Podcasts about gpa

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Best podcasts about gpa

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Latest podcast episodes about gpa

Glass & Out
Team Czechia Head Coach Carla MacLeod: Keeping joy in the game, fixing one team aspect, and how to instill confidence in your players

Glass & Out

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 63:05


Carla MacLeod, Head Coach of both the University of Calgary Women's program as well as the Czechia National Women's team, joins us for episode 197 of the Glass and Out Podcast. MacLeod is currently in her second season with the Dinos program, and will be leading Czechia at the upcoming World Championships after guiding the team to its first ever medal at the 2022 event in August. Her unique ability to inspire what some may consider underdog programs have helped her gain notoriety in the hockey community. From 2011 through 2014, MacLeod was an Assistant Coach with the Japanese National team and helped it qualify for the 2014 Sochi Olympics. It was the first time they had done so since hosting the first female Olympic tournament at the '98 games in Nagano. MacLeod got her coaching career started with the Edge School's U18 Female program. In 2020, the program captured the first ever Canadian Sport School Hockey League Female U18 Prep division Championship. During her tenure, the team upheld an average GPA of 89%, 98% of her players went on to pursue post secondary studies and 88% continued their hockey career. As a player, she patrolled the blueline for Canada's National Women's team for five seasons, capturing two Olympic Gold Medals, the second of which was at the 2010 games in Vancouver. She is also a member of the University of Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame, as well as the Alberta SportsHall of Fame. In this episode we discuss why it's important to keep joy in the game, when you should focus on one thing with your team, and how she approaches inspiring and instilling confidence in her players.

Finding Genius Podcast
Bringing Fresh, Local, Nutritious Food to College and Beyond – Glenn Loughridge Talks Food, Community, and More

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 34:08


When you think of a college campus cafeteria, do you think about fresh-picked veggies like leafy greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, and peppers? Probably not! But at Auburn University, that's what you'd find. Along with familiar favorites like pizza and burgers, students can find a wide variety of local fresh food to fuel their bodies and minds. Glenn Loughridge is the director of campus dining and concessions at Auburn University. He shares the ins and outs of his daily work, goals, and passion for high-quality and nutritious food. Press play to learn: How food and community are inextricably linked and how Auburn University is a perfect example of this How college students' tastes evolve from freshman to senior year How new advances in technology are helping kitchens mitigate staffing issues and high demand for culinary talent The relationship between GPA and transactions at university dining Tune in for the full conversation and learn more at http://campusdining.auburn.edu. Episode also available on Apple Podcast: http://apple.co/30PvU9C

Education Matters
Ohio Teacher of the Year Melissa Kmetz

Education Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 19:01


Ohio Teacher of the Year Melissa Kmetz - Season 3, Episode 12Third grade language arts teacher Melissa Kmetz will spend the next year shining the spotlight on Ohio's exceptional educators and our public schools as the 2023 Ohio Teacher of the Year. She shares her thoughts on mandatory retention under the Third Grade Reading Guarantee, the importance of truly seeing students and empowering them to be leaders, and the one big thing she would do if she could wave a magic wand over her classroom.SUBSCRIBE | Click here to subscribe to Education Matters on Apple Podcasts or click here to subscribe on Google podcasts so you don't miss a thing. And don't forget you can listen to all of the previous episodes anytime on your favorite podcast platform, or by clicking here.Featured Education Matters guest: Melissa Kmetz, 2023 Ohio Teacher of the YearMelissa Kmetz is a third grade language arts teacher and Grade Level Chairperson at Lakeview Elementary School in Cortland, Ohio. She was raised in Campbell, Ohio, graduating from Campbell Memorial High School in 1999. Miss Kmetz obtained a full academic scholarship to Youngstown State University and, in 2003, graduated Summa Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science in Education (Early Childhood P-3). She began her career teaching kindergarten and then first grade in Salem, Ohio. There, she secured a Martha Holden Jennings Grant to Educators, which she used to open a literacy lending library. In 2006, she moved to Lakeview Local Schools, where she has been teaching third grade ever since! She obtained a Master's Degree as a Reading Specialist from Youngstown State University in 2007, graduating with a 4.0 GPA and ranking in the top 1% of her graduating class. That same year, she was awarded the ETS Recognition of Excellence for scoring within the top 15% in the history of her licensure exam, the PLT K-6 Assessment. Miss Kmetz is a fierce advocate for culturally diverse curriculum, global education, and student leadership/activism. She furthered her knowledge in these areas through professional development at Harvard Graduate School of Education in Boston, taking the courses Advancing Culturally Responsive Literature Instruction and Educating Global Citizens. In 2010, she developed a Change the World Project in her school district, where for the past twelve years, Lakeview students have been activists, spearheading charity projects to benefit those in need near and abroad. Source - Ohio Department of Education Connect with OEA: Email educationmatters@ohea.org with your feedback or ideas for future Education Matters topics Like OEA on Facebook Follow OEA on Twitter Follow OEA on Instagram Get the latest news and statements from OEA here Learn more about where OEA stands on the issues  Keep up to date on the legislation affecting Ohio public schools and educators with OEA's Legislative Watch About us: The Ohio Education Association represents about 120,000 teachers, faculty members and support professionals who work in Ohio's schools, colleges, and universities to help improve public education and the lives of Ohio's children. OEA members provide professional services to benefit students, schools, and the public in virtually every position needed to run Ohio's schools. Education Matters host Katie Olmsted serves as Media Relations Consultant for the Ohio Education Association. She joined OEA in May, 2020, after a ten-year career as a television reporter, anchor, and producer. Katie comes from a family of educators and is passionate about telling educators' stories and advocating for Ohio's students. She lives in Central Ohio with her husband and two young children. This episode was recorded November 2, 2022.

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
YCBK 279: The Future of Fair Admissions: Is Early Decision Fair?

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 107:39


In this episode you will hear:   (15:48) Mark and Susan discuss the first of three reports by Educational Reform Now entitled, “The Future of Fair Admissions Report 1: Early Decision”. The Report was written by the Senior Policy Analyst, James Murphy. The Report looks at a number of questions including: Who benefits from Early Decision; which colleges utilize Early Decision the most; does ED give students an inherent advantage; What can be done to change affirmative action to make it more just and equitable. Mark and Susan discuss the full range of issues related to affirmative action. This discussion will air in two parts over the next two Thursdays. Each discussion is approximately 32 minutes.     (35:18) Mark and Lisa answer a question from Nina of Massachusetts:  I keep hearing a lot about the "reach for all" schools and the importance of a well balanced college list. I guess I'm struggling with knowing what schools are actually target vs reach vs reach for all. By way of background my son has a strong GPA and ACT scores and seems to check a lot of boxes but I have a hard to believing any school is in his reach just given the amount of applications schools are receiving. Are "reach for all" schools just the ivies or is it schools usually in the Top 20 (on those awful rankings)? Is a 20% acceptance rate still a reach for all? I guess it just seems like everything is a reach for all when it comes to schools (especially those in the northeast!).   (57:32) Mark continues his interview with Milyon Truelove, the  Vice President and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid at Reed College. We turn our attention to the topic of, “Understanding Reed College” Part 1 of 2   Preview of Part 1   Milyon gives a great overview of the type of student that excels at Reed Milyon describes where Reed is located, what the campus is like and how well students have done in getting advanced degrees Milyon talks about the mission of Reed and how it impacts the student experience Milyon shares something unique about Reed's faculty Milyon talks about Reed's unique position on sports Milyon talks about how being in Portland impacts the student experience Milyon and Stuck discuss what are the distinctive traits of the Reed student Milyon talks about why Reed has it's grading policy that it has Milyon talks about some of the distinctive programs that Reed offers   (01:09:32) Our Recommended Resource is a Forbes article that does a great job at explaining the difference between REPAY (Revised Pay as You Earn) and PAYE (Pay as you Earn) Melissa Ford of the Damsel of Success YouTube channel also has a great video on REPAY that I recommend you check out, but this article has a great explanation of the differences between the two leading Income Driven Repayment Plans. Income Driven repayment plans are usually appropriate for students who have more student loan debt then their salary. Every college counselor needs to be familiar with these differences but every parent should also know their options when it comes to having their student pay student debt. The article is written by of Forbes and it is entitled, PAYE vs REPAYE, which student loan repayment plan is right for you? It is an excellent article we encourage you to read.   https://www.forbes.com/advisor/student-loans/paye-vs-repaye/   We now have set up audio recordings in your own voice for any question you send in for our “question from a listener” segment. In order to send us an audio message, just go to speakpipe.com/YCBK. You can also use this for many other purposes: 1) Send us constructive criticism about how we can improve our podcast 2) Share an encouraging word about something you like about an episode or the podcast in general 3) Share a topic or an article you would like us to address 4) Share a speaker you want us to interview 5) Leave positive feedback for one of our interviewees. We will send your verbal feedback directly to them and I can almost assure you, your positive feedback will make their day. Speakpipe.com/YCBK is our preferred method for you to ask a question but if you are not comfortable with this, we will also receive your questions either on Twitter at @YCBKpodcast using the Messages tab or via email at If you have a question for one of our upcoming interviews with admissions professionals, here is a list of admissions professionals who we will interview in 2023 or 2024 Confirmed interviews not yet completed Bard-Mackie Siebens Rice University-Tamara Siler American University-Andrea Felder Pitzer College-Yvonne Berumen Chapman University-Marcela Meija-Martinez Connecticut College-Andy Strickler* Trinity College-Anthony Berry* College of the Atlantic-Heather Albert* Spelman College-Chelsea Holley* Scripps College-Victoria Romero* Saint Louis University-Daniel Wood-(Interview is about transfer admissions, Daniel is a transfer counselor) Colby College-Randi Arsenault* University of Georgia-David Graves* Washington University St Louis-Ronne Turner University of Wisconsin-Andre Phillips University of Illinois-Brian Hodges Purdue University-Mitch Warren University of Minnesota-Keri Risic Cornell University-Jonathon Burdick Oberlin College-Manuel Carballo UW-Madison-Andre Phillips Carleton College-Art Rodriguez Swarthmore-Jim Bok Joy St. Johns-Harvard Duke-Christoph Guttentag Florida State-John Barnhill Southern Methodist University-Elena Hicks Johns Hopkins-Calvin Wise Cornell University-Shawn Felton Haverford College-Jess Lord UAspire-Brendan Williams Yale University-Moira Poe Akil Bello of Akilbello.com Bard College Baylor University Butler University California Institute of Technology Colorado School of Mines Creighton University   To sign up to receive Your College-Bound Kid PLUS, our new monthly admissions newsletter, delivered directly to your email once a month, just go to yourcollegeboundkid.com, and you will see the sign up popup.   Check out our new blog. We write timely and insightful articles on college admissions: https://yourcollegeboundkid.com/category/blog/ Follow Mark Stucker on Twitter to get breaking college admission news,  and updates about the podcast before they go live. You can ask questions on Twitter that he will answer them on the podcast. Mark will also share additional hot topics in the news and breaking news on this Twitter feed. Twitter message is also the preferred way to ask questions for our podcast:   https://twitter.com/YCBKpodcast   To access our transcripts, click: https://yourcollegeboundkid.com/category/transcripts/ Find the specific episode transcripts for the one you want to search and click the link Find the magnifying glass icon in blue (search feature) and click it Enter whatever word you want to search. I.e. Loans Every word in that episode when the words loans are used, will be highlighted in yellow with a timestamps Click the word highlighted in yellow and the player will play the episode from that starting point You can also download the entire podcast as a transcript   We would be honored if you will pass this podcast episode on to others who you feel will benefit from the content in YCBK.   Please subscribe to our podcast. It really helps us move up in Apple's search feature so others can find our podcast.   If you enjoy our podcast, would you please do us a favor and share our podcast both verbally and on social media? We would be most grateful!   If you want to help more people find Your College-Bound Kid, please make sure you follow our podcast. You will also get instant notifications as soon as each episode goes live.   Check out the college admissions books Mark recommends:   Check out the college websites Mark recommends:   If you want to have some input about what you like and what you recommend we change about our podcast, please complete our Podcast survey; here is the link:     If you want a college consultation with Mark or Lisa, just text Mark at 404-664-4340 or email Lisa at lisa@schoolmatch4u.com. All they ask is that you review their services and pricing on their website before the complimentary session. Their counseling website is: https://schoolmatch4u.com/

Ask Dr. Gray: Premed Q&A
197: Will a Postbac Work To Give You a Better GPA Trend?

Ask Dr. Gray: Premed Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 17:07


This premed student wants to know if doing a postbac will give him a better GPA trend.

The Admissions Club
29. Under Pressure: Should Students Still Take the SAT or ACT?

The Admissions Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 48:15


As more and more colleges switch to test optional admission policies, parents begin to wonder whether or not students should still take the SAT or ACT? To put it simply, the answer is yes. If you want to maximize your chances of getting into your dream college, these tests could be the advantage you need. Elizabeth talks with Dr. Al Benthall today about the history behind these tests, the current political views surrounding the tests, and why your student should still take them….. and take them seriously. Dr. Al Benthall, is the founder and owner of Benthall Test Prep which specializes in helping students achieve optimal SAT scores.  Connect with Dr. Al Benthall:WebsiteLinkedIn3 Key takeaways from the podcast are:  When in doubt, take the test (SAT or ACT). If two candidates are identical in their GPA and extracurricular activities, but one candidate submitted their test scores. Chances are the college will choose the student who submitted the scores. Optional is code for Do It! Anytime a college leaves a section optional on an application, fill that section out and take full advantage of this opportunity to make yourself stand out, tell more of your story. If you have a lower GPA, taking the SAT or ACT is a chance to earn a high score and make yourself a more competitive applicant. Don't be afraid to take the test more than once to give yourself a better edge.The Admissions Club Podcast is your one-stop shop for all things college admissions, complete with a nostalgic 80s playlist and Gen X vibes. It's hard to believe that we've traded in scrunchies and Bruce Springsteen posters for walking our kids through the college admissions process!  But, I'm here to share my 25 years of higher education experience, with 10 years of direct college admissions experience, with you and your student so you don't have to walk it alone.Connect with Elizabeth!WebsiteFacebookYouTubeLinkedIn

Faith to Live By with Pamela Christian
A Tale of Two Constitutions

Faith to Live By with Pamela Christian

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 34:12


More evidence is coming to light that our US Republic has been hijacked long before the 2020 election. Join me and my guest, Derek Johnson, for part two of my interview with him. His military and legal insights provide some much-needed sense to all that's going on in our world.   SHOW NOTES CONNECT WITH TODAY'S GUEST: Derek Johnson Derek is a United States Army veteran, with a Bachelor's degree from the University of Alabama, and a Masters in Business from Colorado State University where he finished with National Academic and Military Honors for a 3.8 GPA. Through his own in-depth research, Derek puts a keen focus on a Blueprint that outlines the Covert Sting Operation that's been taking place visually since October 2016, for the common, every day, hard working American, via Military Law, Military Regulations, Military Orders, Military Symbols, Code Language/Optics, the United States Constitution and United States Codes. https://thedocuments.info and https://www.derekjohnsononcountry.com   LINKS FROM SHOW CONTENT: Prophecy Index.. https://www.prophecyindex.org/ “Four Ways to Tell a Prophet from a Political Puppet” written by Thomas Reese, Senior Analyst—Religion News Service. https://www.brookings.edu/blog/fixgov/2020/06/12/four-ways-to-tell-a-prophet-from-a-political-puppet/ Derek Prince's article. I've provided a link in the Show Notes. https://www.derekprince.com.au/resources/teaching-letters/how-to-judge-prophecy SG Anon Breaks Down Donald Trump's November 15, 2022 Announcement: https://rumble.com/v1v8fpa-us-marine-corps-apprehending-traitors-us-national-guard-deployed-trump-spee.html Derek Johnson and SG Anon interview: https://rumble.com/v1w3h22-truthstream-live-with-derek-johnson-and-sg-anon.html   FOR FURTHER STUDY: Be sure to listen to all Pam's past podcasts to know more about world events taking place today. Derek Johnson Suggested to Visit the web site: https://dccouncil.gov/ “The Two President Prophecy”  it using the link in the Show Notes. https://www.charismapodcastnetwork.com/show/adventuresinthespirit/1928f40e-7b9c-4475-a475-496b97f6a5d6/The-2-President-Prophecy-with-Pamela-Christian-(Ep-73)   ACTION STEPS: Recommend Pam's podcast to friends and family and plan to listen next week to learn what you can do to make a Kingdom difference.   BONUS: Learn more of what God is doing to change governmental leadership in Israel: https://ifapray.org/blog/election-2022-a-global-perspective/   Reduce Risk of COVID: https://www.theepochtimes.com/health/simple-nasal-wash-reduces-risk-of-covid-hospitalization_4814791.html The Heritage Foundation working to fight voter fraud: https://www.heritage.org/voterfraud America's Future: https://www.americasfuture.net/newsletter/the-rightful-restoration-of-power/ Clay Clark's ReAwaken America Tour - use this link and enter FTLB promo code to get a 10% discount:  https://timetofreeamerica.com/ Fall of the Cabal video: https://www.fallcabal.com/ Evidence of the WEF's plan of genocide: https://rumble.com/v1gx0ah-the-great-reset-did-the-world-economic-forum-recommend-killing-94-of-the-ea.html SUPPORT: If you've been blessed by my podcasts, please show your support. We cannot bring you this faith-building podcast without your financial support. There are several ways you can partner with me: Support my Affiliate Sponsors from my web site: https://pamelachristianministries.com/affiliate-sponsors-and-partners Sponsor an episode of Faith to Live By, email me to learn more. Donate from my web site on the web store page upon checkout. Purchase any goods or services listed in the Show Notes or from our web store. Learn more about Pam's books: https://pamelachristianministries.com/products-and-services/authors-page STORE: Learn about Pam's books and products from her web store. Select from a variety of enlightening books, CD/DVD's, conference collectibles and more. Get something for yourself and something to share. Use the promo code TRUTH at check out and get 20% off up to two items. https://pamelachristianministries.com/store AFFILIATE SPONSORS: PROTECT YOUR HEALTH AND PERSONAL FINANCES Affiliate Sponsors Main Page: https://pamelachristianministries.com/affiliate-sponsors-and-partners Dr. Zelenko: https://zstacklife.com/?ref=FTLB Use promo code FTLB for a 5% discount. Subscribers enjoy a 10% discount each and every month. MFinity: Help for optimum health, detox and weight loss: FTLB.mymfinity.com Hear my series of conversations with Todd Smith, Former Co-founder, about my journey using their products. Scott McKay, Operation Tomahawk “Vote with Your Dollars with Everyday Purchases:” https://switch.patriotstreetfighter.com/ Use drop down menu and click Pamela Christian - Faith to Live By so one of my team members personally contacts you. Listen to my first interview with Scott McKay. Dr. Kirk Elliott Consider having gold and silver to diversify your financial portfolio: https://kirkelliottphd.com/faith/ CONNECT: Exclusive for my podcast listeners “Beyond the Podcast.” Get exclusive downloads, special discounts and more. https://pamelachristianministries.com/beyond-the-podcast   Subscribe to my Bi-monthly ENewsletter to become a preferred member and select one of three thank you gifts.   HELP PAM WITH HER SOCIAL MEDIA Copy and paste this on your Social Media page: “Pam Christian is one of the people I follow on social media and/or her podcast. Her Linked In account has been banned and she requests all her connections to find her on other platforms. She's on Twitter, Facebook, Gab, Blessed2Teach Neighborhood, and Truth Social. Search for plchristian or Pam Christian.”   We can also connect on Social Media:                 Truth Social: plchristian Twitter and Gab @PLChristian Facebook: Pamela Christian and my Faith to Live By page Linked In: Pamela Christian Blessed to Teach Neighborhood: Pamela Christian and my Faith to Live By page Amazon Author Central:  https://www.amazon.com/author/pamelachristian.com   Let me hear from you. Let me know how I'm helping you, to share a testimony, or if there are any topics you want me to cover as together we seek to discover and live in life-giving truth and experience all the hope truth provides. Email me at: FaithToLiveBy@PamelaChristianMinistries.com Visit Faith to Live By to see Show Notes and any Bonuses for each episode: https://pamelachristianministries.com/faith-to-live-by-podcast-show-notes   Trustworthy news and information sites: Pamela Christian Ministries Intercessors for America American Values Liberty Counsel Charisma News Network America's Voice Epoch Times American Faith Intercessors for America ACLJ Judicial Watch Heritage Foundation Pacific Justice Institute   Disclaimer: Pamela Christian, Pamela Christian Ministries LLC, and its employees, sponsors, or affiliates do not necessarily hold to the views, advice or claims from podcast guests, posted resources, or our sponsors. We take no responsibility for claims or representations made in any guests, ads, books, businesses or by ministries mentioned. Faith to Live By is for informational purposes only and in no way should be construed to be counseling or professional advice of any kind. In no event shall Faith to Live By, Pamela Christian, Pamela Christian Ministries LLC, and employees, sponsors or affiliates assume liability for any damages whatsoever resulting from any action in connection with the use of this information or this podcast. You are responsible for your own counseling and care. We pray that the Lord will guide you to the help you need so you can truly enjoy Faith to Live By.  

I Like Beer The Podcast
Best Beer GPA Scores Ever with Wild Thing

I Like Beer The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 42:01


Influencer Jeff brings some of the best beers we have ever tasted on the show, pushing the single episode GPA to an all-time high, while the Doctor makes a Wild Thing house call to tell the love story of two Dung Beetles, Talent and Josefina.  Cue the laughter.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
MBA Wire Taps 263—Accounting entrepreneur. Online degree, enlisted candidate. MBB-sponsored, is GMAT good enough?

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 38:29


This week's episode kicks off with an update on admissions decisions and all the latest MBA LiveWire activity.  This includes Round 1 admits being released early for London Business School. Alex and Graham then moved into a quick conversation about top law schools leaving the U.S. News rankings, and whether that will happen with the MBA rankings; your hosts are not convinced. Graham highlighted the Real Humans pieces recently published for IESE and for Georgetown McDonough, and then ran down the latest employment reports for MIT / Sloan and McDonough. Alex points out that there were no real surprises in the numbers, with both schools reporting strong average salaries. As usual, Alex chose three candidates for profile reviews, taken from recent ApplyWire entries: First up, Alex selected an entrepreneur who set up and is running an online accounting business, which looks to be doing very well. Their numbers are solid, and they have a masters degree, but Alex and Graham are a little concerned as to whether or not their 10 years of experience raises fit issues with the programs they are targeting. With that said, your hosts move into a discussion as to how this candidate might mitigate some of those concerns. This week's second candidate is enlisted in the navy, and has completed an online undergraduate degree. Alex discussed the implications of that; their GPA is at 3.9, and it's been an interesting, less traditional pathway to the MBA for sure. The GRE of 324 is decent, and they are targeting next season - which is a good thing, since your hosts would like to hear more about this candidate's post MBA goals, specifically in the longer term. This week's final candidate works at an MBB consulting firm and is being sponsored for their MBA. They are from Canada, and it looks like the only real concern is the slightly lower GMAT of 690. They have taken the test three times, should they try for a fourth, or should they widen their target school list? This episode was recorded in Cornwall, England and Paris, France. It was produced and engineered in always sunny Philadelphia by the amazing Dennis Crowley. Please remember to rate and review this podcast wherever you listen and to 'stay safe everybody'!

Financial Margin
Set goals for your benchmarks

Financial Margin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 6:15


Today we are going to look at setting goals for the benchmarks you've established. If your vision is the forest, your benchmarks are the trees, then the goals are the undergrowth or what actually gives legs to growing a tree and eventually a forest. Goal-setting is probably the one area most of us have done at least some planning in or have had some experience with. For you, this could take the form of a New Year's resolution, a GPA you're striving for, an amount of profit you are working toward in your business or a fitness goal of some kind. Margin Membership Sign-up: https://millennialmargin.com/learn/How are your finances doing? Take the quiz: https://i2tvdm52vbg.typeform.com/to/YFcT68CWJared created Millennial Margin out of necessity, as he has watched countless people schedule-away, mortgage-up, and max-out their lives. Margin is simply the antithesis, providing leeway in an increasingly margin-less culture.Subscribe for daily tips and discussions about how to better manage your personal finances and, by extension, your margin.Listen to the podcast: https://margin.simplecast.com/Have a question? Contact Jared at jared@millennialmargin.comFollow Millennial Margin: facebook.com/millennialmargin, instagram.com/millennialmargin1, or simply visit millennialmargin.comGoal/Disclaimer: My goal with [Margin] is to prepare you with the knowledge but then inspire you to act on that knowledge. My goal is to be in your corner bridging the gap between your trusted CPA, attorney, and financial planner. My advice is simply from my own personal experiences and is not meant to override or replace professional advice from your trusted investment professional. The content found here is for entertainment purposes only.

Faith to Live By with Pamela Christian
Do Not Accept Defeat—Things are Not as They Appear

Faith to Live By with Pamela Christian

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 35:57


Derek Johnson helps us explore what's been hidden in plain sight for us to discover and be encouraged by the truth. Derek comes from a long line military family, and his unique interpretation of all we've witnessed since 2016 gives us much hope that the whole world is very close to seeing the victory we've been praying and waiting for.   SHOW NOTES CONNECT WITH TODAY'S GUEST: Derek Johnson Derek is a United States Army veteran, with a Bachelor's degree from the University of Alabama, and a Masters in Business from Colorado State University where he finished with National Academic and Military Honors for a 3.8 GPA. Through his own in-depth research, Derek puts a keen focus on a Blueprint that outlines the Covert Sting Operation that's been taking place visually since October 2016, for the common, every day, hard working American, via Military Law, Military Regulations, Military Orders, Military Symbols, Code Language/Optics, the United States Constitution and United States Codes.  https://thedocuments.info and https://www.derekjohnsononcountry.com   LINKS FROM SHOW CONTENT: Biden Investigated Article: https://dailycaller.com/2022/11/17/gop-hunter-biden-committee-report-on-biden/ Biden Investigated Video: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/marcia-lynn-eichenauer_thank-you-god-hallelujah-activity-6999145785435037696-qGlR/?utm_source=li_share&utm_content=public_post&utm_medium=g_dt_web&utm_campaign=copy Josh Hawley EXPLODES on Chris Wray Over the FBI's Targeting of Conservatives https://t.me/team1anons/17715 The Believer's Authority by Kenneth Hagin, paperback: https://amzn.to/3TMZllr or ebook: https://amzn.to/3SxgPAJ “The Two President Prophecy”  it using the link in the Show Notes.  https://www.charismapodcastnetwork.com/show/adventuresinthespirit/1928f40e-7b9c-4475-a475-496b97f6a5d6/The-2-President-Prophecy-with-Pamela-Christian-(Ep-73)   FOR FURTHER STUDY: Be sure to listen to all Pam's past podcasts to know more about world events taking place today. Black preacher talks about witchcraft of democrats: https://twitter.com/kingojungle/status/1583495033248182272?s=20&t=-CH0iTvpPlXUlhe4fSCzfA   ACTION STEPS: Recommend Pam's podcast to friends and family and plan to listen next week to learn what you can do to make a Kingdom difference.   BONUS: Learn more of what God is doing to change governmental leadership in Israel: https://ifapray.org/blog/election-2022-a-global-perspective/   Reduce Risk of COVID: https://www.theepochtimes.com/health/simple-nasal-wash-reduces-risk-of-covid-hospitalization_4814791.html The Heritage Foundation working to fight voter fraud:  https://www.heritage.org/voterfraud America's Future: https://www.americasfuture.net/newsletter/the-rightful-restoration-of-power/ Clay Clark's ReAwaken America Tour - use this link and enter FTLB promo code to get a 10% discount:  https://timetofreeamerica.com/ Fall of the Cabal video: https://www.fallcabal.com/Evidence of the WEF's plan of genocide: https://rumble.com/v1gx0ah-the-great-reset-did-the-world-economic-forum-recommend-killing-94-of-the-ea.html SUPPORT: If you've been blessed by my podcasts, please show your support. We cannot bring you this faith-building podcast without your financial support. There are several ways you can partner with me: Support my Affiliate Sponsors from my web site: https://pamelachristianministries.com/affiliate-sponsors-and-partners Sponsor an episode of Faith to Live By, email me to learn more. Donate from my web site on the web store page upon checkout. Purchase any goods or services listed in the Show Notes or from our web store. Learn more about Pam's books: https://pamelachristianministries.com/products-and-services/authors-page STORE: Learn about Pam's books and products from her web store. Select from a variety of enlightening books, CD/DVD's, conference collectibles and more. Get something for yourself and something to share. Use the promo code TRUTH at check out and get 20% off up to two items. https://pamelachristianministries.com/store AFFILIATE SPONSORS: PROTECT YOUR HEALTH AND PERSONAL FINANCES Affiliate Sponsors Main Page: https://pamelachristianministries.com/affiliate-sponsors-and-partners Dr. Zelenko: https://zstacklife.com/?ref=FTLB Use promo code FTLB for a 5% discount. Subscribers enjoy a 10% discount each and every month. MFinity: Help for optimum health, detox and weight loss: FTLB.mymfinity.com Hear my series of conversations with Todd Smith, Former Co-founder, about my journey using their products. Scott McKay, Operation Tomahawk “Vote with Your Dollars with Everyday Purchases:” https://switch.patriotstreetfighter.com/ Use drop down menu and click Pamela Christian - Faith to Live By so one of my team members personally contacts you. Listen to my first interview with Scott McKay. Dr. Kirk Elliott Consider having gold and silver to diversify your financial portfolio: https://kirkelliottphd.com/faith/ CONNECT: Exclusive for my podcast listeners “Beyond the Podcast.” Get exclusive downloads, special discounts and more. https://pamelachristianministries.com/beyond-the-podcast Subscribe to my Bi-monthly ENewsletter to become a preferred member and select one of three thank you gifts. HELP PAM WITH HER SOCIAL MEDIA Copy and paste this on your Social Media page: “Pam Christian is one of the people I follow on social media and/or her podcast. Her Linked In account has been banned and she requests all her connections to find her on other platforms. She's on Twitter, Facebook, Gab, Blessed2Teach Neighborhood, and Truth Social. Search for plchristian or Pam Christian.” We can also connect on Social Media: Truth Social: plchristian Twitter and Gab @PLChristian Facebook: Pamela Christian and my Faith to Live By page Linked In: Pamela Christian Blessed to Teach Neighborhood: Pamela Christian and my Faith to Live By page Amazon Author Central:  https://www.amazon.com/author/pamelachristian.com Let me hear from you. Let me know how I'm helping you, to share a testimony, or if there are any topics you want me to cover as together we seek to discover and live in life-giving truth and experience all the hope truth provides. Email me at: FaithToLiveBy@PamelaChristianMinistries.com  Visit Faith to Live By to see Show Notes and any Bonuses for each episode: https://pamelachristianministries.com/faith-to-live-by-podcast-show-notes   Trustworthy news and information sites: Pamela Christian Ministries Intercessors for America American Values Liberty Counsel Charisma News Network America's Voice Epoch Times American Faith Intercessors for America ACLJ Judicial Watch Heritage Foundation Pacific Justice Institute Disclaimer: Pamela Christian, Pamela Christian Ministries LLC, and its employees, sponsors, or affiliates do not necessarily hold to the views, advice or claims from podcast guests, posted resources, or our sponsors. We take no responsibility for claims or representations made in any guests, ads, books, businesses or by ministries mentioned. Faith to Live By is for informational purposes only and in no way should be construed to be counseling or professional advice of any kind. In no event shall Faith to Live By, Pamela Christian, Pamela Christian Ministries LLC, and employees, sponsors or affiliates assume liability for any damages whatsoever resulting from any action in connection with the use of this information or this podcast. You are responsible for your own counseling and care. We pray that the Lord will guide you to the help you need so you can truly enjoy Faith to Live By.

CRNA School Prep Academy Podcast
Episode 92: How To Get Accepted Into CRNA School On Your First Attempt

CRNA School Prep Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 30:31


Getting accepted into a CRNA school on your first attempt is quite a huge achievement. It saves you a lot of time and gives you a powerful boost in self-confidence. To help you pull this off, Jenny Finnell presents eight simple steps that you can easily follow. She breaks down tips on keeping a good GPA, the importance of job shadowing in critical care, how to determine if you need graduate-level courses, and a lot more. Jenny also talks about the leadership skills you must possess and why you should never pursue success just by mimicking other people.Get access to planning tools, mock interviews, valuable CRNA Faculty guidance, and mapped-out courses that have been proven to accelerate your CRNA success! Become a member of CRNA School Prep Academy here!Get CSPA 8 Steps To Become CRNA E-Book Guide Here: https://www.cspaedu.com/stepshttps://www.crnaschoolprepacademy.com/joinBook a mock interview, personal statement, resume and more at http://www.NursesTeachNurses.comJoin the CSPA email list here! https://www.cspaedu.com/podcast-emailSend Jenny an email or make a podcast request!Hello@CRNASchoolPrepAcademy.com

Crazy Money with Paul Ollinger
Why Boys and Men are Struggling with Richard Reeves - S4 Ep 17

Crazy Money with Paul Ollinger

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 45:42


Richard Reeves is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and the author of a new book called Of Boys and Men: Why the Modern Male Is Struggling, Why It Matters, and What to Do about It. You might ask, “Why is this topic relevant to Crazy Money, a podcast about money and happiness, work and meaning?” Because the connection between education, gainful employment and life satisfaction is massive. And on these metrics, the modern male is not doing well. Consider some of these data points: Boys are 50% more likely to fail classes in math, reading and science than girls. By High School, 2/3 of the students in the top 10% of the class ranked by GPA are girls, while about 2/3 of the students in the lowest 1/5 of the class are boys. And education matters. One in three American men with only a high school diploma (10 million men!) are now out of the labor force. They're not unemployed–they're out of the labor force. They're not even counted in the unemployment numbers. And this matters because men without education and jobs do less well as husbands and fathers and thus perpetuate the cycle for their children. Yes, especially for their sons. Perhaps worst of all, men make up 75% of those who die by deaths of despair, i.e. by suicide, or acute substance abuse. The net of it is when you lose hope in the future, you will become increasingly volatile in the present. You've probably read Richard's writing in the New York Times, The Guardian, The Atlantic or the Wall Street Journal, his previous book Dream Hoarders, which The Economist named a Book of the Year.. I'm delighted to have him back on the show.

Les enfants vont bien: homoparentalité et autres schémas familiaux
Ashley, Jérome et Eric: Une histoire de famille entre une femme porteuse et des papas

Les enfants vont bien: homoparentalité et autres schémas familiaux

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 82:49


Il y a un peu plus d'un an, pour ouvrir la saison 3 du podcast, j'avais réussi à donner la parole à une femme porteuse pour recueillir ses ressentis et comprendre les motivations qui peuvent conduire une femme à offrir ce geste si précieux, de porter un enfant pour autrui. J'ai une conviction profonde que nous avons, les femmes, une chance énorme et un don qui peut être assimilé à quelque chose de céleste, de pouvoir porter la vie. Je l'avais dit à l'époque, mais depuis petite, je suis intriguée et je me suis interrogée sur ma capacité à offrir ce cadeau. J'ai cherché longtemps un témoignage et j'avais écouté, fascinée, le parcours de Virginie qui avait porté pour son frère. Porter pour sa famille, c'est tout à fait ce qui me semblait réalisable, envisageable, encore plus depuis que je suis devenue mère, et que j'ai compris que si on désirait la parentalité, en être privé était inenvisageable, invivable devrais-je dire. Oui mais qu'en est-il quand il s'agit de porter pour un couple inconnu? J'avais suivi le parcours d'Eric et Jérome sur leur compte Instragram @2papasgays et en parallèle ait recueilli le témoignage de Christophe et Ghislain Beaugrand, Rémy et Grégoire, Romain et Alex, Yoann et Jéremy, et j'ai compris. J'ai compris ce lien indéfectible qui unit très souvent les couples et les femmes porteuses. Faire appel à une femme porteuse l'intègre très souvent directement dans la famille au sans large. Le don effectué est inestimable et la reconnaissance éternelle. Alors naturellement, j'ai demandé à Eric et Jérome, que je savais être passé par une GPA au Canada avec Ashley, une canadienne francophone, si on pouvait enregistrer leurs parcours au pluriel. Le parcours dans une GPA engage toutes les parties. Chacun de leur coté, puis ensemble quand ils se sont trouvés. Eric et Jérome diffusent si simplement et facilement, avec beaucoup d'amour, ce qu'ils ont vécu, que je sais que leur témoignage n'appellera à aucun commentaire négatif. Chacun est consentant, chacun savait dans quoi il s'engageait et l'a fait en pleine conscience. Je ne retiens qu'une chose de cet épisode, la force des liens qui uni Ashley, Jérome, Eric et Augustine maintenant. De l'amour à l'état brut. Je vous laisse découvrir leur histoire et je vous souhaite une bonne écoute. Je tenais à remercier sincèrement Ashley, Eric et Jerome, pour leur confiance, car comme je le précise dans l'épisode, diffuser autour d'une GPA en France, ce n'est ni simple ni évident. L'adage pour vivre heureux vivons cachés, s'applique d'autant plus dans un contexte ou la conception de ces enfants n'est pas légiféré en France et ou tout peut être renversé du jour au lendemain. La GPA est illégale en France, elle est légalisée dans certains pays. L'envie d'enfant ne se contrôle pas et ne se discute pas. L'interdiction de concevoir pour certaines personnes uniquement, par d'autres, non concernées pour la plupart, est intolérable. Diffuser et visibiliser contribue à normaliser ces familles et surtout a faire avancer l'opinion dans l'optique de l'étude et de la construction de la future loi bioéthique. Je l'espère sincèrement en tous cas. Soutenez ce podcast http://supporter.acast.com/lesenfantsvontbien. Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Wire Taps 262—Female Asian attorney. Hispanic in Private Equity. Phoenix-bound

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 44:53


This week's episode of the podcast kicks off with Graham and Alex discussing the latest activity on MBA LiveWire which included interview invites from Berkeley / Haas and Stanford. Graham then highlighted his recent tour of leading MBA programs on the east coast, including Harvard, Dartmouth / Tuck, MIT / Sloan, Yale SOM, NYU / Stern, and Wharton; he noted the energy and diversity of the student bodies he observed on the campuses. Graham and Alex also reviewed the employment reports for Harvard and Duke / Fuqua. Both programs released strong numbers, including increases in average starting salaries. Your hosts then discussed the potential  impact from employment contraction in the tech sector. Graham also mentioned the Real Humans pieces recently published, for HEC / Paris and Washington / Olin. As usual, this episode features three profile reviews, taken from ApplyWire entries: First up, Alex selects a female attorney from Asia, who relocated to the United States for her undergraduate degree. She's just received a 720 on the GMAT and is exploring her options for Round 2. Likely she will be a decent candidate for top programs, Alex and Graham just worry a little about the late start in the application process. There might be an argument to target few top programs this season, for a second opportunity next season. This week's second candidate appears to have really strong work experience, having moved from investment banking into private equity. They are Hispanic, and also have a good GPA from an engineering discipline. They will need to ace the GMAT, but given that they are targeting next year, there's a lot of time and potential.  The final candidate for this week has a focus on living in Phoenix post-MBA. This led to a conversation about whether that makes Arizona State / Carey a better option than programs that are ranked higher, especially if this would mean greater access to scholarship. This episode was recorded in Cornwall, England and Paris, France. It was produced and engineered in 'always sunny' Philadelphia by Dennis Crowley. Please remember to rate and review this podcast wherever you listen and to 'stay safe everybody'!

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team
157: Help Us Give the Gift of Higher Education

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 26:15


Vineyard Team's Juan Nevarez Memorial Scholarship provides multi-year, higher education investments in the children of vineyard and winery workers on California's Central Coast based on academic excellence, financial need, and community involvement. The majority of awardees are first-generation college students. This funding supports students and their families in achieving their dreams of successful graduation from a trade, or two- or four-year school to pursue a professional career. Vineyard Team's Executive Director, Beth Vukmanic, and milti-year scholarship recipient and Assistant Grower Relations Representative at Justin Winery, Evelyn Alvarez Mendoza talk about how the scholarship impacted her education and career trajectory through not only financial aide but industry connections. Evelyn gives her advice on how to succeed in college to new students and Beth shares how to apply for funding. First-generation students have more barriers when it comes to attaining higher education – they cannot ask their parents how to navigate the system, budgets are often tight, and they can feel guilty for leaving their families. As a community, we can band together to better the future of the next generation. Multi-year recipient Alberto Gonzales says, "I am proud of breaking the cycle and being the change in my family as the first generation to go to college." You can give the gift of higher education to students like Evelyn and Alberto this GivingTuesday. Our goal is to raise $75,000 by November 29, 2022. You'll be doing more than just donating — your kindness will make it possible for working families to send their children to two-year colleges, four-year universities, and trade schools. References: Donate to the scholarship – help us raise $75,000 by November 29, 2022 Evelyn Alvarez Mendoza – check-ins throughout her college career From the Crops to the Classroom – a story about Esteban Garcia Juan Nevarez Memorial Scholarship Meet three recipients of the Juan Nevarez Memorial Scholarship (video) Newsletter SIP Certified “The biggest inheritance that I'm going to leave you…” Get More Subscribe wherever you listen so you never miss an episode on the latest science and research with the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast. Since 1994, Vineyard Team has been your resource for workshops and field demonstrations, research, and events dedicated to the stewardship of our natural resources. Learn more at www.vineyardteam.org.   Transcript Craig Macmillan  0:00  And today our guests are Beth Vukmanic, she's executive director of vineyard team and Evelyn Alvarez Mendoza. She is assistant grower relations representative with Justin Winery. Today we're going to talk about the Juan Nevarez Memorial Scholarship. Beth, would you tell us a little bit about how that came about? What it is what it does, and that kind of thing with the background is?   Beth Vukmanic  0:22  I would love to, but one of ours Memorial Scholarship is to benefit the children of vineyard and winery workers. For anybody who has been a fan of this podcast. You know, we talk about sustainable winegrowing. And a lot of the times that focuses on the planet part of it. So we're talking about soils and pests and irrigation, but people are our most valuable resource. And this scholarship program is a way for us to give back to the people who helped us make a wonderful industry.   Craig Macmillan  0:50  Who was Juan Nevarez?   Beth Vukmanic  0:52  Juan Nevarez was a winegrower, who started out in the Paso Robles area, he moved here to the United States as a teenager, I believe he was just 16 years old. He didn't speak any English. And he just learned everything from the ground up. He was a very, I guess you'd probably call it a gritty soul, he would always put in the time and effort to try to teach himself. So if somebody was putting in irrigation lines, he would go over and ask them questions. Or if somebody was planting vines, he would go in and ask questions about why they made that choice. And he over time really developed a successful management company called Nevarez Farm Labor, he helped establish a lot of notable vineyards, including Justin in the Paso Robles area of California. And then he actually developed his own vineyard property, too. And he unfortunately passed away a couple of years ago. And something that was really special about Juan is that he held that he was a self made man, he dreamed of higher education for his own children, his daughter, Mia said that their dad had just one require from them that they had to go to college. And his thought with that was that he felt like he had to work really hard to prove who he was and what he knew. And that an education would help his children get that foot in the door, so that they could more easily build a better lives for themselves. And so that's why we named the scholarship after him to honor that memory of somebody who really supported higher education and valued it, and wanted it for the next generation.   Craig Macmillan  2:24  I never met him, I never connected with him. But from what I've learned, over the years, talking to people, one of the things that made this such an obvious thing to do for the community to start this scholarship was he was connected to like everybody, like he knew everybody. Everybody knew him. Curious more about that this idea of community, because I've talked to so many individuals who had some kind of connection to him, was that part of how this all came about, as folks wanted to, you know, encourage this idea. But also, they all felt like maybe they had some kind of connection there, they had some kind of responsibility. Scholarship is not a simple thing. Like you have to get kind of a critical mass of people to do it.   Beth Vukmanic  3:00  That's definitely true. Yeah. So when we first started the scholarship program, back in 2015, we were hosting our Earth Day Food and Wine Festival. And that was a way that we would take, you know, some of the proceeds raised by that to give back. And I think those first couple of years, that's the total amount that we were giving was, you know, maybe $5,000, to a few different students. Over time, like you said, because it is a community driven effort, as more people learned about the program, and especially a lot of our vineyard management companies that work with us, they will outreach the scholarship program to their team so that their students can apply for it. So they're really seeing this direct impact of helping their own employees, children attend school and earn that higher education. So I think that's really how the community build started. And it's just grown from there. This year, we gave out $62,000 to 14 different students. And it's just phenomenal. Like how much growth it's seen over the last so many years since 2015.   Craig Macmillan  3:58  That's fantastic. That's really, really wonderful. If I'm gonna apply, do they have to be a high school senior? Do they apply once they get one year of funding? Can they apply multiple times? How does how does the funding work?   Beth Vukmanic  4:10  The way that the funding works is they don't necessarily have to be a high school senior, although a lot of our applicants are that could be somebody who is already attending school, they can still be eligible to apply for the scholarship program as well. So far, the way that the scholarship has worked is that students would apply each year to get a scholarship. However, we just had an incredible investment from Must!  Charities that's going to help us expand this program to a whole new level. They've raised $1.3 million dollars...   Craig Macmillan  4:40  What!   Beth Vukmanic  4:42  Which is a huge and so a big change that we're going to make that's going to be incredible is to provide multi year scholarships. Instead of a student needing to come back and apply every single year as they're going to into your school or trade school or possibly a four year school, we would be able to give them funding for that period. bit of time, if they beat the benchmarks of a minimum GPA, and then also checking in with our organization. And that's something that we found was sort of kind of happening already with recipients like Evelyn. But now we have to do that more intentionally.   Craig Macmillan  5:14  And let's ask everyone. So Evelyn, you are a multi year recipient, is that correct?   Evelyn Alvarez Mendoza  5:19  That is correct. Yes.   Craig Macmillan  5:20  How did you find out about it? What was the process like when you first connected with vineyard team in the scholarship program? How did how did this come about for you?   Evelyn Alvarez Mendoza  5:28  So I found out about the scholarship through my dad's job. So my dad is currently employed by messa vineyard management, he works as a tractor driver and Sierra Madre Vineyard, which is located in Santa Maria, I'm not sure who exactly approached him with information about the scholarship, but it was something through his work. And he came home one day, and he gave me the application. He's like, I think this would be great for you to apply to it's a scholarship. I know, you're always seeking scholarship opportunities, you should give this a try. And of course, I was like I, I will do it. You know, like I was always seeking these type of opportunities throughout my college journey. And so I went for it. And the process was very simple. It was great communicating with the Vineyard Team. If I had any questions, it was very straightforward and clear. The application process itself was very simple. And I'm just super grateful for it, I had no idea that it would lead to a multi year scholarship recipient outcome. And I can't express enough in words that I'm so thankful for that in the change that I made throughout my college educational journey was just undescribable. It was very impactful for sure.   Craig Macmillan  6:37  So the first award that got you started. And where did you go to school?   Evelyn Alvarez Mendoza  6:42  So I attend a Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. First award, I believe I received in 2017. So it was during my sophomore year at Cal Poly. And during this time, I was pursuing a degree a Bachelors of Science degree in animal science. So that was my initial career direction. I would definitely say that the scholarship not only represented financial assistance for me to be able to afford my education at the time. But really the way I saw it was an opportunity to open up doors throughout my educational journey, and kind of helped me figure out a little bit more what direction I could take career wise connections through the Vineyard Team really kind of helped me land where I am today. And I can definitely talk more about that if you'd like me too.   Well. Yeah. I'm curious because first of all, Beth, students do not have to be pursuing a degree in an agricultural area. Right? They can they can be pursuing any career paths that correct?   Elizabeth Vukmanic  7:37  That's correct. Yeah. We're happy to support students that are pursuing any kind of career. So it doesn't have to be an ag, although sometimes we find ones that are still working and viniculture too.   Craig Macmillan  7:46  So Evelyn, but you were doing animal science?   Evelyn Alvarez Mendoza  7:49  Yes.   Craig Macmillan  7:50  How did you how did you move then into the viticultural world? How was what was that path link ? How did that happen?   Unknown Speaker  7:56  Yeah, I love sharing the story. Um, it's an interesting one. So animal science, for me started out with my passion for animals, I always kind of assumed, okay, I will have a career that has to do with working with animals and helping them. And it's one of those things that as I navigated Cal Poly with my animal science degree, I just kind of came to a point where I realized I was learning a lot of valuable information but I just didn't feel like my heart was in it. It wasn't speaking to me. And so I realized that this is probably not the field where I want to obtain a career that I would be content with. And so then I started to think about any other fields I could possibly explore that would interest me and I thought about my dad's job. He's always worked in vineyards for as long as I can remember, remember, ever since I was really young, I decided to explore that through a research project that was presented to me at Cal Poly. And that was my first exposure to vineyards, specifically, wine diseases is what I worked with, and I ended up falling in love with it. And I wanted more I wanted to dive in a little bit deeper into the viticulture industry.   Craig Macmillan  9:03  I think there were a lot of us that started doing something else and then got exposed and we got the bug. After that you kind of just can't look back. I know so many people have that story. So you completed your undergrad at Cal Poly? Is that correct?   Evelyn Alvarez Mendoza  9:16  Correct. Yes.   Craig Macmillan  9:17  And was at that point, was the wine and viticulture program happening? Or was this a fruit science degree? Where were you at?   Unknown Speaker  9:23  At that time, I finished off my degree in animal science just because by the time I realized I was really interested in viticulture a little too late to change my major. So I finished my degree animal science and then I decided to do a master's in agriculture with a specialization in crop science. That was the closest I could get to having a research experience related to viticulture, just because of the moment Cal Poly doesn't offer a specific master's program for wine and vit but it was a great opportunity. I decided to take that route just to kind of specialize a little bit more in my field of interest.   Craig Macmillan  9:56  And did you get scholarship money through your masters?   Unknown Speaker  9:59  Yes, I did get scholarship money from other vineyard organizations. The Vineyard Team scholarship specifically was throughout my undergrad journey, my undergraduate degree, which was an animal science. Needless to say, this scholarship did help expose me more to this industry through connections, talking to people who already were embedded in the industry. And it really did help me get my foot in the door in the matter speaking for kind of ended up where I am now. So.   Craig Macmillan  10:31  Were there things that the scholarship allowed you to do that you otherwise would not have been able to do? Because I remember talking to some folks who want it and they some of its tuition, but some of it's also things like rent and food or the ability to travel potentially, or something like that, or the materials that they needed. How did they How did the money help you? What did you What were you able to do that you would otherwise not have been able to do?   Unknown Speaker  10:52  Many things. And what was important for me is my parents at the time had other things to worry about in terms of expenses, and I have two older sisters. So they were also helping them get through their college journeys. And so the biggest thing for me was able to take a weight off of my parents shoulders in terms of having to financially support me. And this scholarship made a huge difference in me being able to take care of rent, take care of book costs, or any type of trips related to my classes, I was taking any extracurricular activities that kind of helped me dive deeper into my interest, career wise. So it definitely made a huge difference in being able to afford these opportunities and being able to become more involved in activities I was very interested in participating in for sure.   Craig Macmillan  11:44  Do you think you would have gotten into the vineyard industry without the scholarship?   Unknown Speaker  11:47  No. I think part of it was the research opportunity that I was presented at Cal Poly, but really this current job that I have now, I don't believe I would have attained it if it wasn't for this scholarship, because it was through this scholarship and having my affiliation with the Vineyard Team and their roots in the wine growing community here that really helped me meet, they introduced me to Molly Scott, Director of Grower Relations here at Justin. And it really just connecting the dots, it played a huge role in landing me where I am now. So I don't believe that I would be in the Viticulture industry as I am today without the scholarship.   Unknown Speaker  12:33  And so that is another part of the scholarship program where we've seen these connections being made, you know, over the years. And it's an area where we can further formalize this to with our new investment. We've had a few different students who've met different vitiulturalists at like, I remember barbecue or different video team events and ended up with jobs or internships out of them. And our membership is very supportive of the scholarship program. And not just in terms of donations. But going beyond that and wanting to offer internship opportunities wanting to offer job opportunities to the students who are recipients of it.   Craig Macmillan  13:06  Again, how many recipients per year does it vary?   Unknown Speaker  13:09  It does vary. Yes. So this last year was 14, we're going to be looking at adding in more because we have the capacity to add in more over the next few years. Another thing that's been interesting about the scholarship program, too, is we're really reaching for the most part first generation college students. So 98% have been first generation so far, by going into this next phase of the program, we're going to bring on an administrator who's going to help us oversee the whole program. And I think a really important component of that is kind of like a coaching element that they're going to provide, you know, not just processing applications, but actually doing active outreach to all of the recipients with tips and ideas like how to file the FAFSA form or, or college, you know, have you looked for these kinds of resources. So go into that next level of providing help support to help the students not just financially, but really get through the whole process of getting to college. A challenge that a lot of first generation college students run into is that no one of their families had this experience before, right. So they can't ask their parents, you know, like, hey, you know, how do I how do I get into school? And like, what do I do when I go to class? You know, a lot of times budgets are tight, or they might have maybe me feel guilty about like, you know, leaving their family, stuff like that. So I think having this scholarship administrator is going to provide a wonderful level of support for everyone who's a part of the program.   Craig Macmillan  14:31  98 percent first generation. It's not a requirement, though, isn't?   Elizabeth Vukmanic  14:33  No, it's not a requirement.   Craig Macmillan  14:35  What are some other examples over the past golly, how ling has it been now seven years of really interesting cases or success stories of folks that have gone out and done other things or would not have made it without somehow?   Unknown Speaker  14:45  I think an incredible story is Esteban Garcia. He was a young teenage dad, his family worked in the fields, his grandparents worked in the fields. He did the same thing too. And at a certain point, he thought, you know, is this what I'm just going to do is just sort of live this day to day, you know life or am I going to do something else. And he saw, you know, being in the United States as an opportunity to get a higher education. Later on in life, he went back to college with two children and a fiancee, works full time. Just a total Rockstar. Right now, he's been a multi year recipient, he went to Allan Hancock College, which is down in Santa Maria and then moved over to Fresno State, he actually is going into viticulture as well, and has a great job at Sea Smoke vineyards too. So that's another one of these kind of parallel stories maybe with Evelyn where he got the scholarship. And then by being involved with the Vineyard Team through us was able to make these other connections and move into a nice career as he graduates school.   Craig Macmillan  15:45  Evelyn, you're relatively early in your career. It sounds like this is a completely personal question. Where do you want to? This isn't like an interview question. Where do you want to be five years from now? Where do you want to be 10 years from now? How do you what do you see your trajectory being?   Unknown Speaker  15:59  Oh, man, yeah. I love to think about that all the time and plan. What I have clear right now is my interest in viticulture, anything related to wine grapes. Honestly, my biggest goal at this moment is to just advance in my career, I like to apply value to what I've learned and not only be able to apply that in a job, but also continue growing professionally. Five years from now 10 years from now I see myself without a doubt still being an agriculture still been in this industry. Who knows I may kind of divert a little bit from viticulture, we try horticulture, you know, even different avenue, but for sure still in the agriculture world. I know agricultural is for me, it's in my family. It's been for years. So this is where I want to stay for sure. Honestly, right now, I guess to put it in a clearer way is I'm open to opportunities that offer learning and growing. And that is really what I am seeking after. So.   Craig Macmillan  17:04  As someone who's come out the other side and have educational piece, what would you say? How would you mentor a young person who's just senior in high school or freshman in college, about how they should navigate all this and how they should look for help.   Unknown Speaker  17:17  My biggest point of advice would be take the time to research take the time to get to know and become familiar with opportunities are out there. For most scholarships that I received, including the Vineyard Team scholarship, I wouldn't have known if I didn't either hear it from someone that I knew or look more into it by doing my own research. So I know sometimes it can be like, oh, man, I don't know if I have time for this, you know, to write an essay or ask for a reference letter or a reference, but it's worth it. It's the few hours or even minutes that you put towards a scholarship application can result in something so big like landing an ideal career, you know, I'm opening the door to a route that really will land you where you want to be career wise. And that's what happened to me, and I can't stress enough. I always talk to my peers, and people that I know are currently navigating college and they say, you should, you know, definitely take the time to apply to scholarships, use your resources, talk to people, you know, and it will never have a negative outcome for sure. And you will always have something rewarding come out of that. So that's my biggest point of advice for people.   Craig Macmillan  18:31  And turning back to Beth, I think the idea of having an administrator who not only manages numbers, but also helps to managing council people is a really, really great thing. I think better, scholarships had that it would be more successful, not just in getting people but also the outcomes. I think that's really wonderful. Beth, how is it techniques and getting the word out to the community about the scholarship?   Unknown Speaker  18:53  A lot of times the scholarship gets sorted out by word of mouth. We also have a newsletter on our website, if anyone wants to sign up for that. And in there, we've been sharing some wonderful stories about students like Evelyn and updates on the scholarship program. And then a lot of it ends up going through like Evelyn said to through the vineyard management companies, because they're telling their staff about it, who's been telling their children about it to help them apply.   Craig Macmillan  19:19  Where do you see this going? You've talked about multi year awards. You've talked about getting to more students, what's your five year tenure plan for this scholarship path? Where do you see this headed?   Unknown Speaker  19:29  I will look forward to the next phase of the scholarship. We're going to be making some of these tweaks, I guess, to our current system so that we can really solidify a lot of these great things that were already naturally happening. I'm really excited about the multi-year scholarships. I think we can come up with a really good communications plan with the administrator for the students and really figure out like what their pain points are like, where are they struggling, where do they need more help? Maybe doing even more conversations with the students themselves with the question that you just asked Evelyn like what is your piece of advice you would give somebody who is in your shoes, you know that you were just issues a few years ago, I think all of those are going to be really, really valuable to everyone participating in the program.   Craig Macmillan  20:12  Which reminds me something. So who's on the selection committee? How are already selected?   Beth Vukmanic  20:17  So we have seven different members on the selection committee. And the way that the process works is once the applications come in, we blind them. So you know, so they don't know whose application they're reading. And all of the applicants, you know, give kind of like basic information about themselves, you know, where they are in school right now, what they plan on doing, but then they always write these wonderful, you'll have more personal essays where we get to learn more about them as an individual. And so this selection committee will spend their time reading through all of these applications, and then sort of discussing based off of need, which students will get a scholarship that year.   Craig Macmillan  20:54  And these are folks in the vineyard and winery industry. They are, what is the cycle? Where do students go to apply? What time of year does it take place? What's the timeframe? Like how does that work?   Unknown Speaker  21:04  Applications are going to be opening up in March for students, so they can be popping on vineyard team.org/scholarship, to see when applications go live.   Craig Macmillan  21:15  That's fantastic. I had been involved as well over the years, I think this is a fantastic thing. I have also followed some individuals through the process. And it's been very rewarding for me as a person. And I know it's rewarding for them, because I could see outcomes that happen that otherwise never would happen. I really am proud of you, Evelyn, I think you've done great. And I'm glad that you participated. And I'm super proud of you, Beth, for making this all happen over the years. This is not a small task, but it started. And then the successes, runaway and really, really exciting. What can people do to support? You mentioned the website? Is there anything else people can do?   Unknown Speaker  21:51  We are fundraising for this. So although must has raised $1.3 million for the program, we actually have to match a chunk of that money in order to be able to apply it to the scholarship program. So matching funds are really, really important to to help us keep this going. People can go ahead and donate at being your team.org/scholarship And right now our goal is to raise $75,000 By giving Tuesday, which is November 29, 2022.   Craig Macmillan  22:18  That's fantastic. Well, that's all the time we have for today. I thank you both so much for being here. Beth Vukmanic, executive director of Vineyard Team and Evelyn Alvarez Mendoza, assistant grower relations representative for Justin Winery. Again, there's gonna be information in the show notes, look online, go to the links, get a checkbook, please support this project. This has done so much good for so many people and all of us very excited to say continue. Thank you both for being here.   Evelyn Alvarez Mendoza  22:46  Thank you so much.   Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Nonprofit Nation with Julia Campbell
Secrets of Compelling Grant Writing That Gets Funded with Rachel Waterman

Nonprofit Nation with Julia Campbell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 36:18 Transcription Available


Requesting grant dollars can be quite intimidating, especially when you're new to the grant seeking process. When it comes to nonprofit grant writing, there's not a formulaic approach or “one-size-fits-all”. Rather, you need to customize your approach for each funder you pursue. Rachel Waterman is here to help! Rachel is the CEO and Founder of GDS Grants. She is a GPA approved trainer and presenter on various topics related to grant writing, research & management, but her favorite "things" are data collection/outcome measures and systems for scale and efficiency. She helped develop the grant management software GEMS Grant Easy Management Software.In this episode, you'll learn Rachel's best tips to:Best identify which funders to pursueDetermine what to include in your grant proposal - and what you can leave outPersuade funders that you are worthy of a grantManage grant-writing with the other responsibilities on your plate About Julia Campbell, the host of the Nonprofit Nation podcast:Named as a top thought leader by Forbes and BizTech Magazine, Julia Campbell (she/hers) is an author, coach, and speaker on a mission to make the digital world a better place.She wrote her book, Storytelling in the Digital Age: A Guide for Nonprofits, as a roadmap for social change agents who want to build movements using engaging digital storytelling techniques. Her second book, How to Build and Mobilize a Social Media Community for Your Nonprofit, was published as a call-to-arms for mission-driven organizations to use the power of social media to build movements.Julia's online courses, webinars, and keynote talks have helped hundreds of nonprofits make the shift to digital thinking and how to do effective marketing in the digital age.Take Julia's free nonprofit masterclass,  3 Must-Have Elements of Social Media That ConvertsConnect with me on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/juliacampbell/

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

At its core, the WorkInSports Podcast teaches you how to sell yourself to an employer in the sports industry. Jennifer in Massachusetts is seeking some sports career advice on that front with this question for VP of Content and Engaged Learning Brian Clapp:“Hey Brian, it feels like 2022 was a tumultuous year for job seekers and employers. First it was the post-pandemic hiring boom, then it was the Great Resignation, then it was the Great Regret, and sprinkled in throughout the year was ghosting. On both sides. I was ghosted by an employer... and sorry to admit, I ghosted an interview I wasn't that interested in. What do you think are the trends and standards that employers will be looking for in 2023?”What Employers WantHiring managers need to feel confident making a hire, so they don't have to repeat the same process a few months later. So what are employers looking for when they scan resumes? Well, for one, your college GPA isn't a critical consideration, as only 37% of employers screen recent grad applications by GPA, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). On the other hand, here are six traits that employers seek when deciding who to hire:1. Problem-solving skills (61.4% said the skill was extremely important)2. Ability to work in a team (61%)3. Strong work ethic (52.4%)4. Analytical/quantitative skills (50.4%)5. Communication skills (50%)6. Technical skills (50%)

Coach Mo Golf Show
"Rise to Becoming #1 D1 Women's Golfer in The World, Natalie Srinavasan"

Coach Mo Golf Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 58:55


Natalie Srinivasan, a 2020 Furman Health Science Grad, isn't your average college golfer.  Natalie is anything but average, and has excelled both scholastically with a 3.9 GPA and winning the Winston Babb Memorial Award, which is given to a woman in each class who has demonstrated the most outstanding qualities of leadership, scholarship, and service to the university. Each year Natalie's game kept improving. By the time she had graduated, she was awarded the 2020 ANNIKA Award, one of the most well-respected awards for female college players to earn. Natalie was also named the 2020 PING WGCA National Player of the Year, winner of the inaugural Juli Inkster Senior Award, and finished her collegiate career as the #1 ranked female college in the world via Golfstat rankings. Natalie is a first team All-American selection by both the WGCA and Golfweek with an adjusted scoring average of 70.51. Srinivasan paced the Paladins and the SoCon with a 70.78 stroke average over 18 rounds, the best single-season stroke average in Furman women's golf history… Natalie concluded her career with a 72.6 stroke average over 118 rounds, the best career stroke average ever for a Paladin women's golfer.  Natalie has four college victories to her name, three her senior year: the Glass City Invitational, the Lady Paladin Invitational, and the Moon Golf Invitational and finished as runner up at the Darius Rucker Intercollegiate… Natalie recorded five top 20 finishes in six tournaments, four top-five finishes, and fired a season-low 67 in the final round of the Moon Golf Invitational. Natalie shot at or under par in 13 of 18 rounds, just wow! Natalie earned an invitational to the prestigious Augusta National Women's Amateur for the second-consecutive year.  Her stats and accolades can go on and on, and is impressive to say the least. Hear on the podcast what she credits all of her success to as well as the importance of communication and some funny stories and some of the pranks the team and Coach Jeff pulled on each other in college!@srinavasannatalie@furmanwgolfContact Coach Mo@coachmogolfprowww.coachmogolfpro.commgesualdi@stjohnsgolf.comThe Golf Academy at St. Johns Located at St. Johns Golf & CC in St. Augustine/St. Johns, FL@thegolfacademy_st.johnswww.stjohnsgolf.com

Pharmacy Leaders Podcast: Career Interviews and Advice
Ep 518 Increasing Residency Match Odds

Pharmacy Leaders Podcast: Career Interviews and Advice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 24:32


The book Perils of Polypharmacy can be found here: https://www.audible.com/pd/B0BG98JWZ3/?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWU-BK-ACX0-323817&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_323817_pd_us You can work with me one-on-one here: https://residency.teachable.com/ In this episode, I review some of the many characteristics of a residency application that matter in improving one's odds. But, instead of generalizing, you want to use these attributes to make sure you are applying them to the right place.  What increases your odds of matching? increased applications, interviews, research abstracts, and GPA. What pharmacy school characteristics matter? Public, older schools, higher NAPLEX pass rates, and affiliations with academic medical centers.  But, there are clear exceptions, many of the best matching schools are private schools with no AMC affiliation. Some colleges with terrible NAPLEX pass rates earn residencies at a high rate. Knowing where you stand is key.   

Enterprise NOW! Podcast
Ep 236: Don't Follow Your Dreams, Follow Your Purpose with Dr. Joe Johnson

Enterprise NOW! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 38:33


When it comes to finding success in your career, there's no single formula that will guarantee success. However, there is one important ingredient that you can't afford to ignore: your purpose. Too often, people chase their dreams without first stopping to consider what they're really passionate about. As a result, they end up in jobs that don't fulfill them and eventually become unhappy or even disengaged with their work.According to a recent study, 52% of employees are unhappy at work and 71% are disengaged. What's more, 50% or more of workers are actively looking for new jobs while they're still employed. Dr. Joe Johnson is a perfect example of someone who followed his purpose and made a significant impact as a result. Despite graduating from high school with a 1.6 GPA and undergrad with a 2.4 GPA, he went on to become a successful national speaker, trainer, peak performance coach, and entrepreneur leader.In this episode, Dr. Joe shares his thoughts about taking time to learn who you are and finding your authentic voice, understanding the game you're playing in, learning from experiences to overcome obstacles, unleashing our purpose, being selfish with healing, and becoming aware of your thoughts, feelings, and actions so you can learn how to control them. This focus on personal growth has helped Dr. Joe create minor shifts that have had a major impact in his life and career. And as a result, he's been able to help countless other people do the same.Episode Highlights:05:41 - There was this feeling that I was doing the right thing. Purpose to me, is a soul feeling. You're going to feel it in your soul, right? And so I stuck to it because it takes a long time to figure out who you are as a speaker, your style, right? Because what you see is people try to mimic other speakers and you can't be great unless you are who you are. And so that's why I took so long. I was nurturing my purpose, figuring out my flow, figuring out what I wanted to talk about, figuring out who I was as a speaker. And then it was time to start to get paid.24:44 - A lot of people dream big but then they get to this destination and they're like, yo, this is not what I thought it was going to be. And the purpose is different. So if you look at the fundamental definition of dreams and purpose, they're two different things. Dreams are thoughts or ideas that may or may not come true. That's the fundamental definition. Purpose is the reason for which something or someone exists. If you just look at the fundamental definition alone, and if you have any type of spirituality to you, there's a spiritual piece to the reason for which something or someone exists. It's here. You don't find your purpose, you don't discover it, you unleash it, it's already here. But then what happens, you get introduced, once you tap into that initial layer of your purpose, then you get introduced to the other levels of your purpose.35:40 - Sometimes it's as simple as I just need a reset, I need to take a weekend to myself, get back to center, realign, and I'm back. But sometimes it's I'm done with this job. I'm done with this relationship. I`m done with my old self. If you understand the game that you're playing in and the first game you need to understand is self is this game called life.Connect with ElzieWebsiteLinkedInEmailConnect with Dr. Joe

Manager Minute-brought to you by the VR Technical Assistance Center for Quality Management
VRTAC-QM Manager Minute: Rethinking Agency Organizational Structure- Ideas that work with Dacia Johnson-Oregon Blind

Manager Minute-brought to you by the VR Technical Assistance Center for Quality Management

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 23:58


Today, Dacia Johnson, Executive Director of the Oregon Commission for the Blind, chats with Carol Pankow, about some of the really innovative practices that the Oregon Commission for the Blind has implemented to improve organizational effectiveness and benefit the VR community.   Dacia and her team did a lot of work preparing for monitoring and restructuring some critical elements of the organizational structure that has the VR community talking.    Join Dacia and Carol in the Manager Minute studio for this timely conversation on championing innovation and high performance in a climate where so many agencies are looking for ways to spend VR funds effectively.   Listen Here   Full Transcript   VRTAC-QM Manager Minute: Rethinking Agency Organizational Structure- Ideas that Work with Dacia Johnson-Oregon Blind   {Music} Speaker1: Manager Minute brought to you by the VRTAC for Quality Management, Conversations powered by VR, one manager at a time, one minute at a time. Here is your host Carol Pankow.   Carol: Well, welcome to the manager minute. Joining me in the studio today is Dacia Johnson, executive director of the Oregon Commission for the Blind. She has been the executive director since 2013 and was the director of the agency's rehabilitation services program prior to that. So Dacia was so good to see you at the VR conference last week. How are things going in Oregon?   Dacia: It was great to see you as well, Carol. And things are going well here. I mean, I think like every agency, we have our challenges and opportunities, but certainly we're focused on providing the best services we can to Oregonians who experience vision, loss and just getting at it every day.   Carol: Awesome to hear. Well, full disclosure to our listeners, Dacia and I have worked together in both NCSAB and CSVAR and we were new director buddies. Back in 2013, right before the world changed with WIOA in 2014, and I had the good fortune to participate in the Oregon Commission for the Blind Monitoring visit this year and learned a ton of interesting things about the agency. Dacia's undertaken some really cutting edge organizational improvements that will be a benefit to the VR community, and I knew I needed to get her on the program to talk about this. And I think it's also fitting and timely with the state of the national VR program and agencies are looking for ways to effectively spend funds. So let's dig in. So Dacia, can you tell our listeners a little bit about yourself and the agency? Like what's your background and how did you land at the commission?   Dacia: Sure. I started my undergraduate degrees in psychology and so like every undergraduate with a psychology major, I didn't know what I was going to do. And I moved back to a small town in southern Oregon and I got a job with at the time it was a GPA workforce training program, and I loved that job. I did that for a couple of years and what I realized was my favorite part of it was working with at Risk Youth and what that was with youth with disabilities, right? They were kids with significant learning disabilities, kids with psychiatric disabilities. And I just love the work. That job ended and I moved myself to the big city and I started in private rehabilitation. And I realized quickly that the work of private rehabilitation just didn't really fit my values. And so I started working in public vocational rehabilitation while I simultaneously pursued my graduate degree in rehabilitation counseling. I did that at the general agency in Oregon. There's two agencies here, there's the general agency, and then there's the services for the individuals who are blind under what's called the Commission for the Blind, where I currently work. And I was recruited to come here in 2000 and I immediately fell in love with the work. Carol, you know this, but blindness rehabilitation is very holistic. You really have to address the needs of the entire person, starting with skills and adjustment and just helping them kind of redirect their existing skills and new and innovative ways. And I just loved it. I also love the fact that with the blindness organization are oftentimes closer to the work. I love policy, I love meetings. I'm a nerd that way. I love thinking about new programs. But with our agency, you actually get to see people who are going through the rehabilitation process. You get to interact with them. And so it was just the right elevation for me. And I've been here ever since.   Carol: I love that. I didn't know that about you. That's a cool way to start. And you're like an old timer now. You've been there, what, 20 going on? 23.   Dacia: Been here? Yep, 22 years in August. And for a long time I was the newbie. And so now it is a little bit interesting to be one of the most senior staff people. I will say that I have never not wanted to come to work and to me that's an incredible gift to be able to work doing things that you're passionate about with incredibly committed, passionate rehabilitation professionals, not unlike yourself, Carol, but we just have just a wonderful, service oriented mission. And I love coming to work and I feel incredibly grateful for that opportunity every day.   Carol: Yeah, you have a fantastic team. Now, I know a commission is a little bit of a different structure than most people are maybe used to. Can you give us just a few high points and what's different about that? And then also, like, how many people do you guys serve?   Dacia: All right. So we have a commission structure. We're grandfathered under the Rehabilitation Act, so we don't have a state rehabilitation council. We have a seven member board that reports directly to the governor. And that board has appointing authority over the executive director. Myself and the majority of those commissioners in Oregon have to be legally blind. And so our structure really ensures that we're focusing in and have crystal clear priorities around the best services possible to Oregonians who are blind or blindness organization. So we provide a combination of vocational rehabilitation services and independent living. Services to individuals with the largest independent living program being the older independent living program. For individuals who are blind. We serve anywhere from 1300 to 1600 folks a year in our vocational rehabilitation program. Last year, I think we served around 650 folks.   Carol: Yeah, it gives me a good perspective because I think back at SSB when I left, we were around 800 folks in the VR, and OIB program we were serving about 5000 people.   Dacia: Wow. It's incredible.   Carol: It's pretty cool. But I'm like you, I love that work and I love being close to the people and seeing what's going on. So I know you and your team did a just a ton of work preparing for that monitoring, but you also did a lot of work in restructuring some critical elements of your organizational structure. Can you tell our listeners what prompted you to think about doing something different with your structure and what are the specific things that you've done.   Dacia: On the monitoring piece, I think what I will say about preparing for monitoring is use the tools that are available to us that you, Carol, have developed. So I think that basically you use the checklists that the TAC has created for agencies. It makes a difference, right? So we actually thought we were on the short list for a long time. So we actually had been preparing, I would say, on a quarterly basis, going through the monitoring guide for that particular year and just trying to think through some of the questions. The monitoring guide doesn't change radically year to year. So we just kind of made sure that we were not starting from ground zero once they notified the states that were monitored. And I encourage everyone to do that because it really makes you think about kind of your structure. The other thing is I've been here a long time, and so I think that some of the skills that we all developed in vocational rehabilitation counseling, in terms of assessing skills and abilities and capabilities, I feel like I've applied that to our organization over time. And then I've looked for opportunities to be able to strategically invest in the organization. One of the things in which we're unique is that we actually employed an internal auditor and folks are like, How can a small agency benefit from an internal auditor? Well, I'll tell you, one of the first things that that position did when we hired them was to create some infrastructure around our quality assurance manual auditors, because we wanted that position to be able to actually audit the work they own the process of making sure things were documented in terms of internal controls, policies and procedures, but they actually didn't create the internal control, if that makes sense. They didn't create the policies and procedures. So that position had enough distance that over time they can actually do the internal auditing and testing of the processes to make sure they're in place. But really having one position that directly reports to me that had that full responsibility of making sure that things were clear documented in one place and kind of reflected the organization, I think was critical to us. That position is constantly having activities going on to make sure that our organization is running effectively and efficiently. They also were the lead on the monitoring preparation. It is a massive lift to get prepared for monitoring and go through the process. But we had one point of contact that doesn't do the work of the service delivery and they were able to objectively kind of track our progress and leading up to the monitoring and then led the work for the onsite monitoring itself. And it felt like it ran pretty smoothly to have that structure. So even if you don't have a separate position like we have, I would encourage folks to use that central point of contact ownership model because I think it made our monitoring run fairly smoothly.   Carol: Yeah, I thought it was pretty cool because that's Clay's position, correct?   Dacia: Yes. Yes.   Carol: So if anybody out there, you can't have Clay, But Clay is really awesome. And we were able to get into contact with him before you all went through the monitoring. He had reached out about a couple of things and I was like, What? Like what is this position? And that's why I just want you to say, what did your monitoring team say about this position?   Dacia: They were really pleased to see it, particularly on the fiscal side and looking at the way we have that separation and the ability to objectively review information, they were very favorable about the position for sure.   Carol: Yeah. In fact, I think they said we've never seen this anywhere else. You are the only agency that has had a position that was developed quite like that, and I thought that was pretty cool. So I guess I didn't realize that Clay had not developed that whole extensive manual that you had. There is a lot of work that went into that. Who did that? Who did all of that?   Dacia: He helped kind of with the lift of getting things documented. But each of the programs actually did the identification of the issues because we wanted him to have that autonomy and independence and not creating the actual documentation itself. Before we had dedicated resources, we started the process of creating a quality assurance manual. And what we realize is without dedicated resources to focus on it, it never happened. So the other thing I would encourage folks to do, if you don't have that position to help with the documentation is I basically said and I gave I think three months and I just said, you have to do it by this date.   Carol: Oh my gosh, yeah, that's quick.   Dacia: And I just said, it's never going to be a good time. And I just set a deadline. I think it was three months. People freaked out a little bit, but the reality is it got done right? And then we built from the foundation. We added once we kind of did a gap analysis of what was missing from that initial documentation list, then Clay helped kind of figure out where we needed to create documentation beyond what that initial lift was.   Carol: Well, and I know with the blind agency, it's always unique because we're typically smaller. We don't have a lot of resources. So kind of carving out these sort of positions and making investments in a particular piece of infrastructure like that. You know, it's kind of a deal. It's a big deal to do it. And so taking the funds and kind of making that happen. So had you had that kind of swirling around in your mind for a while?   Dacia: I had I mean, like every agency you go through the single audit act experience where you have external auditors. When I first became executive director, there was a significant push to try to make sure that the agency was running effectively and efficiently. And what I quickly realized is you don't know what you don't know, you know, especially like in on the service delivery side, but you have gaps and you're just not going to see them unless you have a focused attention on actually looking for your gaps. And so once I realized the pressure and the expectation to have this particular element be like running the best it could be, then I thought, well, then give me the resources. Right? I advocated for the resources to make sure that we could actually maintain that level of expectations.   Carol: Good for you. That's awesome. You also made some investment, though, in your fiscal team. I remember because did you not structure some things in a different way with your fiscal unit as well?   Dacia: We did. We actually had some turnover at our chief financial officer level and as I did the exit interview with the candidate that left who loved working for the agency, they indicated like this is impossible work, like you have like the CFO as a small agency wearing all of these hats. But there were so many hats that they were running from one fire to another fire to another fire to another fire. So then we hire a new CFO, and within a couple of months, the new person was like, I feel like I'm running from one fire to another fire to another fire like, All right. So either I listen to these very different professionals with different backgrounds and expertise and say there's too much work, right? So we advocated to add a grant accountant position that had just started actually last December. So not quite a year yet. And the grant accountant position in part is going to be focusing on preparing all of the grant reports and all of that tracking. And then that gives the CFO the opportunity to be able to review that work with some separation to make sure that that work is accurate, that it has all of the required elements in it. We had some very small but annoying financial reporting errors that were recurring that came up on the Single Audit Act audits. And the major barrier for us was the CFO was preparing the report, reviewing their own work and then submitting the report. And there were keying errors, you know, silly things that you just can't double check your own work. It's impossible.   Carol: Right? Good for you. Yeah. Because you know, all those single audit act, when you get on that list, there's always a lot of follow up. And I remember back in the day, like our governor's office, I'd have to send quarterly reports like how we're going to resolve this particular finding. They don't like you to have any. So good for you for doing that. So how do you think things are working out since you've made those changes? And have you had any kind of lessons learned along the way so far?   Dacia: Yeah, I think that they're working out well. One of the things we're working on now that's still in development is, as we know, our financial management is super complex. So we have to at any one time look at state level appropriations and budgets. At the same time, we need to be managing our match and our maintenance of effort and our Pre-ETS and we have to look at our cash on hand and tracking that and making sure that we don't have federal cash around too long and all of these pieces. And so we're creating with the lead work, being of that new grant account position, some kind of a dashboard that can kind of help us make those types of decisions, like when to switch from one year of Pre-ETS to the next year of Pre-ETS, and when we've met our match and maintenance of effort. And how does that compare with our state appropriation year and making sure that we expend all of our state funds that we have available during that period? And what I'm hoping that will be able to do is as we're trying to make decisions in terms of budget appropriation, grant management decisions around re allotment and all of that stuff, that we have kind of some data intelligence to help us kind of drive those decisions and track it over time.   Carol: Well, imagine that data driven decision making, Dacia.   Dacia: I know, right?   Carol: I think you did a little presentation on that a few years ago somewhere. I kind of seem to remember that was one of your big things you like to think about.   Dacia: Yeah, the piece that I would in terms of lessons learned, we're a small agency and we have passionate staff, right? Sometimes I think that I could have probably engaged staff and more often. And as to why are we adding these positions that aren't in the direct service bucket, I think that's a question that still comes up periodically, even though they see the value, but still sometimes they're like, Oh, did we add this? And why didn't we add a counselor or a teacher? No, I don't think you can over communicate the why to staff, even though, again, I think they intellectually see the benefit. But when you add FTE, they really want it to be in the service bucket, the admin stuff. I think they feel like you always have enough, you know. And the truth is, I think that agencies, particularly small agencies under resourced the administrative tasks because there's a certain amount of work that has to happen and it has to happen well, and at the end of the day, if you aren't running your organization well, they're not going to give you extra credit because you've been putting all your resources in the direct service area. They're just going to say that you're not running your organization well.   Carol: Yeah, and then that doesn't bode well. I came in too, to that. And if we aren't shipshape financially and we don't have all of that together, then we can't really run the program.   Dacia: Yeah.   Carol: Don't know what we're doing. So it is always that fine balance because like you say, we're small typically, and when you add that resource over here, people immediately look at that, Oh, sure, you're making, you know, the central office. People are bloated, There's too many people. But boy, in a blind agency, when you're wearing 15 hats, it gets tough. And there has to be that separation for sure.   Dacia: Yeah. And Carol, you and Sara have kind of reinforced directors need to know the financial matters. And I think I can't reinforce that enough, like the whole vision of having a grant account and then figuring out this dashboard stuff that came out of me not sleeping right and trying to think like, gosh darn it, I need to have this kind of information available because I'm the one that's worrying about this at the end of the day.   Carol: So I hope we didn't make you not sleep.   Dacia: Oh, no, not at all.   Carol: I know we talk about it a lot, though. So how far away do you think you are from this dashboard? Because I'm sure people are probably pretty interested.   Dacia: It's probably about 70% there.   Carol: Oh, wow.   Dacia: Yeah, we've been working on it for a while. Like right now we're having to try to make some decisions. Do we have enough spending authority for the remainder of our budget cycle, which is through June 30th? We're going to meet in a couple of weeks. And this is the first test. It's like, is this dashboard going to give us the data that we need to make that budget decision? So we're trying to apply the concepts now to say, where are we at with periods? That's the other test that we have is working with our sister agency, the general agency, on the 22 projects. Are we good? Can we move on to 23 periods? Those kinds of Things.   Carol: Yeah. I definitely want to take a look at that. When you get that done. I'm super interested. I'm sure other people would be as well. So I know your mind is always thinking, Do you have other things you're cooking up there that you're thinking about doing?   Dacia: Well, right now we're preparing and Oregon has a biennial budget, so we've been looking at a specific focus on outreach. We feel like the pandemic was a particular time where folks were kind of hunkered in, especially individuals who are blind, as oftentimes they had other secondary health conditions that made them nervous about acquiring COVID. And so we're wanting to do a pretty aggressive outreach effort and we're hoping to get the resources on that. The other thing that we're excited about is we're asking for some dedicated resources. That would be in house expertise with state funds. That would be like technology gurus to help with kind of the statewide enterprise technology projects to lean in on the accessibility and usability of any type of statewide projects. So in the event that a job seeker or candidate who is blind was thinking about working in some case management system or whatever, that we would at least be able to influence the accessibility usability of some of those statewide systems. So we're pretty excited about that as well.   Carol: Oh, that is very cool. I'm going to give you a tip on that outreach campaign. Check out David D'Angelo. He's from Mass Commission for the Blind. He did this big PSA initiative about a year or so ago with some real admin dollars. And it was very clever, very well done. And I know it's impacted his numbers, so I always like pitching that to everybody. Check out Mass Commission for the Blind as well, because there's not a lot of people. Everybody's talking about this right now, but there's not a lot of examples of ways that people have done that that are out there. So it is always nice to kind of go, Oh, what's somebody else done?   Dacia: That's great. Yeah, we'll definitely check them out.   Carol: So do you have any advice for our listeners as they contemplate looking inward at their own organizational structure, any kind of words of wisdom for them as folks are struggling with this right now?   Dacia: Well, I was inspired by our colleague from California, Joe Xavier, during the course of our leadership forum when he was like, be bold. Right? So I think that would be my first thing. I'm going to just quote Joe and say, be bold. I think that this is a time to just lean in and just think big and just try to apply the same skills that we learned. Many of us grew up through the ranks of counselors and just think about your organization the way you would think about a client, like what are the strengths, what are the resources and what are those opportunities to improve? The other thing I would say to folks is even if you have constraints around FTE and you can't build out a grant account and look for an intergovernmental agreement and grab some resources from another agency that might be able to loan you the expertise. The same with auditing. Before it had a position, we contract it out for auditing work. What I realized from that is the ownership piece is different, right? And you're just not controlling and directing a consultant the way you do a staff. So it just didn't have exactly what I wanted, but it was better than nothing. So know what you can do within your constraints of your systems that you have to work with and then just go for it.   Carol: That's well said. And you've given a little commercial for next month because next month I'm talking to Brent McNeal from Florida General and they've had this contract. They lost FTEs and they weren't able to get them, but they had the dollars, so they were allowed to contract for positions. So we're going to talk to him about how he did that so that that is timely, too. Well said to lead into that. Well, I appreciate your time today, Dacia. I think it's super cool. I'm really excited about what's going on at Oregon and please do share that dashboard when you get that done.   Dacia: Absolutely.   Carol: Thanks for being on the show and best of luck to you and happy holidays. Coming up, Happy Thanksgiving and all that good stuff.   Dacia: Yes. Well, thanks for the opportunity, Carol. It's always fun to visit with you.   {Music} Speaker1: Conversations powered by VR, one manager at a time, one minute at a time, brought to you by the VR TAC for Quality Management. Catch all of our podcast episodes by subscribing on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Thanks for listening!

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
448: AIEDC with Leonard S. Johnson

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 53:34


Leonard S. Johnson is the Founder and CEO of AIEDC, a 5G Cloud Mobile App Maker and Service Provider with Machine Learning to help small and midsize businesses create their own iOS and Android mobile apps with no-code or low-code so they can engage and service their customer base, as well as provide front and back office digitization services for small businesses. Victoria talks to Leonard about using artificial intelligence for good, bringing the power of AI to local economics, and truly democratizing AI. The Artificial Intelligence Economic Development Corporation (AIEDC) (https://netcapital.com/companies/aiedc) Follow AIEDC on Twitter (https://twitter.com/netcapital), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/netcapital/), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/Netcapital/), or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/aiedc/). Follow Leonard on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LeonardSJ) and LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/leonardsjohnson84047/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: VICTORIA: This is The Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Victoria Guido. And with us today is Leonard S. Johnson or LS, Founder and CEO AIEDC, a 5G Cloud Mobile App Maker and Service Provider with Machine Learning to help small and midsize businesses create their own iOS and Android mobile apps with no-code or low-code so they can engage and service their customer base, as well as provide front and back office digitization services for small businesses. Leonard, thanks for being with us today. LEONARD: Thank you for having me, Victoria. VICTORIA: I should say LS, thank you for being with us today. LEONARD: It's okay. It's fine. VICTORIA: Great. So tell us a little more about AIEDC. LEONARD: Well, AIEDC stands for Artificial Intelligence Economic Development Corporation. And the original premise that I founded it for...I founded it after completing my postgraduate work at Stanford, and that was 2016. And it was to use AI for economic development, and therefore use AI for good versus just hearing about artificial intelligence and some of the different movies that either take over the world, and Skynet, and watch data privacy, and these other things which are true, and it's very evident, they exist, and they're out there. But at the end of the day, I've always looked at life as a growth strategy and the improvement of what we could do and focusing on what we could do practically. You do it tactically, then you do it strategically over time, and you're able to implement things. That's why I think we keep building collectively as humanity, no matter what part of the world you're in. VICTORIA: Right. So you went to Stanford, and you're from South Central LA. And what about that background led you to pursue AI for good in particular? LEONARD: So growing up in the inner city of Los Angeles, you know, that South Central area, Compton area, it taught me a lot. And then after that, after I completed high school...and not in South Central because I moved around a lot. I grew up with a single mother, never knew my real father, and then my home life with my single mother wasn't good because of just circumstances all the time. And so I just started understanding that even as a young kid, you put your brain...you utilize something because you had two choices. It's very simple or binary, you know, A or B. A, you do something with yourself, or B, you go out and be social in a certain neighborhood. And I'm African American, so high probability that you'll end up dead, or in a gang, or in crime because that's what it was at that time. It's just that's just a situation. Or you're able to challenge those energies and put them toward a use that's productive and positive for yourself, and that's what I did, which is utilizing a way to learn. I could always pick up things when I was very young. And a lot of teachers, my younger teachers, were like, "You're very, very bright," or "You're very smart." And there weren't many programs because I'm older than 42. So there weren't as many programs as there are today. So I really like all of the programs. So I want to clarify the context. Today there's a lot more engagement and identification of kids that might be sharper, smarter, whatever their personal issues are, good or bad. And it's a way to sort of separate them. So you're not just teaching the whole group as a whole and putting them all in one basket, but back then, there was not. And so I just used to go home a lot, do a lot of reading, do a lot of studying, and just knick-knack with things in tech. And then I just started understanding that even as a young kid in the inner city, you see economics very early, but they don't understand that's really what they're studying. They see economics. They can see inflation because making two ends meet is very difficult. They may see gang violence and drugs or whatever it might end up being. And a lot of that, in my opinion, is always an underlining economic foundation. And so people would say, "Oh, why is this industry like this?" And so forth. "Why does this keep happening?" It's because they can't function. And sometimes, it's just them and their family, but they can't function because it's an economic system. So I started focusing on that and then went into the Marine Corps. And then, after the Marine Corps, I went to Europe. I lived in Europe for a while to do my undergrad studies in the Netherlands in Holland. VICTORIA: So having that experience of taking a challenge or taking these forces around you and turning into a force for good, that's led you to bring the power of AI to local economics. And is that the direction that you went eventually? LEONARD: So economics was always something that I understood and had a fascination prior to even starting my company. I started in 2017. And we're crowdfunding now, and I can get into that later. But I self-funded it since 2017 to...I think I only started crowdfunding when COVID hit, which was 2020, and just to get awareness and people out there because I couldn't go to a lot of events. So I'm like, okay, how can I get exposure? But yeah, it was a matter of looking at it from that standpoint of economics always factored into me, even when I was in the military when I was in the Marine Corps. I would see that...we would go to different countries, and you could just see the difference of how they lived and survived. And another side note, my son's mother is from Ethiopia, Africa. And I have a good relationship with my son and his mother, even though we've been apart for over 15 years, divorced for over 15 years or so or longer. But trying to keep that, you can just see this dichotomy. You go out to these different countries, and even in the military, it's just so extreme from the U.S. and any part of the U.S, but that then always focused on economics. And then technology, I just always kept up with, like, back in the '80s when the mobile brick phone came out, I had to figure out how to get one. [laughs] And then I took it apart and then put it back together just to see how it works, so yeah. But it was a huge one, by the way. I mean, it was like someone got another and broke it, and they thought it was broken. And they're like, "This doesn't work. You could take this piece of junk." I'm like, "Okay." [laughs] VICTORIA: Like, oh, great. I sure will, yeah. Now, I love technology. And I think a lot of people perceive artificial intelligence as being this super futuristic, potentially harmful, maybe economic negative impact. So what, from your perspective, can AI do for local economics or for people who may not have access to that advanced technology? LEONARD: Well, that's the key, and that's what we're looking to do with AIEDC. When you look at the small and midsize businesses, it's not what people think, or their perception is. A lot of those in the U.S. it's the backbone of the United States, our economy, literally. And in other parts of the world, it's the same where it could be a one or two mom-and-pop shops. That's where that name comes from; it's literally two people. And they're trying to start something to build their own life over time because they're using their labor to maybe build wealth or somehow a little bit not. And when I mean wealth, it's always relative. It's enough to sustain themselves or just put food on the table and be able to control their own destiny to the best of their ability. And so what we're looking to do is make a mobile app maker that's 5G that lives in the cloud, that's 5G compliant, that will allow small and midsize businesses to create their own iOS or Android mobile app with no-code or low-code, basically like creating an email. That's how simple we want it to be. When you create your own email, whether you use Microsoft, Google, or whatever you do, and you make it that simple. And there's a simple version, and there could be complexity added to it if they want. That would be the back office digitization or customization, but that then gets them on board with digitization. It's intriguing that McKinsey just came out with a report stating that in 2023, in order to be economically viable, and this was very recent, that all companies would need to have a digitization strategy. And so when you look at small businesses, and you look at things like COVID-19, or the COVID current ongoing issue and that disruption, this is global. And you look at even the Ukrainian War or the Russian-Ukrainian War, however you term it, invasion, war, special operation, these are disruptions. And then, on top of that, we look at climate change which has been accelerating in the last two years more so than it was prior to this that we've experienced. So this is something that everyone can see is self-evident. I'm not even focused on the cause of the problem. My brain and the way I think, and my team, we like to focus on solutions. My chairman is a former program director of NASA who managed 1,200 engineers that built the International Space Station; what was it? 20-30 years ago, however, that is. And he helped lead and build that from Johnson Center. And so you're focused on solutions because if you're building the International Space Station, you can only focus on solutions and anticipate the problems but not dwell on them. And so that kind of mindset is what I am, and it's looking to help small businesses do that to get them on board with digitization and then in customization. And then beyond that, use our system, which is called M.I.N.D. So we own these...we own patents, three patents, trademarks, and service marks related to artificial intelligence that are in the field of economics. And we will utilize DEVS...we plan to do that which is a suite of system specifications to predict regional economic issues like the weather in a proactive way, not reactive. A lot of economic situations are reactive. It's reactive to the Federal Reserve raising interest rates or lowering rates, Wall Street, you know, moving money or not moving money. It is what it is. I mean, I don't judge it. I think it's like financial engineering, and that's fine. It's profitability. But then, at the end of the day, if you're building something, it's like when we're going to go to space. When rockets launch, they have to do what they're intended to do. Like, I know that Blue Origin just blew up recently. Or if they don't, they have a default, and at least I heard that the Blue Origin satellite, if it were carrying passengers, the passengers would have been safe because it disembarked when it detected its own problem. So when you anticipate these kinds of problems and you apply them to the local small business person, you can help them forecast and predict better like what weather prediction has done. And we're always improving that collectively for weather prediction, especially with climate change, so that it can get to near real-time as soon as possible or close a window versus two weeks out versus two days out as an example. VICTORIA: Right. Those examples of what you call a narrow economic prediction. LEONARD: Correct. It is intriguing when you say narrow economic because it wouldn't be narrow AI. But it would actually get into AGI if you added more variables, which we would. The more variables you added in tenancies...so if you're looking at events, the system events discretion so discrete event system specification you would specify what they really, really need to do to have those variables. But at some point, you're working on a system, what I would call AGI. But AGI, in my mind, the circles I run in at least or at least most of the scientists I talk to it's not artificial superintelligence. And so the general public thinks AGI...and I've said this to Stephen Ibaraki, who's the founder of AI for Good at Global Summit at the United Nations, and one of his interviews as well. It's just Artificial General Intelligence, I think, has been put out a lot by Hollywood and entertainment and so forth, and some scientists say certain things. We won't be at artificial superintelligence. We might get to Artificial General Intelligence by 2030 easily, in my opinion. But that will be narrow AI, but it will cover what we look at it in the field as cross-domain, teaching a system to look at different variables because right now, it's really narrow. Like natural language processing, it's just going to look at language and infer from there, and then you've got backward propagation that's credit assignment and fraud and detection. Those are narrow data points. But when you start looking at something cross-domain...who am I thinking of? Pedro Domingos who wrote the Master Algorithm, which actually, Xi Jinping has a copy of, the President of China, on his bookshelf in his office because they've talked about that, and these great minds because Stephen Ibaraki has interviewed these...and the founder of Google Brain and all of these guys. And so there's always this debate in the scientific community of what is narrow AI what it's not. But at the end of the day, I just like Pedro's definition of it because he says the master algorithm will be combining all five, so you're really crossing domains, which AI hasn't done that. And to me, that will be AGI, but that's not artificial superintelligence. And artificial superintelligence is when it becomes very, you know, like some of the movies could say, if we as humanity just let it run wild, it could be crazy. VICTORIA: One of my questions is the future of AI more like iRobot or Bicentennial Man? LEONARD: Well, you know, interesting. That's a great question, Victoria. I see most of AI literally as iRobot, as a tool more than anything, except at the end when it implied...so it kind of did two things in that movie, but a wonderful movie to bring up. And I like Will Smith perfectly. Well, I liked him a lot more before -- VICTORIA: I think iRobot is really the better movie. LEONARD: Yeah, so if people haven't seen iRobot, I liked Will Smith, the actor. But iRobot showed you two things, and it showed you, one, it showed hope. Literally, the robot...because a lot of people put AI and robots. And AI by itself is the brain or the mind; I should say hardware are the robots or the brain. Software...AI in and of itself is software. It's the mind itself. That's why we have M.I.N.D Machine Intelligence NeuralNetwork Database. We literally have that. That's our acronym and our slogan and everything. And it's part of our patents. But its machine intelligence is M.I.N.D, and we own that, you know; the company owns it. And so M.I.N.D...we always say AI powered by M.I.N.D. We're talking about that software side of, like, what your mind does; it iterates and thinks, the ability to think itself. Now it's enclosed within a structure called, you know, for the human, it's called a brain, the physical part of it, and that brain is enclosed within the body. So when you look at robots...and my chairman was the key person for robotics for the International Space Station. So when you look at robotics, you are putting that software into hardware, just like your cell phone. You have the physical, and then you have the actual iOS, which is the operating system. So when you think about that, yeah, iRobot was good because it showed how these can be tools, and they were very, in the beginning of the movie, very helpful, very beneficial to humanity. But then it went to a darker side and showed where V.I.K.I, which was an acronym as well, I think was Virtual Interactive Kinetic technology of something. Yeah, I believe it was Virtual Interactive Kinetic inference or technology or something like that, V.I.K.I; I forgot the last I. But that's what it stood for. It was an acronym to say...and then V.I.K.I just became all aware and started killing everyone with robots and just wanted to say, you know, this is futile. But then, at the very, very end, V.I.K.I learned from itself and says, "Okay, I guess this isn't right." Or the other robot who could think differently argued with V.I.K.I, and they destroyed her. And it made V.I.K.I a woman in the movie, and then the robot was the guy. But that shows that it can get out of hand. But it was intriguing to me that they had her contained within one building. This wouldn't be artificial superintelligence. And I think sometimes Hollywood says, "Just take over everything from one building," no. It wouldn't be on earth if it could. But that is something we always have to think about. We have to think about the worst-case scenarios. I think every prudent scientist or business person or anyone should do that, even investors, I mean, if you're investing something for the future. But you also don't focus on it. You don't think about the best-case scenario, either. But there's a lot of dwelling on the worst-case scenario versus the good that we can do given we're looking at where humanity is today. I mean, we're in 2022, and we're still fighting wars that we fought in 1914. VICTORIA: Right. Which brings me to my next question, which is both, what are the most exciting opportunities to innovate in the AI space currently? And conversely, what are the biggest challenges that are facing innovation in that field? LEONARD: Ooh, that's a good question. I think, in my opinion, it's almost the same answer; one is...but I'm in a special field. And I'm surprised there's not a lot of competition for our company. I mean, it's very good for me and the company's sense. It's like when Mark Zuckerberg did Facebook, there was Friendster, and there was Myspace, but they were different. They were different verticals. And I think Mark figured out how to do it horizontally, good or bad. I'm talking about the beginning of when he started Facebook, now called Meta. But I'm saying utilizing AI in economics because a lot of times AI is used in FinTech and consumerism, but not economic growth where we're really talking about growing something organically, or it's called endogenous growth. Because I studied Paul Romer's work, who won the Nobel Prize in 2018 for economic science. And he talked about the nature of ideas. And we were working on something like that in Stanford. And I put out a book in 2017 of January talking about cryptocurrencies, artificial intelligence but about the utilization of it, but not the speculation. I never talked about speculation. I don't own any crypto; I would not. It's only once it's utilized in its PureTech form will it create something that it was envisioned to do by the protocol that Satoshi Nakamoto sort of created. And it still fascinates me that people follow Bitcoin protocol, even for the tech and the non-tech, but they don't know who Satoshi is. But yeah, it's a white paper. You're just following a white paper because I think logically, the world is going towards that iteration of evolution. And that's how AI could be utilized for good in an area to focus on it with economics and solving current problems. And then going forward to build a new economy where it's not debt-based driven or consumer purchase only because that leaves a natural imbalance in the current world structure. The western countries are great. We do okay, and we go up and down. But the emerging and developing countries just get stuck, and they seem to go into a circular loop. And then there are wars as a result of these things and territory fights and so forth. So that's an area I think where it could be more advanced is AI in the economic realm, not so much the consumer FinTech room, which is fine. But consumer FinTech, in my mind, is you're using AI to process PayPal. That's where I think Elon just iterated later because PayPal is using it for finance. You're just moving things back and forth, and you're just authenticating everything. But then he starts going on to SpaceX next because he's like, well, let me use technology in a different way. And I do think he's using AI on all of his projects now. VICTORIA: Right. So how can that tech solve real problems today? Do you see anything even particular about Southern California, where we're both at right now, where you think AI could help predict some outcomes for small businesses or that community? LEONARD: I'm looking to do it regionally then globally. So I'm part of this Southern Cal Innovation Hub, which is just AI. It's an artificial intelligence coordination between literally San Diego County, Orange County, and Los Angeles County. And so there's a SoCal Innovation Hub that's kind of bringing it together. But there are all three groups, like; I think the CEO in Orange County is the CEO of Leadership Alliance. And then in San Diego, there's another group I can't remember their name off the top of my head, and I'm talking about the county itself. So each one's representing a county because, you know. And then there's one in Northern California that I'm also associated with where if you look at California as its own economy in the U.S., it's still pretty significant as an economic cycle in the United States, period. That's why so many politicians like California because they can sway the votes. So yeah, we're looking to do that once, you know, we are raising capital. We're crowdfunding currently. Our total raise is about 6 million. And so we're talking to venture capitalists, private, high net worth investors as well. Our federal funding is smaller. It's just like several hundred thousand because most people can only invest a few thousand. But I always like to try to give back. If you tell people...if you're Steve Jobs, like, okay, I've got this Apple company. In several years, you'll see the potential. And people are like, ah, whatever, but then they kick themselves 15 years later. [laughs] Like, oh, I wish I thought about that Apple stock for $15 when I could. But you give people a chance, and you get the word out, and you see what happens. Once you build a system, you share it. There are some open-source projects. But I think the open source, like OpenAI, as an example, Elon Musk funds that as well as Microsoft. They both put a billion dollars into it. It is an open-source project. OpenAI claims...but some of the research does go back to Microsoft to be able to see it. And DeepMind is another research for AI, but they're owned by Google. And so, I'm also very focused on democratizing artificial intelligence for the benefit of everyone. I really believe that needs to be democratized in a sense of tying it to economics and making it utilized for everyone that may need it for the benefit of humanity where it's profitable and makes money, but it's not just usurping. MID-ROLL AD: As life moves online, brick-and-mortar businesses are having to adapt to survive. With over 18 years of experience building reliable web products and services, thoughtbot is the technology partner you can trust. We provide the technical expertise to enable your business to adapt and thrive in a changing environment. We start by understanding what's important to your customers to help you transition to intuitive digital services your customers will trust. We take the time to understand what makes your business great and work fast yet thoroughly to build, test, and validate ideas, helping you discover new customers. Take your business online with design‑driven digital acceleration. Find out more at tbot.io/acceleration or click the link in the show notes for this episode. VICTORIA: With that democratizing it, is there also a need to increase the understanding of the ethics around it and when there are certain known use cases for AI where it actually is discriminatory and plays to systemic problems in our society? Are you familiar with that as well? LEONARD: Yes, absolutely. Well, that's my whole point. And, Victoria, you just hit the nail on the head. Truly democratizing AI in my mind and in my brain the way it works is it has opened up for everyone. Because if you really roll it back, okay, companies now we're learning...we used to call it several years ago UGC, User Generated Content. And now a lot of people are like, okay, if you're on Facebook, you're the product, right? Or if you're on Instagram, you're the product. And they're using you, and you're using your data to sell, et cetera, et cetera. But user-generated content it's always been that. It's just a matter of the sharing of the economic. That's why I keep going back to economics. So if people were, you know, you wouldn't have to necessarily do advertising if you had stakeholders with advertising, the users and the company, as an example. If it's a social media company, just throwing it out there, so let's say you have a social media...and this has been talked about, but I'm not the first to introduce this. This has been talked about for over ten years, at least over 15 years. And it's you share as a triangle in three ways. So you have the user and everything else. So take your current social media, and I won't pick on Facebook, but I'll just use them, Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. Twitter's having issues recently because Elon is trying to buy them or get out of buying them. But you just looked at that data, and then you share with the user base. What's the revenue model? And there needs to be one; let me be very clear. There has to be incentive, and there has to be profitability for people that joined you earlier, you know, joined the corporation, or become shareholders, or investors, or become users, or become customers. They have to be able to have some benefit, not extreme greater than everyone else but a great benefit from coming in earlier by what they contributed at the time. And that is what makes this system holistic in my opinion, like Reddit or any of these bloggers. But you make it where they use their time and the users, and you share it with the company and then the data and so forth, and whatever revenue economic model you have, and it's a sort of a three-way split. It's just not always equal. And that's something that I think in economics, we're still on a zero-sum game, I win, you lose sort of economic model globally. That's why there's a winner of a war and a loser of a war. But in reality, as you know, Victoria, there are no winners of any war. So it's funny, [laughs] I was just saying, well, you know, because of the economic mode, but Von Neumann, who talked about that, also talked about something called a non-zero-sum game when he talked about it in mathematics that you can win, and I can win; we just don't win equally because they never will match that. So if I win, I may win 60; you win 40. Or you may win 60, I win 40, and we agree to settle on that. It's an agreement versus I'm just going to be 99, and you'll be 1%, or I'm just going to be 100, and you're at 0. And I think that our economic model tends to be a lot of that, like, when you push forth and there needs to be more of that. When you talk about the core of economics...and I go way back, you know, prior to the Federal Reserve even being started. I just look at the world, and it's always sort of been this land territorial issue of what goods are under the country. But we've got technology where we can mitigate a lot of things and do the collective of help the earth, and then let's go off to space, all of space. That's where my brain is focused on. VICTORIA: Hmm. Oh yeah, that makes sense to me. I think that we're all going to have to evolve our economic models here in the future. I wonder, too, as you're building your startup and you're building your company, what are some of the technology trade-offs you're having to make in the stack of the AI software that you're building? LEONARD: Hmm. Good question. But clarify, this may be a lot deeper dive because that's a general question. And I don't want to...yeah, go ahead. VICTORIA: Because when you're building AI, and you're going to be processing a lot of data, I know many data scientists that are familiar with tools like Jupyter Notebooks, and R, and Python. And one issue that I'm aware of is keeping the environments the same, so everything that goes into building your app and having those infrastructure as code for your data science applications, being able to afford to process all that data. [laughs] And there are just so many factors that go into building an AI app versus building something that's more easy, like a web-based user form. So just curious if you've encountered those types of trade-offs or questions about, okay, how are we going to actually build an app that we can put out on everybody's phone and that works responsibly? LEONARD: Oh, okay. So let me be very clear, but I won't give too much of the secret sauce away. But I can define this technically because this is a technical audience. This is not...so what you're really talking about is two things, and I'm clear about this, though. So the app maker won't really read and write a lot of data. It'll just be the app where people could just get on board digitalization simple, you know, process payments, maybe connect with someone like American Express square, MasterCard, whatever. And so that's just letting them function. That's sort of small FinTech in my mind, you know, just transaction A to B, B to A, et cetera. And it doesn't need to be peer-to-peer and all of the crypto. It doesn't even need to go that level yet. That's just level one. Then they will sign up for a service, which is because we're really focused on artificial intelligence as a service. And that, to me, is the next iteration for AI. I've been talking about this for about three or four years now, literally, in different conferences and so forth for people who haven't hit it. But that we will get to that point where AI will become AI as a service, just like SaaS is. We're still at the, you know, most of the world on the legacy systems are still software as a service. We're about to hit AI as a service because the world is evolving. And this is true; they did shut it down. But you did have okay, so there are two case points which I can bring up. So JP Morgan did create something called a Coin, and it was using AI. And it was a coin like crypto, coin like a token, but they called it a coin. But it could process, I think, something like...I may be off on this, so to the sticklers that will be listening, please, I'm telling you I may be off on the exact quote, but I think it was about...it was something crazy to me, like 200,000 of legal hours and seconds that it could process because it was basically taking the corporate legal structure of JP Morgan, one of the biggest banks. I think they are the biggest bank in the U.S. JPMorgan Chase. And they were explaining in 2017 how we created this, and it's going to alleviate this many hours of legal work for the bank. And I think politically; something happened because they just pulled away. I still have the original press release when they put it out, and it was in the media. And then it went away. I mean, no implementation [laughs] because I think there was going to be a big loss of jobs for it. And they basically would have been white-collar legal jobs, most specifically lawyers literally that were working for the bank. And when they were talking towards investment, it was a committee. I was at a conference. And I was like, I was fascinated by that. And they were basically using Bitcoin protocol as the tokenization protocol, but they were using AI to process it. And it was basically looking at...because legal contracts are basically...you can teach it with natural language processing and be able to encode and almost output it itself and then be able to speak with each other. Another case point was Facebook. They had...what was it? Two AI systems. They began to create their own language. I don't know if you remember that story or heard about it, and Facebook shut it down. And this was more like two years ago, I think, when they were saying Facebook was talking, you know, when they were Facebook, not Meta, so maybe it was three years ago. And they were talking, and they were like, "Oh, Facebook has a language. It's talking to each other." And it created its own little site language because it was two AI bots going back and forth. And then the engineers at Facebook said, "We got to shut this down because this is kind of getting out of the box." So when you talk about AI as a service, yes, the good and the bad, and what you take away is AWS, Oracle, Google Cloud they do have services where it doesn't need to cost you as much anymore as it used to in the beginning if you know what you're doing ahead of time. And you're not just running iterations or data processing because you're doing guesswork versus, in my opinion, versus actually knowing exactly specifically what you're looking for and the data set you're looking to get out of it. And then you're talking about just basically putting in containers and clustering it because it gets different operations. And so what you're really looking at is something called an N-scale graph data that can process data in maybe sub seconds at that level, excuse me. And one of my advisors is the head of that anyway at AGI laboratory. So he's got an N graph database that can process...when we implement it, we'll be able to process data at the petabyte level at sub-seconds, and it can run on platforms like Azure or AWS, and so forth. VICTORIA: Oh, that's interesting. So it sounds like cloud providers are making compute services more affordable. You've got data, the N-scale graph data, that can run more transactions more quickly. And I'm curious if you see any future trends since I know you're a futurist around quantum computing and how that could affect capacity for -- LEONARD: Oh [laughs] We haven't even gotten there yet. Yes. Well, if you look at N-scale, if you know what you're doing and you know what to look for, then the quantum just starts going across different domains as well but at a higher hit rate. So there's been some quantum computers online. There's been several...well, Google has their quantum computer coming online, and they've been working on it, and Google has enough data, of course, to process. So yeah, they've got that data, lots of data. And quantum needs, you know, if it's going to do something, it needs lots of data. But then the inference will still be, I think, quantum is very good at processing large, large, large amounts of data. We can just keep going if you really have a good quantum computer. But it's really narrow. You have to tell it exactly what it wants, and it will do it in what we call...which is great like in P or NP square or P over NP which is you want to do it in polynomial time, not non-polynomial, polynomial time which is...now speaking too fast. Okay, my brain is going faster than my lips. Let me slow it down. So when you start thinking about processing, if we as humans, let's say if I was going to process A to Z, and I'm like, okay, here is this equation, if I tell you it takes 1000 years, it's of no use to us, to me and you Victoria because we're living now. Now, the earth may benefit in 1000 years, but it's still of no use. But if I could take this large amount of data and have it process within minutes, you know, worst case hours...but then I'll even go down to seconds or sub-seconds, then that's really a benefit to humanity now, today in present term. And so, as a futurist, yes, as the world, we will continue to add data. We're doing it every day, and we already knew this was coming ten years ago, 15 years ago, 20 years ago, even actually in the '50s when we were in the AI winter. We're now in AI summer. In my words, I call it the AI summer. So as you're doing this, that data is going to continue to increase, and quantum will be needed for that. But then the specific need...quantum is very good at looking at a specific issue, specifically for that very narrow. Like if you were going to do the trajectory to Jupiter or if we wanted to send a probe to Jupiter or something, I think we're sending something out there now from NASA, and so forth, then you need to process all the variables, but it's got one trajectory. It's going one place only. VICTORIA: Gotcha. Well, that's so interesting. I'm glad I asked you that question. And speaking of rockets going off to space, have you ever seen a SpaceX launch from LA? LEONARD: Actually, I saw one land but not a launch. I need to go over there. It's not too far from me. But you got to give credit where credit's due and Elon has a reusable rocket. See, that's where technology is solving real-world problems. Because NASA and I have, you know, my chairman, his name is Alexander Nawrocki, you know, he's Ph.D., but I call him Rocki. He goes by Rocki like I go by LS. But it's just we talk about this like NASA's budget. [laughs] How can you reduce this? And Elon says they will come up with a reusable rocket that won't cost this much and be able to...and that's the key. That was the kind of Holy Grail where you can reuse the same rocket itself and then add some little variables on top of it. But the core, you wouldn't constantly be paying for it. And so I think where the world is going...and let me be clear, Elon pushes a lot out there. He's just very good at it. But I'm also that kind of guy that I know that Tesla itself was started by two Stanford engineers. Elon came on later, like six months, and then he invested, and he became CEO, which was a great investment for Elon Musk. And then CEO I just think it just fit his personality because it was something he loved. But I also have studied for years Nikola Tesla, and I understand what his contributions created where we are today with all the patents that he had. And so he's basically the father of WiFi and why we're able to communicate in a lot of this. We've perfected it or improved it, but it was created by him in the 1800s. VICTORIA: Right. And I don't think he came from as fortunate a background as Elon Musk, either. Sometimes I wonder what I could have done born in similar circumstances. [laughter] And you certainly have made quite a name for yourself. LEONARD: Well, I'm just saying, yeah, he came from very...he did come from a poor area of Russia which is called the Russian territory, to be very honest, Eastern Europe, definitely Eastern Europe. But yeah, I don't know once you start thinking about that [laughs]. You're making me laugh, Victoria. You're making me laugh. VICTORIA: No, I actually went camping, a backpacking trip to the Catalina Island, and there happened to be a SpaceX launch that night, and we thought it was aliens because it looked wild. I didn't realize what it was. But then we figured it was a launch, so it was really great. I love being here and being close to some of this technology and the advancements that are going on. I'm curious if you have some thoughts about...I hear a lot about or you used to hear about Silicon Valley Tech like very Northern California, San Francisco focus. But what is the difference in SoCal? What do you find in those two communities that makes SoCal special? [laughs] LEONARD: Well, I think it's actually...so democratizing AI. I've been in a moment like that because, in 2015, I was in Dubai, and they were talking about creating silicon oasis. And so there's always been this model of, you know, because they were always, you know, the whole Palo Alto thing is people would say it and it is true. I mean, I experienced it. Because I was in a two-year program, post-graduate program executive, but we would go up there...I wasn't living up there. I had to go there maybe once every month for like three weeks, every other month or something. But when you're up there, it is the air in the water. It's just like, people just breathe certain things. Because around the world, and I would travel to Japan, and China, and other different parts of Asia, Vietnam, et cetera and in Africa of course, and let's say you see this and people are like, so what is it about Silicon Valley? And of course, the show, there is the Hollywood show about it, which is pretty a lot accurate, which is interesting, the HBO show. But you would see that, and you would think, how are they able to just replicate this? And a lot of it is a convergence. By default, they hear about these companies' access because the key is access, and that's what we're...like this podcast. I love the concept around it because giving awareness, knowledge, and access allows other people to spread it and democratize it. So it's just not one physical location, or you have to be in that particular area only to benefit. I mean, you could benefit in that area, or you could benefit from any part of the world. But since they started, people would go there; engineers would go there. They built company PCs, et cetera. Now that's starting to spread in other areas like Southern Cal are creating their own innovation hubs to be able to bring all three together. And those three are the engineers and founders, and idea makers and startups. And you then need the expertise. I'm older than 42; I'm not 22. [laughs] So I'm just keeping it 100, keeping it real. So I'm not coming out at 19. I mean, my son's 18. And I'm not coming out, okay, this my new startup, bam, give me a billion dollars, I'm good. And let me just write off the next half. But when you look at that, there's that experience because even if you look at Mark Zuckerberg, I always tell people that give credit where credit is due. He brought a senior team with him when he was younger, and he didn't have the experience. And his only job has been Facebook out of college. He's had no other job. And now he's been CEO of a multi-billion dollar corporation; that's a fact. Sometimes it hurts people's feelings. Like, you know what? He's had no other job. Now that can be good and bad, [laughs] but he's had no other jobs. And so that's just a credit, like, if you can surround yourself with the right people and be focused on something, it can work to the good or the bad for your own personal success but then having that open architecture. And I think he's been trying to learn and others versus like an Elon Musk, who embraces everything. He's just very open in that sense. But then you have to come from these different backgrounds. But let's say Elon Musk, Mark Zuckerberg, let's take a guy like myself or whatever who didn't grow up with all of that who had to make these two ends meet, figure out how to do the next day, not just get to the next year, but get to the next day, get to the next week, get to the next month, then get to the next year. It just gives a different perspective as well. Humanity's always dealing with that. Because we had a lot of great engineers back in the early 1900s. They're good or bad, you know, you did have Nikola Tesla. You had Edison. I'm talking about circa around 1907 or 1909, prior to World War I. America had a lot of industries. They were the innovators then, even though there were innovations happening in Europe, and Africa, and China, as well and Asia. But the innovation hub kind of created as the America, quote, unquote, "industrial revolution." And I think we're about to begin a new revolution sort of tech and an industrial revolution that's going to take us to maybe from 20...we're 2022 now, but I'll say it takes us from 2020 to 2040 in my head. VICTORIA: So now that communities can really communicate across time zones and locations, maybe the hubs are more about solving specific problems. There are regional issues. That makes a lot more sense. LEONARD: Yes. And collaborating together, working together, because scientists, you know, COVID taught us that. People thought you had to be in a certain place, but then a lot of collaboration came out of COVID; even though it was bad globally, even though we're still bad, if people were at home, they start collaborating, and scientists will talk to scientists, you know, businesses, entrepreneurs, and so forth. But if Orange County is bringing together the mentors, the venture capital, or at least Southern California innovation and any other place, I want to say that's not just Silicon Valley because Silicon Valley already has it; we know that. And that's that region. It's San Jose all the way up to...I forgot how far north it's past San Francisco, actually. But it's that region of area where they encompass the real valley of Silicon Valley if you're really there. And you talk about these regions. Yes, I think we're going to get to a more regional growth area, and then it'll go more micro to actually cities later in the future. But regional growth, I think it's going to be extremely important globally in the very near term. I'm literally saying from tomorrow to the next, maybe ten years, regional will really matter. And then whatever you have can scale globally anyway, like this podcast we're doing. This can be distributed to anyone in the world, and they can listen at ease when they have time. VICTORIA: Yeah, I love it. It's both exciting and also intimidating. [laughs] And you mentioned your son a little bit earlier. And I'm curious, as a founder and someone who spent a good amount of time in graduate and Ph.D. programs, if you feel like it's easy to connect with your son and maintain that balance and focusing on your family while you're building a company and investing in yourself very heavily. LEONARD: Well, I'm older, [laughs] so it's okay. I mean, I've mentored him, you know. And me and his mom have a relationship that works. I would say we have a better relationship now than when we were together. It is what it is. But we have a communication level. And I think she was just a great person because I never knew my real father, ever. I supposedly met him when I was two or one; I don't know. But I have no memories, no photos, nothing. And that was just the environment I grew up in. But with my son, he knows the truth of everything about that. He's actually in college. I don't like to name the school because it's on the East Coast, and it's some Ivy League school; that's what I will say. And he didn't want to stay on the West Coast because I'm in Orange County and his mom's in Orange County. He's like, "I want to get away from both of you people." [laughter] And that's a joke, but he's very independent. He's doing well. When he graduated high school, he graduated with 4.8 honors. He made the valedictorian. He was at a STEM school. VICTORIA: Wow. LEONARD: And he has a high GPA. He's studying computer science and economics as well at an Ivy League, and he's already made two or three apps at college. And I said, "You're not Mark, so calm down." [laughter] But anyway, that was a recent conversation. I won't go there. But then some people say, "LS, you should be so happy." What is it? The apple doesn't fall far from the tree. But this was something he chose around 10 or 11. I'm like, whatever you want to do, you do; I'll support you no matter what. And his mom says, "Oh no, I think you programmed him to be like you." [laughs] I'm like, no, I can't do that. I just told him the truth about life. And he's pretty tall. VICTORIA: You must have -- LEONARD: He played basketball in high school a lot. I'm sorry? VICTORIA: I was going to say you must have inspired him. LEONARD: Yeah. Well, he's tall. He did emulate me in a lot of ways. I don't know why. I told him just be yourself. But yes, he does tell me I'm an inspiration to that; I think because of all the struggles I've gone through when I was younger. And you're always going through struggles. I mean, it's just who you are. I tell people, you know, you're building a company. You have success. You can see the future, but sometimes people can't see it, [laughs] which I shouldn't really say, but I'm saying anyway because I do that. I said this the other night to some friends. I said, "Oh, Jeff Bezo's rocket blew up," going, you know, Blue Origin rocket or something. And then I said Elon will tell Jeff, "Well, you only have one rocket blow up. I had three, [laughter] SpaceX had three." So these are billionaires talking to billionaires about, you know, most people don't even care. You're worth X hundred billion dollars. I mean, they're worth 100 billion-plus, right? VICTORIA: Right. LEONARD: I think Elon is around 260 billion, and Jeff is 160 or something. Who cares about your rocket blowing up? But it's funny because the issues are still always going to be there. I've learned that. I'm still learning. It doesn't matter how much wealth you have. You just want to create wealth for other people and better their lives. The more you search on bettering lives, you're just going to have to wake up every day, be humble with it, and treat it as a new day and go forward and solve the next crisis or problem because there will be one. There is not where there are no problems, is what I'm trying to say, this panacea or a utopia where you personally, like, oh yeah, I have all this wealth and health, and I'm just great. Because Elon has had divorce issues, so did Jeff Bezos. So I told my son a lot about this, like, you never get to this world where it's perfect in your head. You're always going to be doing things. VICTORIA: That sounds like an accurate future prediction if I ever heard one. [laughs] Like, there will be problems. No matter where you end up or what you choose to do, you'll still have problems. They'll just be different. [laughs] LEONARD: Yeah, and then this is for women and men. It means you don't give up. You just keep hope alive, and you keep going. And I believe personally in God, and I'm a scientist who actually does. But I look at it more in a Godly aspect. But yeah, I just think you just keep going, and you keep building because that's what we do as humanity. It's what we've done. It's why we're here. And we're standing on the shoulders of giants, and I just always considered that from physicists and everyone. VICTORIA: Great. And if people are interested in building something with you, you have that opportunity right now to invest via the crowdfunding app, correct? LEONARD: Yes, yes, yes. They can do that because the company is still the same company because eventually, we're going to branch out. My complete vision for AIEDC is using artificial intelligence for economic development, and that will spread horizontally, not just vertically. Vertically right now, just focus on just a mobile app maker digitization and get...because there are so many businesses even globally, and I'm not talking only e-commerce. So when I say small to midsize business, it can be a service business, car insurance, health insurance, anything. It doesn't have to be selling a particular widget or project, you know, product. And I'm not saying there's nothing wrong with that, you know, interest rates and consumerism. But I'm not thinking about Shopify, and that's fine, but I'm talking about small businesses. And there's the back office which is there are a lot of tools for back offices for small businesses. But I'm talking about they create their own mobile app more as a way to communicate with their customers, update them with their customers, and that's key, especially if there are disruptions. So let's say that there have been fires in California. In Mississippi or something, they're out of water. In Texas, last year, they had a winter storm, electricity went out. So all of these things are disruptions. This is just in the U.S., And of course, I won't even talk about Pakistan, what's going on there and the flooding and just all these devastating things, or even in China where there's drought where there are these disruptions, and that's not counting COVID disrupts, the cycle of business. It literally does. And it doesn't bubble up until later when maybe the central banks and governments pay attention to it, just like in Japan when that nuclear, unfortunately, that nuclear meltdown happened because of the earthquake; I think it was 2011. And that affected that economy for five years, which is why the government has lower interest rates, negative interest rates, because they have to try to get it back up. But if there are tools and everyone's using more mobile apps and wearables...and we're going to go to the metaverse and all of that. So the internet of things can help communicate that. So when these types of disruptions happen, the flow of business can continue, at least at a smaller level, for an affordable cost for the business. I'm not talking about absorbing costs because that's meaningless to me. VICTORIA: Yeah, well, that sounds like a really exciting project. And I'm so grateful to have this time to chat with you today. Is there anything else you want to leave for our listeners? LEONARD: If they want to get involved, maybe they can go to our crowdfunding page, or if they've got questions, ask about it and spread the word. Because I think sometimes, you know, they talk about the success of all these companies, but a lot of it starts with the founder...but not a founder. If you're talking about a startup, it starts with the founder. But it also stops with the innovators that are around that founder, male or female, whoever they are. And it also starts with their community, building a collective community together. And that's why Silicon Valley is always looked at around the world as this sort of test case of this is how you create something from nothing and make it worth great value in the future. And I think that's starting to really spread around the world, and more people are opening up to this. It's like the crowdfunding concept. I think it's a great idea, like more podcasts. I think this is a wonderful idea, podcasts in and of themselves, so people can learn from people versus where in the past you would only see an interview on the business news network, or NBC, or Fortune, or something like that, and that's all you would understand. But this is a way where organically things can grow. I think the growth will continue, and I think the future's bright. We just have to know that it takes work to get there. VICTORIA: That's great. Thank you so much for saying that and for sharing your time with us today. I learned a lot myself, and I think our listeners will enjoy it as well. You can subscribe to the show and find notes along with a complete transcript for this episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobot.fm. You can find me on Twitter @victori_ousg. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks for listening. See you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Leonard S. Johnson.

Your Passion, Purpose and Personal Brand
Navigating the Choice of a Career Direction with Nate Clayberg

Your Passion, Purpose and Personal Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 41:27


Nate Clayberg is a college and career navigator with a passion for helping us be confident about finding a career path that motivates us with purpose.  While he is interested in working with students, we can all benefit from his insights. Imagine if you were in high school and had the chance to have an expert help you navigate questions such as "What lights you up?", "What about this career excites you?" and "How do you want to change the world?" There would be less anxiety and more clarity about moving to the next step. In this episode, you'll learn: How a visit to space camp redirected Nate's career choice The pressures students experience to make a decision based on their GPA, parent expectations, and today's culture The power of the word "Why" in a career conversation. The overwhelming feeling students express about a high-stakes decision that may not align with who they are The manageable tension of working with the client (parent) and the customer (student) to come to a mutual decision on future career/school choice How a college degree may no longer be required for a career but still may offer a valuable experience Connect with Nate Website  LinkedIn Instagram That's a Job? podcast  Connect with Lisa Get her free download: The Essential Guide to Telling Your Story Email: lisa@lisamcguire Website LinkedIn Instagram Facebook

Morning Devotion with Dr. Yong
Morning Devotion: Episode 744

Morning Devotion with Dr. Yong

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 42:17


Topics [True Mother's Anthology Book 1] - "The Twenty first Centry and the Mission of Women" "What responsibilities should women fulfill in the women's era that has arrived with heavenly fortune?" [Living Divine Principle] - "The fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil(1)" "Adam and Eve did not have a yearning feeling for what would come after keeping the commandment" "The way for Adam and Eve to overcome the archangel's temptation" [Today's Youth Ministry] - "When Does Our Center Collapse" "When Do We Receive God's Grace and Mercy?" "We Must Live a Life of Being Considered Righteous Wherever We Go" "True Father Lived a Life of Being Considered Right Wherever He Went" [Living Testimony] - John Davis from GPA

The Recruit-Me Athletic Scholarship Podcast with Brent Hanks
Episode 327 An Inside Look at the NCAA, NAIA & NJCAA Websites; Resources with Academic Requirements

The Recruit-Me Athletic Scholarship Podcast with Brent Hanks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 21:41


This episode of The Athletic Scholarship Podcast is the 2nd in a series of inside looks into 3 free websites provided by the NCAA, NAIA and JUCO levels of college athletic play.  Last week's episode covered the Eligibility Centers on these websites and this week's episode covers the Academic Requirements to play at each level.   The Athletic Scholarship Podcast and Recruit-Me wants to provide as many free and inexpensive recruiting resources to you, the High School Student-Athlete and the families of those students.  The NCAA.org, the NAIA.org and the NJCAA.org websites are great free resources for recruiting, but you can get paralyzed by the amount of information on each of the websites.  This episode and this series of episodes will help you focus on a subject on recruiting to help you on your recruiting path.   Find out the standards, GPA and test scores, that each level requires for you to be eligible to play your freshman year of college in your sport.  Learn what the core-courses are that are required during high school and where to find this information easily.   In honor of the all-new Recruit-Me.com website, The Athletic Scholarship Podcast is offering the Recruit-Me 3.0 Athletic Scholarship System for only $89.  Take charge today.   Click Here to join the Recruit-Me Monthly Newsletter.  Get monthly tidbits of recruiting advice and education.   Recruit-Me.com Recruit-Me 3.0 Athletic Scholarship System FREE Recruiting Power Pack QRRecruiter.com  promo code RecruitMe5 CollegeCoachesOnline.com  promo code RM123 Listen to Past Episodes of The Athletic Scholarship Podcast NCAA.org NAIA.org NJCAA.org  

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Wire Taps 260—Healthcare data scientist. 15 years of experience, low GPA. First generation, energy career

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 38:47


This week's podcast kicks off with a look at the latest activity on MBA LiveWire, which led to a disussion about the anxiety the interview invite process creates for candidates. Graham highlighted the recently published Real Humans pieces for Toronto / Rotman and SMU / Cox before calling listeners attention to  the congested application deadlines for Round 2; on January 4 and 5, there are 16 top MBA programs with Round 2 deadlines! Graham also highlighted this Tuesday's webinar with Georgia / Terry, focused on Experiential Learning, signups are here: https://bit.ly/experientialmba Graham also reminded listeners of Clear Admit's upcoming Deferred Enrolment event featuring Wharton, MIT Sloan, Chicago Booth and many other leading programs; signups are here: https://bit.ly/defermba As usual, this episode features candidate profile reviews for three real applicants, each selected from ApplyWire.  First up, Alex selects a data scientist in the healthcare domain, who has a 720 GMAT (decent) and a 3.3 engineering undergraduate degree. They have also completed a masters degree, with a 3.8. They are an over-represented minority (likely Asian American), and Alex and Graham discussed the programs they are targeting, and whether Wharton should be included, because of its strength in the healthcare domain. This week's second candidate has 15 years of experience, and unfortunately has a low undergraduate GPA, due to some mental health issues. They have subsequently completed a masters degree with a stronger result (but did not share the exact GPA). Beyond the potential academics problem, they will need to address issues related to fit because of their additional length of work experience. The final candidate this week is targeting next season, and is a first generation candidate who's pivoted from engineering into finance. Alex and Graham like that pivot, and had a long conversation about their goals, post MBA, and whether they should stick to an energy theme, which has formed the basis of their prior experiences. This episode was recorded in Paris, France and Cornwall, England. It was produced and engineered by the immensely talented Dennis Crowley in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, home of the National League Champion Phillies. Thanks for joining us and for reading these descriptions! Please remember to share the Clear Admit podcast with friends, colleagues, and anyone who might benefit from tuning in. Stay safe everybody.

Hot Springs Village Inside Out
Special Episode: Altrusa 4.0 Dinner & Fundraiser November 8, 2022

Hot Springs Village Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 42:47


  Valerie Derryberry stops by from the HSV Altrusa to explain what Altrusa is and how they help the community. They have a big fundraising event scheduled at the Governor's Mansion for 4-point GPA school students from Jessieville, Mountain Pine, and Fountain Lake - on November 8, 2022. Find out more by visiting their website or Facebook page. You can also email them at altrusahsv@gmail.com   • Join Our Free Email Newsletter • Subscribe To The Podcast Anyway You Want • Subscribe To Our YouTube Channel (click that bell icon, too) • Join Our Facebook Group • Tell Your Friends About Our Show • Support Our Sponsors 

Dave by the Bell
045 Location! Location! Location!

Dave by the Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 11:45


In this only just barely adjacent to homecoming edition of Dave by the Bell, Dave and University Communications intern Madi chat it up with almost always friendly passersby and pose the question, "If you could live anywhere on campus that was not a residence hall, where would you live?"        Transcript:   Dave Blanks: Madi, you're our intern.   Madi: I am.   Dave Blanks: And we're going to do a Dave by the Bell.   Madi: We are.   Dave Blanks: What are we talking about?   Madi: Well, did we decide what we're talking about?   Dave Blanks: Yeah, yeah. I think we finally landed on an idea.   Madi: Did we land on the roommate idea?   Dave Blanks: No, we're not doing the roommate idea.   Madi: Oh.   Dave Blanks: But we will do that one in the future.   Madi: Okay.   Dave Blanks: No, no, no. We're not going to do the roommate. We're going to do-   Madi: If you could live anywhere on campus.   Dave Blanks: Yes.   Madi: That's not your residence hall/dorm room...   Dave Blanks: Right.   Madi: ...where would you live and why?   Dave Blanks: Yeah, that was it. Good job. Perfect. So, yeah. Do you want to go to Sanford Mall?   Madi: I sure do.   Dave Blanks: Okay, let's do that. I usually just find a person and go, "Hey, excuse me." Like this guy.   Madi: Hey, you want to be in our podcast?   Anonymous Solarium Lover: No, that's okay.   Dave Blanks: Oh, come on man. Do you want to hear the question and then say yes or no.   Anonymous Solarium Lover: Okay.   Dave Blanks: All right. All right. So the question is, if you could live somewhere on campus, where would it be and why? So is there a little spot that's your spot? That's your go-to?   Anonymous Solarium Lover: Oh, God. The Solarium.   Dave Blanks: Yeah. Okay.   Anonymous Solarium Lover: I love that.   Dave Blanks: Why would you live in the Solarium?   Anonymous Solarium Lover: It's very peaceful.   Dave Blanks: Right?   Anonymous Solarium Lover: I really like it.   Dave Blanks: Right.   Anonymous Solarium Lover: It's very calming.   Dave Blanks: It's like the opposite of this moment.   Anonymous Solarium Lover: Yes, exactly.   Quin Hernandez: I'm Quinn Hernandez. There's a little lookout up by Greenwood.   Dave Blanks: Okay.   Quin Hernandez: I like looking over it, specifically in the wintertime, because the snow makes it really bright and you can ... The stadium lights up everything.   Dave Blanks: Okay. All right. You would live up there?   Quin Hernandez: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: Because it's beautiful.   Quin Hernandez: Yeah, it's really pretty up there.   Madi: What a lovely answer.   Dave Blanks: I know. That was so good.   Madi: She was ready.   Andrea Martinez: I'm Andrea Martinez. Ooh. I would probably live at Walmart.   Dave Blanks: Wait, wait, wait. That's not on campus. Andrea.   Andrea Martinez: Technically it's not, but it is   Dave Blanks: It's on the Appalcart stop.   Andrea Martinez: Yes.   Dave Blanks: So in that respect, I mean, it is definitely a part of your student life, right?   Andrea Martinez: Yeah, definitely.   Dave Blanks: Okay. But with all the options, explain to me why you would live at Walmart.   Andrea Martinez: Well, I mean, it's just a place I frequent a lot.   Dave Blanks: Okay.   Andrea Martinez: But it's also got everything.   Dave Blanks: Okay.   Andrea Martinez: You've got a TV.   Dave Blanks: Yes.   Andrea Martinez: You've got blankets, you've got food. It's the perfect place.   Dave Blanks: I knew you were thinking like that. It's very practical of you. All right. Well, thank you for your answer and have a great day. Are you headed ... Where you headed?   Andrea Martinez: I'm heading to the bus stop, actually.   Dave Blanks: Are you going to Walmart?   Andrea Martinez: I am going to Walmart.   Dave Blanks: No way. Oh, my. That's funny.   Phillip Lavey: I'm Phillip Leavy. Chapel Wilson, second floor, I guess. That's where the theater department kids seem to hang out. That's most of my friends here at App State, so.   Dave Blanks: Right on.   Phillip Lavey: All the professors are super welcoming. All the students, it's like a big happy family there.   Dave Blanks: Nice, man.   Phillip Lavey: Yeah, so.   Dave Blanks: Well, good.   Phillip Lavey: Without a doubt. Plus the benches are pretty nice to sleep on. Pretty comfy. So, yeah.   Dave Blanks: From personal experience?   Phillip Lavey: Personal experience, yeah.   Dave Blanks: All right.   Meredith Kaiser: I'm Meredith Kaiser. Okay. I'm honestly going to go with living in the library.   Dave Blanks: Yeah.   Meredith Kaiser: Low key, because there's a coffee shop in there.   Dave Blanks: Right.   Meredith Kaiser: There's a lot of good study spaces.   Dave Blanks: Right.   Meredith Kaiser: There's books. There's a lot of just cool things in there. So, yeah.   Dave Blanks: What floor in particular? Any ideas?   Meredith Kaiser: Definitely not the second, because it's kind of loud.   Dave Blanks: Okay.   Meredith Kaiser: Probably the third.   Dave Blanks: All right. Peaceful.   Meredith Kaiser: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: Yeah.   Meredith Kaiser: Very peaceful. Yeah.   Billy: Oh, man. That's a tough one. Probably up there in that tower right up there.   Dave Blanks: What? You'd live in the Steam Tower?   Billy: Oh, is that a steam tower?   Dave Blanks: Yeah, dude. I don't know if you want to live in the-   Billy: What's at the very top though?   Dave Blanks: Steam. Just steam.   Billy: No, it's not. It looks like somebody out there right now, kind of.   Dave Blanks: Whoa. Are you for real?   Billy: It looks like a lookout post.   Dave Blanks: Oh, my gosh.   Billy: Is it not? Is it not?   Dave Blanks: No, it's a steam-   Billy: You can't get up there?   Dave Blanks: We call it the Steam Tower. Yeah, you can get up there.   Billy: Well, I don't know.   Dave Blanks: I mean, not you.   Billy: I kind of want to live up there. Maybe the room below it, but that'd be my upstairs deck.   Dave Blanks: That would be super cool. Do you think people would come visit you if you lived in-   Billy: No. People don't come visit me anyway.   Dave Blanks: But if you lived in the Steam Tower, they might be like, Come on, let's go to Billy's house, man.   Billy: You know what? You know what? Being right here, people would come visit. Because I'd be right here.   Dave Blanks: Yeah, I think they would. Great idea.   Billy: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: Thanks for your answer, man.   Billy: That's it?   Dave Blanks: That was it. That was all.   Billy: Did I pass?   Dave Blanks: Yeah. You passed with flying colors. Yeah. Thanks, Billy. Madi, would you live in the Steam Tower?   Madi: Probably not.   Dave Blanks: I don't think so. I think I might come visit Billy, though.   Madi: I might visit Billy for sure.   Dave Blanks: Yeah, just to see if he was okay, because I'm not sure you can survive up there. But he was like, "There's somebody up there right now." And then I thought I could kind of see them. It was sort of weird.   Madi: No, I kind of did too.   Dave Blanks: Did you see them?   Madi: He tricked me.   Dave Blanks: He totally pulled one over on us.   Lily: I'm Lily. The Student Union.   Dave Blanks: Okay.   Lily: The arboretum-type room.   Dave Blanks: Oh yeah, Solarium.   Lily: The Solarium.   Dave Blanks: The Solarium.   Lily: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: Yeah. Caitlin, what do you think about Lily's answer?   Kaitlyn: It's a good answer, but I would probably say the library, because it's open most of the time.   Dave Blanks: Right?   Kaitlyn: 24 five, and they have some comfy chairs up there.   Dave Blanks: Wait, did you say 24 what?   Kaitlyn: 24 five.   Dave Blanks: 24 five? I've never heard that.   Kaitlyn: 24 five. It's open 24 hours, five days of the week.   Dave Blanks: Five days of the week.   Kaitlyn: Right.   Dave Blanks: Wow. You're very accurate with that. I was like, wait, did she mess that up? But no. You said it very specifically. All right. So what floor would you live on?   Kaitlyn: I think the second, but I haven't explored the third or fourth before.   Dave Blanks: All right. Well, the second floor, from what I've heard, is a little louder.   Kaitlyn: That's true. I could always go up to the quiet floor if I need some quiet.   Dave Blanks: Yeah. Yeah.   Kaitlyn: I do think the chairs are very comfy on the second floor, and you could definitely sleep on one of those.   Dave Blanks: Excellent. All right, so now we're in the Student Union. Do you actually want to interrupt somebody who's doing something in the Student Union? Hey, excuse me.   Eva Morgan: Hi.   Dave Blanks: Hi, I'm Dave. I have a podcast called Dave by the Bell, where I interview App State students.   Eva Morgan: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: Are you an App State student?   Eva Morgan: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: Could you hear out my question and maybe answer it?   Eva Morgan: Mm-hmm!   Dave Blanks: All right, cool. I like your energy. Very positive.   Eva Morgan: Thanks, man!   Dave Blanks: This is Madi.   Eva Morgan: Hello.   Dave Blanks: She's our intern.   Madi: Hi.   Dave Blanks: So the question for today pertains to the fact that it's homecoming this weekend.   Eva Morgan: Yeah?!!!   Dave Blanks: Are you excited?   Eva Morgan: No, I'm not even going.   Dave Blanks: Okay, fair enough. Home is the word that we honed in on. If you could make your home somewhere here at App that wasn't a residence hall?   Eva Morgan: I'd live in the gym.   Dave Blanks: Where would you ... You'd live at the gym?   Eva Morgan: I'd live at the SRC.   Dave Blanks: All right. Why would you live there?   Eva Morgan: I work out every day.   Dave Blanks: Okay.   Eva Morgan: So I'm kind of obsessed.   Dave Blanks: What do you like about the SRC?   Eva Morgan: That's a solid question.   Dave Blanks: Yeah.   Eva Morgan: That I do not know the answer to.   Dave Blanks: They have equipment that you can use there?   Eva Morgan: Yeah. I mean, they have machines and free weights, so.   Dave Blanks: Perfect. SRC?   Eva Morgan: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: Yeah. Good answer.   Eva Morgan: Thank you.   Dave Blanks: Hey, can you tell me your name?   Eva Morgan: Oh, Eva Morgan.   Dave Blanks: Thanks, Eva.   Eva Morgan: Of course. You have a good one.   Dave Blanks: Yeah, you too. Are you going to workout?   Eva Morgan: Nice to meet you too. Oh, I already did my round today.   Dave Blanks: Already did it.   Eva Morgan: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: Nice. Nice work. Nice work. Have a good one. Madi, you're on the cross country team, right?   Madi: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: Do you work out every day?   Madi: Unfortunately, I don't have a choice if I work out every day.   Dave Blanks: You're forced to work out every day?   Madi: I'm not forced every day.   Dave Blanks: What way do you want to go?   Madi: It's a forced decision. Bookstore?   Dave Blanks: Yeah. Okay. We could do the bookstore. A forced decision.   Madi: Oh, maybe these fellows.   Dave Blanks: Yeah. Do you think they work here?   Madi: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: So we actually here at App State, do you have a Apple Store? What do you call it? An Apple Store. They're an authorized campus store.   John Paul Hansen: That's the magic of it.   Dave Blanks: There we go. You don't live on campus currently, correct, sir?   John Paul Hansen: No, sir. I do not.   Dave Blanks: All right. Did you ever live on campus?   John Paul Hansen: I did.   Dave Blanks: All right. Where were you? What residence hall?   John Paul Hansen: Bowie Residence Hall.   Dave Blanks: You were in Bowie.   John Paul Hansen: Yes. Getting knocked down currently, right?   Dave Blanks: You're right. I'm sorry. Are you dealing with that okay or?   John Paul Hansen: Yeah, a little bit sad. I'd like to go over and get a brick. I don't know what the legalities of brick taking from a active construction zone are, so.   Dave Blanks: Yeah, I think first degree brickery.   John Paul Hansen: Yeah, first degree brickery.   Dave Blanks: It could ruin your job here.   John Paul Hansen: True. True.   Dave Blanks: So what is your name, sir.   John Paul Hansen: John Paul Hansen.   Dave Blanks: Okay. So John Paul Hansen, it's homecoming weekend. Did you know that?   John Paul Hansen: I did, yes.   Dave Blanks: All right, all right. So if you could live and make your home anywhere on Appalachian State's campus, that wasn't Bowie. Okay? And that wasn't a residence hall.   John Paul Hansen: Yes.   Dave Blanks: Where would it be and why would you live there?   John Paul Hansen: Inside of the Founder's Bell. It's nice and cozy. You can really get inside of it. Once the metal kind of heats up to your body temp, it's cohesive. You're in there. You can't get much colder or warmer. It's a perfect environment.   Dave Blanks: Right. You would have a lot of interaction because apparently if people rub it or something like that, they do good on their examinations.   John Paul Hansen: Yes. yeah. And then I kind of crawl out like a hermit crab and just really, you are at my home. Really give it to them. So, yeah. Yeah, absolutely.   Dave Blanks: John Paul, you're a silly fellow. You know that? Did you know the podcast is called Dave by the Bell?   John Paul Hansen: Yes.   Dave Blanks: Yeah.   John Paul Hansen:  And so I know this because probably four years ago, I was walking to one of my freshman year classes, and I was stopped by you, Mr. Dave.   Dave Blanks: No way.   Madi: Wow.   John Paul Hansen: Yes. I had a previous appearance.   Dave Blanks: You're one of our first multiple episode people.   John Paul Hansen: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: Yeah, yeah.   John Paul Hansen: This was fun. It's coming full circle.   Dave Blanks: Yeah, I know. Well, come visit John Paul, who's in the ... What's the name of your store?   John Paul Hansen: Oh, University Bookstore Tech Center, rebranded from the Computer Shop.   Dave Blanks: All right. Okay.   John Paul Hansen: Yep.   Dave Blanks: All right.   John Paul Hansen: Yep.   Madi: What if I go rub the Founder's Bell before finals, and then he just like jumps out-   Dave Blanks: And he's like. I never rubbed the Founder's Bell, but when I think about my GPA, maybe I should have. I also never exercised while I was at Appalachian State.   Madi: Hey, this person's watching right now.   Dave Blanks: That guy. Excuse me, Mr. Flannel. Hey. Hey. I have a podcast called Dave by the Bell, where I interview App State students. Would you mind if I ask you a question? I don't think your name is really Mr. Flannel either.   Ben Perkins: Oh, you don't? Well, that's good.   Dave Blanks: No, I'm not aware of your name, but I would assume it's not Mr. Flannel.   Ben Perkins: Well, if you knew, it'd be weird, because I don't think we've ever met.   Dave Blanks: That would be crazy, right?   Ben Perkins: My name is Ben Perkins.   Dave Blanks: All right.   Ben Perkins: I'd probably live in the Union. Location-wise, I think it's the best.   Dave Blanks: Fair enough.   Ben Perkins: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: So what part of the Student Union would you live in?   Ben Perkins: Well rest in peace to the Whitewater Lounge, but that's where I'd live.   Madi: That's what I said.   Ben Perkins: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: So I asked Madi this, and she said ... Now why did you like the Whitewater? Let's ask you first, Ben.   Ben Perkins: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: And then, Madi, we'll get your take on why the Whitewater was awesome.   Ben Perkins: Well, I think originally it was had this classy lounge kind of vibe.   Dave Blanks: Okay.   Ben Perkins: And I don't know. It was really secluded, so not a lot of people went there. So I thought that was really cool about it.   Dave Blanks: Yeah. Yeah. Well, good choice. Ben, thank you. Madi, tell us why you liked the Whitewater.   Madi: I just have good memories of escaping to there. Well, I remember my freshman year, I was really bored, and I was like, I'm going to just go explore the Student Union. And I felt like I went in there, and it was like a secret hideout almost. And it was just nice and dark, and they would sometimes play music in there. If only it still existed, that's where I'd choose.   Dave Blanks: Listen, I think I want to encourage y'all to go back to where it was, because now it's the Career Development Center. Okay?   Ben Perkins: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: So take charge of your future.   Ben Perkins: Oh, yeah.   Dave Blanks: Okay? All right, please.   Ben Perkins: I will.   Madi: Oh, yeah.   Dave Blanks: Ben. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Ben, thanks for your answer.   Ben Perkins: Absolutely.   Madi: Okay, we're at the Alpha Phi Omega table, and we have four students here. Why don't you all introduce yourselves in a row?   Jenn: Hi, I'm Jenn.   Chris: I'm Chris.   Gigi: I'm Gigi.   Skyler: And I'm Skyler. I would live in the Solarium. It's just the ambience and all the plants and stuff. I feel like it's so lively and fun in there.   Madi: Awesome. Thank you. Moving on to Chris.   Chris: Yep. That's my same answer. I would live in the Solarium. Honestly, it's one of the most peaceful places on campus.   Madi: For sure. What about you?   Gigi: Same. Same here.   Madi: Same?   Dave Blanks: Gigi's there.   Madi: Skyler?   Skyler: I've got to say the garden near the LLC.   Madi: Okay.   Skyler: I love doing garden work there. It's so much fun. I think I'd make a little home in the little greenhouse with the solar panels on top. I think that would be really cutesy. Yeah.   Madi: Yeah. That's a great answer. Very unique. Thank you, guys.   Dave Blanks: Thank y'all so much.   Skyler: Thank you.   Ashlyn Benzel: My name is Ashlyn Benzel. Sanford Mall! Right here! I would set up a tent and just stay here. There is, I mean grass. There's trees to climb. My friends. The dining hall's right over there. I mean, you can't-   Dave Blanks: Nothing wrong with that.   Madi: Can't go wrong.   Ashlyn Benzel: Can't go wrong.   Madi: Great answer. Thank you so much.   Ashlyn Benzel: You're so welcome.   Dave Blanks: Maddie, we're done. What did we learn today?   Madi: Today we learned that Walmart is on campus.   Dave Blanks: We also learned that if you're going to live in the Solarium, you better like other people, because everybody else is living in the Solarium too, right?   Madi: Yeah.   Dave Blanks: Thanks for taking the time. Thanks for coming along with me. You did a great job. Was it fun?   Madi: It was a great time.   Dave Blanks: Let's edit this podcast.   Madi: Sounds good.   Dave Blanks: I'm Dave Blanks, and this has been Dave by the Bell. Bye, Madi.   Madi: Bye.  

Attention to Intention
#ShareYourStory: You Are Who You Surround Yourself With Featuring Justin Schenck

Attention to Intention

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 60:33


I was HOOKED on this Stephen Spielberg documentary & as I heard this award winning pioneer of American film, the most successful director of all time talking abut his insecurities. How he felt alone as a kid & he used this loneliness behind the screen to build the connection with the audiences he was so hungry for. How true this is of so many of us. Using the thing that brought us to our knees to get us to a breakthrough to our own calling. Our guest today, Justin Schneck, is no different. I LOVE me an authentic, no bullshit genuine good purpose driven human & that's exactly what Justin is. Justin is the host of INC magazine top rated podcast, Growth Now Movement & founder of Growth Now Summits. Justin & I are two birds of the same flock. He had a 1.7 GPA, his mother battling an opiod addiction, his father in jail. The world labeling him as having no shot in the world. At age 19, h got introduced to personal development by a mentor who unlocked this hunger wihtin him to continue to learn & grow knowing that he had control over the outcome in his life. In this episode, you'll hear Justin talk to us about:The hard journey he had to go through to find love & how it came after he learned to love himself firstHe unpacks for us the 5 people we need to surround ourselves with & whyAnd the common denominator of the most successful people he's interviewed (which my friends, each & very one of you have & it's free) Connect with Justin:Growth Now Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/growth-now-movement-with-justin-schenck/id1086471656Growth Now Community: https://growthnowmovement.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/justintschenck/Connect with Meg:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/megan.b.miller/ LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/meganmillerintention

College and Career Clarity
Will grade inflation hurt your teen? with Brian Eufinger

College and Career Clarity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 27:18 Transcription Available


High school grade and GPA inflation has become rampant since COVID, and families can be caught off guard when they realize that when it comes to GPA, pretty good is no longer good enough. Brian Eufinger explains how we got here and gives tips on how to best navigate your family's college-bound journey in the current climate so your teen can avoid roadblocks when applying to college.EPISODE NOTESBrian Eufinger is my guest today. He is a test prep and tutoring provider for the Greater Atlanta area, and he has some shocking statistics to share with you as well as some helpful advice. While test scores are certainly important, even impressively high scores are not going to be enough for many schools if your student's grades are not up to snuff. Like it or not, grades are the most significant factor in college admissions decisions.The reality is that because of grade inflation, the GPA that got you as a parent into college decades ago may not even be considered passable for your high school student by today's standards. There are many factors that have played into this, including no zero policies high school teachers must adhere to and opportunities for second chances brought about by COVID. What this ultimately means is that the bar is much higher than it used to be for what qualifies as a remarkable GPA.But this doesn't have to be all bad news. There is a way for you to get ahead of the curve. Ideally, you should be starting early with your young teen. If your student can begin earning high school credit in the eighth grade, that is a great way to get a leg up. If you're already past that point, consider the core courses that your student is taking and how they affect unweighted GPA. And if they're enrolled in any AP courses, discuss with them that taking the exam will add more value to the course in the long run.HighlightsWhy your teen's GPA can't be compared to yoursHow grade inflation combined with AP coursework has compounded problems for GPAsWhat grade compression is and how the bottom likely isn't where you think it isAdvice that begins with students who are in 8th-gradeLinksLaunch College & Career Clarity CourseLaunch College and Career Clarity Facebook CommunityEdison Prep WebsiteInstagram: @edisonpreptutoringEpisode #037 ACT-SAT Test Optional Admission DataTimeline[3:00] What was considered a decent GPA will no longer pass in the current college climate[6:01] How no zero policies have contributed to grade inflation[8:30] AP classes offer a huge bump to GPA, even when students don't end up sitting for the test[12:43] How inflation compresses the grading scale[15:43] How a ranking percentile system to communicate to parents where grade inflation is affecting the individual school profile would be helpful[17:46] Phenomenal test scores are often not enough to balance out a less-than-stellar GPA[20:39] Students should always test, even for test-optional programs[23:10] Covid learning loss has led to significantly lower average ACT & SAT scores

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
294 Quit A Job You Hate For The Work You Love with Pat Hiban, Bestselling Author of The Quitter's Manifesto

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 65:01


On this episode of Christopher Lochhead: Follow your Different, we discuss the idea of keeping a successful career that you have stopped liking a long time ago versus quitting it to find one that you find more fulfilling. And who better to have this conversation than with our guest, Pat Hiban. Pat Hiban is the bestselling author of the book, The Quitter's Manifesto. He is an investor, author, podcaster, and a guy having a very good time living an epic life. By the end of this dialog, you will gain radical new insights to build your muscles for designing the life of your choosing, and not just do something because of a current trend. Pat Hiban on The Quitter's Manifesto The conversation starts with Pat Hiban's book, The Quitter's Manifesto, particularly on the topic of why he wrote it, and his inspiration while doing so. Pat shares that during the past year or so that we were all locked up, people had time to think a lot about their work conditions, and what they want to do in life. “It was during COVID. I just heard of a lot of people making decisions to change jobs and the change the location of where they were working from. Also, we had this great resignation going on. I saw it, and I called Tim and I was like, “Tim, the one thing that I learned from you, you are my mentor in quitting, and I said, we should write a book on quitting.”” – Pat Hiban So Pat and Tim Road pooled their thoughts together and The Quitter's Manifesto was born. Quitting is Scary Pat's idea for the book was that it should be a tactical, step-by-step book. So first things first, they have to acknowledge the reality of things: that quitting a stable career is scary. “The first chapter in the book is called, Acknowledging the Truth. And the truth is, quitting is very, very scary. It's like going to a cliff and jumping off.” – Pat Hiban For entrepreneurs, taking the jump is just Tuesday to them. This is because before they jump, they already have a parachute or glider ready even before they take the leap. Normal people do not always have those prepared beforehand, and jump blindly to their doom. So the aim of The Quitter's Manifesto is to create rope swings that they can hang on each chapter, and at the end of it all, a net of safety when you finally decide to take the plunge. The Company Healthcare Trap The conversation then shifts to the topic of job fluidity being hampered by healthcare being tied to their employment. There are a lot of people who stick it out with big corporations for less pay, because of the healthcare benefits that they could have. So a lot of people end up being stuck or always teetering at the edge of quitting, until they find something with enough income that it overshadows the healthcare benefits they get. The weird thing about this is that they may already be earning a lot more monthly than that potential “healthcare benefit” might provide, but they still hedge because they don't want to let go of that supposed “security blanket”. “I talked to a guy yesterday that had a family health care plan, it was worth $2,000 a month. And he wouldn't quit his work because of it, even though he was flipping real estate on the side, making 400 grand a year. He wouldn't go to flipping real estate full time, just because he wanted that healthcare. And then he finally did quit, and he realized how minuscule that the healthcare actually was, it didn't matter.” – Pat Hiban To hear more from Pat Hiban and The Quitter's Manifesto, download and listen to this episode. Bio Pat Hiban As a young child, Pat Hiban was labeled “learning disabled with speech deficiencies” and put into special classes. Through his teenage years, Pat fell forward through life and tried everything he could to find his purpose, including 2 years as a 4th string player (benchwarmer) on the lacrosse team. He graduated from college with a degree in sociology and a 2.6 GPA. After being turned down for several corporate sales positions out of college,

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
YCBK 269: Northern Kids Heading South For College

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 118:05 Very Popular


In this episode you will hear:   (11:00) Mark and Dave discuss a Town and Country article entitled, Why Are More Northern Kids Heading South For College by Nicole Laporte. The article was written on 10/2/2022. The article looks at why so many students are not looking to New York, Boston or LA, but are flocking to Southern schools. Mark and Dave discuss about a half a dozen reasons why so many students are flocking to Southern universities.   (44:16) Mark discusses with Julia pick up where Mark and Lisa left off by discussing reasons why a college will admit a student with a lower GPA and a lower test score over a kid with a higher GPA and a higher test score. Julia shares what she has learned from her work with College Horizons. Part 3 of 3   (01:20:35) Mark continues with his four part interview that some of our listeners have been asking about for years. Trinity University in San Antonio's Admission Director (Justin Doty) is joined by their athletic liasion of over 30 years (Paul McGinlay) for an indepth interview of how athletic recruiting works at an academically selective D-3 school. Justin and Paul answer over 40 questions that Mark asks them about athletic recruiting and how it works. Part 2 of 4 Preview-Part 2   Justin and Paul continue the conversation about how many of their students are recruited athletes Paul talks about how the recruited athlete differs from the random athlete when it comes to yielding the student Paul talks about what he looks for first when an athlete reaches out to him Paul talks about the one things that almost every student athlete who ends up at Trinity ends up doing Paul talks about when student-athletes should start the recruitment process Justin talks about one thing that almost every serious athlete does Paul gives his opinion of athletic interest forms Paul gives his advice on who athletes should reach out to Paul gives his opinion on what he thinks about video Paul shares the thing that is better than video Paul gives his advice on how long the video should be Paul answers the question, how can a student know if an invitation to an ID camp is an attempt to generate revenue or a reflection of the fact that the school has genuine interest in the student     (01:31:44) Our Recommended Resource is the documentary, “the Race to Nowhere”. The documentary looks at the incredible pressure that students as young as elementary students are under to forsake creativity and get caught up in the rat race of excessive homework. The documentary was released in 2010 but it is just as relevant now as it was then. It is available on YouTube and Amazon Prime https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BE7TLXbXROg   (01:40:00) Kevin Newton is back for a College Spotlight triology that will look at the Ancient Scotish Universities. Over the next three weeks Kevin will answer questions about what makes these five universities special.   Please send in your questions either on Twitter at @YCBKpodcast using the Messages tab (this is our preference) or via email at for the 25 admissions interviews we are doing in the summer and fall. Our interviews are with the following people at the following schools: Confirmed interviews not yet completed Bard-Mackie Siebens Mercer-Kelly Holloway Rice University-Tamara Siler American University-Andrea Felder Pitzer College-Yvonne Berumen Chapman University-Marcela Meija-Martinez Connecticut College-Andy Strickler* Trinity College-Anthony Berry* College of the Atlantic-Heather Albert* Spelman College-Chelsea Holley* Scripps College-Victoria Romero* Saint Louis University-Daniel Wood-(Interview is about transfer admissions, Daniel is a transfer counselor) Colby College-Randi Arsenault* University of Georgia-David Graves* Washington University St Louis-Ronne Turner University of Wisconsin-Andre Phillips University of Illinois-Andy Borst Purdue University-Mitch Warren University of Minnesota-Keri Risic Cornell University-Jonathon Burdick Akil Bello of Akilbello.com Bard College Baylor University Butler University California Institute of Technology Colorado School of Mines Cornell College Creighton University   To sign up to receive Your College-Bound Kid PLUS, our free quarterly admissions deep-dive, delivered directly to your email four times a year, just go to yourcollegeboundkid.com, and you will see the sign up on the right side of the page under “the Listen to our podcast icons”   Follow Mark Stucker on Twitter to get breaking college admission news,  and updates about the podcast before they go live. You can ask questions on Twitter that he will answer them on the podcast. Mark will also share additional hot topics in the news and breaking news on this Twitter feed. Twitter message is also the preferred way to ask questions for our podcast:   https://twitter.com/YCBKpodcast   To access our transcripts, click: https://yourcollegeboundkid.com/category/transcripts/ Find the specific episode transcripts for the one you want to search and click the link Find the magnifying glass icon in blue (search feature) and click it Enter whatever word you want to search. I.e. Loans Every word in that episode when the words loans are used, will be highlighted in yellow with a timestamps Click the word highlighted in yellow and the player will play the episode from that starting point You can also download the entire podcast as a transcript   We would be honored if you will pass this podcast episode on to others who you feel will benefit from the content in YCBK.   Please subscribe to our podcast. It really helps us move up in Apple's search feature so others can find our podcast.   Don't forget to send your questions related to any and every facet of the college process to: questions@yourcollegeboundkid.com.   If you enjoy our podcast, would you please do us a favor and share our podcast both verbally and on social media? We would be most grateful!   If you want to help more people find Your College-Bound Kid, please make sure you follow our podcast. You will also get instant notifications as soon as each episode goes live.   Check out the college admissions books Mark recommends:   Check out the college websites Mark recommends:   If you want to have some input about what you like and what you recommend we change about our podcast, please complete our Podcast survey; here is the link:     If you want a college consultation with Mark or Lisa, just text Mark at 404-664-4340 or email Lisa at lisa@schoolmatch4u.com. All they ask is that you review their services and pricing on their website before the complimentary session. Th