropical Storm or Hurricane Threatens(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-action) “When a hurricane threatens your community, be prepared to evacuate if you live in a storm surge risk area.  Allow enough time to pack and inform friends and family if you need to leave your home. Secure your home: Cover all of your home's windows.  Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows.  A second option is to board up windows with 5/8 inch exterior grade or marine plywood, built to fit, and ready to install.  Buy supplies before the hurricane season rather than waiting for the pre-storm rush. Stayed tuned in: Check the websites of your local National Weather Service office (online at https://www.weather.gov/) and local government/emergency management office.  Find out what type of emergencies could occur and how you should respond. Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or other radio or TV stations for the latest storm news. Follow instructions issued by local officials. Leave immediately if ordered! If NOT ordered to evacuate: *Take refuge in a small interior room, closet, or hallway on the lowest level during the storm.  Put as many walls between you and the outside as you can. *Stay away from windows, skylights, and glass doors. *If the eye of the storm passes over your area, there will be a short period of calm, but at the other side of the eye, the wind speed rapidly increases to hurricane force winds coming from the opposite direction.” After a Hurricane(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-after) Continue listening to a NOAA Weather Radio or the local news for the latest updates. If you evacuated, return home only when officials say it is safe. Once home, drive only if necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed-out bridges.  If you must go out, watch for fallen objects in the road, downed electrical wires, and weakened walls, bridges, roads, and sidewalks that might collapse. Walk carefully around the outside of your home to check for loose power lines, gas leaks, and structural damage. Stay out of any building if you smell gas, if floodwaters remain around the building, if the building or home was damaged by fire, or if the authorities have not declared it safe. Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the leading causes of death after storms in areas dealing with power outages.  Never use a portable generator inside your home or garage. Use battery-powered flashlights.  Do NOT use candles.  Turn on your flashlight before entering a vacated building.  The battery could produce a spark that could ignite leaking gas, if present.”

united states tv music university earth education college water state mexico zoom walk tech research office government predictions national write plan safety greek environment dark normal web natural va rain skills ocean voices atlantic snow weather preparation citizens air hurricanes presidential agency stream pacific prevention whiskey secure priority environmental bay images grade centers earl carbon index charlottesville permanent gulf map establish satellites disease control pond formed signature arial graphic virginia tech tropical pacific ocean detailed accent atlantic ocean stayed assemble govt natural resources hurricane irma gaston compatibility msonormal colorful american red cross edt times new roman sections cyclone hurricane sandy noaa civics watershed national archives emergency management wg chesapeake old dominion national weather service emergency preparedness policymakers hurricane season earth sciences glossary shenandoah tropical storms blacksburg hurricane matthew national oceanic acknowledgment put together cosgrove cambria math style definitions atmospheric administration virginia governor worddocument chamomile saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning stormwater breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup virginia department donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin defjc wrapindent rmargin intlim narylim caribbean sea sols defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked qformat semihidden unhidewhenused atlantic coast latentstyles table normal nws bmp safe home north pacific name title name normal name strong name emphasis name subtle reference name colorful shading name intense reference name colorful list name book title name default paragraph font name colorful grid name bibliography name subtitle name light shading accent name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name revision name table grid name list paragraph name placeholder text name quote name no spacing name intense quote name light shading name dark list accent name light list name colorful shading accent name light grid name colorful list accent name medium shading name colorful grid accent name medium list name subtle emphasis name medium grid name intense emphasis name dark list federal register wmo national hurricane center atmospheric administration noaa news releases world meteorological organization emergency kit shary grades k name e space systems atlantic hurricane season light accent dark accent roanoke times colorful accent name list cumberland gap nelson county name date name plain text name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name list table name message header name table columns name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name table elegant name note heading name table professional name block text name table subtle name document map name table web name normal indent name balloon text name table theme name list bullet name normal web name plain table name list number name normal table name grid table light name closing name no list name grid table name signature name outline list do before driving rain prepare now ben cosgrove audio notes national ocean service 20know water center tmdl 20image donotshowrevisions 20things virginia standards
The Current of Emergency Management
Interview with TDEM Chief Nim Kidd

The Current of Emergency Management

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 63:17


Nim Kidd, Chief of the Texas Division of Emergency Management and Vice Chancellor of Texas A&M, sat down with us at TheConferenceTx to discuss recently announced programs in the State of Texas. The programs we discuss are the County Liaison Officers, EM Academy, and Constellation. Chief Kidd answered questions about the details of these programs including areas of concern for local EMs. Support the show

OBBM Network
Health Freedom - OffBeat Business Show Featuring Lauren Davis & Dr. Peter McCullough

OBBM Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 38:45


Host Susan Hamilton talks with Dallas County Judge Candidate Lauren Davis and Dr. Peter McCullough about their efforts to champion health freedom.  Neither Lauren nor Dr. McCullough had ever expected to be thrust into an advocacy position, but now  that they have been challenged, these stars are rising to defend the rights of Americans right here in our backyard. Dr. McCullough points out that advocacy for the patient starts with the patient-doctor relationship, and there is no place for the government to tie the hands of a doctor. The government is not the expert in our family health care, and they don't have the right to interfere with the decisions we make regarding the care of our personal bodies or those in our care. In Lauren's case, she illustrates the time her son as an infant in the operating room, and it was no place to tie the hands of the doctor. The Dallas County Judge is the CEO of Emergency Management for Dallas County. In this capacity,  Lauren has pledged to uphold people's rights to the governance of their own bodies. Additionally, Lauren's choice of experts will be a diverse group, not simply an echoed voice from a single frame of reference. Listen in to learn Dr. McCullough's 4 points that the medical community can and should agree on at this time. To get behind Lauren, learn more about her stand on the issues, and help to get the word out, go to https://Davis4Dallas.com. Click here to get The Courage to Face Covid-19 co-authored by Dr. Peter McCullough and John Leake for yourself! OBBM Network Brands, OffBeat Business Media, LLCChester Squared Music Therapy, John ChesterJunkluggers of Grapevine, Irving, and Denton  630-470-8307Subscribe to the OBBM Network Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify (https://open.spotify.com/show/2LopRv8p1ZEcytdUP377ug), iHeart, Google Podcasts and more.OffBeat Business TV can be found on Youtube (https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZcr5JSLWKmiYl6td7ZjjbnOU-ZAY0GPB),Vimeo (https://vimeo.com/channels/offbeatbusinesstv),Rumble (https://rumble.com/c/OffBeatBusinessTV),BitChute (https://www.bitchute.com/OBBMNetwork/) and wherever you enjoy great on-demand podcasts and TV.Find OBBM Network TV:Roku: https://channelstore.roku.com/details/2d588bed3170f71fd5e7173e8732082d/obbm-network-tvClouthub TV: https://clouthub.com/c/OBBMNetworkTVGab TV: https://tv.gab.com/channel/OBBMSupport the show

Houston Matters
Preparing for another hurricane season in Houston (June 1, 2022)

Houston Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 50:31


On Wednesday's show: On this first official day of the Atlantic hurricane season we present a special edition of Houston Matters with everything you need to get ready for whatever tropical weather the next six months may have in store for us. We talk with Matt Rosencrans of NOAA about the hurricane forecast and what we can expect in terms of the number and severity of tropical storms between now and the end of November. Also, we offer a first-timer's guide to hurricane season for newbies wondering what to do and what to expect before, during, and after a tropical storm. Then Craig Cohen and Ernie Manouse of Town Square go shopping for hurricane season supplies. And we reflect on the impact of Hurricane Ike as told in the Houston Public Media podcast series Hurricane Season. Plus, in the audio below we visit Harris County's Emergency Operations Center at Houston TranStar, which is where local officials converge when the Houston area is under threat of a storm or other emergency. Houston Matters producer Michael Hagerty takes us on a tour with the help of TranStar's Josh Shideler and Brian Murray with Harris County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. And Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo talks with Michael about how the county prepares for hurricane season. Hurricane Resources: Ready Harris | Emergency Supply Kit | Flood Insurance FAQs

Disaster Zone
Law Enforcement and Emergency Management

Disaster Zone

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 44:56


Ever since the terrorist attacks of 9/11 there has been a much stronger relationship between law enforcement and emergency management. In this podcast we explore that relationship with Paul Pastor, the former Pierce County, Washington State Sheriff. It is a wide-ranging discussion of challenges being faced by both professions. One of the topics covered included how we need to become prepared for much longer duration events, like that which we have endured with the COVID pandemic. We also covered climate change, the political climate, and how we need to work towards more transparency. This episode is sponsored by Unearth. Unearth's emergency response software connects field responders and the command center, equipping teams with mobile tools for rapid damage assessments, real-time incident tracking, and seamless information sharing. Empower field teams where their work actually happens - reducing response times, optimizing resource management, and simplifying reporting with a dynamic, map-based field operations platform.

Dave and Dujanovic
Be Ready Utah - Preparing for a Wildfire in your home

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 10:44


Wade Mathews, Utah Division of Emergency Management, joins in on the conversation to help all homeowners be ready in an unthinkable fire breaks out in our property. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dave and Dujanovic
Be Ready Utah: Preparedness in the Workplace

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 8:21


What do you do if you are at work.. and an emergency hit. Whether it is a natural disaster or another sort of threat. Are you prepared? As a bonus Be Ready UT we are going to dive into what you need to do to prepare yourself for an emergency at work. It is Business Continuity awareness week and Wade Mathews, with the Division of Emergency Management joins the discussion on what you need to be prepared at work, today. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Enrollment Growth University: Higher Education
The Critical Nature of Crisis Communications

Enrollment Growth University: Higher Education

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 29:04


Christy Jackson, Sr. Director of Reputation Management and Communication at UNC Charlotte and Chris Gonyar, Director of Emergency Management at UNC Charlotte join the podcast to discuss why operational and communicational responses must be aligned during a crisis, and how to ensure that actually happens.

Hacks & Wonks
The State of Public Safety in Seattle with Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 63:13


On this midweek show, Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell joins Crystal for an extensive conversation about public safety in Seattle. Their discussion ranges from how to handle an officer shortage with a long hiring pipeline, the Harrell administration's approach to encampment sweeps, how safety involves more than just policing, and the thought process on creating a third department (beyond Fire and Police). The importance of negotiating the SPOG contract in removing obstacles to progress is covered, as well as the thinking behind hotspot policing and strategic use of limited public safety resources. The show wraps up with what steps we can all take to help create positive change and make our streets safer. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell at @RuleSeven.   Resources “Seattle clears Woodland Park homeless encampment after months of trying to place people into shelter” by Greg Kim from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/homeless/seattle-clears-woodland-park-homeless-encampment-after-months-of-trying-to-place-people-into-shelter/   “Harrell Outlines Public Safety Strategies: Expanding Policing, ‘Hot Spots' Focus, Police Response Alternatives” by Elizabeth Turnbull from the South Seattle Emerald: https://southseattleemerald.com/2022/02/04/harrell-outlines-public-safety-strategies-expanding-policing-hot-spots-focus-police-response-alternatives/   Community Police Commission (CPC) - Police Accountability Recommendations Tracker (PART): https://www.seattle.gov/community-police-commission/our-work/recommendations-tracker   Community Police Commission (CPC) - Accountability Ordinance Tracker: https://www.seattle.gov/community-police-commission/our-work/accountability-ordinance-tracker   Washington State Office of Independent Investigations - Final Bill Report for ESHB 1267: https://lawfilesext.leg.wa.gov/biennium/2021-22/Pdf/Bill%20Reports/House/1267-S.E%20HBR%20FBR%2021.pdf?q=20220517001510   “Harrell Touts Arrests at Longtime Downtown Hot Spot in ‘Operation New Day' Announcement” by Paul Kiefer from PubliCola: https://publicola.com/2022/03/04/harrell-touts-arrests-at-longtime-downtown-hot-spot-in-operation-new-day-announcement/   “Harrell says he ‘inherited a mess,' will solve crime issues by putting arrests first, social services second” by Sarah Grace Taylor from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/harrell-says-he-inherited-a-mess-will-solve-crime-issues-by-putting-arrests-first-social-services-second/   One Seattle Day of Service - May 21: https://www.seattle.gov/mayor/one-seattle-initiatives/day-of-service Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Well today, I'm pleased to welcome Senior Deputy Mayor of Seattle, Monisha Harrell, back to the program. Welcome back. [00:00:47] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Thanks for having me. [00:00:48] Crystal Fincher: Thanks for coming. Well, I suppose this is your first time as the Senior Deputy Mayor - your many, many previous roles and titles and accolades from before this proceeded you - but now you're in the role of Senior Deputy Mayor of Seattle in the Bruce Harrell administration. And how's it going? [00:01:12] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: It's been a fast four and a half months - I think it's a little bit like dog years - each week feels like a year, and there's nothing like on-the-job learning. [00:01:27] Crystal Fincher: Nothing like on-the-job learning. Now, what are you doing? What are you responsible for? [00:01:33] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: So my portfolio includes Fire, Police, Office of Emergency Management, Office of Intergovernmental Relations, Budget, and HR. [00:01:51] Crystal Fincher: And nothing else - that's it? [00:01:55] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: I have a few things. I have a few things in the - I say anything that'll wake you up in the middle of the night is in my portfolio. It's helpful to have all those things in one place, and we're trying to envision the future of the City. There's a lot of work that has followed me from my previous experiences that I now have an opportunity to be able to put some of that visioning into practice in helping to lead the City, so it's exciting. I like it. It's a new take on some work that I've been doing for a long time. [00:02:32] Crystal Fincher: Well and you've certainly worked in several areas of the public safety spectrum in several different roles. Now this is part of your portfolio in this role. So I do want to talk about just the - a number of things - starting in terms of public safety and the conversations that we're having - that are lively and starting off conversations, just this week, with regard to staffing in SPD and moving forward. And I think, as we're looking about it, certainly we've talked on the program before about it - whether or not people agree with the need for more SPD officers, the City is moving forward with hiring more SPD officers and talking about that being part of the solution, or your plan for helping to make people safer. But with that, even if we were to hire 50 people today, that is actually a really long pipeline and those folks aren't going to be making it onto the streets for a while. So if we're talking about public safety, that might be a solution for the fall or next year, but what - short of adding more officers, which can't happen - can be done right now to help intervene in the rising crime levels. [00:03:58] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Yeah, that's a good question. We have to prepare for the short-, mid-, and long-term. And so one of the things that we've been doing in the short-term is civilianizing some positions that were previously certified positions. And so that helps us to be able to spread out our resources a little bit more - taking some internal positions, be they administrative or other, where we've asked - does this position need to be a law enforcement officer, a certified law enforcement officer, or can this be a civilian or a civilianized position and moving those to civilianized positions? So that is a short term solution - we are currently working on that, the chief has currently been working on that for the last several months. And so we're working through extending our resources through that. And that's a great long-term solution as well - analyzing what has to be a certified position and what can be a civilianized position. In the midterm, we do have to recruit folks to be willing to go into the academy. And policing across the country - there's a shortage of officers across the country. I don't know one department right now that is fully subscribed, that has all of the officers that it needs. We have seen a lot of people, especially officers, leaving the workforce over the course of the last couple of years. It's been a toll. It's been a toll on absolutely everybody. And in particular, as we've been having discussions - deep, deep discussions - around policing and the future of policing, some people in the profession have taken a look at whether or not they want to continue in that line of service. Some have been retirement age and some have decided that they want to take different paths - but those are all culminating in this moment. We have people - good people - who have reached an inflection point in their life and want to do something different. Some of them may turn towards policing, many of them have turned to other ways to support and help the community. So we have to talk to - and on the long end of the pipeline, it's talking to a lot of our young folks and seeing if there are people who want to be part of the future of what policing will be. And not looking at what it is now, but looking at what it could be for the future - and being a part of that, and being willing to step into something that is wholly uncertain at this moment. What policing is today is different than it was 10, 20 years ago, will be different than what it will be 10, 20 years from now. And so there has to be a willingness to embrace some of the uncertainty and wanting to be - and be willing to be - a part of what it could be in the future and shaping that. [00:07:15] Crystal Fincher: So is it possible to make people safer in the existing staffing footprint that we're going to be dealing with for the near term? [00:07:25] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Safer is - I think safer involves more than just policing. Safer involves getting more mental health support, safer involves better conflict resolution solutions beyond guns, safer is never going to be a police-only solution - and so we have to, candidly, be able to walk and chew gum in terms of yes, working on our policing shortages and working on shoring up our mental health systems, our physical health systems. Acknowledging that even if we have community members who had food on their table, a roof over their heads, jobs to attend to, their financial needs - the last couple of years haven't left many people in better mental and physical health than they were prior to 2020. And so even those who have had all of the means are still going to be unstable in some way and need help and need support. So safety really looks like - how do we build a larger support system and safety net to even catch those who wouldn't otherwise be considered vulnerable? [00:09:12] Crystal Fincher: Well, you know I agree with that. And I guess that's why it has been confounding in some of the actions that have been taken, whether it's some of the hotspot policing or the sweeps of encampments, where there certainly has been a lot of talk about having those kinds of supports and interventions and people reaching out to be there, but that being absent in so many of those situations where we are seeing predominantly public safety-led, and some of those situations only law enforcement-led, sweep or intervention. And looking at whether that can effectively address the problem and whether that's really delivering on the vision that you laid out. How do you explain that? [00:10:06] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Absolutely. So I think that people only see a portion and it's really hard. People only see a portion of what we're doing - of what any administration or any government agency is doing. Some of the things that are not as readily accessible is how much transitional housing we have actually opened up and made available over the course of the last few months - we have done an amazing job in terms of making transitional housing available and getting people into that transitional housing. In terms of some of the encampment removals, we've made a tremendous number of referrals and we've gotten people help and support that have been on the streets for years. Some of these stories of people being living on the streets for five years - that is never going to be a success. It's not a success that somebody lives in the street in the same spot for five years. That is an absolute dead end, and we should never be satisfied with somebody having that as an outcome and that as an option. And we have done quite a bit, this administration has done quite a bit, in terms of getting resources to many of those folks. [00:11:27] Crystal Fincher: So are you disputing that some of those have taken place without that outreach taken, done at first? Are you saying that that has occurred with all of them? [00:11:39] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Every person has been given the opportunity for support services - they're offered that. They don't always take it, and some people might not be in a place to be able to take it at that time period. I will talk a little bit about the Woodland Park encampment removal. There were, I think, 85 referrals made from the Woodland Park encampment. And those are real offers of help that we're getting out to folks in that we're making spaces available for them to be able to come indoors. Not everybody is ready for that, and certainly there were - there have been more people who have come on site who have needed help and support, and we're still working on getting supports for those folks. But when we have something open, we're trying to get people in it. [00:12:41] Crystal Fincher: So would it then be a fair characterization to say, in the case of an encampment sweep or a hotspot enforcement, if - or I guess that's a different situation - looking at encampment sweep. If a person there hasn't had contact with a, whether it's a caseworker or service provider - someone with a connection to services available to them if they are ready to go, that meet their circumstances, that they meet the qualifications to go into. If that doesn't happen, that is not your policy, that would be something going wrong in the process and not what you had ordered to be carried out? [00:13:32] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: So we don't have as many resources to allow people to pick their exact type of transitional housing. There have been times where we've said, there is a tiny home available and people might decline that because they would rather have a hotel, or there might be a tiny home available within a particular village and they don't want to go to that area of town. We don't have control over all of the inventory available, but we make something available. [00:14:09] Crystal Fincher: So something is always available for someone? [00:14:13] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: When we are doing - when we are doing removals, we make offers of support. There is a crew that goes out in advance that makes an offer of support prior to the removal. [00:14:26] Crystal Fincher: And so one of the issues, and it's been covered - in looking at offers of support. There seem to be some disconnects in what is available and what people need. And some really understandable and justifiable reasons why people may not be able to go to a shelter. Sometimes the situation may be - hey, shelter requires people be in by 7:00 or 8:00 PM, I have a job that requires me to be there later or to leave earlier. And so I can't keep my job and both go into the shelter. Obviously, keeping the job is something that preserves a pathway into housing. In those situations, does the City have a responsibility to find something more suitable, or to wait on sweeping them until there is something more suitable available? [00:15:25] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: So the removals are based on a number of different criteria and we'll be sharing more about that criteria in the coming weeks. There are some occasions where there is a safety reason to need to engage in a removal. And some of those safety reasons might be if there is a lot of - if there are some gun violence in that area or if there has been - and I'm just going off of specific instances that have increased the need for removals - if there was a sexual harassment, sexual assault incident within an encampment. There are any number of reasons - a number of fires that have been occurring in an encampment - those might be public safety reasons where we would prioritize dispersement in those cases. And so we use all of the resources that we have available - doesn't mean that we're going to have exactly what they need at that moment. We do our absolute best. Some people will be able to tell us what they are hoping for and if there's a match, we will try to match it. But this is also where the Regional Homelessness Authority comes in. This is part of taking the regional solution - we have 84 square miles in the City of Seattle to be able to accommodate folks. There is more housing available outside the region, and we want to make sure that there are options available for folks all over. That's part of why, when I refer to something like the Woodland Park encampment - we had services for everybody that was at Woodland Park during the time that we took the inventory of the area. Those people received housing and new people came in because they knew that the people at that encampment were able to access housing. And so we're trying to get to as many places and as many people as we possibly can, and we need the support and the help of the regional authority to be able to bring their resources to bear, to be able to get more transitional housing faster. [00:18:05] Crystal Fincher: Gotcha. In terms of just community-based interventions overall, certainly some of those are useful in and addressing some of the issues that the unhoused population is dealing with, others are direct interventions to help prevent crime and people from being victimized - with lots of evidence to show that they're very effective interventions. And the Harrell administration - you have talked about the intention to establish that - it looks like the last place where that left off was Mayor Harrell saying that there was an evaluation of some of the partners and service providers that you would potentially be working with. Where does that stand and what is that evaluation based on? [00:18:58] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Yeah, we're asking a lot of our providers to share with us what they've been doing with the resources that they are being provided by the City. And we're looking at the effectiveness rate - the rates with which people are able to support the community based on the resources provided. We had two - I don't want to call them necessarily summits, they weren't really summits - but they were information fact-gathering sessions with the providers who are doing that work - to be able to let them tell us how they're able to use their resources, and what else we could do to support them in their work. [00:19:53] Crystal Fincher: So what are you hearing from that? [00:19:56] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: We are hearing a lot of need, quite candidly. There is a lot of need, particularly in and around as we spoke about earlier, mental health supports, emotional supports. Some folks are meeting communities' need to just be connected with one another in order to better manage their challenges. And we're really trying to assess who has set up systems to be able to make greater advances with more resources if they were provided to them. There are certainly some services that I think people have heard quite a bit about that have had pretty good levels of success, and we're trying to figure out how to get some of those organizations more resources. And there are some organizations candidly that didn't fare as well through the pandemic, where their organizations might not be as strong as they were before and they may be in a position where they have to regroup before they're ready to receive more supports from the City. So we're evaluating all of those things, but we've seen a lot of really good things out there. Organizations like JustCare, for example, they've been able to remain pretty steady and and do some great work across the City. And certainly they've been resourced to do some great work, but we're looking at all of the, all of our providers out there who have a part of the puzzle piece that we need in this moment. [00:21:51] Crystal Fincher: So in short - taking a look at, hey, you've had resources. Have you demonstrated that you have used the tax dollars that you've received to further the mission and deliver results, when it comes to tangible increases in prevention of crime, interventions, reduction of recidivism - metrics like that. [00:22:18] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Absolutely. And then also looking at whether or not we've got the right mix. Do we have enough across the spectrum of the needs that are required? Do we have enough in the healthcare arena, both mental and physical? Do we have enough in the internship and apprenticeship arena to ensure that particularly folks have access to being able to set up their futures for themselves? Those are all of the things that we have to look at because we have a finite number of resources - as a city, we have to manage and take care of all of our basic functions. And then what we have, we have to be really - we have to really pay attention to - are we using these dollars effectively because we don't have the endless pot that we would want. [00:23:11] Crystal Fincher: Right. So basically, are you getting a bang for your buck, is the money that you're spending resulting in safer streets? [00:23:20] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Exactly. And not just safer streets, but prosperity for those who have access. Part of safer streets is - there are components of economic justice that are related to that. I don't think people - if they have to resort to any sort of stealing, I don't think they do it because they want to do it. I think they do it because there is a need that's not being met, so how else can we meet that need? Is it through additional education? Is it through apprenticeships? So stronger work opportunities, better paying jobs, access to education - we have to look at that whole ecosystem because it's not one lever. If it was one lever, somebody would've pulled it a long time ago. [00:24:13] Crystal Fincher: That makes sense. And as I look at it, especially with - looking at the money that we're putting into community-based interventions, it is not an unlimited budget, need to make sure that that money is delivering a result. It makes sense to do the same thing with the police department, doesn't it? Are you using that same kind of evaluation to determine if the police department should receive more funding, if we should pull back and redirect to other areas? [00:24:42] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: And that's exactly what we were doing when I mentioned earlier - looking at positions and seeing which positions can be civilianized, looking at the job functions and trying to evaluate whether or not those job functions need to be certified in order to be effective. And so we're looking at the whole ecosystem of that. One of the things that I think we talked about before was the third department that would be on par with Police and Fire. What does that third department look like? What services still need to be met in an emergency situation that we need to dispatch, where Police or Fire are not the solution in that instance? We've talked about the history of EMTs and EMS, where you would no longer send police to a heart attack, but there was a time period where that's exactly what you did. And so we're looking at what are the calls that don't need a a law enforcement response or a fire response? What are the needs that are not being met and how do we put that department together? We're working on that - our goal, our hope is to have a white paper and structure for that third department by the end of this year, that we would then begin to structure in 2023 for a 2024 deployment. [00:26:16] Crystal Fincher: So then am I hearing that it's a possibility that some of those community-based interventions, non-law enforcement-based interventions may be made functions of the City within a public safety department that doesn't have a sworn officer. So you're looking to build up that infrastructure. So that actually may not occur from service providers that you're partnering with today? That may be an internal thing? [00:26:45] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Absolutely. It's also part of - what I will say is - we are looking at the functions that are provided and of course, if that's the case, the third department will be just, will be a professional entity, just like fire and law enforcement - where there will be a curriculum and a program and the proper certifications for whatever is needed within that body of work. It will be a professionalized entity that is able to respond to 911 calls that meet their unique skillset. [00:27:20] Crystal Fincher: Okay. Have you received - which makes sense - have you received pushback from SPD on civilianizing parts of it? There were some - there was a recent report about responses to 911 calls potentially being handled by alternate responders that they recently pushed back on. Are you hearing that, and how are you working through that? [00:27:44] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: I think that's natural and I think that's to be expected. It is part of - would I want that? No, I want everybody to work together and I think by and large people are working together. But it's the job of their police union to push and try to negotiate and try to get as much for their members as they possibly can. We know that some of it is founded, and some of it is just part of what they have to do in trying to negotiate for their next upcoming contracts. What they see is - they might see - well, that used to be a body of work that pertained to us, and we don't want to lose that body of work. But the truth of the matter is policing is many different professions rolled under one title. They're not all the same. Somebody who is on a beat isn't necessarily trained to be an effective detective. Somebody who might be doing homicide might not be right for a domestic assault. There are different skillsets, there are different trainings - and depending upon the line that an officer wants to go into, they might need a different career development path. So we really have to look at the body of work and whether or not it fits in with solving some of those crimes and getting justice in that way and if not, there might be instances where the presence of a uniform could escalate a situation. And there's somebody who has not got a weapon on the other side - then we don't want to send a certified officer into that particular situation - that might not be a best fit for them. We know that labor will want to negotiate that and those are some things that we'll have to address. And there are some where labor might want to negotiate that and we say - but that's not, that's not within the purview of your scope anyway. So it's a conversation. [00:30:18] Crystal Fincher: It's a conversation. And as you just brought up, that conversation is about to be codified into a new Seattle Police Officers Guild contract, and you will be at the negotiating table. And there there's been lots of discussions in the greater conversation about the role that police officers have and the larger public safety conversation and how and whether their interventions do result in people being less likely to be victimized. Lots of conversations about what is appropriate, what's not appropriate to be in a contract, what oversight should be more independent and not internal. So I guess starting out, are there, especially in light of the prior public safety ordinance that had a lot of reforms in there - some of them rolled back with the contract - are you looking to reimplement those? What approach are you taking in this negotiation? [00:31:27] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: So our prioritization is absolutely on accountability. We have to move forward aggressively on accountability for many different reasons, not not the least of which is we have a consent decree that - at this moment, it's not benefiting the City or the people of the City to still have this as an operating standard or practice for the City. It reminds me of - there's this old Thomas Jefferson quote that kind of refers to - if you wear the clothes, if you try to wear the clothes that fits you as a boy as a man, it doesn't work. And to me, that's where we are with the consent decree - we are 10 years into this and those clothes no longer fit - we have moved well beyond that. And if we want to get to what the future of policing is, we need to move past this past that is not even close to the picture of where we want to be. And so it has to be a prioritization on accountability - that has to be everything. And I know some people - going back to the other part of what we were talking about - some people will want to jump ahead and say, well, let's negotiate what the third department looks like and the trading off of those roles. The police contract is only three years and we're already one year into a three-year contract. We can negotiate the roles of that next contract in the next cycle. We're one year into a three-year contract, so we have to focus on accountability - that has to be our number one goal. And then once we get the right accountability measures in place, within the next contract we can start negotiating roles and responsibilities as pertains to what might be a third public safety department. [00:33:45] Crystal Fincher: There've been several recommendations related to collective bargaining from lots of entities, including the CPC. Some of those including fully implementing the reforms in the accountability law, removing limits on civilianization of OPA and ensuring civilian investigators have the same powers as their sworn counterparts, removing clauses in the contract that take precedence over local laws including that accountability ordinance, the police being empowered to place an employee on leave without pay, and ensuring OPA has authority to investigate allegations of criminal misconduct. Do you agree that those should be implemented in this new contract? [00:34:37] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: You named so many that I just want to say that the answer is yes. But let me - that's bad radio to be like, the answer is just yes - but the answer is yes. And I'll just pull out a couple of them that are of particular interest - civilianization of investigators at OPA - I think that is something that we need to seriously explore for many different reasons, but let me just go on a couple. One of which is - the statewide Office of Independent Investigations that we'll eventually move to - it was envisioned to eventually be a civilianized body so that there were no conflicts of interest in those investigations. And we have to look at the same thing for SPD - that these are officers that are being forced to investigate their fellow officers. That can't be a good place to be. It can't be a good place to be to - you're working in one department and you're working alongside your team, and then you move and have a rotation to the next department. And in that next rotation, you're having to investigate the people that you were just working alongside of. And I use this example because - no matter how many firewalls you put up, there is always going to be the potential - and a strong potential - for conflict of interest. Crystal, you and I have known each other for a really long time and - we're not that old, we've known each other for a little while - and we would both do our jobs if we had to do an investigation. And yet I think that the way that we've crossed paths over the years, it would be really hard to be an absolutely unbiased independent investigator if something were to come up, because I know you're a good person. And I wouldn't believe that you would do anything terrible, so it would be hard for me to say and now I want to investigate you. And then when my rotation in this department is over, now I just want to go back to working alongside you. That's a tough place to be. And I think that exploring the civilianization of investigators at OPA - it protects us from some of those potential conflicts of interest, and we really have to take a hard look at that. [00:37:04] Crystal Fincher: And not just civilianization, but giving them - removing the limits to make sure that they have the same power and authority in all instances of investigation. Because I think that's been a frustrating part - to be like, well, I'm not part of the police department - even the elements that are civilians just being kneecapped and not having the authority to fully investigate or to make any recommendations that hold any weight. Is that part of your vision, and what you plan to negotiate is also providing them with that authority? [00:37:47] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Absolutely. And again, following the statewide model of the Office of Independent Investigations that will follow the same path. We'll see who races each other first to that finish line, but very much following the same model. And the one thing I want to just clarify for folks - sometimes people hear the term "civilianization" and they think sloppy or not as professional - we are talking about professional investigators that just may not be certified officers. And there are a ton of highly trained professional investigators in a lot of different professions that could have skillsets that apply to the work that would be needed for these types of investigations. I'll give you an example is - there's always forensic auditors for things like financial accounting crimes - they may not be law enforcement officers, but they are trained professionals in forensic accounting who can help with some of this criminal problem solving. There could be people who are forensic anthropologists or other such things, who know how to contain a crime scene and who know how to collect the evidence. When we say civilianized, we're not talking about anything less than the highest level of professionalism. It just means that they are not trained officers in the way that they would respond to an immediate and imminent crisis. [00:39:28] Crystal Fincher: That makes sense and is certainly valid. We've seen that operate very successfully in similar areas. And I think an even bigger deal - we're seeing the current system not working, so a change is in order. So is that a red line for you in this negotiation? Is that something that you're starting with as a foundational this is where we need to be? [00:39:54] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: It will probably take us, it will take us more than this contract to get to a fully civilianized team, investigative team at OPA, but we certainly want to begin to move in that direction where we have very professional civilian investigators available to us for that work. And I believe that there's going to be a bigger demand for that particular career going forward. I do believe that sometimes Seattle is on the frontline of a lot of this work, but where and how we make these things successful, we will see them roll out in other areas across the state and across the country. [00:40:44] Crystal Fincher: So it's possible that we walk out on the other side of this contract and there are still situations where the police are investigating themselves. [00:40:53] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: For certain things. So, as the Office of Independent Investigation gets set up, they will take all lethal use of force - that will go to the state regardless - that body of work will go to the state. As pertains to any accusations of sexual harassment or sexual assault, that will go to the state. So we are going to, we absolutely will honor state law. And quite honestly, I think folks should be grateful that the state is doing that work. I think that what they're setting up will be revolutionary in order to ensuring that we have unbiased, less-biased investigations. And do I believe you can eliminate bias 100% entirely? I would love to say yes, I don't know if that's ever completely possible, but I think we can get to a system that is more accountable and more transparent for everybody involved. [00:42:02] Crystal Fincher: As we look forward in the short-term and some of the interventions that are going, do you expect a continuation or more deployments of the hotspot policing strategy? [00:42:18] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: I think that while we have limited resources, we have to be really strategic about where and how we deploy them. And so, I wouldn't call it hotspot policing because it's a little more nuanced than that, but what I would say is when you have limited resources, you have to be really, really strategic about where and how you deploy them. And that's what we're having to do - we're having to look at the areas that are in the greatest need and providing resources to those areas in those moments. And so we look at things like - what are the big events coming up in and around the City and how do we deploy in order to make sure that yes, we can cover the Mariners game, the Sounders game, a concert at Climate Pledge, because we are short-staffed and that there's no quick way to make up for that. This has been a while in the making and even if we had all of the body signed up right now, we still only have one Criminal Justice Training Center to run all of the state's recruits through. So we're going to have to be strategic for a little while - we can't, we don't have the staffing at every precinct and in every neighborhood that we would want to have. And so that means looking at what is on our social calendars, trying to get people back to normal, right? This is - it has been many years since we've had a full cadre of parades and outdoor events, and we want people to be able to get back into life again and get back into life safely. So how do we have the Torchlight Parade with such a limited number of officers available to staff? How do we have one of my favorites, the Pride Parade, with a limited number of officers to staff? So we really have to be a lot more strategic and it means that we really have to look at the chess board. I think what people see are hotspots and it's not as much hotspots as we have to be more predictive about where we go and strategically plan for that. [00:45:01] Crystal Fincher: And I can see that - I guess the challenge, as you articulate that, the mayor certainly articulated certain spots that were spots of emphasis that were going to be receiving increased patrols and resources and have folks stationed basically there full-time to, I think as he talks about, calm the area. So it seems like there have been point - that kind of thing has been referred to by lots of different terms, whether it's a hotspot or an emphasis patrol or however we want to characterize it, we are focusing our admittedly limited number of resources in a concentrated area. And are we expecting, are you expecting to deploy resources in concentrated areas, not talking about surrounding events that may happen, but on day-to-day, as we saw before - Tuesday through Friday in a place - is that part of an ongoing strategy, or have we seen the last of that? [00:46:16] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: It has to be a little bit of both. And so I'll give you an example - some of where people have seen us focus have been in areas where there have been increases in gun violence - and so Third Avenue is an example. So what people saw is they saw us move the mobile precinct to the Third Avenue area right after we had two incidents - two pretty painful incidents - of gun violence deaths in that area. And what that additional patrol allowed us to do was to be able to add more investigative resources to both of those cases. And we've made - we have two suspects that have been arrested for both of those shootings on Third Avenue where - it was an area that there was an increased amount of gun violence. And two, all murders are painful. It is particularly challenging when one of them is really just a child, a 15-year old. And because of the police work that we - the police and the officers were able to put in that area - to be able to canvass and collect the camera information from in and around the area, we were able to bring forth two suspects in both of those murders. And so, that is part of the job. It's not just about patrolling for what is happening in the moment. It's also patrolling and doing the detective work to solve crimes that we know have been happening in that area, that families will want answers for. [00:48:14] Crystal Fincher: Well, I think that's an excellent point. I actually think there's a very strong case to be made for increasing the deployment of resources in investigative roles. It seems like that's actually an area of unique specialty and opportunity, and results that come from that can yield long-lasting results. So it feels like people in the City see that, it seems like that's been widely acknowledged. However, when we have these conversations about - hey, we're short staffing, the conversations are - we have to move people out of these investigative roles, these victim liaison and services roles - a lot of things that get at preventing behavior from people who are currently doing it. So does it make sense to continue to move people away from those investigative roles onto patrol, especially in these conversations as we continue to identify areas where patrol doesn't seem like the most effective intervention? [00:49:29] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Yeah, we need both. It's - this is the Catch-22. We need both. We have to find ways to be able to, in some ways, tamp down ongoing incidents. And sometimes the presence of a mobile precinct can do that, can be a little bit of what just helps take some of the fire out of the air. There's some things that we've done over the course of the last few years - back in the olden times when people used to go out, for example, and they talked about - well, instead of everything closing at the same time every night, what if we were to stagger release hours from some of the different clubs and bars? For the young people listening, who don't remember what clubs and bars are, and that was a way to not push everybody who might have a little bit of alcohol in their system out into the street at the same time. So we are having to do a little bit of column A a little bit of column B because we have imperfect resources. [00:50:40] Crystal Fincher: Well, and seem to be saying - we need to do all we can to meet patrol numbers, and we will take from other areas to deploy on patrol - that's what the chief was saying. Should we continue taking, or should we rebalance, because both are going to happen. Should we be deploying back in the detective arena and investing more in actually trying to solve some of these crimes and find some of the people who are doing them? [00:51:16] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: For those people who are trained to be detectives, we are doing everything we can to get them back to their primary functions. And in the meantime, taking a try to do-no-harm approach, which is in not letting people continue to get victimized as we're trying to do that. And that's why I said it's gotta be a little from column A and a little from column B, because we have to solve crimes that have occurred and we have to do what we can to prevent additional crimes from occurring. Not everybody is trained to be a detective, but for those who have those trainings and have those skills, we want to be able to give them all of the resources we can to get them back on those jobs. [00:52:05] Crystal Fincher: And you've been very generous with your time - we are just about to wrap up. I think the last question - we could cover a ton - but appreciate getting through the chunk that we did today. You talk about some of those emphasis patrols or areas where more resources are being deployed - whatever name it's going by. With those, there was a press conference that even Chief Diaz seemed to acknowledge that those increased patrols and having the mobile unit nearby does have an effect on that area during that time. But he brought up instances in this current iteration, and certainly we've seen in prior iterations, where the result isn't that the crime stops, it moves to other neighborhoods. And it sets up a situation where it looks like - for moneyed interests, for downtown interests, they're getting super special police deployments in the name of safety. And sure it may improve things on that block while those police are there, but it actually is moving that activity elsewhere in the City. And he said they were working on trying to track that. And are we succeeding? Is that the best expenditure of resources if that's the result that we're getting, which is seemingly - hey sure, maybe a win for those businesses on that block, but a loss for the neighborhood and the residents that are receiving that activity. Should we - is that the most effective way to address that? Is that the most equitable way to address that for everybody in the City? [00:54:03] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: I would say that there is still a benefit to having those resources visible and available. And think about when somebody - there might be an area where people are used to speeding and then they put up the electronic board that says you're going this fast, and it reminds people to slow down. Sometimes the visual cues that we use for some of the public safety is just - you're in this area and you might have something that might pop off, but just calm down. It's a visual reminder to calm down, a visual reminder. And that doesn't necessarily always move someplace else, but it can be a reminder to - this is not your time and this is not your moment. We can't stop every single incident from occurring, but we certainly want to be able to give people pause before they might do something that would be regrettable later. So, it's not the perfect system. It's certainly not the perfect system, but there are benefits across the board if we can get people to think about how they might seek help, or how maybe just the presence can calm people down, or how we can even regain a sense of normalcy to an area that might draw in more foot traffic - and where there is more foot traffic and more positive activity than in the absence of nothing which can create some negative activity. We're bringing people back to an area that would allow us to get some good activity back on the streets. One of the best approaches for public safety, quite candidly, is for people to start going out again - filling up those spaces with positive activity, filling up those spaces with positive engagement - because where you have more eyes and positive activity, you actually need less policing. [00:56:24] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely true. And I guess my question is, even in a situation where - okay, you do that, you intimidate someone away and they aren't doing that there. In the instance that they're then moving somewhere else, we have not necessarily successfully intervened in their activity, but have moved it. [00:56:49] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: I don't think it's a hundred percent though. I do think that there are places where you can put in positive activity and attract positive activity response. So I think about some of our young folks where the hours where they would get in the most trouble would be those immediate hours after school. If they are in a space that is filled with positive activity, then perhaps they will adopt and take on that positive activity. If they're in a space where there is negative activity, then they can take on that negative activity. That's the case where it's not just it would move to a different place. It's - you're giving idle hands an opportunity to do something more productive. And that's what I'm talking about filling that positive activity space - not everybody would necessarily fill that space with the sort of activity that we wouldn't care for if we get more more positive engagement in those areas. [00:57:47] Crystal Fincher: I certainly agree about the benefit of positive engagement. I am certainly hoping that maybe we can envision a time where we actually deploy resources surrounding positive activities and positive connection to opportunities - in that kind of emphasis patrol and intervention that we have. But I appreciate the time that you've taken to speak with us and help us understand better what's going on in the City and what you're up to, and certainly look forward to following as we continue to go along. [00:58:27] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Well, this is a conversation, it's a dialogue. We've got a lot of work to do. There's no one group that has all of the answers, and so I appreciate the opportunity to come on and speak with you. And I know we get a lot of feedback and that's good, because we listened to the feedback and we'll make adjustments as we go along, but we're trying to do everything we can to make sure that we get the City back on track. [00:58:54] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. Okay, I'm going to sneak in one more question. You talk about you get a lot of feedback - is there something that people can do, or a way to engage that you think is a great opportunity to get involved in making a difference, helping to create positive change, helping to keep our streets safer? Is there one thing that you would recommend that they could do to be a part of that? [00:59:14] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: I'm going to give you two things. So the first thing is I'm going to mention our One Seattle Day of Service on May 21st, and just say that it's more than about just cleaning up some aspects of our city and helping us put some positive activity out there. It's also about a sense of building community with one another - that we're really hoping that everybody who comes to the Day of Service will find somebody new that they haven't connected with, that they haven't built community with and be willing to reconnect with society in doing some positive work together. So I'll talk about that because I think that there are significant benefits to our mental health - to rebuild positive social skills and positive social relationships. So that's one thing that if people were like, I don't have a lot of time on my calendar, but I can commit to a couple hours on one day. And then the other thing that I would say is - we need to return to the old scripture - being our brother's keeper. And that may mean reaching out to nonprofit organizations that are doing this great work. We will help their dollar stretch farther when we provide them resources through serving on boards, through providing hands-on activity or volunteer opportunities to help them further their missions. And so anything that we can do to pitch in and to add - whether or not that is - maybe even it's reaching out and having lunch with a young person and providing them paths that they might not have otherwise thought of, letting them know young or old - quite candidly in this one - that somebody out there cares and will listen to them. We have a lot of - our older folks - and I know you are wrapping up, I'm sorry - but I'm just gonna make this one last pitch. We have a lot of older folks who've actually struggled through this pandemic. They have suffered from withdrawal because their social structures have been pulled from them, and older folks who withdraw from society have higher instances of high blood pressure and hypertension - all of those things that result from depression and not having a social network around you, can result in physical health loss as well as mental health loss. And so being a part of - I know it's a tough time period because COVID is still out there, but the ability to reconnect with one another as humans - social skills deteriorate a little bit when we're not with each other. And so just taking these moments to rebuild our social skills, having some patience with each other, but rebuilding them together. When our City gets healthier in all aspects, especially mentally healthier, we'll be able to help each other better. [01:02:26] Crystal Fincher: I agree with that. Thank you so much for your time, Monisha. [01:02:30] Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell: Thank you. [01:02:31] Crystal Fincher: I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks & Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - we'll talk to you next time.

Disaster Tough Podcast
#109 The Role of Tech in Emergency Management - Interview with Heidi Hessler

Disaster Tough Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 31:44


Technology continues to make life easier in many walks of life and Emergency Management is no different.Over the past decade, Heidi Hessler has been at the forefront of that effort as Co-Founder and CEO of Futurity IT. Their GIS and mobile enabled software tools aim to assist organizations in the way they communicate, coordinate and collaborate especially during disasters such as wildfires, floods or even training exercises where multiple organizations are involved.In this episode, Heidi talks about some of those instances where effective communication and collaboration was aided by technology and data during a disaster. She also talks about the broader advantage of having more data available at your fingertips and how it can make the response efforts more effectiveDoberman Emergency Management owns and operates the Disaster Tough Podcast. Contact us here at: www.dobermanemg.com or email us at: info@dobermanemg.com.We are proud to endorse L3Harris and the BeOn PPT App. Learn more about this amazing product here: L3Harris.com/ResponderSupport.The Readiness Lab is trailblazing disaster readiness. Early access for the highly anticipated course emergency management response for dynamic populations is currently live. Think you have what it takes? Join us in Atlanta for an immersive experience. Space is limited to 40. Go to thereadinesslab.com/training to learn more.

The Current of Emergency Management
Cognitive Bias in Emergency Management

The Current of Emergency Management

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 59:27


In this episode, we discuss cognitive bias and how it could potentially affect your job as an Emergency Manager. Specifically, we spend the majority of the episode discussing 'deformation professionnelle,' translated to mean, professional deformation. We also touch on other cognitive biases and their potential impact on Emergency Managers. Support the show

Dave and Dujanovic
Be Ready UT: Preparing for an emergency on a budget - what you need in your home

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 8:05


In this addition of Be Ready UT - Dave breaks down the items you need in your home and how much they will cost you. Jeff Johnson, UT Division of Emergency Management joins the show.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dave and Dujanovic
Be Ready Utah: Preparing for an emergency on a budget

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 10:44


What do you need to have in your car in case of an emergency? Debbie goes through the costs of items you should have on your car..   Wade Mathews, UT Division of Emergency Management joins to  to explain more on what items you need and why you need them.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dave and Dujanovic
Be Ready Utah: Important Documents to have prepped for an emergency

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 8:51


Bryan Stinson, Emergency Preparedness Specialist, Utah Division of Emergency Management joins the show to tell us how to keep important documents and pictures safe.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Business Resilience Decoded
The Future of HBCUs and Their Emergency Management Programs

Business Resilience Decoded

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 16:58


Episode 103: The Future of HBCUs and Their Emergency Management Programs This episode is brought to you by Fusion Risk Management, Building a More Resilient World Together. Request a demo at https://bit.ly/FusionDECODED today! Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) faced a series of bomb threats in February this year. Though no physical harm has come from them, the ever present threat and psychological trauma from these events has shaken HBCUs across the country… but they're still standing strong. In this episode, President Kimberly Ballard-Washington of Savannah State University joins us to share her perspective on the matter, as well as insights into the homeland security and emergency management program at SSU (of which Vanessa was the first female graduate!). Kimberly Ballard-Washington, J.D., is the president of Savannah State University in Georgia. She has practiced law in the state of Georgia for 20 years and, prior to becoming president of SSU, most recently served the University System of Georgia (USG) as associate vice chancellor for legal lffairs and as the assistant secretary to the board of regents. To date, Ballard-Washington is the only person to have led all three of Georgia's public Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Savannah State University Website - https://savannahstate.edu/ Homeland Security Program at SSU - https://www.savannahstate.edu/class/departments/political-science/homeland-security.shtml Sign up for our Four Corners newsletter for opportunities to connect, access to exclusive content and bonus interviews, and more - https://bit.ly/BRDFourCorners In this episode, you will learn: How she became the first person to lead all three public HBCUs in Georgia How SSU is approaching bomb threats to HBCUs from both emergency preparedness and campus morale perspectives The vulnerable conversations around HBCUs being targeted How the Emergency Management program at SSU is shifting The input emergency management programs need from professionals in the industry at all levels to help these programs improve Disaster Recovery Journal: Register for DRJ's weekly (Wednesday) webinar series: https://drj.com/webinars/up-coming/ Register for DRJ Fall 2022: The Evolution of Resilience: https://www.drj.com/fall2022 Asfalis Advisors: Visit our website here: https://www.asfalisadvisors.com Apply to be a guest on the podcast: https://www.asfalisadvisors.com/decoded/ Download the 5 Step Crisis Strategy: https://www.asfalisadvisors.com/services/ Connect with the podcast! Email us: podcast@drj.com Podcast website: https://drj.com/decoded/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BRDecoded LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/business-resilience-decoded/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNEIrqWlxuyDvkXB24h6Obw/videos Vanessa Mathews, host Vanessa Mathews is the founder and chief resilience officer of Asfalis Advisors, where they are focused on protecting the legacy of the leaders they serve through business resilience. Before becoming an entrepreneur, Mathews developed global crisis management and business continuity programs for government and private sector organizations to include Lowe's Companies, Gulfstream Aerospace, and the Department of Homeland Security. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vanessa-vaughn-mathews-mba-cbcp-70916b4b/ Book Mathews as a speaker: https://bit.ly/VanessaMathews Jon Seals, producer Jon Seals is the editor in chief at Disaster Recovery Journal, the leading magazine/event in business continuity. Seals is an award-winning journalist with a background in publication design, business media, content management, sports journalism, social media, and podcasting. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonseals/ Disaster Recovery Journal: https://drj.com/

Disaster Tough Podcast
#106 Coordination, Collaboration & Compassion in EM - Interview with Erica Bornemann, Director of Vermont Emergency Management

Disaster Tough Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 38:23


It has been said, “Good people make good places.” The Office of Vermont Emergency Management must be a great place to work as long as it is run by the likes of Director Erica Bornemann.Director Bornemann has been with Vermont Emergency Management for 16 years, starting out as a temp right out of college, and working her way up as an EM Planner, Program Specialist before becoming a Planning Section Chief and Chief of Staff of Vermont's Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security. She was appointed as Director of the department in 2017 by Governor Phil Scott and is the sitting President of the National Emergency Managers Association.In this episode of the Disaster Tough Podcast, Director Bornemann talks about how good coordination and collaboration in times of emergency depend on good personal attributes such as kindness, compassion and empathy.Doberman Emergency Management owns and operates the Disaster Tough Podcast. Contact us here at: www.dobermanemg.com or email us at: info@dobermanemg.com.We are proud to endorse L3Harris and the BeOn PPT App. Learn more about this amazing product here: L3Harris.com/ResponderSupport.The Readiness Lab is trailblazing disaster readiness. Early access for the highly anticipated course emergency management response for dynamic populations is currently live. Think you have what it takes? Join us in Atlanta for an immersive experience. Space is limited to 40. Go to thereadinesslab.com/training to learn more.