Podcasts about East Africa

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Eastern region of the African continent

  • 1,337PODCASTS
  • 1,914EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 28, 2021LATEST
East Africa

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Best podcasts about East Africa

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Latest podcast episodes about East Africa

Thee Generation Podcast
GoMission: West Nile Advance

Thee Generation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 13:18


Just home from a strategic trip to Uganda, Mark Gillmore relays fresh accounts and testimonies from the West Nile region of East Africa. Be encouraged by these stories, pray for multiplying churches in that region, and take part in the Great Commission yourself this Christmas season in your own region!If you have your own unique story of gospel advance or if you sense God leading you toward a particular people group, we'd love to hear about it. Even if it's just a sentence or two, share what God is doing in an email to gomission@theegeneration.org.GoMission, hosted by Mark Gillmore, is a monthly, missions-focused program designed to expose young people to the people, stories, and opportunities happening across the globe in the world's harvest fields.

Analyst Talk With Jason Elder
FBTT: Crooked Folk

Analyst Talk With Jason Elder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 14:27


Episode: 0002 Title: Crooked Folk Topic: Transnational Crime- bribery, rough practices & money laundering. Release Date: 25th Of November 2021 Podcast Writer: Emmanuel James Oteng Voice over: Dr Susanne Knabe-nicol/ Police Science Dr Podcast Email: podcasts@acia.org.uk Podcast Webpage: https://www.acia.org.uk/Podcasts ,  https://www.leapodcasts.com/ Podcast Social Media: Twitter: ACIA_org,  LinkedIn: Association of Crime and Intelligence Analysts (UK). Bio: Emmanuel Oteng, previously a reservist with the British Army Intelligence Corps, trained as a Criminal Intelligence Analyst with Kent Police and worked in that force concentrating on armed robbery, burglar-handler networks and firearms offence. Since then, he relocated to Uganda, East Africa and has been involved in training Prison Officers there and in surrounding countries in the set-up and running of Correctional Services Intelligence Systems to enhance prison security and counter escape, prison disorder, staff corruption or abuse, ingress of contraband, prison radicalisation and other security breaches.

PRI's The World
Fauci on gathering safely for Thanksgiving amid COVID surge

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 48:08


Thursday is Thanksgiving, a time for families to gather, but COVID-19 is surging across the US, and many parts of the world. So, is it OK to let our guards down for a meal? To answer that, and give us the latest on all-things-COVID, we turn to the nation's top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci. Also, kids here in the US were always taught to say "thank you." But a well-intentioned thanks is not always the same in other languages and cultures. And, when you think of samosas your mind might go to India or the Middle East. But in East Africa, they are a popular treat from Kenya, to Somalia, to Uganda. Every day, the reporters and producers at The World are hard at work providing you with relevant, fact-based and human-centered news from across the globe. From the initial pitch, to the chase, to interviews, to writing, to production, to broadcast, every story from The World requires careful input and touches from many different members of our nonprofit newsroom. The story you just read is available to read for free because thousands of listeners and readers like you generously support our nonprofit newsroom. Become one of 515 donors to make your gift of $130, or pledge $11 monthly before Nov. 30, and you'll help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000. We need your help now more than ever — give today!

Beyond Belief
African Spirituality

Beyond Belief

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 28:00


The increasing influence of African spirituality on Western society is very evident. You can read it in the work of novelists like Ben Okri, see it in the work of artists such as Chris Ofili and hear it in the music of pop superstars like Beyonce. Partly driven by the desire of young people within the African diaspora to find a deeper connection to their African heritage, African spirituality is very different to Christianity or Islam; religions brought to Africa by colonizing forces. It contains many diverse beliefs which differ from region to region. There are no scriptures – the traditions are passed on by word of mouth – and ancestors play a key role. Many of the practices are not found in Western culture (such as juju), but they express deep spiritual convictions and bind societies together. To discuss African spirituality, Ernie Rea has assembled a panel of experts from across the African continent. Born in Nigeria in the West of Africa, Jacob K Olupona is Professor of African Religious Traditions at Harvard Divinity School and Professor of African American Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. Mary Nyangweso was born in Kenya in East Africa and is Professor of Religious Studies at East Carolina University. And Adeola Aderemi is a Holistic Healer who bases her practice on her Isese Ifa spirituality with its origins in the Yoruba culture of Southern Nigeria. Ernie also talks to Nigerian born artist Laolu Senbanjo who now works in New York. Laolu's art is influenced by his Yoruba heritage and practice of African spirituality. His ‘Sacred Art of the Ori' (Yoruba symbols painted onto the naked body) featured on Beyoncé's 2016 Grammy award winning video for her concept album ‘Lemonade'. Producers: Helen Lee Julian Paszkiewicz Image: Original painting by Laolu Senbanjo on display at the Belvedere Vodka x Laolu Senbanjo collaboration celebration on September 6, 2018 in New York City. Credit: Johnny Nunez/WireImage via Getty Images

High Theory
Trace

High Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 0:13


Farah Bakaari talks about Trace, a core concept in deconstruction, that denotes an absent presence, a mark of something that is no longer there. She talks about how in her own work she has used the concept of trace to write about legacies of colonialism and slave trade in the Atlantic and Indian oceans, for […]

The Crime Cafe
Interview with Crime Writer Iain Parke: S. 7, Ep. 11

The Crime Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 43:30


Debbi Mack interviews crime writer Iain Parke. This is the Crime Cafe, your podcasting source of great crime, suspense and thriller writing. I'm your host Debbi Mack. Before I bring on my guest, I'll just remind you that the Crime Cafe has two eBooks for sale: the nine book box set and the short story anthology. You can find the buy inks for both on my website, debbimack.com under the Crime Cafe link. You can also get a free copy of either book if you become a Patreon supporter. You'll get that and much more if you support the podcast on Patreon, along with our eternal gratitude for doing so. Check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimecafe Debbi (00:54): But first, let me put in a good word for Blubrry podcasting. I'm a Blubrry affiliate, but that's not the only reason I'm telling you this. I've been using Blubrry Podcasting as my hosting service for my podcast for years and it's one of the best decisions I ever made. They give great customer service, you're in complete control of your own podcast, you can run it from your own website, and it just takes a lot of the work out of podcasting for me. I find for that reason that it's a company that I can get behind 100% and say, “You should try this.” Try Blubrry. It doesn't require a long-term contract, and it's just a great company, period. It also has free technical support by email, video, and phone, so you can get a human being there. Isn't that nice? If you want to podcast, try out Blubrry. No long-term contract, excellent distribution, and great technical support, too, by email, video, and on the phone. I've included an affiliate link on this blog. Here's a link to a PDF copy of the interview. Debbi: Hi, everyone. Before I introduce my guest, I'll just mention that my latest novel, Fatal Connections is out now. It's the second Erica Jensen mystery. And since Erica is a female marine veteran, Veterans Day seemed like a good day to have it released. So, if you like hard-boiled mystery, please check it out. Yes, it's at all the usual retailers, so do check it out, including Amazon, of course. But with me today is a guy who writes about motorcycle clubs, or as it's described on his website, Biker Noir. I like that description. You should totally check out his writing sample on his website. It's really awesome. And with me today then is Iain Parke. Hi, Iain. How are you doing? Iain Parke: Hi, very well. Thank you. Greetings from across the pond on a fairly grotty November night. Debbi: It's kind of grotty around here. It's not nice, but it's been raining. Actually, it was kind of nice. It's cleared up and well, we kind of went from rain to cleared up. So, it was not so bad, really when it comes down to it. [crosstalk] Iain: Yeah, you can tell you're talking to someone from England because we're on to the weather already. I mean that's all we talk about. Debbi: That's all we talk about in Maryland too, that's interesting. Very, very interesting. I got to tell you though, I noticed you have an MBA and an interesting background, insolvency and business restructuring. So, the fact that you kind of drew on that experience to write a conspiracy thriller as a novel seem to suggest something dire. Iain: Yeah. I did an MBA and was interested in running businesses, and set out effectively to have a career in running businesses and doing just things in this sort of distressed business space. And I won't bore you with the career history, but essentially at one point I ended up, I wanted to get a secondment. I was working for PwC, one of the big firms at the time and I wanted to secondment to Canada and I ended up in Tanzania, which just proves my geography is fairly lousy. So, from going to the west coast of Canada to going to East Africa, I ended up sort of running a match factory with about a thousand employees, including 300 ladies putting matches into boxes by hand on the slopes of Kilimanjaro for a year.

Tough Girl Podcast
Tiphaine Muller - aka Little Miss Pedals - Cycled 20,000+ km over 14 months throughout Europe and Africa.

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 43:42


Tiphaine in her own words:   "My name is Tiphaine, I'm from France and since I was a child my parents took me backpacking in other continents. They've opened me to the world. After three years of studies to obtain my Specialized Educator diploma, I felt the urge to explore more of this planet. I went to Australia on a Working Holiday Visa for a year. The adventures I've experienced there made me reconsider my whole perspective on life.   Inspired by my short cycling trips in Australia and New Zealand, I bought a bicycle and left, in June 2017, on my 23rd birthday. I started from my home in Paris, without a real plan, without a final destination and ended up cycling 20,000 km in 14 months, half of it with Martin (@hi.martin.cycles).    This trip, more than any others, showed me that dreams can come true and that travelling is a matter of motivation. Since then, I dare to live a different life, “unstable”, full of changes, adventures, experiences, that make me who I am today.”   Listen to Tiphaine on the tough girl podcast.   New episodes go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Hit the subscribe button so you don't miss out.    The Tough Girl Podcast is sponsorship and ad free thanks to the monthly financial support of patrons.    Support the mission to increase the amount of female role models in the media. Visit www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast and subscribe - super quick and easy to do and it makes a massive difference. Thank you.   Show notes Who is Tiphaine Wanting some adventure  Deciding to head to Australia on a working holiday  Wanting to continue living this different lifestyle Her younger years and spending time backpacking with her family  Not being afraid of travelling solo Having a plan verses being more flexible and playing things by ear Wanting to join the Civil Service in France Rethinking her whole perspective on life Realising how little you need to be happy Coming back to Paris after 15 months of travelling Not knowing what to do next  Paying for her cycle trip and saving up money Why its cheap to travel by bike Keeping costs down while on the road Leaving Paris on her 23rd Birthday  The route and the plan Meeting Martin in Africa @hi.martin.cycles and deciding to cycle across the Sahara together Using Warmshowers in Europe  Wanting to explore more of Africa and heading to East Africa for 7 months Dealing with elephants close to the tent!  Resupply and accommodation in Africa  Route planning and the challenging in Europe  Trying to pick the nicer routes and avoiding the main roads Maintaining the bike on a long journey  Not knowing how to change a flat tyre at the start Buying a simple bike for 450 EURO Learning new skills on the road Writing her first e-book: Little Miss Pedals: 20,000 km on a bicycle through Europe and Africa  Final words of advice to encourage you to take on your own challenge or adventure. Why it's worth it!   Social Media   Website: www.dreamsontracks.com    Instagram: @littlemisspedals    Facebook: @littlemisspedals    Book: Little Miss Pedals: 20,000 km on a bicycle through Europe and Africa   

Travel and Turn Up Podcast
Trends and Tings: November 17, 2021

Travel and Turn Up Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 39:27


Where in the world can you find the most clear blue water? Trends and Tings is a recap of all the current news in the world of Black travel. This week we're talking about our latest travels and get into the debate. Who has the clearest blue water? The Caribbean? East Africa? The Balkans??? We also touch on our plans for end of year travel, and discuss if local gang wars should deter you from your next vacation. Big Chune: Bruno Mars, Anderson .Paak, Silk Sonic - Smokin Out The Window 

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies
Connecting the World-Island | What Will China's PEACE Cable Bring To Pakistan And East Africa?

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 76:09


China's Hengtong Group—leading a consortium of telecom companies from Hong Kong, Pakistan, and East Africa—will soon complete installation of the Pakistan East Africa Connecting Europe (PEACE) cable. Spanning the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea, this cable will connect the three most populous continents of Asia, Europe and Africa, or what Halford Mackinder described as the “World Island.” The cable aims to provide these previously under-serviced regions with the shortest latency between routes and high-quality Internet, but what are China's aims with the project and what benefits will it bring to partners in South Asia and Africa? This roundtable will discuss the technical, economic, and geopolitical implications of this flagship project of China's Belt and Road Initiative. Speakers: Motolani Agbebi University teacher, Faculty of Management and Business, University of Tampere (Finland) Tayyab Safdar Post-Doctoral Researcher, East Asia Centre & Department of Politics, University of Virginia Roxana Vatanparast Affiliate, Center on Global Legal Transformation, Columbia Law School Moderators: James Gethyn Evans, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies Nargis Kassenova, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Co-sponsored by the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, and the Center for African Studies at Harvard University.

Keeping-Track
Mary Ngugi and the Women's Athletic Alliance : A Female Empowerment Movement In East Africa

Keeping-Track

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 49:33


We talk to Mary Wacera Ngugi, who most recently finished 3rd at the 2021 Boston Marathon, about her start in the sport, how Kenyan camp systems work and her journey to the marathon. You may be surprised to hear who is coaching her now! We also talk to Mary about her brave and impactful efforts to help women of Kenya find confidence and escape abusive marriages. She recently started the Womens Athletic Alliance as part of the movement that has gained volume in East Africa following the tragic murder of Agnes Tirop by her husband, she was one of the brightest young stars in the womens 10,000m. Mary has always seen the need to change how women are treated as property and told from a young age they don't matter and to be quiet. She hopes to provide a safe place of support, to celebrate the women athletes as people, provide legal aid and mentoring through the new Program. Many women from around the sports world have offered help and support and we are there behind her too.  Womens Athletic Alliance founderFollow her here“The women deserve better. Being married to a person who loves and cares about me, I feel so much that my sisters and the women in Kenya should live a life like that; they should be treated better, they should be loved, they should be cared about and supported-they need the support not the control” -Mary Ngugi

Design Lab with Bon Ku
EP 47: Designing Vaccine Equity | Aika Matemu and Pragya Mishra

Design Lab with Bon Ku

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 41:15


Bon talks with the Dalberg Design team (Aika, Pragya, Joy and Mihret) about designers as global health storytellers, the need for creativity in global health and the challenges of social media misinformation.  Aika Matemu is a Director at Dalberg Design in Nairobi, leading the design team in Africa. She brings over 15 years experience in user experience design, digital technologies, global public health and social entrepreneurism, with extensive experience in social impact and innovation. She has committed her career thus far to designing and building innovations that impact social change, movement and revolution. Her design career has been grounded in human-centered design methods with a focus on designing products and services that create channels for underserved populations to access quality health care. She's passionate about building design capacity on the African continent and elevating home grown designers to global design platforms.  Pragya Mishra is Director at Dalberg Design based in Seattle. She applies her expertise in visual and strategy design on social innovation, financial inclusion and global health projects. She brings a human-centered approach to her work that facilitates in-depth understanding of distinct user behaviors, attitudes and preferences towards products, services, and systems leading to actionable insights. Her recent work includes the development of Design for health – a tailored set of design resources for global health practitioners. Prior to joining Dalberg Design, Pragya worked as an independent designer with NGOs and governmental organizations on a range of social innovation projects. Pragya has a Masters in Design in Social Innovation from the School of Visual Arts (SVA), New York and an undergraduate degree in Visual Communication Design from the National Institute of Design (NID) in India.  Joy Kendi is a senior designer based in Dalberg Design's Nairobi studio. Her expertise is in product and service design, user experience and design research, with a focus on emerging markets. Prior to joining Dalberg Design, Joy led product design at a technology innovation hub in Kenya. Mihret Tamrat is a designer with Dalberg Design's Nairobi studio. Her design background includes works in education technology, game design, as well as gender and youth employment across the US, Asia, and East Africa. Prior to Dalberg Design, Mihret worked as a strategy consultant with Dalberg Advisors in Addis Ababa.

StudioTulsa
"Volunteers: Growing Up in the Forever War"

StudioTulsa

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 28:59


Jerad W. Alexander -- who from 1998 to 2006 served as a U.S. Marine, deploying to the Mediterranean, East Africa, and Iraq -- talks about his new memoir.

Stories From Women Who Walk
60 Seconds for Thoughts on Thursday: What Must We Drop to Create Next?

Stories From Women Who Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 2:05


Hello to you listening in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, East Africa!Coming to you from Whidbey Island, Washington this is 60 Seconds for Thoughts on Thursday.My sister's rescue dog, Macarena, enjoys - like most dogs - a game of catch. When Macarena has that big red rubber ball in her mouth she looks like she's swallowing a ripe tomato. And, like most dogs, Macarena loves treats!  I can hold one in my hand while she sits for a moment and calculates. You can almost see the wheels turning: How to grab the treat but *not* let go of the ball? Never happens. She drops the ball, grabs the treat, and I scoop up the ball to play the game all over again.  The most powerful starting point for most endeavors is to ask: What can I eliminate to clear the way forward? What might have been useful to me - maybe even brilliant - in the past could now be distracting me or, even holding me back from envisioning my next creation? I have a few of these!Question: What ball will you drop to get your treat?Bonus Video: Faithful Hound A musical portrait of dogs and friendship across time. The song was written and performed by Steve Schuch, Night Heron Music (ASCAP). If interested in a concert to benefit dog rescue and animal shelters, contact Steve Schuch through his web site:  www.NightHeron.com60 Seconds is your daily dose of hope, imagination, wisdom, stories, practical tips, and general riffing on this and that. This is the place to thrive together. Come for the stories - stay for the magic. Speaking of magic, I hope you'll subscribe, follow, share a nice shout out on your social media or podcast channel of choice, including Android, and join us next time! You're invited to stop by the website and subscribe to stay current with Diane, her journeys, her guests, as well as creativity, imagination, walking, stories, camaraderie, and so much more: Quarter Moon Story ArtsStories From Women Who Walk Production TeamPodcaster: Diane F Wyzga & Quarter Moon Story ArtsMusic: Mer's Waltz from Crossing the Waters by Steve Schuch & Night Heron MusicAll content and image © 2019 - Present: for credit & attribution Quarter Moon Story Arts

Analyst Talk With Jason Elder
FBTT: Criminal Intelligence in the African Setting

Analyst Talk With Jason Elder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 14:27


Episode: 00001 Title: Criminal Intelligence in the African setting Topic: What aspects of Criminal Intelligence should be better promoted in the African setting?  How can this best be done? Release Date: 11th Of November 2021 Podcast Writer: Emmanuel James Oteng  Voice over: Dr. Susanne Knabe-nicol/ Police Science Dr  Podcast Email: podcasts@acia.org.uk  Podcast Webpage: https://www.acia.org.uk/Podcasts ,  https://www.leapodcasts.com/  Podcast Social Media: Twitter: ACIA_org,  LinkedIn: Association of Crime and Intelligence Analysts (UK).    Bio: Emmanuel Oteng, previously a reservist with the British Army Intelligence Corps, trained as a Criminal Intelligence Analyst with Kent Police and worked in that force concentrating on armed robbery, burglar-handler networks and firearms offence. Since then, he relocated to Uganda, East Africa and has been involved in training Prison Officers there and in surrounding countries in the set-up and running of Correctional Services Intelligence Systems to enhance prison security and counter escape, prison disorder, staff corruption or abuse, ingress of contraband, prison radicalisation and other security breaches.  

None of the Above
Episode 16: Airstrikes in East Africa (from the archive)

None of the Above

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 27:12


This week we bring back a timely episode from season 1 with journalist Amanda Sperber and anthropologist Catherine Besteman, who helped us understand an important, yet underreported topic: America's military involvement in Somalia. Since we last spoke to Catherine and Amanda, The New York Times has reported that the terrorist organization, Al Shabab, is at its “strongest in years” and that the Biden administration may be debuting a new Somalia policy in the coming weeks. But will the administration, which has prided itself on ending “relentless war,” pursue a policy less reliant on drone strikes than its Republican and Democratic predecessors?  Though much is still to be seen, airstrikes in July and the Biden administration's touting of its “over-the-horizon capabilities” to attack a globally “metastasized” terrorist threat doesn't augur much change. Catherine and Amanda explore the history of Al Shabab and America's involvement in Somalia and argue that the human costs of current policy lay bare the strategic and moral failings of America's global war on terror. Amanda Sperber is a Nairobi-based award-winning investigative journalist, foreign correspondent, and multimedia storyteller. Her work focuses on East Africa, specifically on Somalia, and the consequences of U.S. drone strikes. Catherine Besteman is Francis F. Bartlett and Ruth K. Bartlett Professor of Anthropology at Colby College in Maine. Her work focuses on U.S. militarism in Somalia. She is the author of The Costs of War in Somalia from Brown University's Costs of War Project, and Militarized Global Apartheid (2020).  To listen to previous episodes and learn more about None Of The Above, go to www.noneoftheabovepodcast.org. To learn more about the Eurasia Group Foundation, please visit www.egfound.org and subscribe to our newsletter.

Going Wild with Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant
Misunderstandings with The Maasai: Part One

Going Wild with Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 22:49


In part one of two, I share some embarrassing cross-cultural misunderstandings from my time living in East Africa. Hear about two of the biggest ones– and what they taught me about the country, the people, and myself.

Strange Animals Podcast
Episode 249: Strange Seals

Strange Animals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 14:28


Sign up for our mailing list! We also have t-shirts and mugs with our logo! Thanks to Richard from NC for his suggestion that leads us to learn about some interesting seals! Further reading: Mystery of Siberian freshwater seal food choice solved Under Antarctica's ice, Weddell seals produce ultrasonic vocalizations Further listening/watching: Rarely-heard Weddell Seal Sounds in Antarctica The bearded seal Wikipedia page with audio so you can listen over and over and over The Baikal seal, the world's only fully fresh water seal species: Baikal seal, round boi: The Baikal seal's teeth have teeth: A Weddell seal mama with her pup who seems to be practicing singing: Look ma, no ears! The bearded seal. Can you tell where its name comes from? (Moustachioed seal might be more accurate.) (Also, note the ear opening with no external ear flap.) Show transcript: Welcome to Strange Animals Podcast. I'm your host, Kate Shaw. This week let's learn about some interesting seals. Thanks to Richard from NC who suggested freshwater seals, which is where we'll start. Most seals live on the coast and spend most of the time in the ocean. But there's one species of seal that lives exclusively in fresh water. That's the Baikal [bay-CALL] seal, and the only place it lives is a big lake in Siberia called Lake Baikal. Lake Baikal formed where two sections of the earth's crust are being pulled apart by continental drift. That's called a rift lake or rift valley lake. The lake gets bigger every year, but only by a tiny amount—just under an inch, or 2 cm. Since this has been going on for an estimated 25 to 30 million years, though, it's an extremely big, deep lake. It is, in fact, the deepest lake on earth, and is also the oldest lake on earth. It's more than twice as old as Lake Tanganyika in East Africa, which is also a large, deep rift lake but only about 12 million years old at the most. Lake Baikal is almost 400 miles long, or 636 km, and nearly 50 miles wide, or 80 km. At its deepest point, it's 3,893 feet deep, or 1,186.5 meters. That's from the surface of the water to the muddy bottom. But that mud and sediment on the bottom has been building up for a very long time and there's a lot of it—4.3 miles of it, in fact, or 7 km. The water is very clear and very oxygenated, but the surface freezes for several months out of the year. Then again, there are some hydrothermal vents, especially in the deepest areas, that heat the water around them to 122 degrees Fahrenheit, or 50 Celsius. Because Lake Baikal is so deep, so big, so oxygenated, and so old, lots of species of animal live in and around it that live nowhere else in the world. That includes the Baikal seal. The Baikal seal is related to the Arctic ringed seal but has lived in the lake exclusively for probably two million years. It only grows five and a half feet long at most, or 1.65 meters, and is usually closer to four feet long, or 1.2 meters. It's gray in color and has no external ears, so that its head appears smooth. It can still hear, but because it doesn't have ears sticking out of its head, it's more streamlined than seals with external ears. It has large eyes, a pair of front flippers that it uses to maneuver in the water and on land, and a pair of hind flippers that act like a tail instead of legs. That's actually the main difference between earless and eared seals. Earless seals are more streamlined in general and more adapted for life in the water and for deep diving, but they're awkward on land because they can't use their hind limbs for walking. Eared seals have little flaps of external ears and while their hind flippers act as a tail in the water, the seal can turn its hind flippers over to walk on them on land. The Baikal seal is quite small for a seal, which keeps it from needing as much food as a bigger animal. For a long time people thought the Baikal seal mostly ate fish,

Experiencing Real Life
Episode 107 – an interview with Peace Ruharuza

Experiencing Real Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 44:55


Me and my Bride sit down on my platform, The Prophetic Life, with the founder of Fountain of Peace ministries, Peace Ruharuza. She is the head of our children's homes in Uganda, East Africa. We tell the story of Goodness and Mercy, two of our earliest rescues in Uganda. She also tells the story of our latest rescue, Paula who was found in a septic tank.

Office Visits with Dr. V
Episode 14: Things to Know Before Gyn Surgery-Dr. Melissa Davies

Office Visits with Dr. V

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 47:35


In this episode of the Office Visits with Dr. V, we meet Dr. Melissa Davies.  She is new to Eagle OB GYN and she is going to be taking care of many of Dr. V's patients as she phases out of her traditional OB GYN practice to pursue her Health and Wellness Enterprise.   Dr. Davies, a caring Ob/Gyn and robotic surgeon, discusses many aspects of gyn surgery from a patient's perspective.     [00:00:55] Dr. V Details Meeting Dr. Melissa Davies [00:03:19] Dr. Davies Tells Us About Herself & Seeing Her First Live Birth [00:05:18] What Does It Meant To be A Doctor Of Osteopathic Medicine [00:10:28] What Does Dr. Davies Love About Obstetrics And Gynecology? [00:16:30] The Difference Between Robotic Surgery and Laparoscopic Surgery [00:20:00] Dr. Davies Two Favorite Common Surgeries That OB GYN's Do [00:20:59] Dr. V's Favorite OB GYN Surgery [00:24:03] Risks Of Hystorectomy Surgery [00:27:37] The Importance of Having an OB GYN Who Provides You With Alternatives To Surgery [00:30:06] The Optimal Surgical Candidate Critera [00:34:32] Dr. Davies Recommendations On Finding Credible Information On OB GYN Surgeries Dr. Melissa Davies Dr. Davies is a native of Fayetteville, North Carolina. She went to Campbell University for her undergraduate degree, then spent three years out of medical school, during that time she worked in a medical office there, before going back to medical school at Campbell again, and then she did her residency training, and just finished up this year at ECU Vidant. She saw her first live birth in Tanzania, East Africa and that solidified all of her hopes and aspirations, during medical school she was drawn to obstetrics and gynecology more than anything else. She loves that it allows her to empower women and educate women on their bodies and overall health. She is a mom of two kids, her oldest is eight and his name is Jonathan and her youngest is four and a half her name is Hannah Grace. She prides herself on being a mom, she always wanted to be. She's been married for 13 years and she just celebrated her 13th wedding anniversary. ------------------------------ Thank you for listening, please like and share this episode with a friend! If you would like to stay connected and get your questions answered by Dr. V, feel free to reach out! Facebook: Office Visits with Dr. V Instagram: office_visits_with_dr_V. Website: https://officevisitswithdrv.com/ Email: officevisitswithdrv@gmail.com Links and Resources: https://officevisitswithdrv.com Dr. Melissa Davies

Capital FM
iMarket: The Future Of Marketing is in Storytelling - Moses Kemibaro

Capital FM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 34:56


Moses Kemibaro is the Founder & CEO of Dotsavvy, Kenya's first digital business agency which conceptualizes, develops, delivers, and manages high-performance business results for its clients via digital channels. Dotsavvy has been operational for almost 20 years spearheading next practices across a broad spectrum of digital offerings. Previously, Moses was the Regional Manager for Opera Ads in East Africa, the Commercial Manager for East Africa at the Perform Group, now known as DAZN and Perform Content, as well as the Sales Director at InMobi for Africa where he led sales in Kenya, Egypt, Nigeria, and Ghana. He was also the Founding Regional Manager at Dealfish East Africa (formerly known as OLX Kenya), Kenya's leading digital classifieds platform, now known as Jiji Kenya. Moses is also a multiple award-winning Technology, Digital Media and Digital Marketing Blogger and Industry Analyst at MosesKemibaro.com where he rants and raves about all things digital in Kenya and Africa. He is a regular speaker and panelist in industry events and also contributes commentaries to leading media. Finally, Moses admits to being a long-suffering but loyal Arsenal Football Club fan, Formula One racing fanatic, and an aspiring runner enroute to breaking the 10K barrier!

Small Changes Big Shifts with Dr. Michelle Robin
Kindness: How Kindness Helps Overcome Loneliness

Small Changes Big Shifts with Dr. Michelle Robin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 30:10


Susan Mettes is the author of the brand-new book coming out November 2 called, “The Loneliness Epidemic – Why So Many of Us Feel Alone and How Leaders Can Respond.” Susan has been studying people and their decisions for over a decade. She has experience in behavioral economics, writing, research, survey design and analysis, travel, journalism, public policy, and teaching. Susan is currently working as an Associate Editor at Christianity Today magazine. Her family alternates between living in East Africa and Washington D.C. Memorable Quotes: “Loneliness is really when we're disappointed with our relationship. So sometimes that takes the form of missing a specific person. Sometimes we wish we had friends, more friends, different friends, a specific friend. But it's always that gap between the relationships we want to have and the relationships we actually have.” “In the United States, the older you are, the less likely you are to be lonely. It is a young person's problem in our country.” “But sometimes people who are very glamorous are also insecure and also feel lonely. And I think it's really important to me to remind people that when somebody looks like they have a good life to you, don't assume that they're emotionally feeling great all the time.” “You have to start. You have to be somebody who's kind. You have to be somebody who is willing to reach out. You have to be somebody who's asking somebody else if they want to do something with you.” What You'll Learn: Research and facts on the loneliness epidemic in the United States and how to overcome loneliness with kindness. This Episode Includes: Loneliness occurs when we're disappointed with our relationship. Most people are in the middle of the loneliness spectrum where they feel bad about it and wish it were different, but don't find it excruciating. Others find it excruciating. Quality friendships help defend against loneliness. The loneliest population is young people who are going through transition periods in their lives. The loneliness epidemic started before the pandemic. Even if someone's life looks appealing from the outside, they may be struggling emotionally on the inside. Kindness is a tool that we can use, or a building block, to help people get out of their feelings of loneliness. A variety of relationships is important for people dealing with loneliness. Kindness is part of the foundation of belongingness. If you pour gasoline on a fire of loneliness, you get more loneliness. But if you put kindness on loneliness, you can actually transform it. Three Takeaways From Today's Episode: Practice kindness this week by starting a conversation with your neighbor. Consider the quality of your relationships and if you're substituting or supplementing your social life with social media. Choose one person to deepen your relationship with by cultivating mutual regard through acts of kindness. Mentioned In The Episode: Community America Credit Union City Wide Facilities Solutions Advent Health 31-Day Kindness Campaign - SIGN UP HERE Small Changes Big Shifts The Loneliness Epidemic, Why So Many of Us Feel Alone—and How Leaders Can Respond by Susan Mettes Till We Have Faces By C.S. Lewis Connect: Facebook Instagram LinkedIn Twitter YouTube

Romus Sounds Inc.
EAST AFRICA CONNECT 1.(KENYA TANZANIA UGANDA RWANDA BURUNDI)

Romus Sounds Inc.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 52:51


East Africa Connect is a new mix on the chart straight from mixtape season 7 , it has been crafted with african music from East Africa . all hits and more from the region covered with beauty . Stream and Download. www.romussoundsinc.com

Witness History
Kilimanjaro: Africa's disappearing glaciers

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 13:20


The mountains of East Africa are losing their glaciers. At 5,895 metres, Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain on the continent, but it has lost about 90% of it's glacial ice in the past 100 years and scientists believe the process is accelerating. They say climate change is the cause and that some glaciers could disappear completely within the next few years. Rebecca Kesby has been speaking to Prof Clavery Tungaraza from Tanzania, and Dr Doug Hardy from the US, who was one of the first scientists to research Kilimanjaro. Simon Mtuy has climbed the mountain many times, and his family has farmed on its slopes for centuries. He tells Rebecca that within his own life time he has witnessed massive changes in the mountain and the climate. (Photo: Giraffes, Fog, Kilimanjaro and Acacia Trees in the morning. Credit Getty Images)

Afropop Worldwide
The Nyege Nyege Villa - East African Hub of the Electronic Music Underground

Afropop Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 59:00


In 2018, the renowned music journal Fact boldly claimed that “the world's best electronic music festival is in Uganda.” In only a few years, Nyege Nyege has indeed become one of the hottest artistic hubs in East Africa, birthing two music labels that propelled local scenes, such as Ugandan acholitronix or Tanzanian singeli, across the globe. At the heart of this explosive universe lies a big house, known as “the Villa,” that almost constantly vibrates with sounds as musicians from the region and beyond tirelessly produce, exchange skills, and frenetically party until dawn. Despite reducing the Villa's bubbling flow, COVID-19 didn't silence it, and the house kept on nurturing its community of underground musicians. In this episode, producer Basile Koechlin takes us to the Villa to meet current residents and other members of the Nyege Nyege nebula. Through a patchwork of stories, soundscapes, and fresh musical releases, we hear more about this unique and strange place that came to host and generate a seminal part of the avant-garde of electronic music production in East Africa. Produced by Basie Koechlin APWW #843

Crime and Roses
Episode 134 True Crime: The Killing of Justine Ruszczyk Damond

Crime and Roses

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 78:48


In the premiere, we met a few of Michelle's students, including two Somali students. The metro area of Minneapolis has one of the highest Somali populations in the world (outside of East Africa). Will Danielle be giving us Minnesota stories all season long, probably! Danielle tells Justine Ruszczyk Damond's story. Justine was originally from Australia, living on the south side of Minneapolis. Justine was doing what a good neighbor does and was reporting a potential crime in her neighborhood. They say, see something, say something; so she did. Somali Minneapolis Police Officer Mohamed Noor and his partner arrived on the scene and shot Justine outside of her home, claiming they heard a noise that startled them and thought that Justine was the perpetrator. This case occurred in 2017, prior to the murder of George Floyd, and it touches on officer-involved shootings, race, the Somali immigrant population in Minneapolis, and the policies and procedures of deadly force. (Story starts at: 12:15) CONTENT WARNING: OFFICER-INVOLVED SHOOTING You can always connect with us at: linktr.ee/CrimeandRoses. There you can see links to our podcast and social media platforms. You can support the podcast by becoming a Patreon Member at: www.patreon.com/CrimeAndRoses. We have several levels of membership, and we truly love you, mean it. Always feel free to email us at: CrimeandRoses@gmail.com. Send us true crime story suggestions and any questions or comments you may have. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/crimeandroses/support

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Geopolitics in the Middle East

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021


Steven A. Cook, Eni Enrico Mattei senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies and director of the International Affairs Fellowship for Tenured International Relations Scholars at CFR, leads a conversation on geopolitics in the Middle East.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic, if you want to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. Today's topic is geopolitics in the Middle East. Our speaker was supposed to be Sanam Vakil, but she had a family emergency. So we're delighted to have our very own Steven Cook here to discuss this important topic. Dr. Cook is the Eni Enrico Mattei senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies, and director of the International Affairs Fellowship for Tenured International Relations Scholars at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is the author of several books, including False Dawn; The Struggle for Egypt, which won the 2012 Gold Medal from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy; and Ruling But Not Governing. And he's working on yet another book entitled The End of Ambition: America's Past, Present, and Future in the Middle East. So keep an eye out for that in the next year or so. He's a columnist at Foreign Policy magazine and contributor and commentator on a bunch of other outlets. Prior to coming to CFR, Dr. Cook was a research fellow at the Brookings Institution and a Soref research fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. So, Dr. Cook, thank you for being with us. I thought you could just—I'm going to give you a soft question here, to talk about the geopolitical relations among state and nonstate actors in the Middle East. And you can take that in whatever direction you would like. COOK: Well, thanks so much, Irina. It's a great pleasure to be with you. Good afternoon to everybody who's out there who's on an afternoon time zone, good morning to those who may still be in the evening, and good evening to those who may be somewhere where it's the evening. It's very nice to be with you. As Irina mentioned, and as I'm sure it's plenty evident, I am not Sanam Vakil, but I'm happy to step in for her and offer my thoughts on the geopolitics of the Middle East. It's a small topic. That question that Irina asked was something that I certainly could handle effectively in fifteen to twenty minutes. But before I get into the details of what's going on in the region, I thought I would offer some just general comments about the United States in the Middle East. Because, as it turns out, I had the opportunity last night to join a very small group of analysts with a very senior U.S. government official to talk precisely about the United States in the Middle East. And it was a very, very interesting conversation, because despite the fact that there has been numerous news reporting and analytic pieces about how the United States is deemphasizing the Middle East, this official made it very, very clear that that was practically impossible at this time. And this was, I think, a reasonable position to take. There has been a lot recently, in the last recent years, about withdrawing from the region, from retrenchment from the region, reducing from the region, realignment from the region. All those things actually mean different things. But analysts have essentially used them to mean that the United States should deprioritize the Middle East. And it seems to me that the problem in the Middle East has not necessarily been the fact that we are there and that we have goals there. It's that the goals in the region and the resources Washington uses to achieve those goals need to be realigned to address things that are actually important to the United States. In one sense that sound eminently reasonable. We have goals, we have resources to meet those goals, and we should devote them to—and if we can't, we should reassess what our goals are or go out and find new resources. That sounds eminently reasonable. But that's not the way Washington has worked over the course of the last few decades when it comes to the Middle East. In many ways, the United States has been overly ambitious. And it has led to a number of significant failures in the region. In an era when everything and anything is a vital interest, then nothing really is. And this seems to be the source of our trouble. For example, when we get into trying to fix the politics of other countries, we're headed down the wrong road. And I don't think that there's been enough real debate in Washington or, quite frankly, in the country about what's important in the Middle East, and why we're there, and what we're trying to achieve in the Middle East. In part, this new book that I'm writing called the End of Ambition, which, as Irina pointed out, will be out hopefully in either late 2022 or early 2023, tries to answer some of these questions. There is a way for the United States to be constructive in the Middle East, but what we've done over the course of the last twenty years has made that task much, much harder. And it leads us, in part, to this kind of geostrategic picture or puzzle that I'm about to lay out for you. So let me get into some of the details. And I'm obviously not going to take you from Morocco all the way to Iran, although I could if I had much, much more time because there's a lot going on in a lot of places. But not all of those places are of critical importance to the United States. So I'll start and I'll pick and choose from that very, very large piece of geography. First point: There have been some efforts to deescalate in a region that was in the middle of or on the verge of multiple conflicts. There has been a dialogue between the Saudis and the Iranians, under the auspices of the Iraqis, of all people. According to the Saudis this hasn't yielded very much, but they are continuing the conversation. One of the ways to assess the success or failure of a meeting is the fact that there's going to be another meeting. And there are going to be other meetings between senior Iranian and Saudi officials. I think that that's good. Egyptians and Turks are talking. Some of you who don't follow these issues as closely may not remember that Turkey and Egypt came close to trading blows over Libya last summer. And they pulled back as a result of concerted diplomacy on the part of the European Union, as well as the Egyptian ability to actually surge a lot of force to its western border. Those two countries are also talking, in part under the auspices of the Iraqis. Emiratis and Iranians are talking. That channel opened up in 2019 after the Iranians attacked a very significant—two very significant oil processing facilities in Saudi Arabia, sort of scaring the Emiratis, especially since the Trump administration did not respond in ways that the Emiratis or the Saudis had been expecting. The Qataris and the Egyptians have repaired their relations. The Arab world, for better or for worse, is moving to reintegrate Syria into is ranks. Not long after King Abdullah of Jordan was in the United States, he and Bashar al-Assad shared a phone call to talk about the opening of the border between Jordan and Syria and to talk about, among other things, tourism to the two countries. The hope is that this de-escalation, or hope for de-escalation coming from this dialogue, will have a salutary effect on conflicts in Yemen, in Syria, in Libya, and Iraq. Thus far, it hasn't in Yemen, in particular. It hasn't in Syria. But in Libya and Iraq, there have been some improvements to the situation. All of this remains quite fragile. These talks can be—can break off at any time under any circumstances. Broader-scale violence can return to Libya at any time. And the Iraqi government still doesn't control its own territory. Its sovereignty is compromised, not just by Iran but also by Turkey. But the fact that a region that was wound so tight and that seemed poised to even deepen existing conflicts and new ones to break out, for all of these different parties to be talking—some at the behest of the United States, some entirely of their own volition—is, I think, a relatively positive sign. You can't find anyone who's more—let's put it this way, who's darker about developments in the Middle East than me. And I see some positive signs coming from this dialogue. Iran, the second big issue on the agenda. Just a few hours ago, the Iranians indicated that they're ready to return to the negotiating table in Vienna. This is sort of a typical Iranian negotiating tactic, to push issues to the brink and then to pull back and demonstrate some pragmatism so that people will thank for them for their pragmatism. This agreement to go back to the negotiating table keeps them on decent terms with the Europeans. It builds on goodwill that they have developed as a result of their talks with Saudi Arabia. And it puts Israel somewhat on the defensive, or at least in an awkward position with the Biden administration, which has very much wanted to return to the negotiating table in Vienna. What comes out of these negotiations is extremely hard to predict. This is a new government in Iran. It is certainly a harder line than its predecessor. Some analysts believe that precisely because it is a hardline government it can do the negotiation. But we'll just have to see. All the while this has been going on, the Iranians have been proceeding with their nuclear development, and Israel is continuing its shadow campaign against the Iranians in Syria, sometimes in Iraq, in Iran itself. Although, there's no definitive proof, yesterday Iranian gas stations, of all things, were taken offline. There's some suspicion that this was the Israelis showing the Iranians just how far and deep they are into Iranian computer systems. It remains unclear how the Iranians will retaliate. Previously they have directed their efforts to Israeli-linked shipping in and around the Gulf of Oman. Its conventional responses up until this point have been largely ineffective. The Israelis have been carrying on a fairly sophisticated air campaign against the Iranians in Syria, and the Iranians have not been able to mount any kind of effective response. Of course, this is all against the backdrop of the fact that the Iranians do have the ability to hold much of the Israeli population hostage via Hezbollah and its thousands of rockets and missiles. So you can see how this is quite worrying, and an ongoing concern for everybody in the region, as the Israelis and Iranians take part in this confrontation. Let me just continue along the line of the Israelis for a moment and talk about the Arab-Israeli conflict, something that has not been high on the agenda of the Biden administration, it hasn't been high on the agenda of many countries in the region. But since the signing of the Abraham Accords in September 2020, there have been some significant developments. The normalization as a result of the Abraham Accords continues apace. Recently in the Emirates there was a meeting of ministers from Israel, the UAE, Morocco, Bahrain, and Sudan. This is the first kind of face-to-face meeting of government officials from all of these countries. Now, certainly the Israelis and the Emiratis have been meeting quite regularly, and the Israelis and the Bahrainis have been meeting quite regularly. But these were broader meetings of Cabinet officials from all of the Abraham Accords countries coming together in the United Arab Emirates for talks. Rather extraordinary. Something that thirteen months—in August 2020 was unimaginable, and today is something that doesn't really make—it doesn't really make the headlines. The Saudis are actually supportive of the normalization process, but they're not yet willing to take that step. And they're not willing to take that step because of the Palestinian issue. And it remains a sticking point. On that issue, there was a lot of discussion after the formation of a new Israeli government last June under the leadership, first, of Naftali Bennett, who will then hand the prime ministership over to his partner, Yair Lapid, who are from different parties. That this was an Israeli government that could do some good when it comes to the Palestinian arena, that it was pragmatic, that it would do things that would improve the lives of Palestinians, whether in Gaza or the West Bank, and seek greater cooperation with both the United States and the Palestinian authority toward that end. And that may in fact turn out to be the case. This government has taken a number of steps in that direction, including family reunification, so that if a Palestinian on the West Bank who is married to a Palestinian citizen of Israel, the Palestinian in the West Bank can live with the family in Israel. And a number of other things. But it should also be clear to everybody that despite a kind of change in tone from the Israeli prime ministry, there's not that much of a change in terms of policy. In fact, in many ways Prime Minister Bennett is to the right of his predecessor, Benjamin Netanyahu. And Yair Lapid, who comes from a centrist party, is really only centrist in terms of Israeli politics. He is—in any other circumstances would be a kind of right of center politician. And I'll just point out that in recent days the Israeli government has declared six Palestinian NGOs—long-time NGOs—terrorist organizations, approved three thousand new housing units in the West Bank, and worked very, very hard to prevent the United States from opening a consulate in East Jerusalem to serve the Palestinians. That consulate had been there for many, many, many years. And it was closed under the Trump administration when the U.S. Embassy was moved from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. The Biden administration would like to reopen that consulate. And the Israeli government is adamantly opposed. In the end, undoubtably Arab governments are coming to terms with Israel, even beyond the Abraham Accords countries. Egypt's flag carrier, Egyptair, announced flights to Tel Aviv. This is the first time since 1979. You could—you could fly between Cairo and Tel Aviv, something that I've done many, many times. If you were in Egypt, you'd have to go and find an office that would sell you a ticket to something called Air Sinai, that did not have regular flights. Only had flights vaguely whenever, sometimes. It was an Egyptair plane, stripped of its livery, staffed by Egyptair pilots and staff, stripped of anything that said Egyptair. Now, suddenly Egyptair is flying direct flights to Tel Aviv. And El-Al, Israel's national airline, and possibly one other, will be flying directly to Cairo. And there is—and that there is talk of economic cooperation. Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi in Sharm al-Sheikh not long ago. That was the first meeting of Israeli leaders—first public meeting of Israeli leaders and Egyptian leaders in ten years. So there does seem to be an openness on the part of Arab governments to Israel. As far as populations in these countries, they don't yet seem to be ready for normalization, although there has been some traffic between Israel and the UAE, with Emiratis coming to see Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, and so on and so forth. But there are very, very few Emiratis. And there are a lot of Egyptians. So as positive as that all is, this is—this has not been a kind of broad acceptance among the population in the Arab world for Israel's legitimate existence. And the kind of issue du jour, great-power competition. This is on everybody's lips in Washington, D.C.—great-power competition, great-power competition. And certainly, the Middle East is likely to be an arena of great-power competition. It has always been an arena of great-power competition. For the first time in more than two decades, the United States has competitors in the region. And let me start with Russia, because there's been so much discussion of China, but Russia is the one that has been actively engaged militarily in the region in a number of places. Vladimir Putin has parlayed his rescue of Hafez al-Assad into influence in the region, in an arc that stretches from NATO ally Turkey, all the way down through the Levant and through Damascus, then even stretching to Jerusalem where Israeli governments and the Russian government have cooperated and coordinated in Syria, into Cairo, and then into at least the eastern portion of Libya, where the Russians have supported a Qaddafist general named Khalifa Haftar, who used to be an employee of the CIA, in his bid for power in Libya. And he has done so by providing weaponry to Haftar, as well as mercenaries to fight and support him. That episode may very well be over, although there's every reason to believe that Haftar is trying to rearm himself and carry on the conflict should the process—should the political process in Libya break down. Russia has sold more weapons to Egypt in the last few years than at any other time since the early 1970s. They have a defense agreement with Saudi Arabia. It's not clear what that actually means, but that defense agreement was signed not that long after the United States' rather chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan, which clearly unnerved governments in the Middle East. So Russia is active, it's influential, its militarily engaged, and it is seeking to advance its interests throughout the region. I'll point out that its presence in North Africa is not necessarily so much about North Africa, but it's also about Europe. Its bid in Libya is important because its ally controls the eastern portion of Libya, where most of Libya's light, sweet crude oil is located. And that is the largest—the most significant reserves of oil in all of Africa. So it's important as an energy play for the Russians to control parts of North Africa, and right on Russia's—right on Europe's front doorstep. China. China's the largest investor and single largest trading partner with most of the region. And it's not just energy related. We know how dependent China is on oil from the Gulf, but it's made big investments in Algeria, in Egypt, the UAE, and in Iran. The agreement with Iran, a twenty-five-year agreement, coming at a time when the Iranians were under significant pressure from the United States, was regarded by many in Washington as an effort on the part of the Chinese to undercut the United States, and undercut U.S. policy in the region. I think it was, in part, that. I think it was also in part the fact that China is dependent in part on Iranian oil and did not want the regime there to collapse, posing a potential energy crisis for China and the rest of the world. It seems clear to me, at least, that the Chinese do not want to supplant the United States in the region. I don't think they look at the region in that way. And if they did, they probably learned the lesson of the United States of the last twenty-five years, which has gotten itself wrapped around the axle on a variety of issues that were unnecessary and sapped the power of the United States. So they don't want to get more deeply involved in the region. They don't want to take sides in conflicts. They don't want to take sides in the Arab-Israeli conflict. They don't take sides in the conflict between the United States and Iran, or the competition between Saudi Arabia and Iran. They want to benefit from the region, whether through investment or through extraction, and the security umbrella that the United States provides in the region. I'm not necessarily so sure that that security umbrella needs to be so expensive and so extensive for the United States to achieve its goals. But nevertheless, and for the time being at least, we will be providing that security umbrella in the region, from which the Chinese will benefit. I think, just to close on this issue of great-power competition. And because of time, I'm leaving out another big player, or emerging player in the region, which is India. I'm happy to talk about that in Q&A. But my last point is that, going back to the United States, countries in the region and leaders in the region are predisposed towards the United States. The problem is, is that they are very well-aware of the political polarization in this country. They're very well-aware of the political dysfunction in this country. They're very well-aware of the incompetence that came with the invasion of Iraq, the withdrawal from Afghanistan, or any number of disasters that have unfolded here in the United States. And it doesn't look, from where they sit in Abu Dhabi, in Cairo, in Riyadh, and in other places, that the United States has staying power, the will to lead, and the interest in remaining in the Middle East. And thus, they have turned to alternatives. Those alternatives are not the same as the United States, but they do provide something. I mean, particularly when it comes to the Chinese it is investment, it's economic advantages, without the kind of trouble that comes with the United States. Trouble from the perspective of leaders, so that they don't have to worry about human rights when they deal with the Chinese, because the Chinese aren't interested in human rights. But nevertheless, they remain disclosed toward the United States and want to work with the United States. They just don't know whether we're going to be there over the long term, given what is going on in the United States. I'll stop there. And I look forward to your questions and comments. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Steven, that was fantastic. Thank you very much. We're going to now to all of you for your questions. So the first raised hand comes from Jonas Truneh. And I don't think I pronounced that correctly, so you can correct me. Q: Yeah, no, that's right. Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you, Dr. Cook, for your talk. I'm from UCL, University College London, in London. COOK: So it is—(off mic). Q: Indeed, it is. Yeah. That's right. COOK: Great. Q: So you touched on it there somewhat particularly with great-power competition, but so my question is related to the current energy logic in the Middle East. The Obama administration perhaps thought that the shale revolution allowed a de-prioritization, if I'm allowed to use that word, of the Middle East. And that was partly related to the pivot to Asia. So essentially does the U.S. still regard itself as the primary guarantor of energy security in the Persian Gulf? And if so, would the greatest beneficiary, as I think you indicated, would that not be China? And is that a case of perverse incentives? Is there much the U.S. can do about it? COOK: Well, it depends on who you ask, right? And it's a great question. I think that the—one of the things that—one of the ways in which the Obama administration sought to deprioritize and leave the region was through the shale revolution. I mean, the one piece of advice that he did take from one of his opponents in 2002—2008, which was to drill, baby, drill. And the United States did. I would not say that this is something that is specific to the Obama administration. If you go back to speeches of presidents way back—but I won't even go that far back. I'll go to George W. Bush in 2005 State of the Union addressed, talked all about energy independence from the Middle East. This may not actually be in much less the foreseeable future, but in really—in a longer-term perspective, it may be harder to do. But it is politically appealing. The reason why I say it depends on who you ask, I think that there are officials in the United States who say: Nothing has changed. Nothing has changed. But when the Iranians attacked those two oil processing facilities in Saudi Arabia, that temporarily took off 50 percent of supply off the markets—good thing the Saudis have a lot stored away—the United States didn't really respond. The president of the United States said: I'm waiting for a call from Riyadh. That forty years of stated American policy was, like, it did not exist. The Carter doctrine and the Reagan corollary to the Carter doctrine suddenly didn't exist. And the entirety of the American foreign policy community shrugged their shoulders and said: We're not going to war on behalf of MBS. I don't think we would have been going to war on behalf of MBS. We would have been ensuring the free flow of energy supplies out of the region, which is something that we have been committed to doing since President Carter articulated the Carter doctrine, and then President Reagan added his corollary to it. I think that there are a number of quite perverse incentives associated with this. And I think that you're right. The question is whether the competition from China outweighs our—I'm talking about “our”—the United States' compelling interest in a healthy global economy. And to the extent that our partners in Asia, whether it's India, South Korea, Japan, and our important trading partner in China, are dependent upon energy resources from the Gulf, and we don't trust anybody to ensure the free flow of energy resources from the Gulf, it's going to be on us to do it. So we are kind of hammered between that desire to have a healthy global economy as being—and being very wary of the Chinese. And the Chinese, I think, are abundantly aware of it, and have sought to take advantage of it. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question, which got an up-vote, from Charles Ammon, who is at Pennsylvania State University. And I think this goes to what you were building on with the great-power competition: What interests does India have in the Middle East? And how is it increasing its involvement in the region? COOK: So India is—imports 60 percent of its oil from the region. Fully 20 percent of it from Saudi Arabia, another 20 percent of it from Iran, and then the other 20 percent from other sources. So that's one thing. That's one reason why India is interested in the Middle East. Second, there are millions and millions of Indians who work in the Middle East. The Gulf region is a region that basically could not run without South Asian expatriate labor, most of which comes from India—on everything. Third, India has made considerable headway with countries like the United Arab Emirates, as well as Saudi Arabia, in counterextremism cooperation. This has come at the expense of Pakistan, but as relations between Pakistan and Saudi Arabia and relations between Pakistan and the UAE soured in recent years, the Indians have been able to take advantage of that. And Indian leaders have hammered away at the common interest that India and leaders in the region have in terms of countering violent extremism. And then finally, India and Israel have quite an extraordinary relationship, both in the tech field as well as in the defense area. Israel is a supplier to India. And the two of them are part of a kind of global network of high-tech powerhouse that have either, you know, a wealth of startups or very significant investment from the major tech players in the world. Israel—Microsoft just announced a huge expansion in Israel. And Israeli engineers and Indian engineers collaborate on a variety of projects for these big tech companies. So there's a kind of multifaceted Indian interest in the region, and the region's interest in India. What India lacks that the Chinese have is a lot more capacity. They don't have the kind of wherewithal to bring investment and trade in the region in the other direction. But nevertheless, it's a much more important player than it was in the past. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Curran Flynn, who has a raised hand. Q: How do you envision the future of Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia politics for the next thirty years? Ethiopia controls the Nile dam projects. And could this dispute lead to a war? And what is the progress with the U.S. in mediating the talks between the three countries? COOK: Thank you. FASKIANOS: And that is coming from the King Fahd University in Saudi Arabia. COOK: Fabulous. So that's more than the evening. It's actually nighttime there. I think that the question of the great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam is really an important one, and it's something that has not gotten as much attention as it should. And for those of you who are not familiar, in short the Ethiopians have been building a massive dam on the Blue Nile, which is a tributary to the Nile. And that if—when competed, threatens the water supply to Egypt, a country of 110 million people that doesn't get a lot of rainfall. Ethiopia, of course, wants to dam the Nile in order to produce hydroelectric power for its own development, something that Egypt did when it dammed the Nile River to build the Aswan High Dam, and crated Lake Nasser behind it. The Egyptians are very, very concerned. This is an existential issue for them. And there have been on and off negotiations, but the negotiations aren't really about the issues. They're talks about talks about talks. And they haven't gotten—they haven't gotten very far. Now, the Egyptians have been supported by the Sudanese government, after the Sudanese government had been somewhat aligned with the Ethiopian government. The Trump administration put itself squarely behind the Egyptian government, but Ethiopia's also an important partner of the United States in the Horn of Africa. The Egyptians have gone about signing defense cooperation agreements with a variety of countries around Ethiopia's borders. And of course, Ethiopia is engaged in essentially what's a civil war. This is a very, very difficult and complicated situation. Thus far, there doesn't seem to be an easy solution the problem. Now, here's the rub, if you talk to engineers, if you talk to people who study water, if you talk to people who know about dams and the flow of water, the resolution to the problem is actually not that hard to get to. The problem is that the politics and nationalism have been engaged on both sides of the issue, making it much, much more difficult to negotiate an equitable solution to the problem. The Egyptians have said in the past that they don't really have an intention of using force, despite the fact of this being an existential issue. But there's been somewhat of a shift in their language on the issue. Which recently they've said if red lines were crossed, they may be forced to intervene. Intervene how? What are those red lines? They haven't been willing to define them, which should make everybody nervous. The good news is that Biden administration has appointed an envoy to deal with issues in the Horn of Africa, who has been working very hard to try to resolve the conflict. I think the problem here however is that Ethiopia, now distracted by a conflict in the Tigray region, nationalism is running high there, has been—I don't want to use the word impervious—but not as interested in finding a negotiated solution to the problem than it might have otherwise been in the past. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Bob Pauly, who's a professor of international development at the University of Southern Mississippi. It got three up-votes. What would you identify as the most significant likely short and longer-term effects of Turkey's present domestic economic and political challenges on President Erdogan's strategy and policy approaches to the Middle East, and why? COOK: Oh, well, that is a very, very long answer to a very, very interesting question. Let's see what happens in 2023. President Erdogan is facing reelection. His goal all along has been to reelected on the one hundredth anniversary of the republic, and to demonstrate how much he has transformed Turkey in the image of the Justice and Development Party, and moved it away from the institutions of the republic. Erdogan may not make it to 2023. I don't want to pedal in conspiracy theories or anything like that, but he doesn't look well. There are large numbers of videos that have surfaced of him having difficulties, including one famous one from this past summer when he was offering a Ramadan greeting on Turkish television to supporters of the Justice and Development Party, and he seemed to fade out and slur his words. This is coupled with reports trickling out of Ankara about the lengths to which the inner circle has gone to shield real health concerns about Erdogan from the public. It's hard to really diagnose someone from more than six thousand miles away, but I think it's a scenario that policymakers in Washington need to think seriously about. What happens if Erdogan is incapacitated or dies before 2023? That's one piece. The second piece is, well, what if he makes it and he's reelected? And I think in any reasonable observer sitting around at the end of 2021 looking forward to 2023 would say two things: One, you really can't predict Turkish politics this far out, but if Turkish elections were held today and they were free and fair, the Justice and Development Party would get below 30 percent. Still more than everybody else. And Erdogan would have a real fight on his hands to get reelected, which he probably would be. His approaches to his domestic challenges and his approaches to the region are really based on what his current political calculations are at any given moment. So his needlessly aggressive posture in the Eastern Mediterranean was a function of the fact that he needed to shore up his nationalist base. Now that he finds himself quite isolated in the world, the Turks have made overtures to Israel, to the UAE, to Saudi Arabia. They're virtually chasing the Egyptians around the Eastern Mediterranean to repair their relationship. Because without repairing these relationships the kind of investment that is necessary to try to help revive the Turkish economy—which has been on the skids for a number of years—is going to be—is going to be more difficult. There's also another piece of this, which is the Middle East is a rather lucrative arms market. And during the AKP era, the Turks have had a significant amount of success further developing their defense industrial base, to the point that now their drones are coveted. Now one of the reasons for a Saudi-Turkish rapprochement is that the United States will not sell Saudi Arabia the drones it wants, for fear that they will use them in Yemen. And the Saudis are looking for drones elsewhere. That's either China or Turkey. And Turkey's seem to work really, really well, based on experience in Syria, Libya, and Nagorno-Karabakh. So what—Turkish foreign policy towards the region has become really dependent upon what Erdogan's particularly political needs are. There's no strategic approach to the region. There is a vision of Turkey as a leader of the region, of a great power in its own right, as a leader of the Muslim world, as a Mediterranean power as well. But that's nothing new. Turkish Islamists have been talking about these things for quite some time. I think it's important that there's been some de-escalation. I don't think that all of these countries now love each other, but they see the wisdom of pulling back from—pulling back from the brink. I don't see Turkey's position changing dramatically in terms of its kind of reintegration into the broader region before 2023, at the least. FASKIANOS: Great. Let's go next to, raised hand, to Caleb Sanner. And you need to unmute yourself. Q: Hello, my name is Caleb. I'm from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. So, Dr. Cook, you had mentioned in passing how China has been involved economically in North Africa. And my question would be, how is the U.S. taking that? And what are we doing, in a sense, to kind of counter that? I know it's not a military advancement in terms of that, but I've seen what it has been doing to their economies—North Africa's economies. And, yeah, what's the U.S. stance on that? COOK: Well, I think the United States is somewhat detached from this question of North Africa. North Africa's long been a—with the exception of Egypt, of course. And Egypt, you know, is not really North Africa. Egypt is something in and of itself. That China is investing heavily in Egypt. And the Egyptian position is: Please don't ask us to choose between you and the Chinese, because we're not going to make that choice. We think investment from all of these places is good for—is good for Egypt. And the other places where China is investing, and that's mostly in Algeria, the United States really doesn't have close ties to Algeria. There was a tightening of the relationship after the attacks on New York and Washington in 2001, recognizing that the Algerians—extremist groups in Algerian that had been waging war against the state there over the course of the 1990s were part and parcel of this new phenomenon of global jihad. And so there has been a security relationship there. There has been some kind of big infrastructure kind of investment in that country, with big companies that build big things, like GE and others, involved in Algeria. But the United States isn't helping to develop ports or industrial parks or critical infrastructure like bridges and airports in the same way that the Chinese have been doing throughout the region. And in Algeria, as well as in Egypt, the Chinese are building a fairly significant industrial center in the Suez Canal zone, of all places. And the United States simply doesn't have an answer to it, other than to tell our traditional partners in the region, don't do it. But unless we show up with something to offer them, I'm afraid that Chinese investment is going to be too attractive for countries that are in need of this kind of investment. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to a written question from Kenneth Mayers, who is at St. Francis College in Brooklyn. In your opinion, what would a strategic vision based on a far-sighted understanding of both resources and U.S. goals—with regard to peace and security, prosperity and development, and institutions and norms and values such as human rights—look like in the Middle East and North Africa? COOK: Well, it's a great question. And I'm tempted to say you're going to have to read the last third of my new book in order to get the—in order to get the answer. I think but let me start with something mentioned about norms and values. I think that one of the things that has plagued American foreign policy over the course of not just the last twenty years, but in the post-World War II era all the way up through the present day, you see it very, very clearly with President Biden, is that trying to incorporate American values and norms into our approach to the region has been extraordinarily difficult. And what we have a history of doing is the thing that is strategically tenable, but morally suspect. So what I would say is, I mean, just look at what's happened recently. The president of the United States studiously avoided placing a telephone call to the Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. The Egyptians, as many know, have a terrible record on human rights, particularly since President Sisi came to power. Arrests of tens of thousands of people in the country, the torture of many, many people, the killings of people. And the president during his campaign said that he was going to give no blank checks to dictators, including to Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. And then what happened in May? What happened in May was that fighting broke out between Israel and Hamas and others in the Gaza Strip, a brutal eleven-day conflict. And Egypt stepped up and provided a way out of the conflict through its good offices. And that prompted the United States to—the president of the United States—to have two phone calls in those eleven days with the Egyptian leader. And now the United States is talking about Egypt as a constructive partner that's helping to stabilize the region. Sure, the administration suspended $130 million of Egypt's annual—$130 million Egypt's annual allotment of $1.3 billion. But that is not a lot. Egypt got most of—most of its military aid. As I said, strategically tenable, morally suspect. I'm not quite sure how we get out of that. But what I do know, and I'll give you a little bit of a preview of the last third of the book—but I really do want you to buy it when it's done—is that the traditional interests of the United States in the Middle East are changing. And I go through a kind of quasi, long, somewhat tortured—but very, very interesting—discussion of the origins of our interests, and how they are changing, and how we can tell they are changing. And that is to say that the free flow of energy resources may not be as important to the United States in the next twenty-five years as it was over the course of the previous fifty or sixty years. That helping to ensure Israeli security, which has been axiomatic for the United States, eh, I'd say since the 1960s, really, may not be as important as Israel develops its diplomatic relations with its neighbors, that has a GDP per capita that's on par with the U.K., and France, and other partners in Europe, a country that clearly can take care of itself, that is a driver of technology and innovation around the globe. And that may no longer require America's military dominance in the region. So what is that we want to be doing? How can we be constructive? And I think the answers are in things that we hadn't really thought of too systematically in the past. What are the things that we're willing to invest in an defend going forward? Things like climate change, things like migration, things like pandemic disease. These are things that we've talked about, but that we've never been willing to invest in the kind of the resources. Now there are parts of the Middle East that during the summer months are in-habitable. That's going to produce waves of people looking for places to live that are inhabitable. What do we do about that? Does that destabilize the Indian subcontinent? Does it destabilize Europe? Does it destabilize North Africa? These are all questions that we haven't yet answered. But to the extent that we want to invest in, defend and sacrifice for things like climate, and we want to address the issue—related issue of migration, and we want to deal with the issue of disease and other of these kind of functional global issues in the Middle East is better not just for us and Middle Easterners, but also in terms of our strategic—our great-power competition in the region. These are not things that the Chinese and the Russians are terribly interested in, despite the fact that the Chinese may tell you they are. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Ahmuan Williams, with a raised hand, at the University of Oklahoma. COOK: Oklahoma. Q: Hi. And thank you for being here. You kind of talked about the stabilization of northern Africa and the Middle East. And just a few days ago the Sudanese government—and they still haven't helped capture the parliamentarian there—have recycled back into a military—somewhat of military rule. And it's been since 2005 since the end of their last civil war, which claimed millions of innocent civilians through starvation and strife and, you know, the lack of being able to get humanitarian aid. There was also a huge refugee crisis there, a lot of people who evacuated Sudan. How's that going to impact the Middle East and the American take to Middle East and northern Africa policy, especially now that the Security Council is now considering this and is trying to determine what we should do? COOK: It's a great question. And I think that, first, let's be clear. There was a coup d'état in Sudan. The military overthrew a transitional government on the eve of having to hand over the government to civilians. And they didn't like it. There's been tension that's been brewing in Sudan for some time. Actually, an American envoy, our envoy to East Africa and Africa more generally, a guy named Jeff Feltman, was in Khartoum, trying to kind of calm the tension, to get the two sides together, and working to avert a coup. And the day after he left, the military moved. That's not—that doesn't reflect the fact that the United States gave a blessing for the military to overthrow this government. I think what it does, though, and it's something that I think we all need to keep in mind, it demonstrates the limits of American power in a variety of places around the world. That we don't have all the power in the world to prevent things from happening when people, like the leaders of the Sudanese military, believe that they have existential issues that are at stake. Now, what's worry about destabilization in Sudan is, as you point out, there was a civil war there, there was the creation of a new country there, potential for—if things got really out of hand—refugee flows into Egypt, from Egypt across the Sanai Peninsula into Israel. One of the things people are unaware of is the large number of Sudanese or Eritreans and other Africans who have sought refuge in Israel, which has created significant economic and social strains in that country. So it's a big deal. Thus far, it seems we don't—that the U.S. government doesn't know exactly what's happening there. There are protesters in the streets demanding democracy. It's very unclear what the military is going to do. And it's very unclear what our regional allies and how they view what's happening. What Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, what Saudi Arabia, what Israel—which Sudan is an Abraham Accords country now—what they are doing. How they view the coup as positive or negative will likely impact how effective the United States can be in trying to manage this situation. But I suspect that we're just going to have to accommodate ourselves to whatever outcome the Sudanese people and the Sudanese military come to, because I don't think we have a lot of—we don't have a lot of tools there to make everybody behave. FASKIANOS: OK. So I'm going to take the next question from Elena Murphy, who is a junior at Syracuse University's Maxwell School. And she's a diplomatic intern at the Kurdistan Regional Government's Representation in the United States. COOK: That's cool. FASKIANOS: That's very cool. So as a follow up, how much do you believe neo-Ottomanism and attempting regional hegemony has affected Erdogan's domestic and foreign policy, especially in consideration of Turkey's shift towards the MENA in their foreign policy, after a period of withdrawals and no problems with neighbors policy? COOK: Great. Can I see that? Because that's a long question. FASKIANOS: Yeah, it's a long question. It's got an up-vote. Third one down. COOK: Third one down. Elena, as a follow up, how much do you believe neo-Ottomanism—I'm sorry, I'm going to have to read it again. How much do you believe neo-Ottomanism and attempting regional has affected Erdogan's both domestic and foreign policy, especially in consideration of Turkey's shift towards the MENA in their foreign policy, after a period of withdrawals and no problems with neighbors? OK. Great. So let us set aside the term “neo-Ottomanism” for now. Because neo-Ottomanism actually—it does mean something, but people have often used the term neo-Ottomanism to describe policies of the Turkish government under President Erdogan that they don't like. And so let's just talk about the way in which the Turkish government under President Erdogan views the region and views what Turkey's rightful place should be. And I think the Ottomanism piece is important, because the kind of intellectual framework which the Justice and Development Party, which is Erdogan's party, views the world, sees Turkey as—first of all, it sees the Turkish Republic as a not-so-legitimate heir to the Ottoman Empire. That from their perspective, the natural order of things would have been the continuation of the empire in some form or another. And as a result, they believe that Turkey's natural place is a place of leadership in the region for a long time. Even before the Justice and Development Party was founded in 2001, Turkey's earlier generation of Islamists used to savage the Turkish leadership for its desire to be part of the West, by saying that this was kind of unnatural, that they were just merely aping the West, and the West was never actually going to accept Turkey. Which is probably true. But I think that the Justice and Development Party, after a period of wanting to become closer to the West, has turned its attention towards the Middle East, North Africa, and the Muslim world more generally. And in that, it sees itself, the Turks see themselves as the natural leaders in the region. They believe they have a cultural affinity to the region as a result of the legacies of the Ottoman Empire, and they very much can play this role of leader. They see themselves as one of the kind of few real countries in the region, along with Egypt and Iran and Saudi Arabia. And the rest are sort of ephemeral. Needless to say, big countries in the Arab world—like Egypt, like Saudi Arabia—don't welcome the idea of Turkey as a leader of the region. They recognize Turkey as a very big and important country, but not a leader of the region. And this is part of that friction that Turkey has experienced with its neighbors, after an earlier iteration of Turkish foreign policy, in which—one of the earliest iterations of Turkish foreign policy under the Justice and Development Party which was called no problems with neighbors. In which Turkey, regardless of the character of the regimes, wanted to have good relations with its neighbors. It could trade with those neighbors. And make everybody—in the process, Turkey could be a driver of economic development in the region, and everybody can be basically wealthy and happy. And it didn't really work out that way, for a variety of reasons that we don't have enough time for. Let's leave it at the fact that Turkey under Erdogan—and a view that is shared by many—that Turkey should be a leader of the region. And I suspect that if Erdogan were to die, if he were unable to stand for election, if the opposition were to win, that there would still be elements of this desire to be a regional leader in a new Turkish foreign policy. FASKIANOS: Steven, thank you very much. This was really terrific. We appreciate your stepping in at the eleventh hour, taking time away from your book. For all of you— COOK: I'm still not Sanam. FASKIANOS: (Laughs.) I know, but you were an awesome replacement. So you can follow Steven Cook on Twitter at @stevenacook. As I said at the beginning too, he is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine. So you can read his work there, as well as, of course, on CFR.org, all of the commentary, analysis, op-eds, congressional testimony are there for free. So I hope you will follow him and look after his next book. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday November 3, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern time on the future of U.S.-Mexico relations. In the meantime, I encourage you to follow us, @CFR_Academic, visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. And stay well, stay safe, and thank you, again. COOK: Bye, everyone. FASKIANOS: Bye. (END)

new york japan europe russian university china chinese american mexico america future oklahoma indian south asian world war ii representation gdp west european france turkey iran council donald trump syria iraq united states vladimir putin russia washington gulf cia africa turkish pakistan african afghanistan needless egyptian indians middle east sudan barack obama struggle bush morocco cook muslims european union palestinians mediterranean tel aviv steven cook ethiopia arab ge trouble security council gold medal outreach assad joe biden nile saudi cabinet arab israeli horn pennsylvania state university jerusalem university college london foreign policy south korea foreign affairs ngos algeria united arab emirates saudi arabia foreign relations cfr ottoman empire turks academic hezbollah libya nato abu dhabi ethiopian syracuse university ambition state of the union southern mississippi fully webinars iraqi ucl oman embassy algerian intervene north africa mena bahrain gaza israelis saudis uae brookings institution sisi yemen east africa west bank iranians geopolitics arrests eastern mediterranean ramadan sudanese ankara george w bush levant benjamin netanyahu yair lapid suez canal riyadh khartoum washington institute near east policy damascus tigray hamas emiratis abdel fattah bashar akp hafez islamists broader mbs nile river eritreans east jerusalem emirates persian gulf recep tayyip erdogan turkish republic maxwell school algerians haftar blue nile false dawn egyptair sharm king abdullah nagorno karabakh gaza strip middle easterners cook it khalifa haftar national program qataris sheikhs sanam wisconsin whitewater kurdistan regional government development party naftali bennett egyptian president abdel fattah ottomanism abraham accords
Thiiird Eye View Podcast
33. Dr Akhtar and iii - The Professor who Teaches Islamic and Jain Studies

Thiiird Eye View Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 45:05


Episode 33 of the Thiiird Eye View Podcast is with Dr Akhtar who is a professor at Florida International University where he teaches Islamic and Jain Studies. The podcasts starts with Dr Akhtar explaining the 2000 year history of Indians migrating to East Africa. We then speak about the role of colonisation and how it impacted the way people interpreted their own religion. We speak about the richness of Islam and how Jainism and Sufism have so many similarities and how Dr Akhtar is bringing Jain Studies to Pakistan and so much more!I hope you enjoy the conversation! Please follow & share my social channels below and subscribe for regular content! Instagram - https://instagram.com/thiiirdworldltd?igshid=u24r6bwjmkwqFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/thiiirdworldltd/Twitter - https://twitter.com/ThiiirdWorldLtdYoutube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtZxkY3mi-pYbnhz0KYmaGQ?view_as=subscriber

Plants of the Gods: Hallucinogens, Healing, Culture and Conservation podcast
Plants of the Gods: S2E9. The Plants of the Apes - How Animals Use Medicinal Plants. Part 1

Plants of the Gods: Hallucinogens, Healing, Culture and Conservation podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 20:29


We have all seen dogs eat grass to alleviate illnesses; why would we not think that other animals do not consume other plants for therapeutic purposes? In fact, it was the great Jane Goodall and other colleagues in East Africa who recorded chimps and even elephants eating medicinal plants. This episode ranges from Tanzania to eastern Brazil to Wisconsin to document animals' use of medicinal and even toxic plants.   Acosta, William. Bombardier Beetles and Fever Trees: A Close-up Look at Chemical Warfare and Signals in Animals and Plants. Addison-Wesley, 1997. Cowen, Ron. “Medicine on the Wild Side.” Science News, vol. 138, no. 18, 1990, p. 280., https://doi.org/10.2307/3974722. Engel, Cindy. Wild Health: How Animals Keep Themselves Well and What We Can Learn from Them. Phoenix, 2003. Huffman, Michael A. “Animal Self-Medication and Ethno-Medicine: Exploration and Exploitation of the Medicinal Properties of Plants.” Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, vol. 62, no. 2, 2003, pp. 371–381., https://doi.org/10.1079/pns2003257. Huffman, Michael A. “Current Evidence for Self-Medication in Primates: A Multidisciplinary Perspective.” American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 104, no. S25, 1997, pp. 171–200., https://doi.org/10.1002/(sici)1096-8644(1997)25+3.0.co;2-7. INGRAHAM, CAROLINE. Animal Self-Medication: How Animals Heal Themselves Using Essential Oils, Herbs and ... Minerals. INGRAHAM TRADING LTD, 2019. Link, K. P. “The Discovery of Dicumarol and Its Sequels.” Circulation, vol. 19, no. 1, 1959, pp. 97–107., https://doi.org/10.1161/01.cir.19.1.97. Montgomery, Sy. Walking with the Great Apes: Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, Biruté Galdikas. Chelsea Green Publishing, 2009. Plotkin, Mark J. Medicine Quest: In Search of Nature's Healing Secrets. Penguin Books, 2001. Strier, Karen B. Faces in the Forest: The Endangered Muriqui Monkeys of Brazil. Harvard University Press, 1999. Strier, Karen B. Primate Behavioral Ecology. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2021.

Art Dimensions: Beyond the Palette
Amadea Bailey - Abstract Expressionist Painter

Art Dimensions: Beyond the Palette

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 21:46


Amadea Bailey is a super talented painter who started painting as a junior in college after being inspired by Monet paintings on a visit to New York. She was born in Germany, grew up for several years in East Africa, and uses painting to evoke the wonderful feelings and experiences she had as a child. Hear how to embrace movement to let your creativity burst out, why it helps to create big art, and the creative ways surfing and traveling impact her craft. Check out Amadea's art at ArtDimensionsOnline.com

Good Morning Africa
Financial institutions in the East Africa region have lost more than $10 million to cyber crime in 6 months. What's the economic cost of the increase in hacks?

Good Morning Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 12:24


October is cyber security awareness month. In this episode we look at the implications it has had on financial institutions. 

Harvard CID
Creating Impact at a Global Scale for Development

Harvard CID

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 30:36


This podcast was originally recorded on Friday, October 15, 2021 for the CID Speaker Series featuring Andrew Stern, Founder and CEO of The Global Development Incubator(GDI). Stern continued the conversation with our CID Student Ambassador, Mandla Isaacs, after an appearance at the virtual CID Speaker Series event. Creating impact at the scale of the problems we are trying to solve in the world is hard -- be it climate change, global migration or agricultural finance. GDI aims to take good ideas and turn them into great solutions -- and ones that can attempt to make a dent in the big problems of our time. In addition to designing and launching new product or service solutions, GDI also creates multi-stakeholder initiatives that bring together governments, companies and nonprofit organizations to solve big problems, such as: How do we build a sustainable agricultural finance market in East Africa? Or, can we create more durable and ethical solutions for refugees and migrants? Or, how do we protect large swaths of forests around the world, with a minimum size being equivalent to the State of Vermont? GDI designs, builds and launches efforts like these and can share some of the lessons learned and pitfalls of attempting to do so.

Truth Talk Weekend
If Only One!

Truth Talk Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 9:11


Stu talks missions with Jack Hutchins, author of the book, "If Only One: Miracles in Missions." Jack discusses his missions work in Kenya, East Africa, and how God has moved.

YourForest
111-Environmental Sociology with John Parkins

YourForest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


As land stewards, we spend most of our time discussing the hard science. If we take this action on the landscape how will that affect everything else? For today's episode, we are stepping out of our comfort zone and into the mysterious and intimidating world of people. How do people's views and relationship to nature change how we manage it? If we could adjust society's perspective, how would that shift the outcomes of environmental management? Ultimately, how does sociology change things?Your Forest Podcast by Matthew KristoffEnvironmental Sociology with John ParkinsEpisode highlightJohn Parkins speaks about the role of society in forestry and how meaningful engagement with indigenous communities is the future of land management.ResourcesJohn Parkins' Profile: https://apps.ualberta.ca/directory/person/jparkins fRi Research: https://friresearch.ca/sites/default/files/HLP_2019_03_EBM%20Dialogue_Paper_Final.pdf SponsorsWest Fraser: https://www.westfraser.com/ GreenLink Forestry Inc.: http://greenlinkforestry.com/ Damaged Timber: https://www.damagedtimber.com/ GiveawayEnter YourForest10 at checkout at the Damaged Timber store for a 10% discount!Quotes 8.36 - 8.51: “We often think that... we can... get out there in the world when we are young and… we can change it, and I guess I realized that… changing the world is a lot more challenging than we think but... we also can make our own contributions in one way or another.” 17.16 - 17.27: “Pretty much every problem we are dealing with ultimately is a social problem... because .. [there] wouldn't be a problem unless humans came along and decided it was a problem.”20.46 - 21.06: “A lot of times, the… controversies that we are dealing with, at the heart of it, involve scientists themselves who are disagreeing with each other... and they are doing that because they are looking at different elements of a very complex world out there and measuring things in different ways.” 1.02.18 - 1.02.29: “That's, I think, a part of the decolonization process - we need indigenous leaders in key positions of leadership, we need indigenous leaders in our industries, we need them in the government, we need them at the university.” Takeaways“It was less about me choosing sociology and more about sociology choosing me” (4.25)John worked in East Africa for 2 years and felt inspired to work internationally in poverty alleviation and rural development, which led him to develop an interest in issues around sustainability. He did a Master's in Rural Sociology from the University of Alberta and then worked on social issues in forestry at the Canadian Forest Service. He now works in the Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology at the university.Society and forestry (10.42)John explains that sociology is the study of groups and group experience, using social facts or contexts to explain social problems. Environmental sociologists are interested in the interaction between society and the natural world, bringing environmental variables and factors into an explanation of human behaviour. Environmental sociology in forestry explores the forest-society relationship through forest-based communities, community sustainability studies, and the like.Every problem is a social problem (16.21)John laments that many people in the resource sector don't think about social contexts. While the scientific method can be used to achieve breakthroughs, the biggest challenge in this work is conflict resolution amongst competing views of disagreeing social groups with varied scientific positions. He cites the example of the lack of consensus on the definition of Ecosystem-Based Management (EBM) in Alberta. Find a middle path or find the right answer (25.03)John believes that to move forward from the conflict of competing scientific views, we need to find a middle path or experiment to find the right answer. Even though the government fears experiments going badly, trying small experiments on small blocks of land may uncover new possibilities. During his Ph.D., he attended public advisory committee meetings which asked the local forestry company to set aside some land as the control for the experiment to proceed.Delinking of industry and community (31.55)An example of a successful experiment in Canada on the social context of forestry is British Columbia's 100+ community forests initiative. Communities take a long lease term on crown land, and through a local community board, manage the forest landscape based on their values, vision and benefits the community receives from doing so. Communities get to have a say in how industry uses the forests too. Meaningful engagement with indigenous communities (42.52)John highlights the need to have a meaningful form of engagement with indigenous communities. Meaningful consultation could mean developing meaningful relationships with trust, collaboration and shared values. However, John supports rooting the conversation in a decolonization context where indigenous communities have control over the decisions made for the land. However, not all indigenous communities agree with the consultation guidelines today.Indigenous land management (47.40)John believes indigenous consultation must go beyond dialogue to equity ownership in land and encourages experimentation to find a successful way to invite indigenous stakeholders as equal players in landscape management. He also emphasizes the need to manage the multiple values in forestry, factoring in conversations around indigenous forestry, decolonization in forestry and economic development through forest management. Forestry's way forward (1.01.34)The University of Alberta is working to secure funds for a new faculty position in indigenous forestry. John hopes to see indigenous leaders drive the conversation for indigenous forestry and create the change they wish to see. Academic literature on indigenous management of conservation areas shows that such areas have better ecological values, and he believes that should be the way forward for forestry. If you liked this podcast, please rate and review it, share it on Instagram and Facebook and tag a friend, and send your feedback and comments to yourforestpodcast@gmail.com.

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles
155: Decolonizing Ourselves, Cultivating an Anti-Oppression Lens, And Living in the Hyphen with Justine Abigail Yu

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 77:52


Justine Abigail Yu takes us on her journey growing up in Toronto as a Filipina-Canadian, navigating that hyphenated identity, and living between two cultures.  She describes how travel has impacted her and reflects on the impact of traveling back to the Philippines at different points in her life.  Justine gives tips on visiting the Philippines, where you should go, and why you should definitely not skip Manila. She also talks about attending the Fringe Festival in Manila, and how it functions as a space for the expression of gender fluidity within a conservative society.  Justine then shares the story of how she met her relationship partner while traveling.  She shares their experiences traveling as a mixed race couple in Asia, and how it provoked some of her most profound reflections on the importance of decolonizing ourselves.  Justine also talks about her trip to East Africa and reflects on the evolution of her anti-oppression politics and the development of her 3DR Approach—Decolonize, Disrupt, Dismantle and Rebuild.  She then talks about her magazine, Living Hyphen, reflects on the importance of storytelling for marginalized communities, and discusses the expansion and future of the project.  Justine also talks about her role as the Marketing and Communications Director at Wanderful, and her involvement in developing their Anti-Oppression toolkit for content creators.  She then explains her role as the senior advisor for the RISE Travel Institute which promotes responsible, impactful, sustainable & ethical travel.  And, finally, Justine reflects on the concepts of allyship and solidarity and what travel means to her today.  FULL SHOW NOTES AVAILABLE AT: www.TheMaverickShow.com GET MATT'S FREE MAVERICK WHITE PAPER “Real Estate Investing for Digital Nomads:  How to Buy U.S. Rental Properties from Anywhere in the World and Finance an Epic International Lifestyle” GET MATT'S FREE MAVERICK PACKING VIDEO “Stylish Minimalism:  How to Travel the World Long-Term with Carry-On Luggage Only”

Sweathead with Mark Pollard
How Running a Small Business Helps in Account Planning - Ben Kuri Mburu, Strategy Director

Sweathead with Mark Pollard

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 35:03


In this Sweathead episode, Ben Mburu takes us behind the scenes of several of his small businesses in Kenya. An account planner by profession, Ben believes that owning a small business helps him validate his ideas and gain insights he can use in his client work. He also shares his experiences of the ups and downs of being a small business owner during a global pandemic. After 14 years in account management in the advertising business, Ben is now building a life selling ideas that solve marketing and communications problems for businesses in East Africa. You can connect with him at www.linkedin.com/in/benmburu or ben.mburu@gmail.com. ** Find out about our Strategy Accelerator at http://www.sweathead.com Follow the fun on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/sweathead Subscribe to our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/dscjW5

The BMJ Podcast
Covid in south Asia - India and Nepal

The BMJ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 53:37


In this podcast series, Kamran Abbasi, executive editor of The BMJ will convene experts from South Asia to discuss how the pandemic has affected the region, how measures like lock-down and vaccination have been handled, and the impact of the pandemic on the social determinants of health. In this first podcast, we're focussing on India and Nepal, and are joined by; Srinath Reddy, president of the Public Health Foundation of India. Biraj Swain, who works in global development in Asia and East Africa, is a senior media critic and Buddha Basnyat, director of the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit in Nepal. For more covid coverage www.bmj.com/coronavirus

Capital FM
RADIO ACTIVE 5TH OCT ( EAST AFRICA OLD SCHOOL RAP)

Capital FM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 56:07


RADIO ACTIVE 5TH OCT ( EAST AFRICA OLD SCHOOL RAP) by Capital FM

Here & Now
Nobel laureate Abdulrazak Gurnah; Virginia governor's race tightens

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:20


2021 Nobel laureate Abdulrazak Gurnah's novels center on themes of migration, identity and effects of colonialism in East Africa. Gurnah joins us. And, polls show the Virginia governor's race tightening between former Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe and GOP businessman Glenn Youngkin. Jessica Taylor of Cook Political Report and Kyle Kondik of Sabato's Crystal Ball join us to analyze the campaigns.

Around The Empire
Ep 237 Realignments in the Middle East & Africa feat Isa Blumi

Around The Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 66:57


Guest: Dr. Isa Blumi. This is a wide-ranging discussion about the political realignments in the Gulf states, new partnerships in the Middle East and Africa, Qatar's involvement in the withdrawal from Afghanistan, developments in Yemen, quiet military repurposing of strategic island of Socotra, the long and complicated exploitation of East Africa, the Red Sea region and Horn of Africa, the mass of military bases in Djbouti, the Turkey-Russia relationship and more. For those listening to the audio version of this podcast, we have added many maps and other visual enhancements to the video version that you might find helpful during some of this discussion so if you are interested you can find those versions on Youtube and Rokfin right now and other video platforms in the not too distant future.  Dr. Isa Blumi is an historian, an author and Professor of Global History, Islamic World, Ottoman Empire, Yemen, Albania. His most recent Destroying Yemen: What Chaos in Arabia Tells Us about the World tells the story of the wars in Yemen but also “ultimately tells an even larger story of today's political economy of global capitalism, development, and the war on terror as disparate actors intersect in Arabia.”  He also authored the book Ottoman Refugees, 1878-1939: Migration in a Post-Imperial World FOLLOW Isa Blumi @IsaBlumi and find his work at Google Scholar and his latest book at UCPress.edu.  Around the Empire aroundtheempire.com is listener supported, independent media. SUBSCRIBE/FOLLOW on Rokfin rokfin.com/aroundtheempire, Patreon patreon.com/aroundtheempire, Paypal paypal.me/aroundtheempirepod, YouTube youtube.com/aroundtheempire, Spotify, iTunes, iHeart, Google Podcasts FOLLOW @aroundtheempire and @joanneleon.  Join us on TELEGRAM https://t.me/AroundtheEmpire Find everything on http://aroundtheempire.com  and linktr.ee/aroundtheempire Recorded on October 6, 2021. Music by Fluorescent Grey. Reference Links: Book: Destroying Yemen: What Chaos in Arabia Tells Us about the World  

Elevated Magazines-Lifestyles, Jetsetter, Yachts, Automotive, Luxury Real Estate, Home & Design, Art
Emma Perrin | Ker & Downey Africa - “The Greatest Wildlife Show on Earth!”

Elevated Magazines-Lifestyles, Jetsetter, Yachts, Automotive, Luxury Real Estate, Home & Design, Art

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 32:46


Ker & Downey Africa - "The Greatest Wildlife Show on Earth!"Never before has there been a moment in time to listen to Emma Perrin, General Manager of the East Africa Division of Award-Winning and Responsible Ker & Downey Africa, ker-downeyafrica.com/. 

Grief 2 Growth
Adam Rabinovitch- Connecting Our Paths Eternally

Grief 2 Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 30:45


Adam has dedicated himself to a lifetime of service, prompted by the early passing of his toddler sister when Adam himself was a young boy.Today, Adam Rabinovitch is Executive Director of COPE - a nonprofit grief and healing organization dedicated to helping parents and families living with the loss of a child. I have worked with COPE to provide support to grieving families. They are a valuable resource.Adam was previously Executive Director of Giving Open Access to Learning, Inc. (GOAL) - a nonprofit educational program that provides children from under-served communities with the resources to help them get the most out of their education.Prior to that, he was Deputy Director of Neighbors Link a nonprofit committed to strengthening the healthy integration of immigrants in local communities.Adam is also proud to be a volunteer board member and to serve as Board Chair of Brick By Brick, a NGO and social enterprise dedicated to improving the lives of children and families in East Africa.ℹ️  https://www.copefoundation.orgSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/grief2growth)

The Science Hour
Drug resistant malaria found in East Africa

The Science Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 61:48


Since their discovery in the 1970s, artemisinin-based drugs have become the mainstay of treatment for malaria caused by the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. Researchers have identified artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites in Southeast Asia since the early 2000s, but now, there is evidence of resistance in Rwanda and Uganda. Dr Betty Balikagala of Juntendo University tells us how this resistance developed and what it means for managing malaria in Africa, which carries the greatest burden of malaria cases and deaths worldwide. We hear from some of the scientists from COVID Moonshot, a non-profit, open-science consortium which has just received key funding to develop affordable antivirals to stop SARS-CoV-2 in its tracks. Also on the programme, Dr Rakesh Ghosh from the University of California, San Francisco tells us how air pollution is contributing to 6 million preterm births globally each year, and Dr Catherine Nakalembe of the University of Maryland and Africa Lead for NASA Harvest returns to the programme as NASA/USGS launches Landsat 9. Also In the past 18 months we have heard lots about the human immune system, as we all learn about how our bodies fight off Covid-19 and how the vaccine helps protect us. But this got listener John, in Alberta, Canada, thinking about how trees and plants respond to diseases and threats. Do they have immune systems and if so, how do they work? Do they have memories that mean they can remember diseases or stressful events 5 months, or 5 years down the line, to be better prepared if they encounter the same threats again? Presenter Marnie Chesterton sets out to investigate the inner workings of plants and trees, discovering that plants not only have a sophisticated immune system, but that they can use that immune system to warn their neighbours of an attack. Some researchers are also investigating how we can help plants, especially crops, have better immune systems – whether that's by vaccination or by editing their genes to make their immune systems more efficient. But some plants, like trees, live for a really long time. How long can they remember any attacks for? Can they pass any of those memories on to their offspring? Crowdscience visits one experimental forest where they are simulating the future CO2 levels of 2050 to understand how trees will react to climate change. Image: Mosquito net demonstration in a community outreach centre in Kenya Credit: Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images

Tea Biz
Tea News and Biz Insight - October 1, 2021

Tea Biz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 22:03


HEAR THE HEADLINES – Kenya Exports Saturate the World's Black Tea Market | COVID Depresses Japanese Tea Business in Unique Ways | Unilever is Recognized as the Top Food and Agriculture Benchmark | NEWSMAKER – Mohit Agarwal Managing Director of the Asian Tea Group, owners of Cha de Magoma and the Monte Metilile brand | GUEST – Supply chain and procurementexpert John Snell, principal at NM Tea B, Toronto | FEATURES – This week Tea Biz travelsto Monte Metilile in Mozambique, a country along the southern coast of EastAfrica where Mohit Agarwal Managing Director of the Asian Tea Group has revived an abandoned 15,000-acre tea estate to demonstrate the viability of organic farming at scale... and then we talk with supply chain and procurement expert John Snell about what makes Mozambique such an exceptional tea-producing region. Producing Organic Tea at Scale Mozambique is the best-kept secret in the tea world, says Mohit Agarwal, Managing Director, the Asian Group. This growing region has beenhidden for centuries. With 6,325 acres under tea, Monte Metilile, located inGúruè, in Zambezia province, is the world's largest bio-organic tea garden anda success story that demonstrates the many advantages of scale in producinggreat-tasting, high-quality, clean teas. “Farming organic at scale is applyingthe required size to solve the problem,"" he says. Mozambique is God's Country for Tea A century ago, when the Portuguese first planted tea in Gúruè,Mozambique they found gentle, well-drained slopes of rich red volcanic soils at1,500 to 3,600 feet elevation – identical to the altitude of India's Darjeelingmid-tier gardens. The climate is cool and dry from May to September and hot andhumid between October and April. Annual rainfall averages more than 3,000millimeters. By 1950 production exceeded 20,000 metric tons a year and there was more land under tea in Mozambique than any country in Africa."

Science in Action
Drug resistant malaria found in East Africa

Science in Action

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 29:01


Since their discovery in the 1970s, artemisinin-based drugs have become the mainstay of treatment for malaria caused by the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. Researchers have identified artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites in Southeast Asia since the early 2000s, but now, there is evidence of resistance in Rwanda and Uganda. Dr Betty Balikagala of Juntendo University tells us how this resistance developed and what it means for managing malaria in Africa, which carries the greatest burden of malaria cases and deaths worldwide. We hear from some of the scientists from COVID Moonshot, a non-profit, open-science consortium which has just received key funding to develop affordable antivirals to stop SARS-CoV-2 in its tracks. Also on the programme, Dr Rakesh Ghosh from the University of California, San Francisco tells us how air pollution is contributing to 6 million preterm births globally each year, and Dr Catherine Nakalembe of the University of Maryland and Africa Lead for NASA Harvest returns to the programme as NASA/USGS launches Landsat 9. Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Samara Linton Image: Mosquito net demonstration in a community outreach centre in Kenya Credit: Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images

The Documentary Podcast
Buy me love: Inside the world of love coaching

The Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 27:20


Love coaching is a multi-billion dollar global industry, and one of the fastest growing in the world. More single people than ever are looking for advice to find a lasting romantic partnership. The result has been an explosion of coaches who claim to guide you to love through viral videos and costly in-person seminars. The BBC attends one such seminar in Kenya, with one of East Africa's most famous love and lifestyle coaches, Robert Burale. He says he can show women all the secrets and tricks to find love in days. But does it work? Is this really a route to buy love, or simply a way to sell a dream?

The Documentary Podcast
Buy me love: Inside the world of love coaching

The Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 27:20


Love coaching is a multi-billion dollar global industry, and one of the fastest growing in the world. More single people than ever are looking for advice to find a lasting romantic partnership. The result has been an explosion of coaches who claim to guide you to love through viral videos and costly in-person seminars. The BBC attends one such seminar in Kenya, with one of East Africa's most famous love and lifestyle coaches, Robert Burale. He says he can show women all the secrets and tricks to find love in days. But does it work? Is this really a route to buy love, or simply a way to sell a dream?

World Business Report
Green Party likely kingmakers after German election

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 22:56


Projected results from the German parliamentary elections show the centre-left Social Democrats are ahead of the conservative Christian Democrats (the party of outgoing Chancellor Angela Merkel) by about two per cent of the vote. The Green Party secured 15 percent of the votes and along with the fourth-placed FDP they are likely to be the kingmakers in coalition talks. It could take weeks or months for one to be formed. German political scientist Knut Roder tells Russell Padmore he believes it will be challenging getting a consensus. We get analysis on the implications for Europe's biggest economy's climate change policies from Stefan Kooths, director of research for business cycles and growth, at the Kiel Institut and from Sophie Pornschlegel, senior analyst at the European Policy Centre in Brussels. Also in the programme, from next month, people from South Sudan will no longer need a visa to enter Uganda, which could boost trade between both nations in East Africa. Nebert Rugadya reports from Kampala. And Daniel Frankel, managing editor of Next TV in Los Angeles, on the every-growing battle between the streaming giants in the US. Producer: Benjie Guy

The Take
The Course of the Forever Wars: The future

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 28:11


This is the final episode of a three-part series looking at the past, present, and future of the so-called ‘war on terror'.  For an idea of the next phase of the US's war on terror, we look to East Africa, where a different version of the war has been unfolding for the past 20 years. American soldiers may not patrolling the streets of Kenya, but the US's counterterrorism presence is very much there. In this episode: Fauziya Hussein (@diamamyn4zi1), Sister of disappeared Kenyan man Samar Al-Bulushi (@samar42), Political Anthropologist at University of California Irvine Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

Medicine, Marriage & Money
53. Curate Your Health with Dr. Heather Hammerstedt

Medicine, Marriage & Money

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 46:59


WHAT YOU WILL DISCOVER IN THIS EPISODE Medicine:  Medicine in East Africa, nonprofit, global emergency care How she worked herself out of a job What is Wholist  Marriage:  Ski bum in college met hubby through moonshine The quote she will never forget The best decision her hubby ever made Why it took 9 months of spreadsheeting to purchase a sprinter van Health Coach: Healing with whole foods Why she traveled from Philly to NY to get a healthy coach certificate What is Lifestyle medicine (sleep, nutrition, and exercise) 15 minutes podcast for her clients,  How her hubby lost 35 pounds Less processed food Local farms Plant-based 2-3 animal meals throughout the week Your children will eat and they will eat what you give them What you do not have in the house, is just as important as what you have in the house Healthy Foods for Picky Eaters: Tofu sticks with cheese Veggie smoothies  Egg cakes with veggies   TAKE HOME POINTS FROM Dr. Heather Hammerstedt Know your spouse so well, there there is no need to fight or get into arguments. This means you are always staying curious and trying to see things through their perspective or you have just accepted them for how they are...no need to change your spouse in order to make you feel better. Would you like them to change you just so they feel better...even if you do not want or agree for the need to change?  What you do not have in the house, is just as important as what you have in the house. Your children will eat and they will eat what you give them The goal is to work yourself out of a job WALK AWAY ASKING YOURSELF How can I Step back and be mindful? How can I delay quick action until I understand what is happening? Do we always eat chips while we eat football? Am I actually hungry or am eating because it is lunchtime? FEATURED ON THIS SHOW Website: www.wholisthealth.com Facebook: Curate Your Health Podcast: Curate Your Health Instagram: @wholisthealth    SPONSOR: Multifamily Masterclass Enrolling NOW! Covers everything from syndications to how to evaluate a deal! $800 off through 9/19 Course starts 10/4 Click Here to Find Out More

Hot Drinks - Stories From The Field
James "KG" Kagambi: NOLS & KG Mountain Expeditions - Stories From A NOLS Legend

Hot Drinks - Stories From The Field

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 43:00


Today our guest is James "KG" Kagambi, Senior NOLS Instructor and the owner of KG Mountain Expeditions. He joined NOLS  as a field instructor in 1987. KG has worked many curses types over the years but regularly works in NOLS mountaineering programs in Patagonia, Alaska, East Africa, and India. KG is not only a senior NOLS instructor; he is the most senior, having more weeks in the field than any other instructor in the history of the school! He has over 870 weeks in the field working for NOLS, that more than 6000 nights!! He has also completed three of the Seven Summits and in 1992 represented Africa in the U.N Peace Climb for the world on the Eiger. In addition, KG has summited the Eiger three times, became the first black African to summit Denali in 1989 and was the first black African to summit Aconcagua in 1994. KG has guided on Mount Kenya and Kilimanjaro since the 1990s and Today trains search and rescue teams on Mount Kenya, Kilimanjaro, and Rwenzori. KG's long-lasting commitments to the field of rock climbing and mountaineering in Kenya have prompted acknowledgment and respect in his country. While he is away from his beloved duty, he enjoys spending time with his family and children.   [3:50] KG talked about two jogging students and how one of them was chased by some Maasai. They were hiking in Kenya, and 2 of the female students wanted to go for a jog. KG allowed them to go but under some rules. They agreed to all of the rules and started their jog. When they reached the point which they promised not to go any further, one of the girls didn't stop and kept jogging even after the other girl told her that they should not go any further. While she was jogging, some Maasai saw her and tried to help her get back to her camp. They ran toward her to help her, but she thought they were trying to chase her.    [18:42] KG talked about his bizarre experience in Patagonia in 1994. It was KG'S second mountain course. After a very long bushwhacking on a rainy day, they got to treeline on a sunny and clear day. So they set up their tents on snow and got some rest. In the morning, everyone was ready to climb the peak, so they started their journey, and by ten, they reached the top of the peak. After hanging out for a while, KG and two of his fellow instructor made a group of 2 students head back down. As they were going down, KG and one of the instructors saw a small dark cloud, and just in minutes, a major wind storm descended upon them. So they started running while yelling to head back down fast and dig the tent's cord even deeper. As they got down, everyone began to dig into securing their tents, and KG was digging a deeper hole when suddenly the wind changed its direction, which made the tent flew up in the sky like a kite and kept going up. As the tent was in the sky, his stuff started to fall out, and his sleeping bag fell into a waterfall that made KG sleep in a wet sleeping bag for days. But eventually, everyone got out of that trip safe. Later in the show, KG answers the rapid-fire questions that reflect his jolly personality.