Podcasts about Depaul

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  • 1,058PODCASTS
  • 2,039EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • May 14, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Depaul

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Latest podcast episodes about Depaul

PassioneInter Talk ⚫️
Vigilia Cagliari-Inter, occasione De Paul e ultime di mercato - INTER NEWS

PassioneInter Talk ⚫️

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 64:08


Nuovo appuntamento in diretta con i giornalisti della redazione di Passione Inter e i membri del club di Passione Inter che vi offrono il punto della situazione con le principali news sull'Inter di giornata a partire dalle ultime verso Cagliari-Inter, le voci dalla Spagna sul ritorno di De Paul e tante altre notizie di mercato.

The Igloo
Season 3, Episode 86: DePaul Star Aneesah Morrow!

The Igloo

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 30:01


I said last time that the star power of guests wasn't gonna stop in May and beyond and I prove it here on this new episode with DePaul star and national Freshman of the Year Aneesah Morrow!

PassioneInter Talk ⚫️
PAURA Perisic, novità Suning, Lukaku e De Paul_ le news Inter del momento

PassioneInter Talk ⚫️

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 18:12


Le ultimissime sul rinnovo di Ivan Perisic, la suggestione Lukaku, le voci dalla Spagna su De Paul, la nostra esclusiva su Zapata e il futuro di Suning all'Inter: tutte le notizie più importanti sull'attualità dell'Inter.

Bernstein & McKnight Show
Transition: The Strus is loose

Bernstein & McKnight Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 19:05


Dan Bernstein was joined by Laurence Holmes for transition, where they had a conversation with executive producer Rick Camp about former DePaul star Max Strus' emergence for the Miami Heat, which led them to recall other players who have been great fits for their team's system in the NBA. The guys also discussed the White Sox's struggles in a 15-7 loss to the Yankees on Thursday.

Los goles de Carrusel
Los goles de Carrusel | Los goles del Elche 0 - 2 Atlético de Madrid | Simeone asegura un puesto para la próxima Champions

Los goles de Carrusel

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 2:52


Con sus goles, Cunha y De Paul certificaron el pase a la UEFA Champions League de la temporada que viene tras una cómoda victoria en Elche.

Carrusel Deportivo
Los goles de Carrusel | Los goles del Elche 0 - 2 Atlético de Madrid | Simeone asegura un puesto para la próxima Champions

Carrusel Deportivo

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 2:52


Con sus goles, Cunha y De Paul certificaron el pase a la UEFA Champions League de la temporada que viene tras una cómoda victoria en Elche.

Tiempo de Juego
Gol de De Paul (Elche, 0 - Atlético, 2)

Tiempo de Juego

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 3:47


Passione Inter Notizie
Mercato Inter, clamoroso scambio in vista per arrivare a De Paul?

Passione Inter Notizie

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 0:37


CALCIOMERCATO INTER - Rodrigo De Paul sta faticando all'Atletico e l'Inter insiste per portarlo a Milano: scambio in vista?

Caja Infinita
Capítulo 24 - La supuesta Muerte de Paul McCartney

Caja Infinita

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 57:02


Muchas son las historias ligadas a los Beatles y una vertiente muy fuerte de esas historias obviamente es la supuesta Muerte de Paul McCartney y todo lo que en referencia hay.Conducen: Omar Carrasco y Juan Manuel Ortiz.

Breaking The Lines Audio Podcasts
Road to Qatar Episode 3: Favourites & FOes: How Brazil & Argentina are Prized to add another Crown

Breaking The Lines Audio Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 43:25


Our journey down the Road to Qatar takes us to South America, where two of the tournament's giants lie in wait. Despite seven titles between the two sides, neither of them has won the big gold in 20 years. We talk to Hand of Pod's Santi Bauza and Junior from Brasiledition as they go beyond Messi and Neymar to give us insight on the new look national sides that are breaking the mold of player's past. From young stars like Vinicius and De Paul to stalwarts like Alves and Otamendi we sink our teeth into every aspect of these nation's chances --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/breaking-the-lines/message

PassioneInter Talk ⚫️
Verso Inter-Empoli tra Dybala e De Paul - INTER NEWS

PassioneInter Talk ⚫️

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 68:09


Nuovo appuntamento in diretta con i giornalisti della redazione di Passione Inter e i membri del club di Passione Inter che vi offrono il punto della situazione con le principali news sull'Inter di giornata.

PassioneInter Talk ⚫️
DE PAUL all'INTER: PRO e CONTRO del possibile AFFARE

PassioneInter Talk ⚫️

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 11:42


CALCIOMERCATO INTER: DE PAUL-INTER ULTIME NEWSQuali sono i pro e quali i contro del possibile affare di calciomercato di Rodrigo De Paul all'Inter.⚽️ Abbonati a questo canale per accedere ai vantaggi:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqQefqGM8yZV3CEwXBy388Q/join✅ Abbonati al club per stare in contatto con noi più privatamente e parlare insieme di Inter

Passione Inter Notizie
Mercato Inter, Biasin si sbilancia su de Paul: i dettagli

Passione Inter Notizie

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 0:35


CALCIOMERCATO INTER - Le ultime news di mercato su Rodrigo de Paul, centrocampista dell'Atletico Madrid, e l'Inter

L'essentiel de Paul Arcand
REM et rémunération : Charles Émond répond aux questions de Paul Arcand

L'essentiel de Paul Arcand

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 54:45


Une éducatrice en garderie de Montréal admet  avoir frappé quatre enfants : elle a plaidé coupable à  cinq chefs d'accusation de voies de fait. Un dossier de Bénédicte Lebel. Paul Arcand reçoit le président de la Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec, Charles Émond, qui affirme que c'est la mairesse de Montréal qui a torpillé le projet du REM de l'Est. Le 14 mai prochain, le masque ne sera plus obligatoire dans les endroits publics.  Voir https://www.cogecomedia.com/vie-privee/fr/ pour notre politique de vie privée

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: It's a bad idea not to pay your student loans, The Odd Couple, Severance, chicken nugget bowls,  Let Me Run This By You: Google is bullying Gina. What's your email archive strategy? We are all mostly old because the window of youth is shockingly short. Some of your dreams are NOT out of reach.Interview: We talk to T.J. Harris about coming to acting later in life, having a background in business, having a close-knit cohort, Title IX investigations, being the victim of racial profiling while at school, the paradox of slightly shy kids being told they were shy so often that they become even more withdrawn, Our Lady of Kibeho, Neighborhood 3: Requisition of Doom, Sean Parris, Chris Anthony.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):3 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.4 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.3 (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.4 (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?1 (34s):Anyway, so I had to like get him out of the house and like men are slow and I just, it's just, it's a really no win situation. So anyway. Hello. Hello Busy. I've been busy. We've all been busy.2 (51s):We have been doing the damn thing. Haven't we?1 (55s):Yeah.2 (56s):Yeah. I have spent the last, what feels like a week. Yeah. I think it's been a week simply reviewing every single dollar 20, 21, like literally and putting it in a spreadsheet, literally like can donuts, can you1 (1m 18s):Keep it because you can write off a lot2 (1m 20s):Of new machine. Yeah. That's yeah. That's, that's the point of it is to find everything that, that can be written off, but it's, you know, and I'm hunched and my back and my eyes strain, and it's just like, oh my God, Calgon, take me away.1 (1m 38s):Yeah. I mean, I think that taxes are one of those things where if you do them right, and legally it's a lot of work, right? It's like,2 (1m 47s):You want to skim and1 (1m 48s):Be shady, which I don't recommend, because guess what? The IRS is only job is to get your money. Like, that's their only job. They don't have any other purpose on the planet. So like, if you think that's not their job, you're wrong. But anyway, so if you do it right, like you are, it's a lot of freaking work and it also is painstaking.2 (2m 12s):And I, and, and it's painstaking. And I think, you know, to, to, to find a silver lining in it, like, I'm so glad I don't have a full-time job because this is the kind of thing that literally, I don't know how people, when it's, when everybody works, how they do it it's1 (2m 35s):Well, you can't. I mean, I think it's, that's why people end up in trouble. Like, that's why people end up trying to skin his scam or not doing them and being like, you know what, I'm going to pass on all this. I'm just going to hope for them. And like, that's what I did with my student loans, because I didn't want to, and that's not even as hard as taxes, but I just like, couldn't cope with the ins and outs of doing the work to defer or like make deals, or like get my payments lower. And thus, I had a sheriff show up at my apartment. Like that is where you're headed. You don't know that story. Oh, all right. So I thought, oh, it'd be really cool to not pay my student loans.1 (3m 15s):I mean, I didn't really have the money, but I also didn't realize that my student loans were private student loans. Oh boy. So when they're private, you're in big trouble, because guess what? It's a bank that wants their money. It's not the government who has a million other things to do. Right. So the bank is like, no, we want our money. And I did that. Know that the bank hires the Sheriff's department to serve papers when you are being sued for your private loans. So one day I am N in Rogers park at my thinking, you know, nothing of it. Like I, I owed 50 grand and I to like four different banks. Right. It's always, and they sell them to other people and it's a big scam.1 (3m 56s):Right. Okay. Fine. But I'm like going about my business thinking, but feeling bad, but like, feeling like, ah, fuck it. Like, who cares? Well, they care. Wait,2 (4m 7s):How long were you not paying them1 (4m 9s):For a couple of years? Maybe I just said, forget it in 15, 20, 15. I said, no more. And then in 27, 20 17, I'm literally, I kept getting calls. They started calling miles and I was just the guy just pay no attention. Miles, like pay no attention. And of course he's like so trusting. He was like, okay, I'll pay no attention. I'll compartmentalize. And okay. So one day there's a, our buzzer goes off and I'm like, hello. Cause no one ever. He's like, this is the Sheriff's department. Are you Jennifer Bosworth? And I was like, and then I realized, I really quickly, your mind goes, oh, what have I done wrong?1 (4m 50s):Right. And it focuses it on the thing. Cause you know what you've done right. Or what I've done wrong. And I'm like, oh, my here is the PA the Piper or the pied Piper or whoever is coming to collect chickens, home to roost all the things. And I was like, and I just said, I have a lawyer go away. And he goes, no, we just, we just want to give you these papers. Like we have to give you these papers. I'm like, no, I have a lawyer go away. Which is the wrong thing to do.2 (5m 19s):What also, what was your logic there? I have a lawyer. Okay.1 (5m 23s):There was no logic. I would say it was the opposite of logic is what's going on. So I see that they go away because, and so they're paid by the bank. So they just hire the Sheriff's department to serve people. I did not know that it's like, they, they you're there for hire basically the Sheriff's department. So they go and they serve people and they could not serve me. But then what it did was it was really actually a great kick in the pants because I was like, oh, I have a court date now. So no. So what I did was I said, okay, let me find it. So then I was like, I need a lawyer. So, and then on my 43rd birthday or 42nd, 42nd birthday.1 (6m 10s):Yeah. 42nd birthday. I went to the lawyer. I found this lawyer fucking brilliant. I can't remember her name right now. She was like legally blonde. She had these long pink nails and her only job was to get people off student loans and, and either file bankruptcy or figure out a way to talk. The loan people doubt. She was a bad-ass and I went there and I was like crying. And I was like, look. And she was like, oh, $50,000. That's nothing. And I was like, oh, she's like, I got people that I was, you know, 600,000 in medical school loans,2 (6m 43s):Medical school, that's1 (6m 45s):All. But also she goes, yeah, the private loans they get ya, you know? So, so she, she, okay. So she said, I said, well, what do I do? I can't remember her name. She was so awesome. And I, and she's like, well, do you have the money? I'm like, well, look, I have this inheritance. She's like, oh no, no, no, no, no, no. Then we can't declare bankruptcy because they'll go after your inheritance. I was like, oh, hell to the, no. So she's like, all right, well, we'll try to get him down. So she reduced $50,000 to $25,000 for a fee of $3,000 and went to court and was like, you know, so she talked them down. She's like, you're getting nothing. If you don't take this 25,000, she's like, can you get me 25,000?1 (7m 27s):I'm like, sure. So I, then it happened to be, we were selling the house around that time. Anyway, I got the money and then my life has, but my credit was literally if a here's what people don't understand. It's like, it may be stupid, but the credit matters. But if you want to live somewhere,2 (7m 46s):Right? Like if you want to be on the grid,1 (7m 49s):If you want to like have a house that is, if you ever want to apply for apartment, if you ever want to it matters. I know it shouldn't. I always tell my students like, yeah, all this shit shouldn't matter, but it does everyone. It does. I hate the fact that it does, but let's be honest about the truth here. Let's just get real. So my, my credit now, what my credit was so low, I can't remember what it was. And I was like, oh, that's not so bad. And my friend was like, that's the worst credit you're going to have? And I was like, oh, okay. I was like, I didn't understand the scale. Right? Like I was like, oh, five 40 isn't bad. Or five, some days she was like, that's like the worst. So now my credit is seven 80.1 (8m 30s):Oh no, no. I got it. All of it is seven 50 because I paid it off. And like, I don't, we don't have any debt. Thank God credit card wise. Oh, because vials is, if, if it were up to me, I probably have debt up to my eyeballs, unfortunately. But my partner is like, oh no, no, no. He's really good with that. Thank God. Oh boy. Cause I have some problems because my parents never taught me shit. You know? So no, all this to say, how did this come up?2 (8m 58s):Because we were talking about,1 (8m 60s):Sorry.2 (9m 1s):Okay. But so many things about your story. First of all, it was $50,000. Just the amount you owed from the time that you stopped paying, or are you saying it has a total of $50,000?1 (9m 15s):No, I had more than that. So I had had 80 and I had paid 30 of it off because I went to school like in oh eight. I graduated. So it's not like a long time. So I had 50, 80,000 total. I had paid 30 somehow some way and all those years around there. And then I had 50 left. Yeah. And I was used to pay the 50, but then I2 (9m 38s):Just, just asking, but like, could anybody go to a lawyer and say, reduce my,1 (9m 45s):Yeah. That's their whole, because here's what the, yes, this is what they don't tell you is that2 (9m 50s):I feel like such an asshole. Right?1 (9m 54s):Doris is literally overdosing on melatonin. Hold on. Okay.2 (9m 58s):Oh my God. I can't believe I could have. I just pay. All of my students will never1 (10m 6s):Happen again. Come2 (10m 7s):Here, Come here. I just can't believe I've paid every penny of my student loans. What is wrong with me? I'm just the worst partner ever. Sorry. No, you're not. You're not the worst person. She meets me. And I eat1 (10m 31s):That2 (10m 32s):Thing away from her and I gave her all kinds of,1 (10m 35s):Okay. So yeah. You don't feel like an asshole because here's the thing. They never tell you this, that you can everything's negotiable in this country. Okay. Every single thing is negotiable. Everything's a business deal. Everything can be reduced. Why? Because there's no set rate for anything that's capitalism. So you, you, you can charge whatever you want. And then it's negotiable. So what she told me was these companies, these banks, they're banks, they're not companies. I mean, they're banks. These banks know that they will get nothing. If someone declares bankruptcy. Okay. So they don't know that I had this inheritance, this, you know, but they, they know that most people say F you I'm part of capitalism is bankruptcy.1 (11m 22s):I'm declaring bankruptcy. You get $0. So they want anything. They'll take pennies on the goddamn dollar. So she's like, oh no. And it's a fine line. And that's why you need a lawyer to go to court and say, my client has nothing. So if you want anything, she'd lucked into 25 grand. She can, she can scrape by twenty-five grand. You want that? Or you want Jack shit. And then they'll say, give me the 25 grand.2 (11m 45s):Right? Right. Well, I, I, it doesn't matter. Now I had done this, you know, 10 years ago. I mean, because the thing is, of course, like you take, you borrow $50,000 and you pay 300, basically.1 (11m 58s):It's ridiculous. Especially with private loans. Ridiculous.2 (12m 3s):That's what, and that's what I had. I had a lot of problems, but the other thing that's so striking about your stories, the moment when you start, when you said you had this moment in 2015, where you said, fuck it. I just, that gave me such a thrill. Like if you would, just because the reason I couldn't do that is I would think about it every second of the day.1 (12m 25s):I would have. Yeah. Because my mom was my co-signer, but that lady was dead. So I was like, what are they going to do? Cause she was really, I was more afraid of my mother than the federal and then the, then the bank and the government. So the private loans and the government. So I, if she was alive, you bet your ass. I would have been paying those motherfuckers off2 (12m 45s):Of my loans for social work school had to have a co-signer of my father-in-law. And for some reason that I never did get to the bottom of Wells Fargo. If I was one day late for a payment, they wouldn't even call me or contact me in any way. They just immediately, it was all on him. Yes. And he would of course call me the second that they called him. And it was so embarrassing every time I'd be like, I mean, it happened like, I want to say it happened five or six1 (13m 19s):Times. That is so easy to do.2 (13m 22s):It's silly. But1 (13m 24s):It's2 (13m 24s):Also like, this is the mafia. Like you're you're one day late in your payment and you don't say, Hey, could you pay me? You just go, do you just threaten somebody to break?1 (13m 33s):Yeah, it's a psychological tactic. It's like some real Scientology bullshit.2 (13m 38s):It was horrible. Horrible, horrible. So if you have a few, can't pay your student loans. If you're listening to this and you cannot pay your student loans, call a lawyer,1 (13m 52s):Let me run this by you.2 (13m 58s):And then I'm also doing another, another way in which I'm an obsessive rural follower is that Google sent me a message saying, I have exceeded my storage limit by 380%. And if that, if I listen, anybody could, anybody can bully me. I am so easily bullied. It said, if you don't, if you don't pay more for storage or get rid of some of what you have, you will no longer be able to send or receive emails. So I spent five hours yesterday going through1 (14m 34s):A bad idea in some it's2 (14m 36s):Not about idea. Well, I've got it down. Sorry. I was, I was out, I was using 385%. I'm down to 340% after deleting probably 10,000 emails1 (14m 49s):With like, is it true? What they're saying?2 (14m 52s):I don't know. All I know is that when I log onto my email and I see a big red line across the top,1 (14m 60s):I can't,2 (15m 1s):I can't take it. I can't take the red line, but upside, it has been a walk down memory lane, you know, because things, I mean, people I'm having email exchanges with, it seems sort of intimate. And I'm like, I have no idea who that person is. Or like reading email. I looked for the oldest email I have from you, which on this, on this, my Gmail is from 2008. And just, you know, whatever, like you were talking about your job. And I was talking about my job and I found the, the engagement announcement. Yeah.1 (15m 40s):That's2 (15m 40s):Kind of fun too. And, and also I realized I had thousands of emails that I just simply don't need. Like I keep every email. Do you keep all of your emails?1 (15m 51s):No. So I I'm so weird. I never have more than zero unread in my inbox.2 (15m 59s):Well, wait, did I just mean you archives of metal?1 (16m 3s):No, I just delete them. Not all the good one. No, no, no, no. I, I don't, I I'm terrible that I don't know how to do shit, so I don't put them in folders or anything like that or archive.2 (16m 18s):And then you have1 (16m 19s):Zero2 (16m 20s):Emails.1 (16m 21s):Yeah. It's because I have no life maybe. And I just,2 (16m 25s):The chairman for you have a full life and now you don't have any of your emails back from you. Don't1 (16m 30s):You know, I have that.2 (16m 32s):Well, how do you have them?1 (16m 34s):I erased the ones as they come in that are know that I don't know longer that have attachments and no longer need.2 (16m 41s):Okay.1 (16m 42s):So I manage my box. So here's the thing I will run out of storage. It's just that I don't think I get a lot of emails. I don't, I actually don't like, I'm always saying, I want more emails. I'm like the only person that wants them. I'm so like, I love paperwork and I love emails. And so I don't know. I'm always like no one ever emails me. It's so weird. But anyway, the pain is,2 (17m 5s):It's not possible that no one ever emails. You Did. The thing that I did, which is I accidentally deleted all my emails from1 (17m 15s):No, I remember that. That was hilarious. And now,2 (17m 19s):For example,1 (17m 20s):So right now I have zero emails, unread, unread,2 (17m 26s):Unread, you keep everything in your inbox.1 (17m 29s):Yeah. You know me, my desktop. How2 (17m 33s):Many emails are in your inbox? Just1 (17m 38s):30,000. I mean read 30,035.2 (17m 44s):Okay. Well what do you do when you have to find?1 (17m 50s):Well, that's why I can't never find my, Why you don't say why it happened. You have ISO every time you send me, it's bad. But miles miles was like, cause now miles is really into email because of his job for the last six months, his new job. And he's like, but you have no full zero four.2 (18m 8s):No, but zero folders. My shoulder, my shoulders are getting so tough.1 (18m 16s):So, Okay. So anyway, it beans, like I'm not saying I have a good system. Like I don't have a good system. I have no system. But what it is is I'm just proud. I don't have like, I'm really judgy about people that have a lot of unread emails. So like literally if I walk by and coworking and I see someone's inbox has like 12,000 unread, I go, oh God, I go, nothing, nothing, nothing little do they know? I have not one fucking folders. So I can't pay,2 (18m 47s):I need to start in a production of the odd couple because I am.1 (18m 54s):I know I look at your, I don't even know how you make. I look at our joint email. I don't know what these folders mean. I don't know what there's like sub folders to me. I'm like,2 (19m 6s):Now that you're, now that we're discussing this, I'm realizing another fake fakery folders actually don't have any meaning because actually, well, because actually, if you wanted to find an email,1 (19m 22s):This is like from2 (19m 23s):Right. If you want to find an email from target, you can just Google. I mean, you can just search.1 (19m 29s):Yes. But the problem is if you have 4,000, let me run this by you emails. So that is my, so I need you to set it up. I thought I had set it up for, for my, let me run this links. No. So what I did was set up a ma a new G Gmail account2 (19m 47s):And it's not1 (19m 48s):Good. It's not fair. So the bottom line is, I don't think my system is great, but what I think is I like I Le well, I'm weird in that. I like having no unread emails, but at the same time, I don't feel like people are emailing me enough.2 (20m 3s):We did a freaky Friday. You and me and you were thrust into my life. And I was thrusted. I think that I would immediately feel relieved because I feel like you don't necessarily carry around you. I mean, you have a lot of stuff that you have to carry around, but you don't necessarily carry around this need to do everything. Perfect.1 (20m 27s):Oh, no. And I think that comes, I swear to God. A lot of it is with kids, because if you fuck up with yourself, okay, so you're a fuck up. But if you are a parent of three children and you don't, you fuck up, you end up like a lot of people we know, which is, and the kids ended up like, like we, us and people, we know we don't like, so that is, I feel like if I was dropped in. So, so I feel like if I was dropped into your life, I would like it. Cause you have like all this space Around and everything.2 (21m 0s):And my kids would love it because you're fun. And that's, that's like, that's like the dynamic, that's the thing in our house. It's like, mom's no fun. Mom is doing, she's got the rules. She's1 (21m 12s):No, no, I'd be like, all right, let's do, let's eat fried food. This would be my thing. I'd be like, Eat fried food. And I can't eat that anymore. But if I dropped into your life, I could write, I could eat that. And I would say, okay, this is what I used to eat before my hurt. Like what completely I would have. I was thinking about the other day, something called a chicken nugget bowls. Okay. Which was, I would a2 (21m 37s):Bowl of chicken nuggets1 (21m 39s):Mixed with, okay. So I'd go to trader Joe's and get the chicken nuggets and then bake those. And then their, their potatoes, fries, fries, and th and literally dump a bunch of that in a bowl, put some ketchup and mix it all up and just have like a chicken nugget fry. But that's not good for you, by the way.2 (22m 2s):Why was it appealing to put it in a bowl? Instead of1 (22m 5s):I liked the combo of the two together and like the ketchup was the glue that held it all together. And I loved that, but the problem was I gained a lot of weight and then my heart went down. You can't really2 (22m 18s):Mean the thing1 (22m 20s):About adulthood, the shit you really like can not be maintained if you want to live.2 (22m 25s):I mean, it's such a bummer. I recently realized that youth really only lasts for 25 years. So, so, so everybody is mostly old, right? Like everybody's friends, the majority of their life that didn't occur to me for some reason, I think because we're so youth obsessed in this culture, I had this way of fit, not logically, but like I had this way of thinking about it. Like it's this long epoch of life, but really1 (22m 59s):You're old for a very long time. And then you die.2 (23m 2s):And then you're also very young for a period of time. So the, the period of time where you're autonomous and1 (23m 14s):We also missed it.2 (23m 16s):And then we were just walking around, feeling horrible about ourselves.1 (23m 19s):That is such a waste. Right? The other thing I was going to tell you, I have a really good story to tell you about someone we know that I can share, because it's a good story. This is a story about why it's good. That life can be good. Okay. I'm teaching at DePaul, our Alma mater, as you know, if you listen to the show, okay. I teach fourth year BFA actors on zoom, which I wasn't supposed to, but I got special and that's a whole nother Oprah and itself. But so I have students and one of my things is we write pitch letters. I help them. Cause that's my jam. I love doing that. Even if it's a pitch letter for them, for a tour to a rep, to a producer, whatever we write these like bio pitch letters.1 (24m 3s):Okay, fine. So I had this student, I still have the student and he's a wonderful youngster. And he's like talking his dream. This is so crazy. His dream is to be in the Mar somehow in the Marvel universe. Okay. Like he wants his dream is to be in a movie, a Marvel movie. But of course he wants a foot in the door, anything. And he goes, and I said, okay, well, like why we're developing his pitch letter with the class. Everyone takes turns, blah, blah, blah. And he's like, I would really like the career of this guy that I, that I've heard about named Sean Gunn. I'm like, wait,2 (24m 37s):Oh my God.1 (24m 39s):He said, he said, I know he went to the theater school. And like, I know, and I'm thinking to myself, cause you know, I obviously we've interviewed Sean gone listened to his interview and obviously, and we've done it twice, right? No, didn't we do two, two parts. I wasn't that the second one. But yeah. And obviously we know him and obviously he's not like my best friend, but I, and I was like thinking to myself and he's like, I just would really love to pitch him. And I was like, oh my God. So we created a dope letter to Sean Gunn. And I wrote to Sean and said, Hey, my students are doing this thing. He would love to jump on a zoom and they're going to have a zoom. So he's going to meet his hero.2 (25m 20s):That's I1 (25m 21s):Know I couldn't have been happier. I was like, I actually am doing something that makes a difference. So I'm facilitating the zoom between Alex and Sean and Sean was gracious enough to do it. And, and it turns out that he's filming. I think in Atlanta, you know, probably some marble thing and, and he gets off this week. And so it's, he has some time and Alex is like lipping out. Out's 21, right. This kid, he's like a great kid. He did stop motion classes. Like he, like, he knows how to do that as an actor, like the guy is in his letter, I really helped him with his letter. And, and Sean said, this, your student's letter is so sweet. Like I love it. So anyway, the point is, I was like, oh my gosh, this is, this is also to say that another reason the podcast is good.1 (26m 8s):Right. Because you just don't know how you're going to like pass it along. And FYI in two months, my students are going to be our colleagues. Right. Cause they're graduating. So you don't know, like, I don't know what they'll need for me or what I need from them.2 (26m 22s):I always say, you're the person who identified from the very beginning that this podcast was going to be healing to people. And not only are you doing it in this way, but you're also doing it in a way that you're through your work as a teacher correcting the thing that almost everybody who comes on says, I, yeah, I got all this education. But then when I graduated and now I do anything, like you're giving them at least,1 (26m 47s):And I do one-on-ones with them. And because I'm like, look, yes, exactly what happens to us and happened to everyone that we've talked to almost missed, except for like three people. And we've talked to a lot of people happened to is happening again, because I think there's obviously a bigger question of the reckoning of how do we change at a theater stage, acting conservatory to become more friendly towards launching these students in a way where they actually can get work and live and not worry and not worry as much that everything is for not. And what am I doing?1 (27m 26s):And I didn't get picked or chosen and how to write a pitch letter. Like FYI, all the people that I'm helping write pitch letters, they're all getting their meetings with people. It just, anyway, you were saying like, you can access.2 (27m 41s):Yeah. People it's, I'm not suggesting that anybody you want to talk to, you can just hit them up and talk to them. But I am just sort of speaking to this barrier that I have always had myself this mental barrier of like, well, I could never talk to so-and-so it's this thing about like, I could never follow my dream. You know, I recently realized that I actually was afraid to say inside of my own head, what a dream, what my dream was like. Right. Like I, I just made 99% of life completely out of reach for me. And then just try and then just try to figure out what this 1% that I could.1 (28m 24s):Yeah. I mean, that's what trauma does to you. That's what it does. It says you are, you can't even, it's not safe to even dream in your own fantasy. So most what I'm finding is as the more I talk to people in the more I sort of do research for like my own writing on trauma, on like serial killers, really. But like that the trauma is so crystallized at a young age, right. That there, it cuts off all access to hope. That's the effect of trauma. There is no hope. So you operate in this one, teeny little place of, I'm not going to hope, but I'm still going to live. Cause I'm not going to die. So there's, it's like, it's like, yeah, yeah.1 (29m 6s):There's no hope trauma cuts off the access to pipeline, to hope and to not just joy, but hope.2 (29m 13s):Yeah. And, and if it's true, like we were saying that youth is this short window, the good on the good side is there is hope in your older years that you can evolve to be the person that1 (29m 28s):You really can't. It takes a lot of work and it takes a lot of, it's not easy. And it's like really bizarre how you get there. But if you keep putting in the work and get support, it is possible. Even at 40, like that's the other thing that I am so clear on because I launched this consulting business so crazy. Like I thought I was going to get a nine to five and like, so my consulting business has taken off. Right. Because you've just fantastic. And people are like, how are you having so many clients? This is the reason I have no imposter syndrome. When it comes to this particular skill, like I'm scared as shit to be an actor. I'm scared as shit to write, to be a writer.1 (30m 9s):I'm still doing it, but I'm scared in that way, a screenwriter, a television writer, that kind of thing. But if you ask me to sit down with somebody and help them to pitch themselves and to crystallize their vision of what their thing is, whatever their thing is, I don't care what it is. I have zero imposter syndrome. I know you don't have to hire me. I don't get that's, you know, but I know that I am good at that beyond a shadow of a doubt because things have all come together to show me that. So my own work emotionally, I'm working with you on this podcast and in the entertainment business and my past life and entertainment and getting a master's in counseling, psych literally has prepared me to do this thing.1 (30m 57s):And I have no like, fear that if I'm talking to somebody about it, that they're going to think I'm full of shit, because it's actually the truth of what it's undeniable, it's undeniable, you eat it. And it's because I put in the work. And also I just it's one of the side effects of being a traumatized and neglected child is, is, and then doing the work to work through that is noticing that in other people and where their trauma points are. So now, like I'm literally about to start pitching my services to the district attorney's office for, for trials, for people to do closing lawyers that are scared to do closing arguments in a theatrical way.1 (31m 42s):Isn't that crazy? I was watching the John Wayne Gacy trial and I was like, oh, this guy has an amazing closing in his, his closing argument. The da was so brilliant. And it's known as like, he did this beautiful theatrical, but also tasteful thing. Cause sometimes it can be like a carnival, but like, and so I was like, oh, how do I help people do that? Cause that's, you know, and that's always tricky in the legal system, but I've also worked in the legal system. So I know a little bit, so anyway, that's my new, I'm like, yeah, these, some of these lawyers2 (32m 14s):How I1 (32m 15s):Have like stage fright, so litigators even, and they need help. So anyway, we shall see where that goes, but I don't have, I don't have, I'm not afraid that doesn't, I don't have imposter syndrome about that.2 (32m 28s):Yeah. Oh, thank God. We should all have at least one thing that we don't feel like we're an imposter about1 (32m 34s):One thing. I mean, for God's sake7 (32m 43s):Today on the podcast, we are talking to TJ Harris, TJ terrorists introduced us to the idea of the artist preneur and his background in business is what helped him get to that exciting place. So please enjoy our conversation with TJ Harris.2 (33m 2s):Okay. All right. All right. Congratulations. TJ Harris, you survived1 (33m 9s):And you did it with some very like your energy just from the emails and from your life is like so positive, ridiculously positive, which I adore and which I think we need. And also you call yourself and you are an extra preneur,8 (33m 29s):Brilliant1 (33m 30s):Artists, preneur artists are brilliant. Brilliant, brilliant mixing of that. Like I love that. Did you come up with that or?8 (33m 39s):Yeah, well I think so. I probably stole it from somebody else, you know, as all artists do. Yeah. But I have, I have, I started in business before acting, so I came to lading to acting and filmmaking later in life. I'm 34 right now. And this I've been on this journey for about six years. So I, I kind of started out like in finance, I studied, I got a general studies degree in undergrad. I went to ball, state university in Indiana and I was a business administration major at first and I hated it.8 (34m 19s):Absolutely hated it, but I knew it was during the time, like right before the recession hit where it was like, just get a degree to get a job. So I was like, okay, I'll get a business degree. But I ended up switching over to general studies with a concentration in finance and sociology. And during that time, I, I, I've always felt like I've been kind of in this, this middle ground of not really knowing which route I wanted to go, because I didn't want to become a doctor and I didn't want to become a lawyer and I didn't want to go down this. Like somebody already created my path for me. So I just kind of started experimenting with things, graduated with my degree.8 (35m 2s):I got a job with a company that I'm currently still with. I worked part-time for him. Yeah. So I I'm, I'm a consultant. Part-time1 (35m 12s):Oh, you know, what's so funny. That is so rare that people keep their job after they graduate from a, from a fine arts, like from a conservatory that they, as a master's student. That is fantastic. And why did you keep it? Like, could you love that work? What makes you want to keep it?8 (35m 30s):No. So, I mean, they know, I don't really love it. So I actually quit. I quit prior to coming to going to TGS for grad school. So the plan was just to, just to be done with it because I really want to transition out of this industry, but it keeps pulling me back somehow. So I quit. And then I had an exit interview and someone that when I first started with the team, the PR one of my colleagues ended up being the manager of the team when I was leaving. So did an exit interview and I was like, Hey, if you all, like, I'll come back and help out while I'm in school, if you all need my help.8 (36m 10s):So six months later, they brought me back as a contractor. So I was working in like, ha basically all my bills were paid for through working this job. Part-time while being at TTS1 (36m 24s):Here, here's the thing. This is brilliant for a lot of reasons. But one of is which, you know, I teach BFA fours at the theater school and, and now they have a class and I don't know, you may have had something to do with it. I don't know that that's called actors as, as entrepreneurs. There's like a, but, but it reminds me of like, they're trying to, but you already did that on your own. So like you, I never, it is so brilliant that you were able to maintain that job so that you might guess is you were able to live, like you had some Dota live on. Right.8 (37m 1s):I didn't take out any additional student loans or anything like that. I did just the bare minimum. And I was living with a friend from undergrad. So my rent was like, mama shit. He charged me charged charge, like 600 or $700 to be in a really nice place. I didn't have to pay your abilities. And I was living with a friend that I knew, so, and it was, it was, so the reason I quit is because I asked to go remote from my previous manager, but they didn't really work that out for me. So I quit. And I was like, you know what? I don't, I don't need it. So they brought me back and it was like, it was a part-time remote. And I already knew that job. And I was, I was basically locked site.8 (37m 43s):So like in the middle of rehearsal on breaks, I was doing work. It's all project based work. I was doing work in between rehearsals in between classes. I would check in and check my emails and just kind of set my own hours. And so when, like when the pandemic hit, I was already in the work from home mindset.2 (38m 2s):I have to stop you for one second. Cause there's so many things that you're saying I want to respond to. One is it's always a good sign, a good omen when just organically, the conversation turns to exactly what she and I were talking about before we started talking to you, we were talking about student loans and what a albatross they are for so many people so that you did yourself, such a favor by not having to go down that path. But also what I, what we always find in the MFA's is they really already know how to hustle, right? Because they've been in the workforce, hustling is like the thing you have to be as an actor.2 (38m 42s):And I feel like that isn't writ large enough when you're in a training program. Like, listen, you can learn about intention till the cows come home. But what you really have to be able to do is figure out how to do a lot of things all the time. Right?1 (39m 0s):Go ahead, go ahead.8 (39m 1s):Oh, I was going to say, yeah, I was, I was already hustling. I was working the full-time job and then immediately go into rehearsal for four hours and then rehearsing on my own after rehearsal and then going back to a job the next day.1 (39m 13s):Well, so this leads me to a question that maybe you can answer, which is okay. So the MFA, what I'm noticing, cause I also am doing a little workshop with some of the MFA actors this year and a writing workshop because I'm really interested in writing8 (39m 28s):Ones or twos or threes. It's all weird. Now1 (39m 32s):I know it's all weird. No, these are twos. And, and anyway, what I'm learning is that maybe, and you can see what you think about this. Maybe we need to look at restructuring acting conservatories to be more like MFA programs versus BFAs. Because like yourself, we have found that the MFA actors who graduate seem way more prepared to live the life of an, of a, of an artist preneur versus the BFAs who are like, I don't know, they seem like daring, like losing it.1 (40m 12s):Right. So what is your thought on that MFA versus BFA for you?8 (40m 17s):So it's a catch 22 because obviously like I wanted my MFA experience and the BFS, you know, we worked together, we rehearsed together and we did shows together and we were offered a lot of the same classes, but also you want that distinction of like, I'm paying more to get this specialized area. And I don't know if when I was 18 or 22, if I would have been in that mindset, like, I don't know what I want it then. So I think it might've been, I think it's a lot to process studying, acting and the business of acting and to make it all make sense, unless you already have an area that you're interested in and you can like apply while you're in, in school from the business side.2 (41m 16s):Did, did your career in business set that intention for you to be an artist preneur from before you ever started the program before you were restarted your MFA?8 (41m 28s):For sure. Yeah. I, so I can, I consider getting my MBA and I was looking at like Northwestern or, and just to preface, I had really had no interesting getting my masters. DePaul was the only school that I applied for because I, I was considering moving to Chicago or LA and I just wanted the training because I didn't study theater and, and undergrad. So I just wanted the training and I was like, you know what? I grew up in I'm from Northwest Indiana. I'm from Gary. And I knew, I knew of DePaul and I really, I searched top 25 MFA programs.8 (42m 10s):And I was like, oh, this isn't in Chicago. And then I looked at like UC San Diego, because that would get me close to LA. So I applied to DePaul and going into it. I told myself that I was never going to get my masters unless it was for something that I absolutely loved, like absolutely without a doubt. So it was acting. And I knew that I knew that I didn't want to get out of school and be poor. Cause like I don't, I don't like the concept of being a struggling poor artists.2 (42m 45s):Well, thank you. Thank you for saying that, that I really appreciate that because that persists as a myth that we all need to be living in a Garret somewhere. But how did you audition when you never studied that? Or did you ever act?8 (43m 2s):I was, I was acting, I was doing like community theater and I had an agent. I was doing improv. I was doing commercials and auditioning for TV and film and doing a lot of auditioning for theater and taking like workshops and classes. I had a vocal coach, so I was training, but it was like a self study type of training. And I never really had the core foundation of what acting is all at once. So I don't honestly, it's just one of those things where I like I'm, I'm very much a spiritual. And like you put out, you get whipped back what you put out into the universe. And like this life, the life that I've been kind of creating for myself is very surreal because things just like on paper, things should not happen the way that they have, you know?1 (43m 48s):Oh, tell us about that. Okay. So what, first of all, my question, my, my feeling is good. Good for you because I think you're making it, it sounds like it's exciting. Things are happening and they're coming together for you. So I guess my first question would be is what is the most exciting thing that is happening for you? Right this second,8 (44m 9s):This second wall, I just established my production company, my film production company in December. And I haven't launched like technically to the public, right until next month. Like I have an official launch day, May 15th next year, next year, next month, while next month. And the most exciting things that are happening are like, I have a small business client lined up for mark doing marketing work. I have someone that approached me for producing a web series that we're kind of developing the scripts. And then last night, DePaul school of cinematic arts student approached me to produce their MFA thesis, which is going to be a sag, a sag agreement.8 (44m 55s):So we just locked that in and that'll be, and I, I can't talk about it too much right now, but that's, we're shooting that in August.2 (45m 4s):Congratulations.8 (45m 5s):So even all of those things are just kind of happening and I haven't even really hit the ground. Yeah.2 (45m 11s):Oh my God. You're going to skyrocket. So what ways, if any, did the theater school experience challenge what you already knew about acting from having been a professional actor before the program?8 (45m 28s):In a lot of ways, it actually made me, it kind of hurt me a lot because I was very naive going into, and I was a lot more free and a bigger risk taker. And then when I got into TTS, you know, you start peeling back all of those layers about yourself and you're getting constant criticism and people were telling you to experiment, but also it's, you can't really experiment because you're getting graded and you're supposed to be taking risks and shows, but you're also getting a rehearsal and performance grades. So they call it caused a lot of like internal conflict. Where,1 (46m 4s):Why does that happen? Is that just the nature of school? I'm really curious as to why. So we have a beginner's mindset, right. Which is a beautiful thing. A lot of us, when we go in some of us, some of, you know, some of your classmates could, like some of ours probably would have been acting since they were like one month old, but for most of us, we didn't know what the hell was going. I didn't anyway. It really was going on. Yeah. So what is it when you say it's cut? Cause you said it was kind of bad, which I totally can relate to the idea of then going from being more free, to being more self-conscious and maybe like precious more about the work, but like what happened? What is the process that makes that happen? TJ, like, I don't get it.8 (46m 42s):I think, I think a lot of it is self-induced of like being in the competitive environment and I camp, I come from a sports background and wanting to just like love competition in a healthy manner. So I think a lot of it is that. And then I think a lot of it is just taking when you're, when you're told that there's so many different things that you need to change about yourself to kind of start fresh aching. Did it eat away at you? And like, and in the midst of like your learning, all your, like exposing yourself to all of this childhood trauma that you didn't even know exist in your body is going through all of these changes.8 (47m 29s):And you're releasing of this, these emotions that you didn't know existed. The reflection was great, but I think it was also like so much in such a little time to where before I was just kinda like, fuck it. Like, I don't have anything to lose. Like I've never acted I'm going to do this my way, regardless of what they think. And I think in grad school, I got back into a mindset of like, oh no, I actually care what they think.1 (47m 58s):Well, the other thing that is because I am a, I, I was listening to the thing you said about the sports mentality or a sports background, like, okay. Like, I was really good at basketball, unbeknownst to me in eighth grade. Okay. Like, shockingly, I was like this overweight kid, but I was really good at basketball. Okay. I didn't know I was good. I just, someone was like, Hey, try out for the team. We need people. I was like, well, I'm doing nothing else. But anyway, I turned out to be really good and I had fun because I had no expectations. I was like, okay, well they want me to play. Someone wants me. And it turns out I was really good. But then when I tried out for the high school team and it was like serious business, of course I never made the team.1 (48m 41s):And I never even went back to tryouts after day one, because I was like, oh, I'm not, this is, I'm not now it's serious business. Now this is like where, where the big boys and girls really play and it's competitive, more competitive. And it's more like, it felt more businesslike, you know, instead of fun. So maybe that has, I don't know. I could really relate to that sports analogy of like, when you're free, you're going to play better. You're going to be a better athlete. Right. Cause you can. So it's like how to maintain that freedom as an artist. If we bring it back to the theater school, like how to maintain that freedom to do what you want to do and experiment. And at the same time, take what they're giving you, but not care what they think.1 (49m 22s):It doesn't seem possible to me,8 (49m 23s):It doesn't. And I think like mid grad school. So probably second year before quarantine and everything happened. I think that was the year where I was like, okay, this is my second year. I know that. I know that I w I like, I really want to set myself up for success beyond just acting. But also I know that the stakes are high, like, or I made them high for myself. Like, oh, I gotta, I have to get an agent. And then you see all of that. You see it, all of your classmates, like they're starting to get representation early, before graduation in the middle of the pandemic. So like, it's like, oh, all of this pressure, and you don't know how the industry is going to be when you get out.8 (50m 6s):And also, like, I think I got back into the mindset of which I started in of like, okay, I feel behind already, because I started acting at the age of 28 and I didn't study. I haven't been studying since I was the age of five. Like I grew up in a performing arts family, but I was not other than just doing improv and having fun and making sketches with friends. So like, I didn't have anyone around me as a mentor in my friend group or in my family that could just kind of guide me. So I got this sense of urgency when I first started like, okay, I have to learn everything possible.8 (50m 47s):So I didn't care then. But like, when I was in grad school, I just started caring more about what my life could be and what it wouldn't be if I didn't get what I wanted. And I think, I just1 (51m 4s):Think she8 (51m 4s):Was as a lot of pressure.1 (51m 6s):So did you enjoy your time there sometimes some, like, did you, what would you say if someone came to you like were coming to you and say, like, what was your takeaway from that theater school experience in terms of high points and low points?8 (51m 22s):I, you know, I've, I, I loved it despite like the first year I will say the first year was brutal. It was brutal. My, my cohort, I love my cohort. We went through like a title nine investigation the first quarter. So it was like emotionally draining, just the, you know, being in a new environment and conservatory to start. And then you have like a sexual harassment case happening that creates like our own type of social distancing thing, where the person can't be in class, we have to go through, like, we're getting Student, this was a cohort member. Who's no longer with the program.8 (52m 3s):They got expelled, but, okay. So yeah, we're going through that. And we're navigating like intimacy and like how to get around all of this in our first quarter at DePaul. So a lot happened and it drew us together a lot.2 (52m 19s):I'll say my God. I mean, that door normally happens anyway, just because of the intimacy of being in voice and speech classes, but having that to go through, I mean, that, that probably in the end, sorry for whoever got hurt in that experience, but probably in the end boded. Well, for everybody just being able to, to judge8 (52m 37s):It did it did. So yeah, that first year was rough. I also went through, like, I went through a racial profiling scenario in the theater school that ended up leaking out to media when the George Floyd things happened in 2020, like that It's a whole thing. I was there's you, where were you all in the, you, weren't in the new building. So1 (53m 5s):We're old, we're old as hell. We've we, we graduated in 97 and 98. So no,8 (53m 12s):So, so I, I was like napping before rehearsal on the second floor, which is next to like the marketing section. And there's like a couch kind of blocked off, but you know, everyone sleeps in theater school cause you spend like 98% of your time there. And there was a, there was an Encore, a duty officer patrolling. And I think he was new because he had never, I never seen him before anyway. So he like woke me up and then started questioning me and like asking why I was there and who I was and asking for my ID. And I'm like, no, I go to school here.8 (53m 52s):And then I was like, why, why did you, why did you wake me up? And then he told me that because someone saw on camera and called to check that there was someone in the building that shouldn't be there. Okay. So we went through this whole process of like investigating and there's no cameras in the theater school. So he lied about why he stopped me. It was, it was, you know, I mean older, like I'm not at a typical theater type look anyway, the case got thrown out because they couldn't like, they couldn't find enough evidence to prove that he was in the wrong, even though he did wrong.8 (54m 34s):So they kind of went by that. So that's, this is all first year, right? So the case got,2 (54m 38s):Oh my God, you've graduated.8 (54m 42s):Yeah. So the case got closed and then we just kinda let it go. But after that first year, I was like, you know what? This was a more emotional turmoil. And I refuse to have the final two years go this way. So that's when I really started focusing on, okay, I'm going to do this. I'm going to get through school and like get every ounce of it out that I can. And that, and that's kind of like this that's when I kind of started developing like truly developing my production company. It had been in the works for awhile, but that's when I really got serious about it. And then the pandemic hit and like I had a lot of extra free, free time and you know,2 (55m 23s):Oh my God, I, I don't think there, there could have been any more calamity that you were facing at this time and you and you, so you truly survive school it on such a deeper level than I think I could, I can attest to, I want to go back to something you were saying earlier, when you were talking about picking careers, you were saying, I didn't want to be a doctor and I didn't want to be a lawyer. And so my assumption was that that's what your parents are. And then you said it's a performing arts family. So tell us more about your performing arts family.8 (55m 58s):Yeah. So my mom, she trained in classical singing and she's not a professional singer. My sister was in a performing arts high school and she's 10 years older than I am. So I grew up exposed to like, I grew up exposed to her in a girl group and around artists and around theater. Like my mom was kind of a, she's a public speaker and a politician her own way because I lived in Arkansas for about five years during my childhood. And it was a small town and everyone knew her and she, she ran this, this preschool, but she also did a lot of things in the community where she would have like women's support groups and she would go do like these leadership workshops.8 (56m 46s):And she's, I also grew up in a Baptist church and in the black church. So I, I grew up seeing performances a lot in a lot of theatrical performances and seeing my mom speak and she's so like articulate and powerful and I always admired her like, wow, she can get up in front of all these people and speak and like enjoy it. And I could not because I was super shy, like super shy. And I think it's because people told me that I was shy. So I had no interest in performing. Cause I was just terrified of it. And1 (57m 24s):I have to pause there for a psychological moment. Isn't that interesting. I did not realize that about shy kids. That a lot of times they're told, oh, this is the shy one. Just like, oh, this is the, you know, whatever one. And then it becomes a self-fulfilling thing. Like this is my, this TJ, he he's the shy kid. And maybe he wouldn't have been so shy if it hadn't been reinforced and reinforced. That's so interesting. It's just like what we tell ourselves like, oh, I can't do that. I can't play basketball at camp, but I'm this one, my sisters, that one, that's so interesting to me. Cause shy you, I mean just shows how people change and w how we aren't really what people say we are.1 (58m 5s):So anyway,8 (58m 6s):I internalized it and what I've psychologically, I think what it was, I grew up around kids. There were way older than me and way more mature. So I'm a, five-year-old around a 15 year old. And my brother who was six years old or 11, and all of my cousins are like 11, 12. I'm not going to be able to articulate the way that they're articulating and expressing themselves. But, so I think I just kind of withdrew within myself when I wasn't able to do what they were doing, which ties back into me, never acting is because I never thought it was a possibility because I saw them being able to do these things, but I didn't feel like I could express myself that way. So I just did sports.2 (58m 51s):Okay. Well, and actually that's kind of a pretty good bridge. Really. If you feel like if you were any bit in your shell, sports does help people come sort of come into who they are a little bit, but what I wanted to ask you was, did you, when did you, when did you figure out that you are not shy and when did you decide that this could be something that you would do?8 (59m 19s):I think in my probably, you know, I never, I've always known that I, I wasn't shy. It just depended on who I was around. You know, what, what group I was around. Because if you, like, if you're around my childhood friends and people, I went to high school with, they'll be like, he is not fucking shy. Like what, he's the worst, actually, he's the worst. Once you get them going? I think it has a lot to do with code switching and being in environments. I was very observant as a kid, you know, because I was shy and I listened a lot.8 (1h 0m 1s):So I think it was more of, I like to observe people around me before I speak. So I knew I wasn't shy, but I, I also knew that I wanted to be able to have a voice and figure out what that looked like. And that was kind of the journey of me that led me to acting is okay. I want to be able to speak and express myself and I want the tools to be able to do it. I just don't know what that looks like.2 (1h 0m 33s):Can you tell us about some of your favorite theater school experiences like performances or, or classes8 (1h 0m 41s):Favorite? Okay. Let's Griffin is a favorite of all. She, I could talk about her for days. Phyllis is a voice, was our, my voice teacher and my second year, and just her spiritual and gentle approach and having a black woman as a faculty member was huge. Those are, so those are some of my biggest highlights. So it's probably going to be more on like me and who I had around me. So just for context, I was the only black male in the MFA program when I went in.8 (1h 1m 26s):So there were two black women in my cohort. And then the class that MFA two's ahead of me, there was one black woman. And then the, is there was one black woman. So I was the only, like, not only was I, the, I was the only black male in the MFA program in my thirties, going into an environment where like everyone out of the other younger black men were 18, 19 20. So there's like this huge gap where I didn't really, I'd never felt like I had someone that I could talk to, you know, so, but great experiences.8 (1h 2m 7s):Our lady of second year, it was majority, all black tasks, a play centered around three well Rwandan girls who saw, saw our, the Virgin mother, Mary, so apparitions of it. So that was a great to being that environment and do that. And then I did this really cool in the, the big black box in the heli. I did this, this horror comedy job, a play called neighborhood three requisition of doom. And I got to play three different characters and I love the horror genre. So it was cool to really dive into that and work with the cast.8 (1h 2m 51s):And then that final quarter of the second year, the pandemic hit. And one of our professors that we didn't know, which was great. We were terrified because we hadn't worked with him, but he's an alumni, Sean Paris. I don't know if you're aware of Sean Paris.1 (1h 3m 12s):I know Sean,8 (1h 3m 12s):Sean, Sean has become a big brother to me. He is so amazing. And that was like the point that was game-changing for me, because it was during, it was during the start of the pandemic where I had not only a black faculty member teaching, but also a black male faculty member teaching me and I, that like that was when I really felt like I was able to open up and truly start translating who I am into acting and into my art or my art1 (1h 3m 42s):So necessary. What, what did, what was Shawn teaching or was he directing?8 (1h 3m 47s):So it was all remote. He was teaching us Meisner and viewpoints, but we were translating it to on camera because everything was done. So I got to really start building my relationship with the camera, Our relationship and the environment, because there's not really on camera for, at the theater school and there needs to be more And I love TV and film is the route that I'm, I want to go mainly in my career.1 (1h 4m 18s):So what, when you say like, that really opened you up in that really? What do you think it, I guess what I'm trying to, I want to get clear about, like, what did it do for you as a performer to have that experience with Sean? Like what, what, what happened? What changed in you?8 (1h 4m 38s):I got to hear his experiences and see him work because he really, he wasn't, he was a student as well, and he, like, we got to watch him do monologues and watch him work. And I think just being in the environment where someone was like me, literally, who was like me and has experienced it, experienced the type of things that I've experienced in life. It's one of those things where like, growing up, I didn't see a lot of people that looked like me on TV or in film. So I never thought it was a possibility. And sh working with Sean in being around him really opened up what acting can look like for me.2 (1h 5m 26s):Oh, that's so beautiful. And I'm never not surprised in all of the ways that representation matters. I never thought about it mattering in the classroom, but it certainly does. I don't know if you got a chance to listen to, we interviewed Justin Ross and he talked about our lady of Cuba. And one of the things that he was talking about was that, that it sounds to me. So I'm asking you to, for clarification, it sounds to me like that production fostered a whole pivot in terms of the curriculum and, and, and how he said it to us as we warmed up differently than was sort of the, the, the usual at the theater school.2 (1h 6m 14s):And that, that production helped create a new normal for that. Is that, was that your experience?8 (1h 6m 21s):It did. And I think a lot of that has to do with our graduating class with BFA and MFA my class, my cohort was very much of like, we'll burn this institution down if we need to, like, we're, we're changing shit, like regardless. And a lot of it had to do with going through what we went through that first quarter with the title nine situation. It was like we had each other's backs and it was the same way with our lady of Cuba. Oh, if like we have each other's backs because we went through some shit in there too with like,1 (1h 6m 54s):Yeah, they, yeah, it didn't, it was like, there was a lot of bad shady shit that went down right there.8 (1h 7m 1s):A lot of shit going down. Yeah. And a lot of like unbiased prejudice and racism that was happening with the people who were working on crew, not really having an understanding of the story that we're telling and not really allowing us to tell the story and not really getting our feedback as you know, it was, it was a lot of like an all black cast, but being essentially produced by all white people was right. You know, and there was a lot of conflict during that production, but I do think,1 (1h 7m 40s):Do you feel like it changed though yeah.8 (1h 7m 43s):To change the culture of TTS? For sure. Because we start, it was, I think that production and the things that happened during it really started shifting the culture of theater in TTS before the culture started shifting in 2020s. It was kind of like the, the catalyst before that.2 (1h 8m 9s):Oh my God. Yeah. Only like 50 years too late, not too late, but 50 years late. Like w we've had a of conversations because your experience of being the only black male in, in our generation there, yeah. There was always an, any class, only one person of color, pretty much. I mean, maybe in a couple of years there were two. And certainly Phyllis was our only are ever professor of color. Is she still the only professor of, I mean, I know the new Dean is a woman,8 (1h 8m 39s):But the only 10 years1 (1h 8m 42s):Tenured and full time, even maybe, I don't know, like adjuncts. Yes. We're cause I'm adjunct. And I know in my cohort of adjuncts there are, but I think full-time like, it's still, what, what, wait, wait, what?8 (1h 8m 55s):Yep. Well, Christina, Anthony, Chris, Anthony is new. She came in our second year. So that, she's also a really great she's. She came from California and she's, she has a lot of background in activism and in the classical. So she, she is a full-time staff member, faculty member, faculty member.2 (1h 9m 18s):Do you remember your audition? And can you tell us about what your audition was like? Yeah.8 (1h 9m 22s):Yeah. So get that. So when I apply for the audition, they were like, you can do the preliminary video or you can just come to in-person and I didn't have any experience with self-tapes. And like, I was still raw. I was like, I don't want to put a monologue on video. Like I won't have a chance at all at all, if I do this, but during that time, I was already preparing for Kentucky Shakespeare auditions. So I had been working monologues and working on a lot of different things with my, my vocal coach. So I did in-person auditions. And it's very funny because I was currently in rehearsals for the show of chorus line, the musical, and then think auditions were on Wednesday, Wednesday.8 (1h 10m 17s):Yeah. Auditions were on Wednesday in Chicago. And then there was an audition for cau UC San Diego in Chicago. Like they were, you know, all of the colleges they come and I was like, okay, I'll, I'll, I'll get an audition for UC San Diego. And it happened to be the day before the DePaul auditions. So I knew that I wasn't going to go to UC San Diego just because I felt like they don't know who I am. It would be like me applying to Yale and they don't, they have no idea who I am. So I have no chance. So I used that as like a warmup for DePaul, used it for a warmup to get, just kind of get the jitters out and audition.8 (1h 10m 59s):And then as I was leaving the, I can't, we were in some hotel downtown, maybe the Hyatt or something like that, as I was leaving, they were like, Hey, we're doing auditions for Columbia and New York. If you have a headshot, a resume and want to get a slot, I'm like, oh yeah, I have these printed out. So I signed up for a slot and then I went and auditioned for Columbia. So it was like, oh, all right. I got these two auditions under my belt. I feel, I feel ready going into tomorrow. Right.1 (1h 11m 25s):Wait, can I just say how brilliant it is that you decided to use them as practice? This is the sign of someone who is ready to do their craft when they see not those opportunities as a chance to have a panic attack and die, but as a chance to use their skills and practice and get in front of people and practice, that is a true artist, entrepreneur mindset. Like that is a better mindset. Thank gosh. You had that anyway. Okay. So then do you went to Columbia? Did you do all those?8 (1h 11m 55s):I did the Columbia. I did the Columbia and you know, there were, I was in the lobby and just ki

RESET
Whole Food closes store in Englewood after 6 years

RESET

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 14:59


Whole Foods opened in Englewood in 2016 to excitement and fanfare, providing options for healthy food and luring other retailers to sign leases in the area. But Friday, the chain announced they were closing the Englewood store in addition to a location near DePaul, as part of a national cost-saving initiative. Reset checks in with local leaders and a local vendor who sold product at the store to hear their reactions and what they want to see open next.

Forum - La 1ere
L'entreprise Magic Tomato souhaite lever des fonds via la blockchain: interview de Paul Charmillot

Forum - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 7:23


Interview de Paul Charmillot, fondateur de Magic Tomato

The Big Big East Show Podcast
Over-Under Take Over! #25

The Big Big East Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 37:45


We have a very special guest on the Big Big East Show today! Joining Chris we have Overtime Team Elite head coach Dave Leitao! Dave tells of his amazing time coaching at Depaul and his hand in the rich basketball history at UCONN. If you ever wanted to hear about the behind the scenes ate OTE, THIS IS YOUR EPISODE! Tune in NOW!Follow Dave!Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/coachdleitaoFollow Chris!Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cwalkersports/Twitter: https://twitter.com/cwalkersports Follow Big Big EastInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/bigeastshow/-When you think of college basketball, what comes to mind first? If it's The Big East Conference, then you're right. Basketball lives in New York City — from the Bronx to Brooklyn to Madison Square Garden, you can't look anywhere without seeing a basketball fan who loves the sport more than anything. If you love the game, you'll love hearing about it from former player, coach, and now CBS Sports analyst, Chris Walker. Tune in weekly with Chris as he breaks down games, chats with friends, and talks the love of the game.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Le décryptage de l'actu dans les Landes
A Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, une maison intergénérationnelle avec des habitants de 1 à 83 ans

Le décryptage de l'actu dans les Landes

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 2:54


durée : 00:02:54 - Le décryptage de l'actu dans les Landes

Le jazz sur France Musique
Repassez-moi ... "Mrs Robinson" de Paul Simon BO du film "The Graduate / Le Lauréat" de Mike Nichols (1968)

Le jazz sur France Musique

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 57:26


durée : 00:57:26 - « The Boxer » (Paul Simon) (1969) - par : Laurent Valero - The Graduate / Le Lauréat (1967) le film mythique de Mike Nichols, musique de Paul Simon et Dave Grusin, avec 2 jeunes acteurs débutants : Dustin Hoffman, Katharine Ross, et des chansons au succès planétaire par Simon et Garfunkel - réalisé par : Antoine Courtin

Repassez-moi l'standard
Repassez-moi ... "Mrs Robinson" de Paul Simon BO du film "The Graduate / Le Lauréat" de Mike Nichols (1968)

Repassez-moi l'standard

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 57:26


durée : 00:57:26 - « The Boxer » (Paul Simon) (1969) - par : Laurent Valero - The Graduate / Le Lauréat (1967) le film mythique de Mike Nichols, musique de Paul Simon et Dave Grusin, avec 2 jeunes acteurs débutants : Dustin Hoffman, Katharine Ross, et des chansons au succès planétaire par Simon et Garfunkel - réalisé par : Antoine Courtin

The Remote Real Estate Investor
Investing in multi-family real estate and opportunity zones w/ Michael Episcope

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 29:09


Michael Episcope is co-CEO of Origin, co-chairs the Investment Committee, and oversees investor relations, marketing, and company operations. Michael brings 25 years of investment and risk management experience to the company and believes that calculated risk-taking in inefficient markets is the key to building wealth. He frequently shares his knowledge with individual investors on Origin's blog, Forbes, ValueWalk, and HuffPost, and his expertise has made him a frequent speaker on real estate investment panels and podcasts. Michael learned about the physical aspects of real estate in his youth as he helped his grandfather manage his apartment buildings on Chicago's west side. He began college at DePaul University and a year later was introduced to the floors of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. He continued to work full-time on the trading floor for the next sixteen years while attending night courses to complete his undergraduate degree. After rising from runner to broker, Michael was given an opportunity to become a floor trader by a Chicago-based hedge fund, Tradelink, LLC, and then had a prolific nine-year trading career, twice named one of the top 100 traders in the world by Trader Monthly Magazine. Join Michael, as he walks us through his role doing ground-up multifamily development and discusses current market conditions and qualified opportunity zones. --- Episode Links: https://origininvestments.com/ --- Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: What's going on everyone? Welcome to another episode of the Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum, and today I'm joined by Michael Episcope, who is the principal at origin investments and Michael is going to be talking to us today about his role in doing round up multifamily development in today's current market conditions. We're also gonna be talking about inflation, and qualified opportunity zones. So let's get into it.   Michael, thanks so much for taking the time to hang out with me today. I really appreciate you coming on.   Michael E.: Thanks for having me, Michael.   Michael: My pleasure. So I know a little bit about your background. But I would love if you could share just a quick and dirty Spiel who you are, where you're coming from and what is it that you're doing today in real estate?   Michael E.: Yeah, how is the quick and dirty so I'll take you back. Well, I'm CO-CEO of origin investments were a real estate investment firm, located in Chicago, we primarily focus on ground up development in what we call the smile states tax friendly, climate friendly, business friendly states. Even though we're located in Chicago, we don't do any investing here and my real estate career if I want to, you know, take you kind of far back started God, I didn't realize this, but I was about 10 years old and I used to go and work for my grandfather in the summer and he was somebody who was pretty gritty bought buildings in the west side of Chicago and if anybody knows, the west side of Chicago, it's not a good area, it hasn't been a good area. Never was and he bought buildings out of tax sales and that was at a time when people didn't take pay their taxes, you can go in there and buy, I mean, a 25 story building for $100,000 and that's what he did and in order to run those, though, you had to be hands on you had to be gritty and so I used to spend my summers with him and, and then I had another friend too, that his dad was in construction. So I love swinging hammers and the bricks and sticks and putting up garages and things like that and didn't get paid much. You know, he'd throw me 20 bucks at the end of the day, which felt great, you know, you had fun building things and then you know, it kind of I left that industry obviously I wasn't in it, you know as a as an employee or even thinking about it.   But I got my feet wet there, went to college, I studied finance and econ at DePaul, I got a job at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange when I was about 19 years old, and I was a runner, and that's kind of the lowest position you can hold down there and I loved it, I thought it was amazing. It was just like nothing I'd ever been exposed to and I pushed all my classes tonight and started what I'll call my first career at a very young age and again, I didn't realize that was my career. But I'd stayed in there for seven or eight years till I got an opportunity to trade at the age of 27. So I've worked my way up from a, from a runner to a clerk to a broker and it really didn't love anything I was doing and I wanted to try my hand at trading and I and I got an opportunity and it turns out, I was pretty good at it. So I did that for nine years and ended up just building more wealth than I had ever set out to and when I was done with my career, I was married, I had two kids, I had another one on way on the way my risk profile had changed and I literally decided I don't want to do this anymore. I don't want to be leveraging myself 300 to one every day, and have you know, like be always faced with the potential for a four or five standard deviation because the bigger you get trading, you know, those moves can wipe you out and I've seen guys literally, you know, like lose everything in these moves. So I punched out of that career and oh five, I stayed home for about three months and I think my wife thought I was retired at that time. So I quickly you know, I sort of started at what I'll call a family office.   But I also enrolled in the Masters of Science program at DePaul, right to really retool, I knew this is where I wanted to go into real estate to grow my wealth to build passive income because when you get out of one career and I know a lot of people out there are in the same boat you have your asset rich, but you're kind of income poor and how do you turn your assets in income? How do you do it in a very tax efficient manner and real estate is one of the greatest avenues to be able to do that and I never loved the stock market bonds didn't pay enough and figured like, you know, my partner and I got together in oh seven. Candidly, we didn't have a lot of great experiences out there investing our own capital and we just said, look, we can do better than this. Like let's do it together, let's pool our money. Let's build something together and we did and that's what it was in the beginning hanging it started out with the two of us. In oh seven, we syndicated a couple of deals in 0809 started building the high net worth, investor base launched our first fund and 11 launched the next one and 13, the next one in 16 and so today, we, you know, we have four open funds, we've closed for funds, we have close to 3000 High Net Worth investors, two and a half billion dollars in assets under, you know, equity assets, which is the total value of the real estate and it you know, we're considered a top decile manager for all of our performance. So it's been a fantastic run, that's probably a lot more than he wanted in this this quick. But, you know, it's hard to condense all that. Because I think the story from how I started to how I got here sometimes doesn't connect unless I share those early days with you   Michael: No, it's so so good. So I just curious, Michael, you started with multifamily, or that's kind of where you ended up?   Michael E.: It's more or less where we ended up where we gravitated towards and in in, 0708. I mean, you can think of us more like a family office, we were two guys trying to put our money into real estate and we're buying deals and at that time, were buying distressed notes. The world looked very different, though, in a way that in oh eight, capital had all the leverage, everything was trading. So far below replacement costs, we were buying bank loans, and it was more of a pricing exercise which fit perfectly for us because we wanted to protect our wealth, we wanted to manage it, we were looking for big edge in the market and that was the way that you were able to find it and when we launched our first fund in 2011, the dead space and sort of dried up right the distress that and throughout that entire exercise of buying debt, what we really gravitated towards was value add buying things cheap, fixing them up adding value and so that's what our first fund was about. But it was really agnostic in terms of asset class. So we did everything from industrial, retail, multifamily, even student housing in that and then fun two was a little bit narrow or fun two was multifamily office and industrial fun, fun three was office and multifamily and today we've sort of narrowed the world down to multifamily only and the reason is, is what I talked about earlier is that in the beginning capital had all the leverage and then as you as the world normalized, and things started a trade at or above replacement costs, you really have to understand how to win at margins and the only way to do that is by setting up operations in a way where you can, you can buy at scale that you know every penny nickel dime and when you're pricing things like you are true experts and for us as a as an investment firm, just making sure that all of our technology, our people have that institutional knowledge and they can bring it with them every day and it's hard to do that if you know, if you're as big as Blackstone, you can have these massive divisions that are huge companies in themselves. But for a company like us, I can't look people in the eye and say, yeah, we're the best at industrial and we're the best at student housing and in and we're the best at multifamily and what I love about the real estate market, it really is dynamic, and we say market, but what do you mean by that? When you say the market? Is it self-storage? Is it you know, multifamily? Is it industrial? Is it ground up? Is it value add is that the dead space and I just you know there is I guess what we would quote unquote, call a market out there. But there's so many different avenues that you have to choose where you want to play and there's no wrong answer, you can make money anywhere in this market.   Michael: Love it and Michael, you've mentioned this concept twice now and I want to come back to it for our listeners that might not be familiar with it. But you said that it was cheaper to build or you are buying value buying properties at less than replacement cost. What does that mean and why is that impactful?   Michael E.: Well, if you think about the Great Recession, what came out of there, prices reset everywhere and one of the governor's in real estate investing is replacement costs generally as you bump up against it and you go, you know, above replacement costs new supply is going to come in, because of the fundamentals. If you can build for a multifamily project, when we do a lot of this for $270,000 a unit, you'd rather build in that case, then go out and buy something that's 10 years old for $300,000 a unit right, eventually, the fundamentals prevail. What came out of oh eight is that the market was so distressed that if you if the market, you know properties that were 357 years old, even 20 years old, we're training 50% of replacement costs 40% of replacement costs in some cases. I mean it was we were buying some class C we don't operate in that today but some of those deals were too good to pass up where we buying, you know in the Atlanta market $15,000 a unit, where if you were trying to build brand new even back then those would have been 150 $180,000 per unit, they were a little bit on the rougher side, you know, so replacement cost is maybe a little bit, you know, not a play there. But when you're buying buildings, 10 years old at, you know, half the value of replacement costs, and you can lease those up. You know, that is, that's a great way, kind of a barometer to, you know, when you're out there investing money and when the market is trading like that, especially what happened in 09-10 11, no shovels went into the ground for years. Because why would you build brand new when you can buy something that is a few years old at such a discount to what you can build for today, because ultimately, if you build, you have to get rents that support those higher costs and so we were really well protected at that time. But the market ultimately caught up and then we saw building start to take off in certain markets and in the higher growth markets that were under supplied in 12 right, that that was the very early stage of development, and then 13, a little more, 14 a little bit more and, and then it's taken off and today because the market is so under supplied. You see a tremendous amount of new construction happening across both single family rentals, or single family homes and multifamily.   Michael: Yeah, it's so interesting, and it just out of curiosity, how long do you think it's going to take to get caught up before we see kind of a more equilibrium?   Michael E.: It's got to be two to three years, I mean, the supply chain logistics COVID set us back. But right now, we need to deliver about 500,000 units a year just to keep up with current demand and we're delivering about 300,000 units of current demand. So between single family homes and apartments, we're still way under supplied on both sides and what's interesting right now, that's going on in the multifamily side is that a lot of millennials are trapped renting, because we all know what's going on with the interest rate side. Well, the it definitely the financing costs hurt us. But what's helping is that it's actually driving demand for apartments, because Millennials can no longer afford to buy a house. Because even as much as construction prices have come up for the projects that we've been building, it's 35% more today than it was 18 months ago, that calculus holds true. Also, for single family homes, you add on top of that mortgage rates, 30 year mortgage rates that have gone from 3% to 5% they've gone up 70% in the last year, millions and millions of individuals can no longer afford to buy a house and are stuck renting. So that's really creating these kind of anomalies in the market right now. They'll eventually work their way out and that's why from our perspective, you want to own quality, you want to own newer, you don't want to be, you know, chasing something, I think that those who are buying existing properties today above replacement costs, there's a short runway to make money, and then and then you're gonna see the water settle.   Michael: Interesting, okay and so what would you say to newer investors that are running up against that issue, they're going to look at the properties, where the prices are, where the cap rates are, and they're getting their insurance quotes, and they're seeing this disconnect between the replacement cost and the purchase price how do you what do you say to those folks?   Michael E.: Tread lightly in those situations, because here's the thing, everything works on paper and when you look at historical norms, they all look great. But ultimately, the fundamentals do prevail and this is why we're not in the value add space today. We haven't been in for two years. Now certainly that's been a mistake. Anybody who was buying value add deals pre 2020 did very well. But we started to see this metric where at that time replacement cost was obviously a lot lower, we didn't realize that it was going to be 50% higher in two and a half years. But the math just didn't work out. We're like, wait, why should we be buying this 20 year old property at 220,000 a door when we you know when and we're going to put another $20,000 into it when we can build for 232 to 40, right, something similar? And we started getting sort of queasy about it then. But the thing that you everybody needs to understand is yes, there are times that if you have barriers to entry, and you're an urban markets, and you know there are times that you can buy above replacement costs and you will do fine. But when the world normalizes in 234 years, if you're a long term holder, and you have more and more and more supply that comes into the market, and it will, that older product is going to be the first to suffer. So if you're paying 20% above replacement cost today, and in five years from now, buyers have the choice of buying brand new properties at replacement costs or your property that's going to be 10 to 15 years old, then dd above that, they're not going to choose those. Right. So that works itself out over time. It's just today what we're seeing distortions in the market and distortions are not good and it's okay. Like one of the lessons I learned very early on is one of the best words you can learn investing is no, like, let it go, you know, there's always going to be another bus that comes by. So, you know, that's why I say I say tread lightly. We're treading, like, we're not in that market at all, we have completely exited, buying existing properties, Core Plus value add, because it's just not a good risk reward in today's market, in my opinion.   Michael: Interesting and it makes total sense. Michael, I want to shift gears here like entirely, as we were talking about, before we hit record, the market is super-hot prices are sky high and so I think a lot of people are thinking, well, is now a good time to sell and if they are on that bandwagon thinking is a good time to sell, where should they be thinking about placing their money, and I'm talking specifically about opportunity zones and a 1031 exchange. So we'd love if you could talk a little bit about where people should be thinking about placing some of their gains?   Michael E.: Yeah, it's a, it's a little bit of a crystal ball, I can I'll tell you what we're doing. So in our legacy funds we are selling. We've been net sellers the last year, but we also have funds where we are more of a buy and hold strategy and markets behave in weird ways and I'll give you an example. If I would have told you two years ago, hey, guess what there is a there's a pandemic coming and the world is going to shut down and Russia is going to invade Ukraine and the 10 year note is going to you know, rally from you know, this rate to this rate. Would you have bought real estate? No, you would have put your head in the sand would you want to sell… you wouldn't you wouldn't jump, hey, listen, I got this crystal ball, I see all these bad things on the horizon, I'm going to jump into this. So I don't, I don't ever think that people should panic. If you have great real estate, the idea is that you want to buy quality, you want to be adequately leveraged so that you can make it to the other side and the thing about owning real estate is that if you want the real benefits of owning real estate, you have to own it for the long term and the people who I know who got really wealthy in real estate, they bought it and held it and the people I know got really wealthy in stocks, they bought it and held it all these day traders, these flippers, things like that they're just churning money constantly paying taxes making a little bit, it's a good living. But I would say real wealth is created by buying and holding quality assets for ever and that's what you have to remember in real estate to that depreciation. You can't get depreciation, if you sell the asset. You can't take advantage of that, that tax free income. You can't take advantage of refinancing tax free if you sell the asset, right. It's only if you hold it, let it appreciate and there's so many reasons, you know, to hold long term because as expensive as everything is today, it's going to be more expensive in five years and 10 years and 15 years and if you study what's going on, especially in the multifamily market, or even the housing market, there's been no period in history over a 10 year period, where multifamily real estate has lost money institutional real estate, and even through the Great Recession, oh eight no nine. I mean, we were almost fully recovered by 2012 on the multifamily side. So you know, like buy quality real estate, hold it for a while now, you asked the question, if you're going to sell it, you know, 1031 I don't know like with the 1031. If you're actually you're selling an existing property, you're buying an existing property. Certainly there are 1030 ones, there's ways to reduce risks, there's ways to reduce headache. You know, buying some of these triple net mailbox money retail properties is always pretty simple to do versus trying to be an active landlord. We do run QC funds. I know a lot of investors who can't find 1031 Exchange properties, they've been coming into our funds as an alternative. And the difference there is QC the way the law is made up is it requires us to build brand new so we are diversified across high growth cities in the Sunbelt markets places like Nashville and Atlanta and Tampa and Phoenix and Dallas and Austin and places like that. So building brand new radio, like getting in at a cost basis is I think a safer way to invest today and I know that might sound like an oxymoron go into construction to actually have you know less risk what are you talking about, but I will write like I would way rather build a brand new property and be in it for 250-260 door than go out and buy something that's three years old for 400,000 a door. Did I answer your question, Michael? That was a very long… Yeah…   Michael: No, no, it's great, it's great. Well, I'm curious if you could define for people what is a QC because I think a lot of our listeners might not be familiar with the term.   Michael E.: Sure, a qualified opportunity zone qualified opportunity funds came out of the 2017 tax cuts and Jobs Act and it was there at 700 QC areas around the countries and these are maps essentially, of low to moderate income areas, some of them have been adjusted by governors in each state. But really what it allows you to do, if you have capital gains from any source, it can be from stocks, it can be from appreciated art, it can be from a home, you sell an investment property, it doesn't matter. So if you invest into a you QZ fund today, right, let's say you have taxes due for 2021 and you have a million dollar gain, if you invest in a QC fund today, you don't have to pay those until 2027 because that's when you will recognize those on your tax return for tax year 2026. So there's a huge deferral, and there's a value to that deferral because it's basically a zero interest rate loan from the United States government and during that period, you your money is working for you in ground up development in deals, things like that. But you ultimately have to pay the piper, you know, come 2027. The other benefit that is phenomenal about this program, if you're in the program for 10 years, and one day, if you're invested in a qualified opportunity's own fund, you Pay Zero Taxes on the game. So if you double, triple, quadruple your money, you pay zero taxes, and you can be in this program for 10,20,30 years, our Fund is designed with optionality, you want to get out in 10 years, you can get out you want to get out in 30 years, you can get out. So this is a place where I'll tell you, I don't think there's any place better to invest, if you have capital gains, and you want to be in the real estate, because when you run the math, you have to earn about 50 to 75% more in a non QC investment to get the same after tax return. So it's exciting, I'm certainly putting a tremendous amount of money into our funds, my partner is as well, but it's one of the best programs that has come about in a while and Michael, the last thing I'll say about it, you know, I mentioned moderate to low income neighborhoods. The caveat to that, like were we sort of searches along the edges and those maps are drawn based on the 2010 census. If you think about how much cities have changed since 2010, many of them have changed drastically and I'll give you an example Nashville. We're in Nashville right now, there's an area called the Gulch and if you were in Nashville in 2010, there was nothing in the downtown area and it was only in about 2012-13-14 that you began to see multifamily residential real estate take off. But before that, it was almost a see through city you could see from one end to the other. Now today, it looks like downtown Denver, it is insane. I took a trip with my son this summer, we drove through there again and I was looking at some of our sites and our properties, didn't even recognize it. Because the last time I was there was three years ago and it looks like I mean, you know, something they build in China, it was going up so quickly, right? They're building these cities in like a matter of a days and that's what's going to Nashville. The point is, there's all of that is considered a ques area and those are the areas that were looking and you wouldn't know the difference between a QoC area and a market rate area, because to us accuse a good future development is just a good development. There's no qualifier to it   Michael: Interesting and so how do people? How are people able to find out and take advantage of TOC funds? Is it Do I just Google QoC II fund Nashville and I'll find them?   Michael E.: Exactly, I mean, you can there's a tremendous amount of information out there and I would recommend anybody who wants to go, who's active, they should be doing this in accuser area, and looking at the areas in your neighborhood because it'd be silly like, you know, we have some QoC projects where across the street is market rate development. Now, those are pension funds, institutions that are building those, so they don't care about the QoC benefits. They only endure to taxable investors. But if you're a taxable investor, you absolutely need to understand this area because to me, it's the best place to gain real estate exposure. You know, so, hands down.   Michael: I love it. All right, Michael, the last question that I have for you today is curious to get your thoughts about inflation and where things are going and how people should be thinking about it and how you at origin are thinking about it?   Michael E.: Well, inflation is real. First of all, we've seen this there's nothing transit worry about it. At some point, it will run through the system. I don't know when that is, we watched the yield curve constantly, some people are calling it inverted, it's more flat today than anything and if you if you kind of go out in the yield curve, and you look past 23, and 24, it looks like rates are going to remain high until that period and then maybe start coming down. But I just don't see that it can say, sustained at this level and I think once China fully comes back online, we take care of a lot of these supply issues. I think what we have to really be concerned about today, and this would not be a good situation is deflation and more and more, I'm reading about that in the market. Deflation is not good, where you have a continued rise in your expenses and things like that, but your demand slows down and you can't raise rents anymore, and your equation just flips a lot. That wouldn't be really good for any investments out there and I'm not saying that it's going to happen. But it's definitely more of a risk today than it has been in the past. A lot of these inflationary pressures, they will you know, get solved over time and right now, it's a difficult period to invest, especially when we're building a brand new ground up multifamily development, and we're trying to get to a guaranteed maximum price contract. It's challenging, because even oftentimes, the general contractor won't fix prices, they won't fix lumber. So we have to leave and by the way, sometimes we're happy doing that we're like, look, we don't want to lock in lumber at $1,700 a board foot, we just don't think it is we'll underwrite to that scenario, we'll leave it out and that's a place where sometimes we can actually have savings in a project like that and certainly, in a market like this today, it would be great to see inflation sort of add for us to be able to, you know, get to a normal place. But it's making it a lot more difficult to do business. I have a friend who runs a lumber company, and he said they used to quote people and they used to have these quotes out for three months at a time and now at the top of it when they quote people 24 hours, they gotta get back to them and I don't think that's a healthy environment for anybody being there's too much volatility. But I would, you know, from an interest rate perspective, we're, it's moving up. I mean, today, it's over 290. Today, I think with interest rates, or with inflation running above 8% it's kind of surprising, it's not at four or five, but I also think that that's kind of a sign to come that inflation will run through that we're seeing these prices sort of top out, we're gonna see some of these supply chain issues, get solved and you'll see 23 late 23, early 24 probably rates come back down, hopefully to you know, 2% or below.   Michael: Okay, I've got my fingers crossed for that too. Michael, this has been super informative, a lot of fun if people want to learn more about you or origin investments, what's the best way for them to do that and get in contact?   Michael E.: Yeah, so just go to our website https://origininvestments.com/, we make it really easy for people to learn about us engage in our content, download our decks things like that or connect with somebody at origin we have a little pop up there we use but you can also just register and then somebody will reach out to you as well, so…   Michael: Sweet. Well hey, thanks again for coming on. Really appreciate you taking the time we'll be in touch   Michael E.: Thank you for having me Michael.   Michael: Hey, you got it, take care. Alright, everyone that was our episode. A big thank you to Michael for coming on the show super, super informative and really cool to hear what they are doing over at origin investments. As always, if you liked the episode, please, please, please feel free to leave us a rating or review wherever it is you get your podcasts and be like focusing on the next one. Happy investing…

Salt & Light Catholic Radio Podcasts
Morning Light - Saint Vincent de Paul (April 29)

Salt & Light Catholic Radio Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 13:19


Morning Light welcomes the Marketing Manager for the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, Kacy Elguezabal.

DePaul Download
Doug Bruno on Title IX's 50-year impact on women's sports

DePaul Download

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 11:29


This year marks the 50th anniversary of Title IX, the federal civil rights law that removed barriers for women in education and sports. It's also a year DePaul University is celebrating the induction of legendary Women's Basketball Coach Doug Bruno into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. In his 36 years as head coach at DePaul, Bruno has advocated for the equal treatment of women. He recently led his team to the NCAA tournament for the 25th time.

D1.t in Five
D1.ticker - Wednesday, April 20th, 2022

D1.t in Five

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 5:00


Peyton Stovall reported as finalist for the Evansville AD job, Inside Higher Ed dives into how often presidential searches fail and why, DePaul's student newspaper reviews information from the school's 990 from 2019-20, and lots more. Be sure to check your inbox to see more of today's news and notes from around the nation. We would love to know what you think of the show and you can let us know on social media @D1ticker. If you are not subscribed to D1.ticker, you can and should subscribe at www.d1ticker.com/.

Rock a Domicilio
Flashback: Muere Linda la espoda de Paul McCartney.

Rock a Domicilio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 1:13


The Mike Broomhead Show Audio
Lenny DePaul, Former Chief Inspector with the U.S. Marshals Service

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 9:00


Lenny shed some light on how the USMS tracks down violent fugitives like the suspected Brooklyn subway shooter. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Par Jupiter !
Attends voir de Paul Fournel

Par Jupiter !

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 3:33


durée : 00:03:33 - La chronique de Clara Dupont-Monod - par : Clara Dupont-Monod - Ce livre commence comme une conférence de rédaction de Par Jupiter et se termine en scène de Kill Bill, de Quentin Tarantino.

Money News with Ross Greenwood: Highlights
Claire Victory - National President, St Vincent De Paul Society

Money News with Ross Greenwood: Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 2:37


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Crypto bros, missing the great economic bubbles of the early 2000s. We may as well have cotton candy furniture, Severance on Apple TV, Bad Vegan. Let Me Run This By You: Stage Moms, kindergarten theatre.Interview: We talk to Joe Basile about Long Island accents, NYU Tisch, Bradley Walker, Ensemble Studio Theatre, Liz Lerman's Critical Response Process, Mary Zimmerman's Metamorphoses, the Neo-Futurists Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind (The Infinite Wrench), perfectionism,  Roundabout Theatre Company,  A Bright Room Called Day, Suzan Lori Parks, Go Humphrey, sock puppet Showgirls, keeping the thread of community after college ends.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):3 (10s):And I'm Gina Kalichi.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.3 (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.1 (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?2 (32s):Okay. I'm getting, I'm getting it together. I, Yeah, I woke up with this really interesting idea that I wanted to run by you, which was, cause I was really tired when I woke up and I thought, okay, everyone's tired when they wake up. And then I thought, well, and they always say like, Americans, you know, never get enough sleep. We're always tired. But like nobody ever investigates why really? Why that is that our system is really fucked up. So like, I don't know. I just was like, yeah, we always do all these like expos A's on like sleep or wellness. Right? Like Americans are the fattest and the most unhealthy. And I'm only speaking about Americans because that's where we live. I don't know shit about Madrid.2 (1m 13s):You know, I'm sure they're they have their own plethora of fucking problems. But I'm just saying like, we don't actually do the work to like, figure out what is wrong. We're just like, Americans are, this Americans are that nobody's getting enough sleep. And like, there's all these, you know, sort of headlines. Right. And we're not just like, well, why is nobody getting enough sleep? Like what is actually happening? So that was my grand thought upon waking up was like, yeah, like, I don't know. We just never dig deep in this case. We're not big on digging.4 (1m 46s):Probably not. I mean, I think our lifestyle overall is pretty unhealthy and it's because of our economic model.2 (1m 58s):What I was gonna say, it all boils down to see the thing is the more you talk to people, the more I do the angrier I get, especially like in my office, like slash co-working, like I gravitate towards the ladies and a lot of ladies of color. And we end up sitting around talking about how like capitalism and systematic racism and sexism are all tied together and how, and by the end, we're just so angry. We're like, okay, what can we do? And we're like, okay, well we need to stop putting money in the pockets of this old white man who owns the coworking. But like we have nowhere else to go. So we're like, now we're screwed. So anyway, it's interesting. It's like it all, every conversation I have of meaning with you or with my cousin and it all boils down to the same thing.2 (2m 43s):And then you end up thinking, I ended up thinking the really, the only way is mass extinction and starting over with a new species, fresh slate, fresh or revolution, right. Or some kind of bloody revolution, it's going to be bloody because you know, the, the, the, the people in power aren't going to let go as we see. So like, we're not, it's not good is all, but I don't feel necessarily like, and maybe it's because I took MTMA, but like, I don't necessarily feel terrible about it. I feel just like, oh yeah, like we're, we're headed towards this way, unless something drastic happens. And I'm not sure that's a terrible thing. Now I don't have children.2 (3m 23s):So I might feel totally different about my children and my children's children and their children, but I just don't, that's not my frame of mind. So anyway, that's what I was thinking as I was so tired, waking up.4 (3m 35s):Is there any world in which you and the other women in coworking can just put your, just rent and office?2 (3m 44s):So we're starting to organize to like, be like, okay, you know, like who would want to go in on a lease, you know? But the thing is, it's so interesting. It's like, well, maybe it's LA, but it's also the world. Like, people don't really trust it. Like we don't really know each other that well yet. So we'd have to like do credit checks and thank God. My credit is good. Thank God. Now it was terrible. But all this to say is that like also LA so transitory that people are like in and out and, and like my, you know, travel. It's just so it's such a weird existence, but we are talking and there's a guy, a black dude. Who's also like my financial guru guy who like, who works at co-working.2 (4m 28s):I met here, he's a mortgage guy. And he's just been like, talking to me all about fucking crypto bros and like how the crypto bros are like, he's like, it is insane. Now, Gina, did you know, now I'm just learning about this world. And he's like, it's all, make-believe basically we live in the matrix and that fucking, there is something called the virtual real estate. Did you know this? Okay, you can purchase virtual squares of real estate, like Snoop Dogg's house, like, like, and people are doing it. And the people who are, it's like a status thing and it's expensive. And the people who are becoming billionaires are the people who run the apps.2 (5m 9s):Right. Are the people who created the fucking program. We are in the matrix. And I was like, wait, what? And he showed me the site where you can buy any town. If you looked into your town, people are doing it. It is, it is consumerism mixed with people are buying things that don't exist.4 (5m 29s):Okay. Yeah. I feel like this is what happens when people with an unchecked power and privilege, it's like, okay, well, like literally we're just making it up. Let's just have cotton candy, be our furniture now. Like it's. So I tried to get into Bitcoin.2 (5m 50s):Oh yeah.4 (5m 51s):Like about five years ago, somebody that I went to high school with is rich from Bitcoin. And, and she was like one of the founders of one of these companies. And so the first problem I have is you shouldn't invest in anything that you don't understand. Right. So I tried to read about it and I'm just like, but what, I just kept reading and being like, yeah, but what is it? Right. You know, what's an NFT.2 (6m 20s):Oh my God. The NFTs. Oh my God. And his name is Lamont and I love him. And he was trying to teach me about those. And I was like, Lamont. I have to take some kind of drug to understand what you're saying. I don't,4 (6m 31s):I have, I, you know, I've read articles. I've had people explain it to me. I mean, I think what it is, is I do know what it is, but I'm just like, that can't be what people are spending that be that,2 (6m 43s):Yeah, because we're not stupid people. Like we can understand concepts of things.4 (6m 47s):The thing that got me off of cryptocurrency and, and FTS and all that is that it's so bad for the environment, blockchain, the amount of energy that's required to power blockchain is just like so destructive.2 (7m 3s):Okay. So this leads me to, so Lamont was like, you know, what's going on in the coworking row storage room. And I'm like, what? And of course me, I'm like, are there, is there like a torture chamber? That's why Was like, no, he's like one of the side businesses of the CEO of this place is to host these crypto machines that, that it's like credit card terminals, but for crypto. And so all the, all the crypto exchanges that go on need checks and balances, God, he's such a good teacher. He actually explained it to me. He's like, look, you, when you do a crypto exchange with somebody that has to be checked or else, how do you know you're actually getting shit, which is all like theoretical anyway.2 (7m 47s):But he's like, so then you have to create these machines that check the other machines. And those are some of those. And you get paid. It's just like having credit card terminals, right? It's like selling credit cards. You know, people that sell credit card terminals, like they make money off the, the things, the exchanges, the, the transactions, right? Transaction fees. It's like 10, 10 cents of whatever or something 4 cents. So we got machines in the fucking co-working that have nothing to do with coworking. And I re one day it was hotter than fuck over here. They take a lot of energy and Lamont Lamont goes to the guy, the crypto bro. Who's also the CEO of this coworking space who really wants to just be the crypto, bro.2 (8m 27s):He's like, listen, bro. Like, something's going to melt down. You got to have something to cool. These machines. I mean, it's a fucking disaster waiting to happen. We're all going to burn up because this motherfucker wants to do crypto. He's not even dude. He's just doing the terminals. They're called terminals. No wonder my motherfucking internet doesn't work. How much juice do these motherfuckers take? I got pissed. I got Lamont. And I got pissed. I said and Lamont so funny. He goes, yeah, I don't mind all this like virtual crypto shit, but I need some actual motherfucking green tee up in here. You haven't had green tea up in here for days.4 (9m 6s):This is what I'm going to say. This is a, like, when you all of this, when all of this starts swirling in my head and it's all overwhelming, I just go, oh, like, okay. But that's not for me. Like this whole ether, a world that's cotton candy furniture. Like that's not for me. I have to stick with what I know. I like go stick with your, with, with what's in your CTA, what's in your wheelhouse.2 (9m 30s):Right. She taught us. Catherine taught us that, right?4 (9m 33s):No, it was a2 (9m 35s):Catherine's job. Oh,4 (9m 38s):Josh. Yeah. Yeah. He was talking about, the programs are called the, your concentration is called dementia anyway, like in the same way that, you know, people create art that other people criticize. And then you say, well, it's not for you. Like, I just know that none of that is for me. So, you know, because here's the thing we Erin and I have had near misses on like a bunch of bubbles. Right? We lived in California, we lived in the bay area during the, what they used to call the.com. And all of our friends had these hundred thousand dollars a year jobs and worked at Google and places and got Friday night, beer parties and lunch catered, whatever, every single day.4 (10m 23s):And we were just like, oh my God, we're so dumb. We can't, we don't know how to work in tech. We don't, we can't get to me take advantage of this opportunity. Then it was the housing market. And in 2004, it's like, wow, you could get a house. Like we could buy a house. Somebody would give us a mortgage. When we have no money in so much debt, we thought we should buy a house. We looked into buying a house that didn't work out. That turned out to be a good thing. I think the crypto thing is another, like, I'm not saying it's a bubble. Although it probably is. Cause we have to be in a bubble. But I'm saying like, I put myself at ease about not being able to really grasp these things by just saying like, oh, that's not for me.4 (11m 10s):That's not what I'm, that's not what I'm really like here on this planet to eat, to do2 (11m 16s):It interests me. And also, yeah, it's so bad for the environment. And also I just don't give a fuck. Also give me my fuck. Oh, we haven't had creamer up in this bitch for like, and I started, I was like, I don't give a fuck what you do here, but I need creamer. So if you don't like it and they finally got it, you bet your ass when Lamont and I were like, okay, green tea, we need it. And they got it. Cause we were like, fuck you. Like we're not stupid. And then the other thing that I wanted to say about the whole Bitcoin, oh the minimalist movement that these, these kids that are in their thirties are doing okay, listen to this. This is insane.2 (11m 56s):So kids are having and kids. Yeah. They're like 30, right? They're buying Teslas. Okay. But great. They buy a Tesla. Teslas are now equipped with so much shit that you can basically live in it. As long as you have a charging, they fucking park their shit and their parents' house. I'm not kidding you. So a lot of them were living with their parents. Right. And they were like, well, this fucking sucks, but they're saving all this money. Right. Cause it's so expensive. So there's sock away, their money. They buy a Tesla, they park the Tesla in their parents' fucking driveway. And they do experiments where they plug in and then they see if they can live in it. Okay. This is like a real thing.2 (12m 37s):Right? So it has everything you need except a shower and the bed, or like you, your seats go down. It's actually an, a toilet shower and a toilet. And then they get, so they have a Tesla,4 (12m 48s):They get,2 (12m 49s):They get, they get, they get a gym membership. Okay. So they had a Tesla and a gym membership and that's all they need. And they fucking don't own shit except crypto currency in their Tesla and fucking go around to different cities. And there's like all these Airbnb hacks and, and rental car hacks that if they travel, they travel around the country. Like the guy who is the CEO of this place, doesn't live here. He lives kind of an Austin kind of here is a test. It is the weirdest thing.4 (13m 22s):Okay. Well, when the Russians send nuclear missiles and we ended up having hand to hand combat with the Chinese or whatever, well, these fighting people gonna to do nothing.2 (13m 32s):I don't know how to do nothing. There'll be dead. No, no. But you and I are scrappy. Like we could figure it out. They're dead. And that's fine.4 (13m 41s):I always think of, I just said, I think like people used to hunt, you know, like w w where if our world is predicated on so much pretend and like, and like also just like this very thin margin of, well, it's all fine and good until the power grid goes out. It's all fine. And good until like, suddenly for whatever reason, there is just no internet,2 (14m 3s):Like, or they get hacked. Right,4 (14m 6s):Right. Yeah. It's all fine. And good until like everything that we put our hope hopes and dreams and faith into just doesn't work one day, because that's what happens with machines is they just, sometimes they write2 (14m 17s):And Lamont was saying, and I kind of agree with him that like, what he thinks is happening. So frantically the government is scrambling to get into crypto. Right. Frantically our government is like, we're going to have a fucking stake in this. So what he thinks is going to happen and like agree with him is that they're going to figure out a way to sabotage the crypto system and say, we, we now run the cryptosystem. He's like, I know it's a conspiracy theory, that kind of thing. But of course it's money. Right. So they're going to say, okay, okay. Like you guys are going to get screwed because someone's going to hack, you, let the government take over, we'll run crypto. And then of course,4 (14m 54s):Which takes away the main draw of crypto, which is that it's this currency that cannot be traced to everything. So the second there's any type of regulation that, that, and it's like, well, you might as well just be talking about dollars. Right. Because you know,2 (15m 9s):That's what they're going to do. So it's going to be really interesting to see how this plays out. We'll probably be dead, but that's okay.4 (15m 14s):Yeah. We'll probably be done. I'm watching this television show called severance. Oh,2 (15m 19s):Everybody loves severance.4 (15m 21s):Wow. Wow. Wow. It's it's woo. It's really something else. But what I love about it is it's kind of hard to explain, so I won't try to explain it, but there's suffice it to say the company that these people work for, the job that they do is they sit at these computer terminals and they there's just a screen full of numbers. And they have to put these digits into the correct bins at the bottom.2 (15m 53s):Okay.4 (15m 54s):Based on their feeling about the numbers, like these numbers are scary and these numbers are half. Yeah. It's so weird. Right? When I, when I see them, they're putting the numbers into this little bins in the bottom and I go cut. This is like my daughters, you know, like educational games. She has to do something like this. Well, it gets to the end of the season. And the they've, all this little department has leveled. The there's all this pressure on getting a certain quota by the end of the quarter. And it's, we don't, we're not gonna make it and we're not gonna make it.4 (16m 35s):We're not gonna make it at the last minute. They make it. And what making it looks like for them is that a pixelated cartoon character comes on and says like, basically you leveled up. So really it, I dunno if this is the point that they're trying to make, but it really looks like they're just playing a video game.2 (16m 58s):This is insane. I love it. It's the same.4 (17m 2s):It's really, really good. And I, and I reached out to all of the actors on there and seeing if anybody wants to be on our show, I got one person who was like, oh, that sounds interesting. I'm like, is that a yes and no, I never, I never heard anything back from her, but yeah, listen, humans are designed to work. So when you don't have to literally like, grow your own food and cut down your own wood, you have to find something to do. That feels work, work ish. And I feel like a lot of our industries are kind of work adjacent2 (17m 43s):And like, and like a lot of sorting into bins. Yeah.4 (17m 50s):You2 (17m 50s):See fucking bad vegan.4 (17m 55s):No, I was wondering if I should watch it.2 (17m 57s):Okay. Watch it. And we'll talk about it because whoa. It is, the Myles was a very frustrated with this documentary based on,4 (18m 9s):Oh, it's a documentary. Oh, I thought it was a tele. I thought it was a fictional show.2 (18m 13s):Oh, it they'll make a fictional show out of it. But it's a documentary about a woman who started a vegan restaurant and so much more in New York city. And it comes down to what we always said. And I'll wait until you watch it. But I, it just reinforces what we always talk about, which is if you have an unfulfilled, inner need from childhood, that shit will play out. I could trace this, her whole demise, her whole demise. And it's a whole crazy ass fucking story about this woman. Her whole demise comes down to the fact that Alec Baldwin did not pick her to date. Okay. That's it.2 (18m 53s):Okay.4 (18m 54s):Completely plausible. I completely understand that.5 (19m 1s):Let me run this by you.4 (19m 9s):I know my son got this part in a movie. And so the thing we wanted to run by you is I, Hm. So many things I get, I get stage moms. I understand why stage moms is a thing. When my son started getting into acting, he was five years2 (19m 35s):Old. Yeah. It was really young.4 (19m 37s):And my thing was, I don't want to be a stage mom. I don't want to be a stage mom. I don't want to be a stage mum, which was reinforced by every time I've ever been on set. There's always at least one really out of control stage mom. And I think I told the story in the podcast before, but one time we, we were in a, he was doing Gotham that showed Bathum and there was like a gaggle of kids in this scene. And this one boy, I was just, you know, whatever. I was striking up a conversation with him and I said, oh, do you, do you really want to be an actor? And he said, no, my father makes me do this. I want to be at school.4 (20m 17s):And it was just so2 (20m 19s):Like,4 (20m 19s):God, and I met a lot of kids. This was back when he was doing all just all background stuff. I met a lot of that's where you find the most stage moms when the kids are like that, the stakes are just, couldn't be lower. Right. You know, they're just doing background, extra work, which is all just to say, though, I've had to be in dialogue with myself about what my aspirations are about working in film and television and my frustrated aspirations. And I, you know, I've had to just be constantly talking to myself about making sure that this is what he wants and not what I want. And in the classic thing that always happens is when he gets an audition, if he doesn't feel like doing it, it just, it becomes this thing.4 (21m 8s):And I always say, you don't have to be an actor. You don't have to have an agent, but if you're going to be an actor and you're going to have an agent, you have to do the audition.2 (21m 18s):That's true.4 (21m 19s):And you have to work at it and you have, you have to work hard at it. And that thing is actually really hard. And it takes a lot of work that we just kind of overcame this obstacle for the audition for this movie, because I made him put in maximum effort. Usually I don't usually, I'm just like, well, it's his career, you know, it's his life. If he doesn't want to work on it, why am I going to spend, you know, my whole time? But I'm really encouraged him to work on it. And he really did. And he did really well. And so now we're waiting to hear, you know, whether or not he's gotten it, but the first night that this was a thing, I couldn't sleep. I was awake. Like, I mean, part of it is thinking about the logistics.4 (22m 1s):Like how will I live in LA for a month when I have two other kids. Right. But the other part of it is just, what is this going to mean for him to, what's going to be what's next and what's next and what's next. And what's next. So I've talked a lot of shit about stage moms in the past. And I just want to say, if you're listening to this in your stage, mom, I get it. I get, I get, you know, because maybe this was your hope and dream, but also maybe just, you put a lot of effort into when you're the mom of the kid who wants to do this, it's so much work for the mom or the dad was the case may too much. It's, it's scheduling babysitters when you have other kids2 (22m 43s):Driving4 (22m 44s):Into the city for auditions paying for headshots every year, because they change so much every year communicating with doing the cell. I had to learn. This is actually how I learned how to do I moving because I had to, you know, work, learn how to edit his self-tapes and stuff like that. So, but have you encountered stage moms? Oh,2 (23m 7s):That's a great question. Yes. And I feel like I totally understand how moms and dads get and caretakers get to be that way. And I think also to remember for me is that it comes from this genuine usually place to want to help and protect your kid. And, and also, and then you mix that in with your own aspirations, which I would have to, if I had a child that I was shoveling around and also, yeah, I would encounter that. So I think I get it. And I also know that like when I worked at casting and at PR and I loved it, but they would occasionally be like moms that would bring in their kids or dads, but usually it's moms.2 (23m 57s):Right. Of course, who bring in their kids that were desperate to get the kid into the face of the casting directors. So they'd hang around. They didn't want to ingratiate themselves to casting at the audition. They'd come into the office and, and, you know, to their credit of my bosses, PR casting, they were lovely. Like they, but, but they also had work to do so. It was like, these kids are just sort of standing there smiling. And the mom is like pushing them and we all, it was very uncomfortable and it doesn't actually work like what works is being professional on set, doing a great job in the room, being a nice kid and being a nice parent, but it just feels like, and we know this from being actors.2 (24m 45s):It just feels like you have to like, sort of ingratiate and push yourself into the faces of the people with power in order to get anywhere. So then there's like these really uncomfortable moments of like talking about nothing while we're trying to get work done in the office, especially like, yeah, they have a lot of work to do. So it was just, it was just very, and you'll see when we go to PR like it's all glass. So like, you can see what the casting directors are doing in the office. So you want to be in there because it looks really fun.4 (25m 16s):Right. And2 (25m 18s):Actors who are like, quote, special, get to go in there and say, hi, like I'm friends with the, with the casting directors is the, is the idea. I'm not saying I'm like someone is, and then they get to go. It's just like a really weird thing. And it's also, it's very hard to navigate and I get it too. We, we, we want to be liked and loved and picked and chosen. And it is a universal thing.4 (25m 44s):I want the same thing for our kids. Yeah. Yeah. Totally.2 (25m 48s):I don't. I've had never had anyone that has been bonkers, you know, but maybe, yeah. I never, yeah, never.4 (25m 55s):Yeah. I think really they're bonkers behavior. I think actually, probably the kids are the ones who absorbed the brunt of it, which is, you know, and also it's really hard to teach a kid about acting because you're, as we've said many times, you're, you're trying to figure out how to play a character when you don't even know who you are. I mean, that's really true for a kid and trying to teach them, it's supposed to be it's. Yes. It's pretend, but you're supposed to be sincere and no, you're not the character, but yes, you have to be there. It's a lot of mental gymnastics,2 (26m 32s):Impossible. And like, if you don't know how to communicate that to a kid, let alone, the kid know how to do it. It's a mess. And then you're just, it's just kind of a crap shoot. Like, especially when you wouldn't see that were two and three years old.4 (26m 47s):Oh, see, now that I can't2 (26m 51s):Was like, yeah, some kids are, I mean, it's just to me, I thought it was amazing, but I also didn't have an agenda. I'm trying to get shit done. Like the directors and the producers on the, everyone is trying to get shit done in the room. And I have a kid doesn't, you know, whatever the kid is literally three years old. So like, I thought it was amazing, but I, they it's, it's a nightmare.4 (27m 15s):Yeah. Did I ever tell you the story of when I taught drama to kindergarten?2 (27m 21s):I know you did, but I don't know.4 (27m 24s):I had this job at this school called head Royce in the bay area. I got a job teaching after-school drama to kindergartners. It might've been my very first teaching thing. No, but it was early on and I hadn't taught, I certainly hadn't taught like my full-time teaching job that I eventually had at a middle school, but not having children and not having taught. I thought we were just going to do a play, you know, like They were going to memorize their lines. I seriously thought I seriously picked a play.2 (28m 5s):What was it? Do you remember? Was it like fucking, wouldn't it be funny if it was like, you know,4 (28m 10s):Romeo and Juliet2 (28m 11s):Steel Magnolias or something like just like totally amazing.4 (28m 15s):And it was age appropriate because it, it, it turned out to have whatever it was. I can't remember. But it was also a children's book, which I, oh, oh yeah. Oh, sorry. I adapted a children's book.2 (28m 29s):Oh my God. Okay.4 (28m 32s):And the entire time we were working on it, it never occurred to me that they couldn't memorize their lives. I just kept being like, well, maybe by next week, they'll know it. My next week they'll know it until it came time to do the performance and all the parents came and I shit, you not, it didn't occur to me until all the parents were walking in. Every single one of them had a video camera. This is before cell phones that, oh my God, they are expecting a show. And I guess I was too. And they don't know, we don't have a shell.2 (29m 7s):It look like my God, this is brilliant.4 (29m 10s):I got to the point for awhile. I was like doing the knee. I was the narrator. Right. And, and then they was supposed to be saying their lines, but then they would never say their lines. So then basically what it amounts to is I just read the entire book. Would2 (29m 26s):They do4 (29m 27s):Well, the kids just stood there. And the middle of it, when kid in the middle of my, and of course the more anxious and, and terrible, I felt like the more forced and forced, I must have looked crazy. I wish I could say videos. I bet I looked like a complete lunatic and in the middle of it as, and I'm also getting louder and louder. It's like, I would love to, I'm sure those parents are erased, taped over those tapes, but I would love to see just frantic me and I'm getting read By the time it was over, I just went to the headmaster's office.4 (30m 16s):And I was like, I did a terrible job. You should never hire me again. This was a complete disaster. And they were like, yeah, maybe this isn't your thing.3 (30m 39s):Today on the podcast, we were talking to Joe, the seal, Joe is an actor and a writer and a content creator and a former Neo futurist. He has got a going on and he is lovely and charming and personable and a marketing genius. He has his own company. Now. He is all that. And the bag of chips as the kids used to say five years ago. And I hope you really enjoy our conversation with Joseph.4 (31m 21s):You still have that fabulous smile.7 (31m 27s):You were so sweet. It's so good to see both. Oh my goodness.4 (31m 31s):What you, what you don't have. What I remember is big hair. Oh, Well, you're a handsome bald bald man. So you can play.7 (31m 42s):Oh, thank you. Go on. Go on.4 (31m 45s):I will. I will. I will. But I'll start by saying congratulations. JoBeth seal. You survived theater school.7 (31m 51s):I did.4 (31m 52s):Yes. And you survived it with us mostly with bod. You guys are graduated in the same year, I think.2 (31m 58s):Yeah.7 (31m 59s):Yeah, we did. Yeah. Do you remember that year? We were in the same section, Johnny.2 (32m 4s):Here's what I remember about you. We went to a Halloween party together with my roommate with a non theater school, like my best friend, Sasha, who Gina knows Sasha and Carsey. And we went to a freaking Halloween party in the suburbs and you had the best costume ever. It was a robot. And you remember any of this? You look,7 (32m 24s):Oh my God. I don't know2 (32m 25s):Brilliance.8 (32m 27s):It7 (32m 27s):Was like, I was a robot. Wow.2 (32m 29s):Like a whole situation. And it was like, we had the best time, but it was like, we didn't know anybody. It was like in the suburbs. It was my friend.4 (32m 37s):Did he make2 (32m 38s):That? Yeah, it was all made. It was so good. Anyway, that's what I remember. That's the main thing that I remember being like, oh my God. His costume. Brilliant. So anyway, I do remember. I mean, I remember, yeah. I mean, remember bits and pieces. I remember that, like I thought you were like super nice. And also, yeah, that we all just were trying to figure it out. Like nobody knew what the hell was going on.7 (33m 7s):Yeah, no, I remember when you joined our section, we were so excited that like someone new was going to like join and we all knew of you, but we didn't know. And I remember that year, you were just like a breath of fresh air. You were just so direct and funny. And you know, I think at that point we were just getting a little tired and you just brought a lot of really beautiful energy into our sections.2 (33m 36s):Oh, the other thing I want to say before I forget is that I, when I was doing research on you, like just to catch up on you and stuff, there's other people with your name that, that some, some before like wild, like one, one guy, like a couple like therapists, couple has Lisa and Joe have your name and, and are like infomercial kind of P anyway, I just thought it was hilarious. And then there's another actor.7 (34m 3s):Yes. There's another actor in what had actually happened one year. It was, I was put in the DePaul, the theater school, alumni newsletter that I was on six feet under and all of this stuff. So people started reaching out to me and it was the other job.4 (34m 20s):That's funny. That's funny. I wonder about those alumni. So it's just, I mean, I guess you've answered the question is somebody scouring the trains or whatever, looking for names that they2 (34m 32s):Used to be John Bridges. And then I think also people submit themselves, which is so, I mean, I get it, but it's also like, I don't have time for that. I mean, like, I mean, not that I'm doing anything that fancy, but like, I, there's something weird about being like, Hey John Bridges, can you put me in the alumni news? I don't know. I'd rather be4 (34m 55s):Except for like your, but that's what it is. Right. That's what you have to do. That's what it's all about the network. I mean, I haven't ever done it either, but2 (35m 6s):I mean, I did it when I had a solo show because I thought, okay, in Chicago, maybe people will come, so I have done it, but I, I just,7 (35m 14s):Yeah, for promo, I think it might be helpful in some instances, but2 (35m 19s):Whatever it is4 (35m 22s):Actually the beginning you're from long island7 (35m 25s):And you have4 (35m 26s):Zero long island accent. Was that very intentional?7 (35m 30s):Well, it's so funny. You mentioned that because I think that was such a big thing my first year. And it really kind of changed the way I speak, because I felt like I was a fast talking like long island kid. And my speech really slowed down that first and second year. Cause I was so conscious of it. So the, after that first year, I think, you know, yoga between yoga and all the voice and speech stuff, like I was like standing up straight and talking like standard American, like, you know, whatever that was that we learned.4 (36m 5s):Like you had to do that in your, not what, even when you weren't on stage.7 (36m 10s):I mean, that was, that was a thing I think back then, I didn't really understand the distinction. I felt like I, I, I had to speak that way on stage and then it just transferred over to my real life. Also, you know, looking back, I was like, oh, you know, I wish I would have been able to make the distinction in my real life that I don't have to speak like this, but it's hard to learn something and practice it. Like I couldn't just practice that in class. It would have just been too difficult, but I started speaking a lot slower just because I was really conscious of the all sounds I was making, like all the sounds and, and I, it was pretty thick. I don't know. I don't know if you all knew me back then, but it was, there were some words I had never heard pronounced.4 (36m 52s):Well, I don't recall you as, I mean, I was surprised to learn that you were from long island and looking at your history because yeah. It seemed, it seemed like you had erased it. So were you the only person from, from New York in your class?7 (37m 10s):No. There were a cup there. Ed Ryan was also from New York. Yeah, but he was from Scarsdale, I think. And then I w I might've been the only one from long island, at least in my class that I remember.4 (37m 23s):And did you have DePaul as your, I mean, is that, was that the school you wanted to go to or your safety?7 (37m 30s):Oh my God. I was all about NYU. I was all about it. And then even before I went to, you know, before I started applying for colleges, my senior year, I went to a summer program at NYU. And at the time there was something called musical theater, works conservatory. And I spent a whole summer doing like conservatory training and, you know, to earn college credit. And it was such a great program at the time too, because we took classes during the day. And then the evening we saw shows and did all this cultural stuff. So after that experience, I was, I just wanted to go to NYU and I just loved it. I loved the city and then I didn't get, I didn't get in.7 (38m 16s):And then I was deciding between DePaul and Emerson and I visited both schools. And when I went to visit DePaul, I know you all had Bradley Walker. And I stayed, he probably doesn't remember this, but I totally stayed with him in the dorms. And the other weird kind of quirky thing I remember was I, I went to his dorm room and he was eating dog food. Like he was eating out of a box2 (38m 44s):And wait,7 (38m 45s):Wait, yeah, hear me out here. So he's like, do you want some? And I was like, okay, sure. You know, peer pressure. So I ate the dog food, like out of the box, it was like dry dog food. And he's like, yeah, it's just, we like how it tastes and it's cheap. And then like, after he told me it was just like cereal and they just like, say like, they put this cereal in the dog food box anyway,4 (39m 9s):Like7 (39m 11s):Quirky things that I remember about that weekend.2 (39m 15s):So here's the thing as a 46 year old tired ass lady. I'm like, who the fuck has time to be switching foods into different modifiers. I can barely get my shoes on 18 year olds who are in college. Like the good quirky marketing. It reminds me of something they might've done. And say that movie with Janine Gruffalo and Ben Stiller, whatever that movie was that they did about gen X, whatever, like reminds me of something like, Hey, let's switch the food into the, but anyway. Okay. So was he nice to you?7 (39m 54s):Oh my God. He really sold me on the school and not, he wasn't trying to sell me on the school. He's like, this is where we do this. And he took me on a tour of the theater school and, you know, I loved that it was in an elementary school and I visited in June, which is like a beautiful time of being in Chicago. And I mean, after that experience, I was just completely sold and I, it was cool. Cause I went by myself like my mom, just let me just go to all these places to visit and like got off the, you know, I took the train, I took the L to the school and everything and, and it was, it was cool. I felt like it was a really good fit. So it worked out nicely.4 (40m 33s):You did a bunch of things though. After theater school, you moved back to New York and got very involved in theater. So tell us about that epoch.7 (40m 42s):Yeah, I mean, I think I did a couple of shows in Chicago and I had major FOMO of what was going on in New York and I felt like I was missing out. And I think, you know, I had audition for a lot of stuff in Chicago and I just didn't wasn't landing things. And then, you know, when I moved to New York, I wanted to focus more on directing and writing. And I did an intern. I did a couple of internships, but I did want to ensemble studio theater. And that was super helpful because as part of the internship, you were in an actor director writing lab and yeah, and it was, I think the first time I had been in a place where you can kind of cross over and do different things.7 (41m 27s):And also the, we had a, a lab director who really kind of just taught me, like how to like give feedback to myself and how to give feedback to others. Like the big thing that she would always ask is like, after we would present some kind of work, she would just say like, what do you need to know in order to move forward with the work? Like, what is important to you? And we really, you know, we had a small group and we really experimented within that. And then after the internship, some of us kind of like stuck together. And I mean, at the time too, there were, there were a ton of interns. There was like over 20 and they gave us the keys to the theater.7 (42m 7s):And we had like, there were a couple of theaters there. So we would do our shows like on the top floor of, of, of the theater there on 52nd street and, you know, hang out after and drink beer. And like, I mean, something that probably is not happening today, but it was, it was a really co like a good landing pad for me. So just to meet other people.2 (42m 28s):Okay. So if we take it back a little bit, like when you work, cause I'm curious about that. So like, you didn't have FOMO about LA, right? Like moving to LA when everyone moved to LA or did you like when you graduated from DePaul and I asked, because now you're here obviously in Southern California, but also because it sounds like New York to you based on you, the summer program you did and stuff was sort of the, like in your brain, like the utopia Mecca for actors, but you, so you felt a FOMO, but like showcase wise. Cause I love the good showcase story where you focused on New York, like, cause you did we, did we go to, no, we didn't go to New York, but we7 (43m 7s):Did know.2 (43m 8s):So how, how did you make the choice to go? Not to LA? Like how did that go down?7 (43m 13s):Yeah. I mean, we took a, that film class our last year with Gerard. I don't know if you remember him.2 (43m 20s):Fuck.7 (43m 21s):Yeah. We took a film class. Yeah. We all, we all did. I think that's what his name was and that2 (43m 29s):Class.7 (43m 30s):Yeah. We took a film class where we did a scene on camera and I, the it call experience was like horrific.2 (43m 39s):Oh, I remember it was bad for all of them.7 (43m 43s):I have like a little breakdown after, cause I was like, I don't, I just felt very, you know, self-conscious, I mean, we had spent like years doing theater and I never really looked at myself. And then I was not like a theater snob at all. Like I was willing to do anything. I would do voice or do film, but I just didn't feel comfortable with the camera at all. And I think by the last year or two, I really started to get more interested in like experimental theater and performance art. And I felt there was more of that in New York at the time or maybe I was just unaware of it in Chicago and I wanted to lean in that direction.7 (44m 25s):And that's another reason I kind of went to New York also.2 (44m 28s):Yeah.7 (44m 29s):Yeah. I wasn't seeing that as much. Like I remember there were some companies in Chicago that did some really beautiful pieces, like all the Mary Zimmerman pieces I loved. And I was like, Ugh, that was like, all those were like the Northwestern kids who were in those shows.2 (44m 45s):Oh, I remember what metamorphosis happened. And everyone was like, we all want it to be in metamorphosis. And none of us got in because she of course chose Northwestern kids because that's who she taught and that's where she went. Right. And so whatever.7 (44m 59s):Yeah. And I ended up seeing that in New York anyway, when it was there. So it was like anything like that would eventually go to New York to,4 (45m 6s):And you did a lot, you worked a lot in New York theater, you worked at roundabout and you, and you worked for the Neo futurists, which I love that. I mean, I, that show too much light makes the baby go blind, which is now called infinite infinite wrench, wrenches that it's called.7 (45m 23s):Yeah.4 (45m 24s):I love that show. Tell me everything about being a part of that.7 (45m 28s):Yeah. You know, at that I first saw that show in Chicago when I was like right outside of, no, I saw my first year when I was 17 and then someone from DePaul had like a friend of mine had brought me to it and I, I loved it and then kind of forgot about it. And then I auditioned in Chicago for it when I was 21 and I was just not ready for it. And then when I moved to New York, I was there for maybe two or three years. I discovered that they had had started the show there. And I mean, that really kind of shifted so much for me. I, well, for one thing, it was like, it was so great to meet a group of people who were passionate about the same thing, like the aesthetic, you know, passion about being ensemble.7 (46m 19s):And that show is like so challenging and fun and stressful, but also like super rewarding. And also at the same time, you know, it kind of changed the dynamic I had as an actor and artists with the audience, because it's so rare as an actor that you get to just like be yourself on stage. It's like rarely happens at all. So to on a weekly basis, just stand in front of an audience and like be yourself. And then, and then also think about like what you want to say and how you want to say it. And you know, like through movement or puppetry or through humor or through earnestness or do something concise conceptual or abstract or, you know, and I did some like crazy shit,2 (47m 10s):Like what was your, what was your favorite cause like what I'm noticing and what as you're talking, what I'm remembering about you is that yeah. Like literally you, you, my experience of you and when we knew each other back in the day, was that yet you did not, you, you, you wanted to sort of push the envelope and step outside of the bounds of what we were learning at the theater school. Like you just had an experimental, like heart about you. So I guess my question is like onstage. What do you remember about to my, about the Neo futurist that like really sticks to you? Like performance wise? Like what was so special? Like when did she7 (47m 48s):So many things? I mean, I think, well, the craziest thing I did was take a shit on stage with someone2 (47m 57s):I never heard about this.7 (47m 60s):It was actually a very like poignant play about like writing. It was with my mentor who was, and then you have you trust and we have the same name and we both, the play was actually called untitled number two. And we had this thing in common before we would perform, we would always like have to take a pill. So I just wrote this play about that experience. And to me, like he was, you know, offered me so much advice and so many, you know, really kind of mentored me through being a new, a futurist. And so I wrote this play in homage to him and, you know, as a gift and a sense. So at the end we like produced.7 (48m 41s):We like, we were actually, we put in a bucket and then at some point we, you know, we turned the bucket over and then, which was really hard to do. Cause I have to like, hold my poo in all day. And I was like, it was not sure what was going to come out at a certain, but I also did other2 (48m 54s):So. Yeah. Yeah. But I guess because, okay, so like the old summit stage fright I think is about being a failure for me on stage, like being embarrassed, being shamed, being all the things, right? Like that's what makes me panic on stage. Right? So this is an experience where you literally are like showing your insides, like take excrement, like on stage for the sake of art and for the sake of, but like, was it freeing?7 (49m 26s):Yeah. I mean, there was, I really never forget when I first run that I did my good friend, Erica, who I met during the new futurist and who I'm still really good friends with now. She said to me, she's like, if you fuck up, you have to let it go because you'll ruin the moment that you're in. And the next moment. So there are so many times, I mean, it was, we would learn things like the day before, the day of, and it was inevitable that we were going to fuck up. So all of that perfectionism, you had to kind of leave at the door. And, and that moment I remember sometimes like being on stage and being like, I have a line coming up. I don't even know what that line is.7 (50m 9s):And here you are. And then you just kind of like, say whatever comes out of your mouth and it's just becomes part of the show. So it was really freaky for me, who I felt like at school, I was not a perfectionist, but I did do a lot of homework to make things go. Right. I had to just let, I mean, another moment to, I, we did this like dance number where we had, we had these masks, there weren't masks. They were like plastic plates with smiling faces on them. And we didn't get a chance to rehearse the dance number before we went on. So I was beat backstage and someone was telling me like what the dancing2 (50m 48s):Score.7 (50m 52s):So I had my glasses on, like with this plate pressed against me and I hardly could see. And I was just like, all right, I'm just going to like follow the person in front of me and just see what happens. And then I think that's on YouTube somewhere of me like,4 (51m 7s):Oh, well, they wait. So I'm glad that you started to speak to being a perfectionist in undergrad because it wasn't until you use that word about perfectionism that I, that rung a bell. Oh yeah. You were perfectionists or, or maybe you were just one of these people that, you know, like we've talked to before who took theater school rarely, seriously, and maybe didn't care for people who didn't. I don't know if that's true about you or not, but how have you wrestled with your perfectionism as a performer and as a writer?7 (51m 42s):Yeah, I mean, I think what was school? I had like a very different experience. My first two years, compared to the second two years, I was certainly a big nerd my first two years. And I wish I had it cause when I knew this was coming up and I couldn't find it, I think it's at my sister's place someplace, but I have a journal that I kept used to write after every acting class. And I would write like what happened and then I'd give myself some like insights and recommendations for like next time I still have it. It's just, I have to find it. And when I do I'll, I'll, I'll send you. Cause I think I was, it was, I definitely documented everything that happened.7 (52m 25s):Like breakdowns, like being really angry, being really happy, like all that kind of stuff.2 (52m 32s): coffee table book, like, like, like acting notes from a teenager, like, like, or like, I don't know. I think it could be really great, but, and with pictures, cause you're an artist the whole, anyway,7 (52m 49s):I will, I will scan a good journal entry and I'll send it to both of you when I find it. But I think, you know, writing that really helped me, I think thrive the first two years was like the writing aspect of it and reflecting on it. And I think in terms of what I do now, like I need breaks and that's how I handle like dealing with perfectionism. Now I sometimes like I've just kind of started to develop a writing practice the past two years. And I know when it's time to stop. And usually it's when I stop, I know I need to like go for a walk and reflect or just let it go.7 (53m 29s):And then like,2 (53m 30s):'cause, that's what your friend Erica told you. It's like, you have to, we have to just let it go at a certain point in order to not because what happens right. As fear begets, fear, begets perfectionism. So on stage, if something goes awry, since we're all artists, we can relate, like if something goes awry and you stay stuck in the earth, wryness you really miss out on what's coming next. And also you're destined to fuck up. What's coming next. So that letting go for you, it sounds like it's really important in order to move on now, even not on stage. Like, and so you, you say like writing and walking helps you let go and you've realized that like to move on.2 (54m 10s):Yeah.7 (54m 11s):Yeah. And I it's so funny. We were talking about letting go. Cause when I auditioned for the Neos, we had to write a play about our biggest challenge. And to me it was letting go and I wrote this play, well, we didn't say any words, but we, there was a paper shredder on stage. And then I wrote out like a word or two on a piece of paper and then like put it through the shredder. And then we gave like, we held out pens or markers to the audience and then like the audience could come up and write something and then shred it. And it was like very powerful. Cause like some people would write like, you know, my, you know, my ex-boyfriend or like envy or, you know, last seasons, like fashion collection or whatever it is, you know, that they wanted to let go of.7 (54m 59s):But I think to me that is something that's still, you know, resonates of like how, how do I let go? You know, like through meditation, through like the walking for me is a meditation and that's, that's usually like, it's a big part of my process just to take the time, you know, to take the time between creation, I guess.4 (55m 20s):What have you learned that you've had to let go in terms of how you saw yourself as an artist when you started school, versus when you came out, like in the time that you've been able to reflect? What, what I mean? Cause we, we had lots of ideas about our spas and I had lots of ideas about ourselves and who we were as artists and whoever people. And most of those were all completely, they were wrong. So, so this podcast has been a process of letting go of some of those antidotes. What's it been like for you?7 (55m 53s):Yeah, I mean a big thing for me at school I remember was I know I've listened to a ton of episodes and I feel like I was really at war with myself. You know, I, the criticism from the teachers wasn't as big of a deal as the, as the criticism that I gave myself. Like I, I never, there was no self validation at all. Like even when I did something, well, I never told myself I, there was always something wrong. And I think that has been a big part of my adulthood is just learning to give myself a gold star and to self validate and then also to learn, to understand permission, to get feedback.7 (56m 44s):And you know, I think that was something that was always a little challenging at theater school too, was, you know, I like, you know, the, the lab director that I mentioned earlier at EST, who would say like, what do you need to know in order to move forward? So often at school we weren't in control of the feedback that we got. So I think sometimes it was really challenging for me when I was like, I'm not ready for all of this or I don't need to know that. Why are you telling me that now? Or, you know, we couldn't, I couldn't control any of that. And maybe I needed to let go of that. And I did have a little bit of a habit and, and a little reputation for walking out of class.7 (57m 32s):Yeah. And it was, it was something I had to address and something, a lot of teachers talk to me about. And I mean, often it was because I was bored or just like needed a break, or I was like, I didn't want to like watch someone or whatever it was. And2 (57m 46s):I think it's really bold. Like what the fuck, man? I wish the one time I did that, I, I like got in big trouble for it. And like, but like whatever the reason is you were on some level trying to take care of yourself. Right. And so good for you. Like, fuck that. I don't know. I like it. I probably would be like, oh, oh, that's awesome. And secretly I'm like, oh, the audacity, the amazing audacity of Joe to walk out and inside. I'm probably like, I wish I could do that. But anyway, so7 (58m 20s):Yeah, I mean, to me it was, it was self care in a way. And that was before we knew anything about that. And you know, when I think of like what I was going through at the time too, was it was such an emotional time for me, like for so many reasons. And, you know, like, you know, being away from home and coming out of the closet and like, you know, like all the money struggles I had and like, I, you know, it just kind of gave me, I was just learning how to take care of myself. And then on top of all those things, like studying drama, like, okay, this is the perfect time to study drama now, you know, and even like doing all the things that we did, like, especially the movement stuff always had kind of profound effect on me.7 (59m 8s):Cause we were like retraining how to the nervous system, that sense of like freeing our natural voice and doing all these things. So I was really emotional, like the first two years a lot. And I would just leave to kind of like collect my thoughts and not like have a major breakdown in class or dumb about something that yeah.4 (59m 25s):To modulate. Right. Because that's what you, what you definitely have no control over is modulating the flow of feedback because it's not just feedback from your teachers. We're getting feedback from our peers. And sometimes you'd get feedback from peers that you didn't really respect them. So you were like, I'm not sure what to, I'm not sure what to make of this.2 (59m 42s):What's becoming clear. Is that based on what you experienced after that with the lab is that we needed a feedback class. Like we needed a literal class of how to give and receive feedback at the theater school would have been fucking phenomenal.7 (59m 58s):Oh my God. I know it wasn't until years later when I was a Neo that we learn, the, the show was on, I think east fourth street and right next to his New York theater workshop. And they do the Liz Lurman feedback method, which I love. And I'm like, oh my God, that was really a beginning point for me because then it just to follow that structure is brilliant. Like, just start with what you were struck by. I don't need your opinion right away on what to change. Look, just tell me what you were struck by what moments did you enjoy? What, you know, what questions do you have and then, or asking questions yourself. And I mean, maybe the school does that now, but I think that was really, that was really big for me.7 (1h 0m 39s):I, for any artist, whether you're a dancer or2 (1h 0m 41s):No matter whether you're a child getting feedback from your parent or a spouse, getting feedback from your other spouse or whatever, it, it, it works in all levels. And I think that what it does though, is disrupts the hierarchy of the power in an institution. And so nobody likes that. I mean, really like teachers need to feel like they're in control, right. Instead of what struck me, let's stay curious, let's stay open. That's not how conservatories are made. Like that's not the whole goal of them. And then maybe I hope they're changing, but like, yeah. Oh, I just love that you haven't had that experience after school with both the, the, the work in New York and the, the ensemble work you did and the Neo futurists sort of sh it sounds like it's really shaped your work moving forward as an artist, right?7 (1h 1m 34s):Yeah. I mean, it was really, I have to say, I mean, after that moment of being a Neo futurists, I was like, I don't think I can play a character ever again. I don't really know it can happen cause I, it just didn't, I, it really changed the dynamic I had with an audience. And I, I guess I didn't want to go back to what it was before also being a Neo. I had to let go of really all the things I had learned at school, in a sense, I mean, all I could really use was like maybe some of the voice and speech work we had done, but I, I mean, yeah, it really kind of shifted things for me, but being in that ensemble was great.7 (1h 2m 14s):Cause I, I, you know, we really learned how you really need to learn how to give and take and to, and, but also be an advocate for your own work because every week, you know, you had to kind of bring in something and you had to pitch it. You had to sell it to the five or six people who were deciding what was in the show that week. So it was, I think it's an experience that I, they do workshops, but like, I think everyone should do a workshop in that way because the show itself is living newspaper. So you have to think of like, what is relevant right now? What's relevant to this audience what's relevant in this moment, you know? And how can I bring that on stage?4 (1h 2m 55s):So wait, so you had an interest young in musical theater, but did you follow that? Have you remained interested in musical theater?7 (1h 3m 6s):No. You know what? I know you all have talked about the brochure and so I completely read the brochure wrong when I chose DePaul. Well, a couple of things I had for musical theater, I wanted to get a BFA musical theater. And there aren't a lot of schools that offer that. So I, you know, when I didn't get into some NYU, I was like, okay, well, what other school? So I had to be flexible with that. But the brochure I remember for DePaul the last year we took ensemble class. And I actually thought that that meant that we were in a theater company.7 (1h 3m 48s):So I not only thought that the, like, after you graduated, you're part of an ensemble theater company. So I told everyone, I'm like, I'm going to DePaul. And then I'm in a theater company. And then I thought that like, that was one crazy thing. And then also the movement stuff, which was, I actually really loved, like all the movements that we did. Like, I'm a big, like I'm, I was a big fan of moving to music. Like that was my jam at school. So I thought I was going to be getting some dancing training there, but I kind of, I did let it go. Certainly like, as the years of the2 (1h 4m 26s):Rest of the school, were you in any7 (1h 4m 29s):I wasn't and I really wanted to be, I, we did like Peter pan one year. And Were you in that?2 (1h 4m 38s):No, but Eric was saying was Susan Lee and she talks about it on the podcast.7 (1h 4m 45s):I heard that one. Yeah, yeah, Yeah. But yeah, no, I didn't do any musical theater stuff. I did love all the, we learned like period dance, which I was a big fan of, like, that was2 (1h 4m 57s):Me too. There was a fucking structure and it was like slow. And like, there was a way to do it. I remember the Elizabethan situation maybe, or like there was like this dance with Romeo and Juliet situation. And I loved that. I felt like there were actual steps we could take, there was a pacing to it.4 (1h 5m 21s):And you knew if you got it or not. Right. Like it was, it wasn't nebulous. Like you either understood how to do it or you didn't.7 (1h 5m 27s):Yeah. I thought I was like, I love the ritual of it. And it was, it was great to learn about history in that way too. And I liked all the Labon stuff that we did with Betsy, I thought,2 (1h 5m 38s):Is that the buoyancy and the, this and the, that.7 (1h 5m 42s):Yeah. I loved all of that stuff.2 (1h 5m 44s):Yeah.7 (1h 5m 45s):I mean, it was, you know, it was physically challenging too. We, I remember that thing we did with it was called like chaos, where you had to like go crazy. And4 (1h 5m 55s):I don't remember that.7 (1h 5m 57s):Yeah.2 (1h 5m 57s):It was crazy. And I remember I got such a stiff neck. I had to go to the emergency Because we were going crazy. And the next day I was like, I think I broke my neck, but I didn't break my head. So I had to go to that. And they were like, what did you do where he's like at a headbanging concert? I was like, no, it's a theater school now.4 (1h 6m 23s):Oh, we got another one. We got another theater,2 (1h 6m 27s):Chaos lady. I was like, I can't move. Yeah.4 (1h 6m 31s):Okay. But wait, so tell us about Susan Laurie parks, 365 plays and 365 days.7 (1h 6m 39s):Yeah. So that was, we, the Neos were given a handful of S of days for our scripts from that. And then as an ensemble, we were tasked with like interpreting it in any way that we wanted to. So it was cool to like, do a show at the public. And I remember we did one piece called FedEx to my ex where we had, like, we used actual FedEx boxes, like maybe like 50 or 60 of them. And we, we had letters on them or words and like kind of configured them to, to give messages out to the audience on these boxes.7 (1h 7m 24s):So I love that experience just cause we, as an ensemble, get to LA to celebrate this playwright with other like theater companies from, I think it was from, from all over the place. And it felt, again, like another professional experience, something that we didn't really get a chance to do, because the show that we did on a weekly basis was like on knew sports street at like 11 o'clock at night, you know? And this was more of a, like, you know, a different audience for us, which wasn't,2 (1h 7m 53s):When did you stop working with, is it like once a Neil always said, Neil, can you stop pack in and do stuff? Or like, how does it work?7 (1h 8m 1s):You can. Yeah. So the, I was like a regularly scheduled Neo for about two years or so. And then I jumped in to do the show at other times. And like we did a pride show that I would do often, or I would come in and do a run. And then we also had primetime shows. So I was involved in like two or three prime time shows as either a performer or assistant director or a collaborator in some way. And I did that up until I did some marketing for the company. I did that up until I moved to LA. And even my first year in LA, I did a project at here art center with my, one of my theater heroes chucked me that I went back to to, to see.7 (1h 8m 50s):So, but yeah, when I moved here, I kind of just decided to let, let that go.2 (1h 8m 60s):They're always themes that emerged with people's lives when they come on the show. So for you then stop and starting, like ed Ryan's is being interrupted and yours is like letting things go. So when did you arrive in LA?7 (1h 9m 13s):I moved here. It's been five years. So 2017 or so. And you know, I finally feel like now I'm kind of getting settled. I mean, I'd go back to New York a lot just to hang out and spend time there. And I work remotely. So I'm able to like go there and like work for a couple of weeks. I've learned not to stay too, too long. Cause last summer I was there for six weeks and I was like, oh, I feel like I'm in my old life.4 (1h 9m 42s):How do you satisfy? If you still have a craving for performance, how do you set it? Because now you have your own company you're self-employed, which is awesome. How do yo

Tasmania Talks with Brian Carlton
Mark Gaetani, State President of St Vincent de Paul Society Tasmania

Tasmania Talks with Brian Carlton

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 7:30


Mark Gaetani, State President of St Vincent de Paul Society Tasmania

The Fast Lane
The Fast Lane - April 11th, 2022

The Fast Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 183:40


2:00 - The season has begun 2:15 - Not the best “start” 2:30 - A potential turning point for Binnington? 2:45 - What's Trending 3:00 - Analyst & former Men's College Basketball Coach, Barry Hinson 3:15 - Women's Top Freshman of the Year from DePaul, Aneesah Morrow 3:30 - Splits be damned, give me Albert 3:45 - Chairman, USBWA Awards Banquet, Missouri Athletic Club's Aaron Pawlitz 4:00 - The Gauntlet 4:15 - Women's Basketball Player of the Year from South Carolina, Aliyah Boston 4:30 - National Freshman of the Year from Auburn, Jabari Smith 4:45 - Have the Blues rounded into form? 5:00 - Oklahoma Men's Basketball Head Coach, Porter Moser 5:15 - Men's Basketball Player of the Year from Kentucky, Oscar Tshiebwe 5:30 - Sports Six Pack 5:45 - What You Missed

DePaul Download
DePaul Law strengthens the pipeline to law school and the legal profession

DePaul Download

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 23:49


The U.S. Senate recently confirmed the first African American woman on the U.S. Supreme Court—the pinnacle of the legal profession. This, however, isn't the only legal arena where historically underrepresented groups are struggling to break through. While law schools have grown more diverse, law students of color still face challenges and barriers to success. DePaul Law Dean Jennifer Rosato Perea, a first-generation law graduate herself, discusses what her college is doing to introduce first-generation and students from historically underrepresented groups to the legal profession and the college's other measures that will make a difference to diversity, equity and inclusion for its students.

Her Story
Briana DePaul shares Her Story with Kathy Romano

Her Story

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 26:24


Briana DePaul talks about losing both of her parents tragically and unexpectedly before she was 20 years old.  Deciding she wanted a better life than the one she was handed, Bri earned a masters degree in education and started her own small business, A + B Custom Creations.  Her Story is hosted by Kathy Romano and airs Sunday mornings on 95.7 BEN-FM.  

The Scorer's Table with Eric Devendorf
Wilson Chandler on growing up playing against Devo, the Big East, Kobe, wild NBA stories & more

The Scorer's Table with Eric Devendorf

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 81:10


Wilson Chandler, the 13 year NBA Veteran and one of Devo's good friends from growing up playing together in Michigan, hops on The Scorer's Table this week! The two chop it up about stories from when they played against each other back in the Big East days, Chandler's career at DePaul and more. Wilson also shares some funny stories about life in the NBA, including a wild story of one time he got traded, his time playing with Kobe and a young Nikola Jokic, why he opted to not play in the NBA bubble in 2020 and how that led to him going to China to play. Subscribe to the Scorer's Table now wherever you get podcasts and subscribe to the Field of 68 YouTube channel to watch every episode and get more great College Hoops coverage. Intro music: Cherry Metal by Arthur Vyncke | https://soundcloud.com/arthurvost Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en_US

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line
PODCAST EXTRA - Prof Luke O'Neill On Seeing Ukrainian Refugee Suffering Firsthand

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 7:23


Luke talks to PJ about his trip to see the work of Depaul, one of the few agencies with in situ operations in #Ukraine to get vital food aid to thousands of people in cities under siege and into neighbourhoods close to the front line. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

I Survived Theatre School
Katharine Scarborough

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 76:12


Intro: Boz did MDMALet Me Run This By You: Will Smith and Chris RockInterview: We talk to Katharine Scarborough about The New School, Ron Leibman, Robert LuPone, Casey Biggs, the Actor's Studio, Neil Labute's Fat Pig, Harvard's A.R.T., Shakespeare & Company, Moscow Art Theatre, Biomechanics, Michael Chekhov technique, Michael Chekhov Theatre Festival, Ragnar Freidank, Mabou Mines, Dixon Place, The Brick Theater, JoAnne Akalaitis, Big Girl web series, Jean Taylor, clowning, clown burlesque, improv culture, Bridesmaids, Melissa McCarthy, actor branding, cultivating a good relationship with agents, One on One NYC.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Kalichi.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand.2 (15s):And at 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.1 (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? So I think the main thing I just want to say is like, I took drugs, but we call it the medicine. Right. Everyone's like in the ma so I did, and I won't, it's still illegal because it's still in third clinical trials, but I took MTMA with a trained MTMA guide. Who's also a therapist whose name I shall not say so that she doesn't go to jail for some weird reasons. And I'm going to tell you, and you probably already know this from your, from, I know you have some like knowledge about psychiatry or about psychedelics in terms of medical use and stuff like that.1 (1m 12s):Not that you've done them, but you know what I mean? I know you, whatever the point is, I think it's going to change psychiatry. Like it's going to change2 (1m 21s):A hundred percent.1 (1m 22s):I had. Okay. First of all, I was scared shitless. So MTMA is the pure forum for people that don't know of, of ecstasy or Molly, but it's, it's, you know, pharmaceutical grade and it's whatever, it's very, you know, whatever, it's a, it's a legit medicine, but I was scared. I was like, I'm going to die. I'm going to take this. This is where for someone that has anxiety more than I have depression, I think now anyway, in my life, the fear was I'm I'm doing something illegal. This is wrong. And I'm going to suffer for it also, like that was the moralistic fear. And then the actual fear of what the fuck is going to happen.1 (2m 3s):So for people, you know, just so people know, like you're in this person, rented a house and Airbnb and had a beautiful, I was, it was just me and her and a beautiful, like, amazing bed. That was that she brings in. That's like a foam, a memory foam. It's not as shitty thing. It's like really great. And I even thought that before I was on drugs, right? Like I was like, this is a really good setup. The house was a neutral house. Meaning she picked a great thing, which was there. Wasn't the, the family of the people's art on the walls. It was like pictures of surfing and stuff and like water.1 (2m 44s):But like not a lot of people, there were no mirrors. Like I was like, is this made for this? And she's like, no, I just found this. There was no, no, the house was clean. So it felt really good. Right. But not sterile. So that was great. And she had flowers and stuff and there was like a table set up. So then you go in, you bring objects and, and pictures, if you want. And there's two kinds of MDM assisted therapy, right. There's talk therapy you could do with two therapists. I did not. This, this practitioner does not do that kind. She's a firm believer in like letting the client lead their own experience.1 (3m 26s):And at first I was like, oh, I hate that. I want you to take care of me. Like I was like, I want all the therapists in the room. Right. It was like a real, and then I said, you know, no, I'm gonna, I'm an adult. Like I can it's. Okay. And also when you have two therapists in the room, they, they, they use the music less. So what I will say is the music was, I would say 90% of what was amazing about this. I don't even like music really. Like, I'm not a music person, but you, you literally have your headphones noise, canceling headphones with th with curated music from MTMA musicians.1 (4m 7s):So people that have scientists have worked with psychiatrists and doctors to develop music specifically for psychedelic MTMA journeys it's and it's timed with the medicines. So, because they know, because they've done studies, they know the trajectory of the journey in terms of what you're going to be, what kind of thing is going to be maybe happening. So they time this music. So you put on these headphones and there's like blankets. And I brought my own blanket. And it's you do like beforehand, you say a prayer and like, not a prayer, but like, yeah, like, like a, like a meditation tension.1 (4m 47s):We said, I, and believe me, this was not something I took lightly in terms of, I for weeks have been committed to doing it. So then there's a workbook beforehand there's sessions with the therapist beforehand. So it is not a party. This is not, I cannot say this enough. It is a journey and not a party. So meaning that it's a whole thing. It's like a process it's it's therapy. It's it's medical treatment is what it is. Okay. So you have this headphones on and also the music is playing in the room as well, the same music. So that even if you take your headphones off, you hear it and okay. And you have total blackout shades on, on your eyes.1 (5m 31s):So a mask that is comfortable and soft, but really dark. And I was like, oh my God, I'm going to die. Like, this is, this is it. This is how I die. And then I was like, you know what? You have so much, like you you've done so much research. You've watched the videos, you know, this is not gonna, they're gonna kill you, but you're scared. Okay. But I just took the pill. I was like, okay, here we go. So I took the pill and then you lay down and you're like, okay, it's not working. Like none of it. And by the way, I've never taken equity in my life. I've taken throughs and I'm taking acid and obviously marijuana I've smoked and stuff and edibles, but never that. So I was like, nah, it's not working.1 (6m 12s):And then the music, okay, well, all I can say is it becomes a party for your body and the notes I will share with you in an email that she took. I said some of the funniest things that I've ever said, and also you're like still aware that you're you. So it's not the feeling because for someone like me who has trauma and panic, the big fears that you'll disappear, I will disappear. I won't have an identity and no one will take care of me. And I will, I will totally decompensate to the point of death. Like that is really the thing, this drug, this medicine, you know, you're still you like, if, if, if a police officer, God forbid came up and said, what's your name?1 (6m 57s):And you could answer all those questions. It's just, it literally turns off the part of your brain that is super judgy. So I knew what was happening sort of, but then the music, I was like, okay, this is not working. And all of a sudden, Gina, the music becomes the most beautiful music you've ever heard in your life. Like, you can't believe that humans made the music. Like I was like, this is, and I, I kept saying, this is like watching a movie with your body. So you're. Yeah. So you're like, and then, okay, so you feel, I felt great. And like, you're underwater, you can breathe under water and there's some visuals, but you're seeing nothing.1 (7m 40s):I mean, there's no, there's black, but you're seeing it. So you are kind of hallucinating. But the thing, and the thing that happens is with MTMA is that the whole principle is that inside of us, that these MTMA psychiatrists and therapists believe that there is an inner healer drive to live person who knows better inside of all of us before the trauma happens. Right. It's moved that we access that part of ourselves during the MTMA journey and you, and that's why they say trust the medicine. And I'm like, that is, fuck you. Trust them like beforehand. I was like, but you, and don't get ahead of the medicine, all these things they say.1 (8m 21s):And you're like, what? But you, you know what it means once you do it, you're like you is the most. So you're feeling good. I felt like you just feel relaxed and, but it gets you in that state. So then you can look at your trauma, so,3 (8m 38s):Oh, okay. Like making everything, just so PR conditions being perfect. Yeah.1 (8m 44s):And then you're like, oh, this is a hard song. So it feels like, oh, this is a hard song. And that's how I started to feel. This is going to be a song. And it, and I can only tell you that, like I worked through some it's, it is, it's like 12 therapy sessions in six hours in a, in a, in a, in a wonderful way in that I looked at some stuff, some crazy stuff, but it is not, we're not when we're on MTMA we're not attached to the trauma. So it's like watching a movie, but also you're feeling it.1 (9m 27s):Like I could feel fear and panic come up. So it wasn't like I had a good time all the time, but I wasn't, you can go towards it without feeling like you're going to be annihilated. I didn't think I was ever going to be annihilated by my trauma in the, in the medicine. I felt like I had the resources and I knew there, and I was curious about what the songs and the music and the drug was going to show me rather than petrified. And I have to get the fuck out of here. And like, I don't care what I do.3 (10m 6s):Did you ha did you remember things that you hadn't remembered before?1 (10m 10s):No. It was like, well, no, no. It was like different. It does it in a way that is like, not you. So the things I worked through, I can say it was like a song and the music is timed. When you're at the peak of the medicine for this, it was like some crazy, like intense, you know, soundtrack to a scary, not a scary movie, like, like, like a war movie. Right. And you're like, oh God. And at least that was my experience. But then what happened was I had a nine 11 situation where I was in the burning building is so crazy. This is nine 11. And I'm in a burning building on the 94, but I'm not panicked. I'm like, okay, this is what's happening.1 (10m 52s):And I go to a man and a woman who are dressed in business clothes, and they're sort of tattered. And we've all been through this horrible crash. And I say, you guys, we have to jump now. And they're like, fuck, you know, way to a man and a woman blonde lady. And I say, listen, I know you're really scared work on a jump together. We're together. And this is the last conscious choice we get to make as a group to do, to take, to take our lives in our own hands. I'm going to ask you now to take my hands and we're going to jump and they're like petrified and I'm like, we can do it. And then, and I'm here watching Jen, the observers, like what is going to happen, but not like I got to get the fuck outta here and clawing at my skin.1 (11m 38s):No, no, no more like we, I knew that we had to do this. And so I took their hand and we jumped and then we started flying. We flew away. So I like helped them to, and it's really me helping me. Right. So like, I get that now. But like, and so I wasn't like petrified. So that was a huge moment. But the other moment was none of the people I didn't want to come in, came in. So like your inner healer knows, like I didn't want to see my parents and I didn't want to see my sister. And I didn't. I saw my dad in the, like a field and he was young and happy. Great. We like, that was great.1 (12m 18s):But in the song, there was a, like a Tibetan song nothing's in English, which is great. So like, if there are words and lyrics, it's not an English, which is great. Unless you speak those languages, then you might know what they're saying, but I did not. And so there was a Tibetan, like guys scream, like screaming, singing, like chanting. And in my head, I was like, oh, this is the reckoning song. This is where he makes other people atone for their sins against me. He's yelling at them, all the bad things they did to me. So I don't have to do it like stuff like that comes forward where you're like, holy fuck. So, and then the other thing was the name.1 (13m 1s):And I will say this, and I will not say the name, but the name of someone I think like sexually abused me as a child came forward. And it just said, the name of your perpetrator is, and then there was the name and it wasn't scary. And it was at the end of my journey. And it was sort of like, this is just the name and it's the name I knew. And it's a name that I had questions about. And I was like, oh, okay. And it was like, not a dun dun dong. It was like, this is3 (13m 33s):Okay. Okay. Oh my God. I make so many feelings.1 (13m 37s):Oh God. Yeah. So, so that is my, so my takeaways are still, I have many sessions afterwards. I'm gonna meet with her tonight on zoom. And we it's an ongoing process. I don't know if I'd ever do it again. They say like, you just do a maximum of three, three sessions for any person, unless you have like severe, severe trauma. And then sometimes they mix it with mushrooms and ketamine and they do all kinds of things for like combat veterans and stuff like that. Or just people that are really stuck for years that are on like 40 meds. And like can't. So I will say that it's changing psycho, like it, because you are self fricking guided.1 (14m 21s):It is, I didn't make the experience about anyone, but myself and I was able to take ownership over. Like it was parts were scary. Parts were lovely. Parts were fun, but it was my experience. So like, you don't lie.3 (14m 40s):You're the protagonist in a story.1 (14m 42s):And I didn't make the therapist, the leader, or I sh she was there as a witness. So what I'm saying about MTMA therapy is if you are committed to it is one it's just like fucking having a dog or getting married or anything else. If you don't really have to, or need to do it, I would say, don't do it. But if you are someone who is in therapy, working on your shit and you feel stuck, or you feel like there is a trauma that you just refuse to touch in there, talk therapy or whatever MTMA is, is the thing. But, but I really recommend, like I took a shit ton of supplements before a shit ton of supplements after HTP, all things you can get at whole foods because your body does need to.1 (15m 29s):And I got a massage, you got to do it the right way. Like this is, I tell people it's not a party, but it's also, it's like a journey. And it's also a huge self care thing. It's like, it's all the all, and they say, the minute you commit to the medicine like that, you're going to go on a journey. The medicine starts working. So like stuff will come up before then you're on. So all this to say, what are your thoughts when you hear this?3 (15m 55s):Well, I mean, I'm, That's what I would be scared of this Learning something new about my past.1 (16m 12s):Right, right. I know. I know. It's3 (16m 17s):Afterwards. How do you feel about that?1 (16m 20s):I, I feel like she not first want to say, like, I totally get that. I was petrified and I, The worst in our life has already happened to us because we were children and we could not do anything about it. That is the worst part of the whole thing is that we were little and had no resources. That is the crime that was committed against us. Not that it, it was that we were resource lists. The thing about MTMA and how I feel. I never felt resource lists.1 (17m 0s):I knew3 (17m 2s):If I'm prepared1 (17m 3s):And in the journey, even while I was like, oh, this is going to be hard, but I never felt like D I was in danger and I never felt like a child. So trauma robs you of your adult hood. Right. So it tells you you're still five and you're still in the situation and nobody's going to help you. You don't feel like that on MTMA. I don't know about, I feel like on other drugs you might, but MTMA is like really renowned for people feeling in somewhat in control. Like I could have, I wouldn't want to drive a car, but if like I needed to, I could have been like, oh, Hey, let's get out of the house now, but I hear you.1 (17m 43s):But it is so evident in my journey that like,3 (17m 51s):We w it really helps to grow you up. Let me run this fine. Everybody has trauma that they need to look at. And that leads us into what we definitely have to run by each other, which is th this thing that happened at the Oscars and talk about trauma. And, you know, all I could see in that moment was two little boys. I saw Gina.3 (18m 30s):Exactly. I thought, oh, they're so hurt. So deeply hurt. I have no tools right now to it, especially for will Smith. It's like, he, he short-circuited somehow. And was his trauma was unable to stay under wraps and it came out in, on a public stage. And that's all I could see too, because that's my framework. That's my, that's my paradigm. Yeah. And, and, you know, of course in the information age that we're in and the, in the social media age, the, the, the, the second something like that happens, all anybody can think about is like, what are the hot takes going to be on Twitter?3 (19m 16s):Right. Okay. Well, there's a variety of takes, but they all seem to be mostly focused on who was wrong or what was wrong, you know, which to me is like, not the point, you know, like it's, who's hurt, who is hurting and what are they going to do about their hurt? You know, I said, yeah. I said, these people, all of them involved need help and support. Absolutely. They need help need shunning. They don't need, you know, I mean, and, and I don't really hear too many people talking about Chris rock, but I mean, I hope his people are checking on him because he gave his help to television.3 (20m 1s):And I just, I know that that has happened to him before. Right. I just felt like this is such a redo of his child that I don't know that it must be. And he said, you know, he's talked about everybody hates Chris. That was a joke. And he talks about getting him, getting in trouble with his mouth before, but I don't know, man. It was just so raw. And I kinda think they just, I guess they had to air it, but, and it's sort of live or whatever, but I don't know. I just, I wish there had been, I wish the grownups had come in. Well, what we need all I was telling my therapist yesterday, we need referees to say, wait, time out time, like psychological referees that are like, this is actually going into a territory.3 (20m 43s):That's not okay. So like, let's stop and regroup, but nobody, you know, it's1 (20m 47s):Capitalism and money. And nobody cares about psychology.3 (20m 49s):It's like, oh, good ratings. You know, this is getting before,1 (20m 52s):Like, fuck them. They're rich. So who cares about them? Or fuck that.3 (20m 55s):I hate that. I, that argument just really is just so tired. Like, oh, if you have money, then you're not allowed to have any other problem for life.1 (21m 4s):Well, the other thing I think is like, if we, if we live in a capitalist world, which we do, and basically the rich people run things, I want my rich people to be healthy.3 (21m 13s):Amen to that. Yes.1 (21m 16s):Yeah.3 (21m 18s):And talk about tools and resources. I mean, they, they that's, that's the one thing I will say, if you have those resources, you have a responsibility to make use of them in a way that contributes not detracts from the world and yourself and the people that you love and who love you, you know? Yeah. So it was sad. And, but at the same time, I was happy. There was theater back in the Oscars. I was happy about all of the firsts that happened. I was, I, it, it looked to me to be the most inclusive orange show I've ever seen in terms of what they talked about and hoop in the symbolism.3 (21m 58s):And I really, I really get into the symbolism, you know, when people wear certain things and do certain things, and this rep, you know, I'm sure if we could talk to the set designer, we would, we would learn a lot about what the symbolism was of the set. And so I thought that was interesting. I was wondering where they were sitting around these tables because it's not like the golden gloves are not eating meals. And then when, when these dancers got on, I thought, oh, this is for this. And, and it just felt like theater. And I just thought, yeah, okay, good. We need this. Anyway. We need, we need to get back to like, something more pure about why we all went into this because Yes. And visceral, because the other thing that occurred to me is like, wow, I never heard about this before, but it must be so tense to be at the Oscars,1 (22m 46s):Like horrible.3 (22m 48s):You're either tense about what you're wearing tense about whether or not you're going to win tense about what speech you're going to make tense about what I noticed people. I feel like I could read people's body language when they were dissatisfied with where their seat was. You know, I just felt like everybody was, everybody comes to that night with who are you going to tell me? I am. Oh,1 (23m 10s):Right. That's right. And am3 (23m 11s):I, is that going to be acceptable to me? And it's a very narrow definition of what's.1 (23m 17s):Yes. Well, yeah. It's like, yeah, it's teeny, it's impossible. It's impossible. So I think you got to go, like, I now know why, like Frances McDormand goes and she's like completely stoned or like, or like just crazy people do because it's too much pressure. That's the other thing I'm real I saw was with the, with the will Smith thing, was that the amount of, like you said, tenseness, you know, the amount of pressure they, everyone looks like ready to pop. They're so anxious and stressed out and understandably it's. So I, I know now why people don't go to those things. Like I always thought it would be so fun, but now that I'm looking at it, I'm like, that seems like a lot of work and also real tense,3 (24m 3s):Real, real tense, but that doesn't take away from the beautiful, you know, I heard some beautiful speeches and overall I think overall I hope everything that happened at the Oscars is indicative of like things moving in a better and better direction, but we're also very far away from a lot of things, a whole lot of things.1 (24m 26s):And, and then there's this, you know, and we don't really have time to talk about it this time. We're going to talk about next time maybe, but like this whole thing of like, okay, so a lot of, you know, like who gets to have a take on what went down? So like, people are, are saying, you know, I've seen members of the black community saying, you know, like no white people should talk about this. And, and frankly, I didn't feel the need to talk about it as a half white, half Latino or as a human. I also, my, I thought, I thought, oh, my framework is I come from a place of like, we're all traumatized. So like, that's what I, and I'm trained in that. And that's what I can chime in about if somebody asks my goddamn opinion, like you and I ask each other's opinion, but nobody's asking my goddamn opinion.1 (25m 13s):So I don't keep my mouth shut. If you want to ask me what I think, then we talk about it on our podcast. You know what I mean? But like, I don't need a platform Twitter to talk about will Smith and Chris rock, they, plenty of people are doing that3 (25m 25s):Where people1 (25m 26s):Covered3 (25m 27s):It's covered. It's well-covered yeah. Oh, I just have a very quick update about my fascination with those tick talks with the, the women and1 (25m 36s):They're getting ready and the coming home,3 (25m 38s):I found out they're all infomercials1 (25m 44s):For the products in there for all the products.3 (25m 47s):Yeah.1 (25m 48s):So it's actually nothing about there. They don't really do that.3 (25m 52s):I mean, who knows,1 (25m 54s):How did you find that out?3 (25m 57s):'cause my kids stole they're like, I mean, and they were, they weren't saying mom, you know, that's just infomercial. They were like, yeah, you can get all those products. If you just click on the thing you can see. And I was like, oh, so the whole thing is a commercial. And they were like, yeah, what did you think it was?1 (26m 12s):You're that it was a day in the life of a lovely lady with very many gadgets and outfit.3 (26m 19s):And it was just one of those moments like, oh, I, so1 (26m 24s):I have those all the time. I have those all where I'm like, oh, I'm truly an eater.3 (26m 29s):I'm truly so dumb. I deserve, I deserve to waste my money on these products and they don't want to get my money completely work. I did in the end, only buy one thing. Oh, you1 (26m 42s):Actually did buy what you3 (26m 43s):Buy. I bought it a egg cooker. You can, you can hardball eggs in the microwave.1 (26m 50s):Well, that's pretty good. Okay.3 (27m 9s):Today on the contest we were talking to Catherine Scarborough. Catherine is an award-winning New York city-based actress and writer. She got her MFA in acting from the new school for drama. And she's also trained with the Moscow art theater and the people's improv theater. She has a lot of interesting stories and she has a fantastic web series called , which you can find on her website, Catherine scarborough.com. So please enjoy our conversation with Catherine Scarborough.6 (27m 51s):Yeah. Yeah. Perfect. Okay.3 (27m 53s):So congratulations, Catherine, Catherine Scarborough, you survived theater school and your first new-school alone. So I I'm really intrigued by the way, by your intro here, he says, can be interesting conversation. Does that mean you had a mixed bag of a time?7 (28m 10s):Well, first of all, thank you. I, yes, it was definitely a mixed bag. It's an interesting program. Yeah. I mean, I, the training, my professors were really great. I had a lot, I really am happy with my artistic training. It was the business side of things1 (28m 32s):That7 (28m 33s):I, we went out into the world completely unprepared.1 (28m 36s):Okay. When did you graduate? You look so young.7 (28m 39s):20 13, 20 131 (28m 44s):Is recent. So we graduated and fricking long, long time ago. So, so like, like, yeah, nineties. So, so at 2013, the new school didn't really prepare you business wise. And I mean,3 (28m 59s):When did these people get,1 (29m 0s):When are we going to get prepared,7 (29m 4s):Please schools do it, to be honest with you. I think that if it's a name, if it's a school that you can walk into an audition room and they're like, oh, you're a Yalie. You're NYU. It's a different story. But like, to give you an idea, and I got my MFA, it was not a BFA program. It was an MFA program when we were getting ready or we had done our showcase maybe. And then we were doing, you know, reaching out to agents and managers, this spreadsheet that we were given, some of the people on it were dead1 (29m 44s):Or in jail or in jail7 (29m 46s):Dead. I mean, one of my classmates came back, oh1 (29m 48s):My God, these people,7 (29m 52s):They were like, I'm sorry, this person has passed away.1 (29m 60s):That's3 (29m 60s):Crazy.1 (30m 1s):I really, I really applaud that. Person's tenacity. They were like trying to get repped by a ghost. They will do like, I'll take anyone, give me the ghost, even3 (30m 10s):The ghost ghosted me. Okay. So, so you weren't prepared, but what about the straight training side of it? Like7 (30m 20s):You,3 (30m 21s):Presumably you went there saying I'm going to be a famous actress. Give me all I need to know. Did they fit the bill in that way?7 (30m 30s):Yes and no. I mean, it was, you know, again, once again a mixed bag, I had some fantastic professors. I, I was lucky enough to study with Ron Leibman1 (30m 42s):Who he, more,7 (30m 44s):Ron originated the role of Roy Cohn in angels in America. He was Rachel Green's dad on friends. He and studying with him was really a gift. I mean, and he, you know, I mean, he had done what you want to do as an actor in his career. He had Tony, can I curse? I really, You know, he had a fucking Tony. So there was no, I think sometimes with acting teachers, there is an ego part of it where they, I don't know, they want to mold you or they're frustrated and they haven't done what they want, but he had done everything that he wanted to do.7 (31m 27s):And so really he was just in it because he cared about young actors and he was tough, but he wanted you to be the best artists you could possibly be. And so that was such a gift that there were lots of professors that I really had a wonderful experience with there. Casey Biggs was my classical technique. Like Shakespeare professor. He's wonderful. He was, he's a star Trek actor. If you don't know, the Saifai world gets a lots of Shakespearian actors because they have to3 (31m 58s):Make7 (31m 58s):Sense. You know, they have to take this ridiculous material and make1 (32m 3s):And make it accessible.7 (32m 6s):Right.1 (32m 7s):So for people that don't know, obviously the new schools in New York, did you audition? How was that?7 (32m 14s):Yes, I auditioned. So it, yes, it's in New York city. It used to be where the actors studio was. And then there was this gray Bradley Cooper went to my grad school at the time that the actor's studio was still attached. And then there was this big schism actor studio went to pace. And then the new school had its own drama program run by Patty lipomas brother bobble poem. So he was the Dean1 (32m 44s):Of the school at your school?7 (32m 46s):At my school. Yeah. Bobby Lou. And so, yeah. So the audition process was I actually, they asked you to prepare a scene. So you had to find a scene partner and do a scene rather than just a monologue, which was cool. So I had a friend of mine come with him. This is funny. And a friend of mine come and do a scene with me. I did a scene from a play that I hate, but that I felt like would make me appear marketable. I did a scene.1 (33m 17s):Yeah.7 (33m 17s):I did a scene from fat pig, which,1 (33m 19s):Oh, no,7 (33m 21s):But Hey, I got into school with it. So1 (33m 23s):Yeah. You know what I always say about that play? Like I actually know Neil LaBute and that guy's a Dick. So, I mean, I've met him. I wouldn't say know him. He directed did he direct, he directed Wicker man, that my boss Nick cage, was it the second time UN he's got problems. He's a, he's like a Mormon, he's got problems with his own body size. I think as a, as a plus sized dude, he's real weird. He's real weird. But anyway, I always say about fat pig. It's like, I am always rooting obviously for the actress that takes on that role.1 (34m 6s):Especially as a plus sized lady, I'm like, yeah, you go. And, and we think, God, I hope we're writing better plays in that, but you know what? It's not the actresses deal that is doing it so good for you. So you did a scene from that pig with your friends,7 (34m 22s):And then he got asked to audition for the school himself and he got into,1 (34m 30s):I'm glad you both did because you didn't.7 (34m 33s):I know it would have been nuts. So, so we do the scene and then we find out what happens then is something called callback weekend. And I actually, I have to say, I think that the new school at that time, because the training has completely changed at the school now, since I've graduated. But their audition process was the best that I ever experienced because, and by the way, I auditioned for graduate schools, like on three different occasions. And when I auditioned for the new school, it was like the last gasp. It was the only school I applied to that season. Like I was like, I'm done with this. I'm going to open it.1 (35m 11s):No one, no one accepted you the first times. Right. Mad at them.7 (35m 17s):It was really awful. But are you1 (35m 19s):Fucking kidding me? Okay. All right. So they, you were like, fuck it. This is the last hurrah. I don't get it here. Okay.7 (35m 25s):Yeah. So the only school that I applied to that season, so you do your scene and then they have something called callback weekend where it's a whole weekend. You go and it's a surprise. You don't know what's going to happen. You go. And they have, because part of the core of the training and the new school is having playwrights directors and actors create new work together, creating your own work is a big part or was at that time a big part of the training program. And so you had to put together, we were put in groups and we put together a short play in 24 hours. And that was our, our callback.3 (36m 6s):I mean, that sounds really stressful, but also really7 (36m 8s):Fun. It was so fun.1 (36m 10s):Did you write the play,7 (36m 12s):The playwrights? Did they1 (36m 14s):Right? Yeah.7 (36m 15s):Yeah. At some point too, I did have to do two monologues and I cannot remember when that happened. I think, I think, you know what it was. Okay. It was callback weekend. I had to go and do my two monologues and do like a movement workshop. And then you found out, okay, you've made it now. You're the last round and you're doing a 24 hour play. Yeah. And so, yeah, it was really fun to be honest with you. It was good.3 (36m 42s):Yeah. I bet it was. So what about for undergrad? Were you also doing theater and under?7 (36m 48s):I did, but I didn't get a BFA. I got a BA at UMass at the university of Massachusetts Amherst. They actually have a beautiful theater program there. I had a great experience with them.3 (37m 1s):Yeah. And what was the impetus to go to grad school?7 (37m 6s):I had always, I mean, since I was a small child, like four years old, I've wanted to be an actress. I always, and I'm not, I'm not, I'm a theater nerd. Like I always wanted conservatory training. My family historically was not supportive of this. I really wanted to get a BFA and they didn't want me to do it. And so I ended up going to, you know, regular school, regular school and just getting a BA but studying theater. And so I had always wanted to have the experience of conservatory training.7 (37m 45s):After, after I got my BA at UMass, then I did a, like a training program with the Moscow art theater kind of connected. Cause I had applied for art. Didn't get in. But then the Moscow art theater reached out to me and they were like, Hey, we do this summer program. And we also do a winter program in Moscow. So I did both of those things.1 (38m 9s):Awesome. Yeah. They tell you my art story.7 (38m 12s):Oh yes, please.1 (38m 13s):Dude. I was a fucking idiot. So I, I was at taking a leave of absence from the theater school at DePaul. And I was at, I was at Shakespeare and company on the east coast. I was working there, but anyway, I thought, oh, this is a great time to audition for Harvard.7 (38m 28s):What?1 (38m 30s):I don't know what I was thinking. Like DePaul was fine. Like Harvard, like air chief was actually going to be better. But anyway, I mean, it's all the same once you get there. But so I thought, let me just audition. Sure. I had, usually I have two monologues. I had one monologue. Sure. I was also young and you didn't3 (38m 49s):Read the,1 (38m 52s):I did not understand the assignment. So I show up at a party and I'm do my monologue. And it went really well, even though it was probably a totally ridiculous monologue. It was above my head and the person the woman goes, that's great. And then I just stopped. Right. Cause I didn't have another monologue. And I said, and they said, do you have anything else you could show me? And I literally said no, but I could tell you some jokes.3 (39m 21s):See, I know it's a great idea. I think that was a great, I mean maybe he didn't know her that well, but I like,1 (39m 28s):And it was the truth and I, and they, she looked at, it was, it was, I did not get in there and I think they were all like what? She was like, what I, it was, she wasn't that I was on drugs. I wasn't, but she probably thought this child is on drugs. Like that's the only answer. So anyway, I don't know. But also they closed so no longer around. So you, okay. So you, so you did, you went to Russia?7 (39m 51s):I did. I went to Moscow and I studied like one of my teachers that I stayed with her father was Stanislavski student. I mean, it was crazy1 (40m 2s):My, oh,3 (40m 3s):Tell us everything about that program. It sounds interesting.7 (40m 6s):And I mean, considering what's going on, it's so sad in the world, but I always will hold my experience with the Stanislavski summer school and with it's my hot mess, Moscow art theater, very, very close because you know, I think as actors, NSX and students, we are delicate creatures and our confidence in ourselves and in our instrument and in our own talent is very, very delicate at all times. You know what I mean? And it really studying with them really made me fall in love with the theater and ma built me up and made me feel like, oh, this is what I'm meant to do with my life. And it just was because again, these, you know, the Russians, they, they don't give a shit.7 (40m 53s):They're all about the art. And they care about you as a, an artist. And1 (40m 59s):Did they not? Can I just say, were they not? Were they inclusive about body sizes? Oh, see, this is my problem. It's like what kid? Anybody fucking, not even in Moscow.7 (41m 11s):I mean, listen over there. It's definitely. But what I will say is my experience in classes and stuff, they just expected me to do it, you know, like,1 (41m 21s):Right.7 (41m 21s):My, my Grotowski admire hold biomechanics teachers. They were like, okay, now you will do backbend. You know? And I would just wouldn't do it. And it was like, okay, Catherine, now you will. You know what I mean? And so, and I, you know, I, we had this one teacher who re actually recently passed away. He was the most wonderful man. His name was Misha and Misha taught Michael checkoff technique, which I had never studied before I studied with them. And he was a lunatic, but like in the best, most beautiful way he would do this, this game with us called I love myself where, where he would have us run around the room, like crazy seagull.7 (42m 10s):And then while we're running around the room, like crazy seagulls, he is humming the theme to the godfather. So he goes,1 (42m 18s):It's fantastic. It's like what I did in my day program in therapy.7 (42m 24s):So he's going up, up, up, up, up, up, up, up, and then he'd clap his hands and go number one. And you had to hug yourself and he goes, I love myself. And then he'd clap again. And then you have to run around again and he'd go bump up, Clap number two. And you'd hug someone and he'd go, I love my friends and Cutest. And like, he, I don't know, it was, it was a lovely experience. And I got to do Google. I was in a Google little, oh, Hey, I was in the inspector general. And I just felt seen by these teachers3 (43m 5s):Randomly, I don't know what the connection is, but they're in my town, which only has 30,000 people in it. There's a Michael checkoff like festival. Oh, I don't know if he lived here or I I'll have to look into it more Connecticut.7 (43m 24s):Is that because my grad school, Michael checkoff technique, professor Ragnar fry dog does a maybe1 (43m 34s):Greta. Steve. I bet it's gotta be connected. Ragnar and fry. Duncan7 (43m 38s):Connect,1 (43m 39s):Cover all connected.7 (43m 40s):Yeah. It might be. It might be there. It's somewhere up. I don't know. It might be,1 (43m 46s):Are you in New York city?7 (43m 47s):I am. I am in the city. Okay.3 (43m 51s):Okay. So you didn't feel prepared once you graduated. So what did you do?7 (43m 56s):Well, one thing that the new school, like I said, that they did, that was great. Was they taught us that we have to make our own work, which I think is true. I mean, I think, you know, and you know, I just been through this experience where I had to plumb all of this personal trauma to, you know, being in front of your friends to be an actor. I don't know. And there was a crisis in my family and I ended up using it and applied for an artist residency with Mabu mines. I don't know if you guys Mabee mind says1 (44m 33s):I don't, what7 (44m 34s):Is that? So Mabu mines is a theater company. That's been in New York city since like the sixties, seventies. And they're very experimental run by who has since passed away Ruth Mela check and Joanne Akalaitis and Lee brewer. Who's also, so they they're really into cookie, like experimental crazy theater. And so I got an artist residency with them right out of graduate school. And for a year developed my own place,3 (45m 5s):Something where you had to write a proposal about what you would be working on there. And, and you're, so you wrote something that was informed by a terrible thing that happened to you.7 (45m 15s):Okay. And so, yeah, I wrote a few3 (45m 17s):Minds saying anything about,7 (45m 21s):Because I wrote a play. So yeah. So I come from a very chaotic family. There's just all kinds of craziness. Always my father, who is much older, he was a doctor for nearly like 50 years, maybe 50 years. And he had this huge practice in this like shitty Podunk, back ass words, town and Florida. And he's very eccentric. He doesn't make friends, he's not politically savvy and was employing really ne'er do Wells to run his office.7 (46m 4s):And one of his nurses was writing counterfeit prescriptions1 (46m 10s):For opioids,7 (46m 11s):Opioids. So the, the, what is it? The DEA shut down his office and conducted an investigation for over a year while I'm in graduate school. This is going on. And then D couldn't get him on running a pill mill because he wasn't, but got him on insurance fraud, which I will tell you, actually, something that I do have done in the past no longer, but for a survival job, I've worked as a medical secretary. Every doctor concerns, insurance fraud and the1 (46m 50s):System, the system is set up for that. What are you7 (46m 52s):Talking about? So at the time, my 77, my in fact, my, was it my third year. Yeah. My third year of graduate school, my 77 year old father went to jail. Thank God he wasn't in there for very long, but we fought, he might be, he was held on half a billion dollars bail. Like it was insane how they went after him. And, you know, it's funny because I've been rethinking the project that I did because I was so fresh out of it. I essentially, I took because as he started me letters from jail, and then I realized he had been writing me letters since I, for like 20 years, he's a letter writer.7 (47m 37s):He himself is kind of insane. Like, he's, I love him, but he's, you know, and so anyway, I took all of that source material and I created a play out of it.3 (47m 51s):Wow. And, and I mean, presented for the public, right. Like people came to see it. How was it received?7 (47m 58s):I think it went really well. I mean, it was my first, you know, I, again, being unprepared, you know, coming out of graduate school, I didn't know a lot about promoting your own work, you know, I didn't know to write a press release and I didn't know to, but I did it with Mabu mines. And then I workshopped it in a few other places. I did it at Dixon place, which is another like incubator you're in the city. And then I did it in residency at the brick theater in Williamsburg. And that was, yeah, that was the last showing that I did1 (48m 30s):A solo show.7 (48m 31s):No, I had a hue. I unwisely had a huge cast. It was like nine all of us. Yeah. But it was like about because I'm from the south originally and it was about my family. And like the stories you tell yourself about your family versus reality versus very, yeah. It was, it was a great experience doing that. So3 (48m 55s):How have you continued to create your own work? I know you have a show, your own show, big girls. Is it called big girl?7 (49m 1s):It's called big girl. Yes, I, yeah. I really do enjoy writing and writing for myself. I think that, yeah, my experience has been more fruitful in writing for myself. Then, you know, the little parts you can get or, you know, yeah.1 (49m 20s):I want to let your, I just want to give you permission to let yourself off the hook for the publicizing of your thing. No, no. I need to tell you that I, when I did a solo show and it went to New York, I fucking paid a publicist $10,000 and they didn't do anything. So, so, so I'm just saying he, they didn't write a press release either and you were out $10,000. So was actually saying you saved $10,000. So you did good. Oh, wait. So Gina asked about like, yeah. So you have big girl is a, it's a, it's a show that is still is an ongoing, is it happening right? The second?7 (49m 56s):No, we, so we did. So the way big girl came around is that I started taking improv classes of all things. I hate improv, but I'm glad that I studied it. And I met my producers there in improv class. And I had written a play about body image and they came to see reading of it. And then we decided to do, let's do something together. We decided to write this web series. And so we, we worked on it from like 2018 through 2019.7 (50m 37s):And it's five short episodes. It's stories based on my life, but heightened about dating and just living as a plus sized woman in New York city, every episode is a different genre. So there's a clown episode, a black and white clown episode. That's episode three, which is my favorite of clowning is my favorite theatrical practice. I think I'm working on a clown show right now, actually, but clowning is my favorite. So what do you3 (51m 7s):Love about it? What do you love about coding?7 (51m 10s):I think that clowning is a way of celebrating your vulnerability and your ridiculousness. You know, I think that whatever makes you feel vulnerable is actually your superpower as a performer. It's the thing that people can see that connects us all to our, you know, terror of the abyss, right? And clowning is such a loving and gentle. Isn't the right word. It's, it's a very freeing way to just celebrate whatever is silly or weird about yourself. And if you can laugh at yourself, it gives the audience permission to laugh at themselves, you know, and it's also just really fun.7 (51m 60s):I, I have this beautiful clown professor, my clown, professor, Jean Taylor, she teaches at the Barrow group and that new school and over the pandemic, she reached out to some of us and was like, would you all like to do some zoom clown sessions? And let me tell you that saved my mental health, my like twice a month clown meeting it.3 (52m 25s):It was a picture of a clown school in zoom.7 (52m 28s):It is, I mean, we would just get into nos and we would do eccentric dance. And, you know, she would just have, she has something called go to my spot, which is like, as your clown, you find your spot. It's the whole thing. And, you know, we just made it work and it was, and we would create little, like a tubes as clowns that we would do for her. And it was, it's just, I just love it so much. It's just a, I don't know. It's like balm for the soul. It makes you feel joy.3 (52m 59s):And this is what happens when people feel left out of whatever's happening mainstream wise, as they go find a, like a little off shoot, you know, where, where any aspect of being different is is okay. Celebrated whatever. I mean, in a way it's like, okay, well, I guess that works out too, even though we'd like to be able to be included in mainstream stuff. Right.1 (53m 21s):Well, I feel like that's how all these theater companies that we adore love were made and then, you know, then it becomes something else that gets commercialized. And, but like, if you think about it, like a lot of, a lot of stuff in life, right. Comes from that. And like, I'm now writing feminist body horror. I know, I didn't even know that existed. It only happened because I just was like, okay, well maybe, maybe this. Okay. Fuck it. And then people are like, no, it's actually a genre. And I'm like, what? So like clowning was like, we can do this thing together and tell these stories. And people were like, oh yeah, that's good. And so then that it becomes a thing, you know, for years and years and years, so, okay.1 (54m 4s):So you, you, are you doing a clown show? Are you developing a solo clown show?7 (54m 10s):I have a co clown and a director and we are putting together a clown burlesque show.1 (54m 19s):I love that.3 (54m 21s):That sounds amazing.7 (54m 23s):It's going to be, I'm really excited. Yeah. It's going to be, we're just at the beginnings, like applying to festivals and things like that. And we're just about to start real rehearsals and1 (54m 35s):Oh, is it a scripted, like how does that work in terms of like, what, how what's your process like for us? So I don't know why I keep pushing you to do solo work. I keep asking if everything you do, I feel like I really need you to do a solo show. Apparently7 (54m 46s):I should do a solo show. I haven't before this1 (54m 50s):Do what you want. I just said, so it's a solo show. So you're doing your clown burlesque show. How do you write, is it scripted? Tell me about that.7 (54m 60s):That is a very good question. We are figuring that out because clown involves a lot of, I don't want to call it improvisation, but impulse it's like, you have to let your in order for it, to be honest, right? The clown clowns are my teacher put it this way. They're like cretins. They're very, they're there. Everything is very simple and they're idiots, but experts at the same time and you have to leave room for the unexpected. So our tactic right now is we're going to have a, a loose, an outline, like beats that we want to hit, let's say, but then to leave room for our clowns to play and do what they want.3 (55m 47s):I'm kind of curious about this thing you said about improv, because I also have the feeling that I hate improv, but only to say that I hate doing it, but actually if I was good at it, I wouldn't hate it. So what do you hate about it?7 (56m 2s):I am also not good at it. I get too, too in my I'm just not good at it. I get too in my head. I'm like, why are there so many rules? Why can't I ask questions? Why can't I just come up here and have fun? Why does there have to be a, what does the Harold, why do I have to go back to see the,3 (56m 22s):I mean, think that like, this is all just because a bunch of guys made up improv, right? Like what would it have been like if it was a bunch of women who, who developed the art,1 (56m 35s):It would be clowning and it would be, it would be something more beautiful. I mean, I just think the culture of improv is such garbage and I happen to love improv. I love, love, love it, but I love it because I'm scared because I do feel like you can do no wrong and improv, especially at like an improv audition for commercials and shit are my jam because there's no things to memorize and, and, and to be serious actors and not fuck anything up, but that does crossover into yeah. It, if you're in a culture and improv like school, the culture is there a lot of rules and there are a lot of stuff.1 (57m 16s):And also to be fair, you know, to be, or to be honest, there's a lot of drinking. There's a lot of drugging. It's just not my scene. And it's also really like a 22 year old white dudes see3 (57m 25s):Very fresh, very fat frat life,1 (57m 28s):But okay. So go ahead.7 (57m 30s):Wait, where was1 (57m 31s):I? Oh, no, it's me. I was just saying, go ahead. Either one of you. Cause3 (57m 36s):Well, I, I, I can't actually bring us back to what we were talking about before, but I can ask you, does new school do a showcase at the end? Can you tell us about it?7 (57m 48s):Sure. So it was, we did our showcase at playwrights horizons. We worked on our scenes for a semester and there were a lot of us in my class. So I got into graduate school, like at a time when people like right after the oh eight recession. So tons of people were applying to graduate school and they let 35 actors into our class. And so that was a big, obviously a big issue all through my graduate experience was what do we do with all of these kids?7 (58m 36s):There were, I think at least a good 10 people in my class who had no business. Like they just shouldn't have. And there were people who graduated from the most expensive. The, my school debt is so ridiculous. It's imaginary. There were people who graduated from my program who never stepped foot on a main stage.1 (58m 56s):We, why is it so fricking expensive? What's happening?7 (58m 60s):I it's the new school. I don't know. But yeah, it's the most expensive,1 (59m 5s):Never we're up. We've heard this before, by the way, at other schools Where the people never, there were people that graduated, maybe not an MFA, but like, there are people that graduated that were never in a show and I'm like, okay,7 (59m 19s):I would have, yeah. I,1 (59m 22s):Why weren't they at a show? They never got cast or7 (59m 24s):They didn't get cast.1 (59m 26s):I give him like a pity part. Like you're going to be Cinderella's step sister. And the,7 (59m 31s):I mean, they would be like in the chorus of something1 (59m 34s):That would have been me. That would have been me. I know it would've been3 (59m 38s):Me too. Me too, but was it for agents? And the showcase was for agents.7 (59m 42s):Yeah. Agents and managers. And I did two scenes from bridesmaids because bridesmaid said recently come out. So I did the airplane scene with, and then I did her, her monologue at the end about being in the CIA. I just love. And it probably wasn't wise of me to choose scenes from what, but I was like, fuck it. This is what I wanna do. I worship Melissa McCarthy. I think that she's I, if I ever met her, I would absolutely lose my mind. I just think she be,3 (1h 0m 13s):I think that was the perfect thing to do because right. Because the, the, the thing that bothered, I are always talking about that we never got is that we were supposed to think of ourselves as, you know, to be crass, like a product and what, you know, so what is our brand and what, you know, and we never did that, but that is what is required. So why is it not good to have done the Melissa McCarthy?7 (1h 0m 36s):I guess maybe I think you're right. I maybe I felt like I should have shown more range.1 (1h 0m 42s):They're not looking for range. Let me tell you something. They're looking to look at you seriously and now be in LA. I can really tell you looking at, oh, oh, she knows. She, she, she knows that we think she's going to be like the Melissa McCarthy character. Great. So let us just all get on the, the Melissa McCarthy bus with her, and then we can sell her that way. And maybe we'll all make a lot of money and be rich. Now look, I'm not saying that's a good thing. I'm just saying it was smart in terms of a business move. And please tell me you got an agent. Did you get an agent and a manager?7 (1h 1m 15s):Ah, I, I got one agent who freelanced with me for a minute and he sent me on two auditions in three years.1 (1h 1m 31s):Okay. All right.7 (1h 1m 32s):So1 (1h 1m 33s):Not good, not good.7 (1h 1m 35s):And that agent, I mean, I,1 (1h 1m 38s):What,7 (1h 1m 39s):He, it just,8 (1h 1m 41s):Eh,7 (1h 1m 44s):I'm worried because why?1 (1h 1m 46s):Okay. Let me tell you something. Let me tell you something. This is not about him. This is about your reaction. You don't have to, obviously don't say the name, but this is about your experience of what it was like to be that age and work with is someone in the industry. So tell it now.7 (1h 2m 2s):Okay. So from that point, yes, from that point of view, you know, number one, it, you know, I, I had one really solid audition. I didn't book it, but it was my first big audition in a big room. And I went in and I was prepared and I killed it. And I remember, oh, at PA, oh, oh wait, okay. It's back. Oh, you're1 (1h 2m 24s):Fine.7 (1h 2m 25s):Okay. Like froze for a1 (1h 2m 26s):Second. That's okay.7 (1h 2m 29s):I went in and it was Judy Henderson's office. She's a casting director. I killed it. And I had them all laughing. And I remember I walked out and I heard the director say, oh, that was really good.1 (1h 2m 43s):Yes.7 (1h 2m 44s):So that was such a win right out of an acting program. You know, I didn't get a call back. I didn't book it, but it was such a great, you know, experience. But then after that, and I emailed my agent to say, Hey, this was so great. This is what the people said, send, thank you, notes, all of that. But he like had this Facebook group for the members of the agency and he would have these mixers, Which, and I went to one and it made me so uncomfortable because it was like him. And then a bunch of like women, you know what I mean?1 (1h 3m 23s):Yeah. It's gross. That's gross. I don't know who you are, agents. So it's not a personal thing, but also that's gross.7 (1h 3m 29s):Yeah.1 (1h 3m 30s):It's weird. That's weird.7 (1h 3m 32s):And like also something that made me super uncomfortable would be that there would on the Facebook group, he would put up these statuses, like, you know, a word to the wise, never write an email to an agent like this deducted that dah, dah, and don't show up to an audition doing blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And I just in my head, I'm like, why don't you go get me an audition instead of spending your time? And like, there is no roadmap for young actors. None of us know what the fuck we're doing.3 (1h 4m 4s):Well, let's do mystify something right now for people who haven't gone through this yet. Why do some agents not get auditions for their clients?1 (1h 4m 16s):Oh, I know. I feel like, I feel like for what my knowledge is of working in casting and then also working as a writer and an actor, is that agents. Okay. So like, this is my understanding. All agents get the same breakdowns, right? And a lot of times for better, for worse they're thinking is I need to, I can't possibly do everything on this breakdown. So who are the people I know that are gonna, for whatever reason are top of mind that are gonna, that have a better, good chance of booking these things. And then they sort of gravitate towards that. And then a lot of people who aren't, don't look a certain way for whatever, get pushed to the side.1 (1h 5m 2s):And then I think we're also not as actors at our schools and in the world taught how to have a relationship with an agent that is on equal footing so that you stay top. This is what I teach my kids at the theater school, which is like how to build a relationship or get out of one. When you feel like it's not on equal footing where you can't, you don't feel like you can call or email the agent and say, Hey, I'm feeling like I'm not going out. Is there something that we can do together? Because we're so scared of the agent. We never make those, but I am. I think that is what happens.1 (1h 5m 43s):And then the fear begets fear. And then you just never hear from them again. Then they drop you or whatever. So it's a matter. So that's what happens. And, and agents, a lot of times, like the rest of us are traumatized and hurt and scared. And, and it's easy to take that shit out on younger people.3 (1h 6m 3s):So it's not what I was thinking. You were going to say, which is that if the agent is unknown, they literally cannot get their client. Okay. It's not that,1 (1h 6m 15s):I mean, I feel like they, I feel like S H certain agents have better relationships than others with casting, but everyone gets the same breakdowns. It's, it's a, it's a common document. So anyone, if we, if you, and I said, now we're an agent. We would get those breakdowns and we could start submitting people. And if you send a kick ass letter that says, Hey, Catherine is perfect for this. Look at our shots. Please see her, they'll see her because they want, Cassie wants to meet new, new, fresh faces that are kick ass. Like that's their jam. So, yeah, it's a matter of top of mind. And3 (1h 6m 49s):Well, since we're on the topic, I don't know. You mentioned this thing about getting a good relationship with your agent CA well, so Kevin, do you have an agent now?7 (1h 6m 57s):I am. Now I am looking for representation right3 (1h 7m 0s):Now. All right. You're looking for representation. A lot of people who listen to this podcast are recent graduates from theater school. I have my only experience with an agent is I'm helped my son with his stuff. And so I'm, I have a relationship with his agent. I'm very scared of this person. And when he doesn't like something we did just on my stomach. So like, what, I mean, you know, what, what do you do and how do you have a good relationship with an agent? Because it seems like they're all the hassle.1 (1h 7m 31s):No, no, they, they, it does seem like that. They're not all assholes, but I feel like a lot of them are, are scary. So inherent and Gina, Gina talks about this and Catherine, I want to know your thoughts. So, so we talk about the idea that like inherent in this industry is a pear is a patriarchal and like a, a status, right. Triangle, whatever hierarchy. So that creates a dynamic where the people that have, are seemingly having the more power are, are, are a little bit mean. It can be a little bit mean. So Catherine, how do you think, I guess my question for you would be like, what is your, maybe your experience with how to work with that and what are you looking to do differently this time when you have an agent, I guess, for the youngsters7 (1h 8m 15s):Listening? So my experience with them being mean, Or I just think that there is a, in my experience, there has been a feeling of being dismissed perhaps of, you know, yeah, yeah. You know, I do a lot of in the past, I've done a lot of there's this company here in the city called one-on-one, which there's another one that's called, like actor's connection where you can go and it, it kinda sucks. It's pay to play and you pay like a little fee to do a class with a casting director or an agent, or, you know, an opportunity for like a 10, 15 minute meeting with an agent.7 (1h 9m 2s):And I have met some success with that, you know, in the past, I don't necessarily, I feel a little morally repugnant about pay to play. You know, this is such a, I mean, the other thing along with the hierarchy of this industry is that it's predatory, you know, it's very predatory on the hopes and dreams of, you know, young actors. And so I have had tons of experience going into auditions for things. And, you know, it's like, oh, you have to pay to do this, or you have to it. And it's like, okay, well, fuck you, bye. I'm not going to pay you to work. But, and then what was the second part of your question about, oh, what am I looking to do differently?7 (1h 9m 45s):I mean, I think the thing is right, I'm a character actress. I'm a misfit, certainly in the industry. And I need to find someone who really gets me, gets my work. You know, I want to find representation that isn't necessarily trying to, and this is perhaps an unrealistic dream, but I, I would like to find representation that that gets my voice as an artist, and doesn't necessarily want to pigeonhole me. You know, for example, I will never, I'm very into body justice and fat liberation.7 (1h 10m 30s):I'm not gonna even say body positivity anymore because it's been co-opted by a skinny white women, but I will never make a weight loss, commercial that's not happening. And that might be a problem for a commercial agent who meets me, you know what I mean? And so I, so yeah, I, I would like to find a team who, who gets me and really, you know, wants to, wants to see me succeed in that, in the, in that way,3 (1h 10m 59s):This relates pause to our conversation earlier, just about contracting versus expanding. And I think that my mindset for certain, and maybe other people too, is like, you know, it's like kind of like how I used to be with boyfriends. If, just, if, if anybody likes me that I have to go with them because there's not going to be anybody else that likes me. Right. When in reality, It seems like the, the way to think about it is, oh, they need me because I know what I'm doing. And I have this look and I've seen people who look like me in this kind of thing. And there'll be lucky to find me because I can solve a problem for them.3 (1h 11m 40s):That's not how I've ever thought about it. I've thought about it. Like, I hope they pick me, but they probably won't. So if anybody shows me any attention, even if I have to pay for it, then the bus. Yeah.1 (1h 11m 50s):I mean, I think that's so right on. And I will say that. And I, I, I was that way for, and I still am obviously that way, but I found a team. I love my team, but it took me a very long time. And it took me to 40, I dunno, 44 to do that or 43. And it took me going in literally and saying, this is me, here's my body of work. I look like this. I want, I came in, I went in with a list of things in a piece of paper and what I brought to the table and what I expected from a relationship.1 (1h 12m 35s):And I had to be prepared that they were going to say, no, thank you. Like, this is crazy. Fuck you. But they didn't say that instead. They said, we, we support you. We've looked at your stuff. We believe in you. And we want to work with you. And that was all right. And then I found my person at that place. And when she left, I followed her. So it really is about relationships, but it's like, it takes a long check. My therapist, this, it takes a long time to do the work. Like it is not an overnight

HEA Insider
DePaul University VP/AD DeWayne Peevy

HEA Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 40:08


DeWayne Peevy became the Vice President and Athletic Director at DePaul University in the Fall of 2020 after serving in senior administration roles at the University of Kentucky. Peevy shares an institutional profile of DePaul and then we walk back the transition from a school like Kentucky to now leading DePaul and what he learned from UK Athletic Director Mitch Barnhart in his 12 years that helped prepare him to lead his own department. Peevy shares the story of why he felt it was the right time for him to become an athletic director as a black administrator in an influential leadership position in the industry. Moving back to the vision for DePaul, Peevy talks about the benefits and challenges being a D1 athletic department in the crowded city of Chicago. As someone known for building incredible sporting events like the CBS Sports Classic, Peevy closes out the conversation talking about the future of those types of events for other sports, too, and how regular season popularity will continue to build in sports like women's basketball, softball, baseball and soccer. 01:26 Institutional Profile 04:00 Working for Mitch Barnhart 08:05 Decision to Pursue AD Job Finally 15:20 Advice for Navigating Direction & Priorities of an AD Job Opening 19:02 Investing in Human Capital Despite Having Less Resources 22:27 Co-Existing in a Crowded College Sports City (Chicago) 26:32 Creating a Major Women's Basketball Regular Season Event 30:31 How to Match Regular Season Popularity w/ Post-season Excitement in Women's Basketball, Softball, Baseball & Soccer 35:35 Day One Mentality at DePaul Athletics

WTMJ Conversations & WTMJ Features
04-04-22 Vince Vitrano w/ Donna Wallace from St. Vincent DePaul

WTMJ Conversations & WTMJ Features

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 4:27


Chicago's Morning Answer with Dan Proft & Amy Jacobson

0:00 - Dan & Amy respond to Lightfoots claims of “unloved youth”   12:40 - Dan & Amy choose sides in Disney vs FL    28:55 - Dan & Amy disagree over alleged abuse reports out of Fenwick HS   53:29 - CAMPUS BEAT: Oberlin   01:08:34 - Dakota Wood, who served America for two decades in the U.S. Marine Corps and now the Senior Research Fellow for Defense Programs at The Heritage Foundation, believes Ukraine needs ask what it is willing to accept in order to end the killing    01:28:40 - Policy Correspondent for FEE, contributor to the Washington Examiner and Co-Founder of BASEDPolitics, Brad Polumbo:  In Defense of Fox News Hiring Caitlyn Jenner. Follow Brad on twitter @brad_polumbo   01:42:38 - Jason Hill, professor of philosophy at Depaul university, asks  Do we really need a law that bans discrimination based on hairstyles? Check out Jason's most recent book  What Do White Americans Owe Black People: Racial Justice in the Age of Post-Oppression 01:59:50 - Dan & Amy share their concerns over Psaki allegedly moving to MSNBC  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dobré ráno | Denný podcast denníka SME
Ukrajinský kňaz: Každá modlitba môže byť mojou poslednou (4. 4. 2022)

Dobré ráno | Denný podcast denníka SME

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 30:08


Na prvý pohľad by ste nepovedali, že je duchovný. Má na sebe rifle, čiernu mikina s kapucňou a nápisom Ukrajina. Je žoviálny, veselý, no z očí mu vyžaruje veľké odhodlanie až bojovnosť. Páter Vitalij Novak od začiatku vojny koordinuje humanitárnu pomoc cez organizáciu Depaul, sám vozí potraviny či hygienické potreby zo Slovenska na Ukrajinu aj do východných oblastí krajiny. Denne tak riskuje svoj život na pomoc iným. Ako zvláda svoj strach a ako vojna ovplyvňuje jeho vieru? Jana Maťková sa pýtala Vitalija Novaka. Zdroj zvukov: FB Depaul International Odporúčanie: Moje dnešné odporúčanie je skôr výzva, aby ste pomáhali. Či už finančne organizáciám, ktoré zabezpečujú pomoc Ukrajincom a Ukrajinkám alebo materiálne prispievať na zbierky, prípadne sa stať dobrovoľníkom a dobrovoľníčkou tam, kde to potrebujú. Vojna sa ešte neskončila a to najmenej, čo môžeme urobiť, je pomôcť tým, ktorí prišli o domov, príbuzných a ľudskú dôstojnosť. – Ak máte pre nás spätnú väzbu, odkaz alebo nápad, napíšte nám na dobrerano@sme.sk – Všetky podcasty denníka SME nájdete na sme.sk/podcasty – Podporte vznik podcastu Dobré ráno a kúpte si digitálne predplatné SME.sk na sme.sk/podcast – Odoberajte aj denný newsletter SME.sk s najdôležitejšími správami na sme.sk/brifing – Ďakujeme, že počúvate podcast Dobré ráno.

Carrusel Deportivo
Rodrigo de Paul, en 'Carrusel': "Intento ser la prolongación del Cholo en el campo"

Carrusel Deportivo

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2022 21:14


El centrocampista del Atlético de Madrid atiende a Carrusel Deportivo antes del partido de Champions contra el City

Whiskey Sessions
Barrel-Aged: 25 - A Reilly Good List

Whiskey Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 38:13


Andy and Brian are taking a few weeks off to deal with being adults, so please enjoy a few cask-strength classics that have been maturing in their barrels over the years. This lovely episode was released all the way back in November 2017, and deals with a very common topic and fellow DePaul alum, John C. Reilly. Enjoy it, ya dingus! A. Metz and B.Pimp welcome back the much-loved This or That (1:42), try out Ancient Age Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey (3:37), run down each of their top 5 favorite John C. Reilly roles (7:47), and read and respond to your emails (33:11). Grab our EP Whiskey Sessions II: Another Sip on a streaming service near you! Check it out on our Bandcamp (https://whiskeysessions.bandcamp.com/) or Amazon(https://www.amazon.com/Whiskey-Sessions-II-Another-Explicit/dp/B08L75RB1Q/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=whiskey+sessions+ii&qid=1603910120&sr=8-1) or YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_kqLf2GsqpfweYOD2xNYAoAsILKWy_SFnU)

Living UD Podcast
Good News UD: Dr. Jonathan J. Sanford & Luis Gonzalez of Society of St. Vincent de Paul North Texas

Living UD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 22:19


Good News UD: Dr. Jonathan J. Sanford & Luis Gonzalez of Society of St. Vincent de Paul North Texas by University of Dallas

Les Grosses Têtes
INÉDIT - La boîte à questions de Paul El Kharrat

Les Grosses Têtes

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 2:27


Dans ce podcast inédit des "Grosses Têtes à Têtes", Paul El Kharrat vous dévoile le livre ou CD qu'il prêterait, ses vacances parfaites avec une Grosse Tête, mais aussi son anecdote marquante avec Sébastien Thoen... Découvrez la page Facebook Officielle des "Grosses Têtes" : https://www.facebook.com/lesgrossestetesrtl/ Retrouvez vos "Grosses Têtes" sur Instagram : https://bit.ly/2hSBiAo Découvrez le compte Twitter Officiel des "Grosses Têtes" : https://bit.ly/2PXSkkz Toutes les vidéos des "Grosses Têtes" sont sur YouTube : https://bit.ly/2DdUyGg

College Hoops Chat - WVOX Talk Radio Show
March Madness Episode, Sweet 16 & Elite 8, Final 4 Preview, Coaches Pat Kennedy & Tom Pecora, 3/28/22

College Hoops Chat - WVOX Talk Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 47:53


Here's the March 28, 2022 episode of the College Hoops Chat radio show (47 mins) with the Coaches: Pat Kennedy (HC at Iona, FL ST, DePaul, Montana & Towson) & Tom Pecora (Current Quinnipiac Asst & former HC at Hofstra & Fordham). We're also joined by our great callers #KennyFromRye & Patrick Madden. We discuss the past 4 days of the NCAA Tournament - the Sweet 16 & Elite 8 - plus thoughts on the Final 4. I also mention my St. Bonaventure Bonnies who made NIT Semifinals. This weekly college basketball radio show airs on WVOX, 1460AM in New Rochelle, NY every Monday night from 8 to 9pm. Check out our website at: collegehoopschat.com. Email me if you have any questions or suggestions for the show. Jim Maisano CollegeHoopsChat@gmail.com (Season 2/Episode 26)