Podcasts about Philanthropy

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Effort or inclination to increase the well-being of humankind, as by charitable aid or donations

  • 2,915PODCASTS
  • 7,740EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 13, 2022LATEST
Philanthropy

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Best podcasts about Philanthropy

Show all podcasts related to philanthropy

Latest podcast episodes about Philanthropy

Door County Pulse Podcasts
Opening the Shoreline: Spending Big to Expand Water Access

Door County Pulse Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 28:00


David Eliot and Myles Dannhausen Jr. discuss the 2022 Philanthropy edition of Door County Living magazine, which focuses on how Door County communities have invested more than $26 million to open public access to 2,700 feet of shoreline since 2007. The issue is available on newsstands now and was supported by grants from the Wisconsin Humanities Council's Beyond the Headlines program.

We Are For Good Podcast - The Podcast for Nonprofits
269. LIVE! from Phoenix: Build Better Boards - Sabrina Walker Hernandez, Jazmin Chavez, Tammy Tibbetts, and Skyler Badenoch

We Are For Good Podcast - The Podcast for Nonprofits

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 45:46


Join Jon + Becky for this Friday's episode alongside a panel of legit experts on Building Better Boards. We talk about creating active boards comprised of diverse voices, lived experiences, and representing the population of people served by the mission. Special thanks to Virtuous for convening this discussion with our panel experts: Skyler Badenoch (Hope for Haiti), Sabrina Walker Hernandez (Saving World Hope), Jazmin Chavez (Hispanics in Philanthropy) and Tammy Tibbetts (She's the First)

EmergentCF
Sarah McLeod Judson - Disaster Philanthropy at CF of SW Louisiana

EmergentCF

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 30:50


Sarah McLeod Judson, President and CEO of the Community Foundation of Southwest Louisiana,  joins the podcast this week to discuss the progress of their disaster and rebuilding efforts in Southwest Louisiana.  Mentions include:Community Foundation of Southwest LouisianaRecommendationsBen Franklin PBSRecast your City - How to Save Your Downtown with Small-Scale ManufacturingEvents/Learning OpportunitiesUniting Americans through Service: The Power of AmeriCorps and Philanthropy Working in PartnershipGrantmaker Ethics and AccountabilityCEO Net Retreat - Save the Date!  September 7 - 9thAssociationsAdvancement Network (AdNet)CEONetProNetCommACouncil on FoundationsAiPAmerican College of Financial Services

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: What Next for Cryptos?

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 3:19


The collapsing values in cryptocurrencies and their exchanges are reminiscent of when the dot.com bubble burst more than 20 years ago. Back then, most of those speculative stocks were listed on the Nasdaq. When the bubble burst, the Nasdaq index plummeted almost 80%. Steve Forbes examines whether the crypto world is in for a similar shellacking.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

Then & Now: Philosophy, History & Politics
MrBeast: Capitalism & Philanthropy

Then & Now: Philosophy, History & Politics

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 80:05


A look at the darker side of MrBeast's philanthropy and the wider philanthrocapitalist model it's a part of. Looking specifically at #teamseas and a partnership with Jennie-O, I attempt to untangle how corporations and conglomerates like Coca-Cola, chemical and oil companies, and big meat monopolies all have a vested interest in financing certain ‘philanthropic' projects while side-lining others. This is a story that takes some surprising twists and turns, from whitewashing, greenwashing & ‘funwashing' sponsorships, to illegal price-fixing, an endemic of farmer suicides, and leaked corporate emails to influence charities. Examining the roots and consequences of ‘philanthrocapitalism' tells us a lot about how lobbying works under modern capitalism. This is a long video, but it'll be worth it to tell this story properly. Then & Now is FAN-FUNDED! Support me on Patreon and pledge as little as $1 per video: http://patreon.com/user?u=3517018

Speaking of Impact
EP #97: Charitable Giving with Rick Peck

Speaking of Impact

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 51:05


Philanthropy doesn't have to be complicated.  There are many ways that you can be generous.  Unfortunately, the charitable sector has many rules and items that can confuse people who want to give.  It's common to default one's giving to what is easiest or what is suggested by friends and family.  Most importantly, you should ask yourself what is most meaningful.   Rick Peck has 17 years of experience working in the charitable sector.  His previous career was in personal financial advice and through that work, he obtained a well rounded set of technical finance skills.  They have enabled him to create a strong bridge between people's investment situation and their giving plans.  He now works as the Vice President for Development and Philanthropy Services at the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation.  His passion for giving is apparent and his knowledge is deep.  Get ready to be an inspired donor.   You can find show notes and more information by clicking here: https://www.bobdepasquale.com/podcast/97

Free Range Humans
Opening Doors with Philanthropy - A Conversation with Kent McGuire

Free Range Humans

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 61:12


Kent McGuire is the Program Director of Education at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. He leads the investments in teaching and learning and open educational resources strategies, with a focus on helping all students succeed in college, work and civic life. Highlights from this episode include: an opening dialogue on re-entry into the world post-COVID; the childhood influences that developed Kent's desire to work in education; what it was like going to school during a period of desegregation; the role philanthropy, and specifically the Hewlett Foundation, can play in promoting deeper learning; ways to get the pockets of innovative teaching and learning out from behind closed doors - building a movement; alternatives to teacher and student evaluations; and the importance of developing trust in the education system. Learn more about the Hewlett Foundation: www.hewlett.orgQuestions? Thoughts? Feedback? Email us at  freerangehumanspod@gmail.com or Tweet us at @jal_mehta and @Rodroad219

We Are For Good Podcast - The Podcast for Nonprofits
268. A Place at The Table: Fighting Food Insecurity with Dignity, Choice + Radical Hospitality - Maggie Kane

We Are For Good Podcast - The Podcast for Nonprofits

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 37:57


Meet Maggie. After spending her childhood serving in soup kitchens, she felt an awakening to bring more than a meal to those who were hungry - she wanted to bring dignity, civility and friendship too. Thus, A Place at the Table was born - Raleigh's first pay-what-you-can nonprofit cafe. She's reimagining a way to feed those in need and baking equity and community into the equation. Swoon

Nonprofit Nation with Julia Campbell
How to Start & Grow Your Monthly Donor Program with Erica Waasdorp

Nonprofit Nation with Julia Campbell

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 36:36


45% of worldwide donors are enrolled in a monthly giving program. In addition, online monthly giving revenue grew by 40% in the past year as recurring donation options become increasingly popular with online donors.I sit down with monthly giving guru Erica Waasdorp, an expert in helping nonprofits of all sizes create and grow vibrant and successful monthly donor programs.  Erica lives and breathes direct response and fundraising and considers herself a "Philanthropy-holic". Building partnerships and trying to find the best solution for members and donors and thus clients' needs are what Erica does best. Erica started A Direct Solution in December of 2003 with more than twenty years of experience in direct marketing, from both sides of the desk, on the client side and the agency side. She has since worked with numerous non-profit clients on and off-Cape as well as internationally.Here are some of the topics we discussed:Why monthly giving is so powerful right nowHow even the smallest nonprofits can set up a monthly giving programHow to use social media to promote and grow your programCommon pitfalls to avoidConnect with Erica:https://adirectsolution.com/https://www.linkedin.com/in/erica-waasdorp-544b74/Do me a favor? Rate, Review, & Follow on Apple Podcasts (or your podcast player of choice) - it helps this podcast get seen by more people that would enjoy it!About Julia Campbell, the host of the Nonprofit Nation podcast:Named as a top thought leader by Forbes and BizTech Magazine, Julia Campbell (she/hers) is an author, coach, and speaker on a mission to make the digital world a better place. She wrote her book, Storytelling in the Digital Age: A Guide for Nonprofits, as a roadmap for social change agents who want to build movements using engaging digital storytelling techniques. Her second book, How to Build and Mobilize a Social Media Community for Your Nonprofit, was published in 2020 as a call-to-arms for mission-driven organizations to use the power of social media to build movements. Julia's online courses, webinars, and talks have helped hundreds of nonprofits make the shift to digital thinking and raise more money online. Connect with Julia on other platforms:Instagram: www.instagram.com/juliacampbell77Twitter: www.twitter.com/juliacsocialLinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/juliacampbell Blog: www.jcsocialmarketing.com/blog Take Julia's free nonprofit masterclass, ​3 Must-Have Elements of Social Media Content that Converts

The Build Good Fundraising Podcast
#57: The 5 powerful questions to ask prospective funder to increase your close rate, with Mallory Erickson

The Build Good Fundraising Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 53:36


Have you ever walked into a meeting with a prospective funder feeling nervous? Maybe you weren't sure how to lead the conversation. Maybe you felt a power imbalance. Or maybe you felt like you were there to beg for money, rather than being there as an equal partner or peer.If you've been there, today's episode is for you.Meet Mallory Erickson. Her mission is to help people like you fundraise more from the right donors WITHOUT hounding people for money. Without feeling like you're begging. Without feeling like you're pitching. Without feeling weird and awkward about having the money conversation.In today's chat, Mallory walks through an powerful 5-question framework you can use at your next meeting with a prospective funder.  Connect with Mallory and learn all about her Power Partners Formula right here.---➡️ Join our FREE training on how to create compelling fundraising messages that lead donors to action and raise more money, from more people, more often—simply by changing the words you use: https://www.5minutefundraisingfix.com/register 

Philanthropy Today
Hiawatha Community Foundation - Philanthropy Today Episode 61

Philanthropy Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 10:02


2022 marks just the second year for the Hiawatha Community Foundations "Give Back To Move Forward" match day.  In the first year, local leaders were blown away by the generosity to the foundation, and they're gearing up to make the 2022 version bigger and better!  Our guest on Philanthropy Today is Virginia Freese, a long time mental health professional, now serving as the President of the Hiawatha Community Foundation.www.hiawatchcf.orgwww.givebacktomoveforward,com

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: A Carbon Tax Won't Fight Climate Change, But Will Make Life More Expensive

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 3:07


It's All Journalism
Better News: 100 Days finds revenue streams beyond philanthropy

It's All Journalism

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 23:41


Since the 2016 election, 100 Days in Appalachia has been working with local voices to apply a cultural lens to national stories about the the Appalachian region. The 100 Days team's reporting, which covers 13 states, earned it a 2021 Edward R. Murrow Award. Although 100 Days originated as a university-incubated collaborative media project, the newsroom recognized it needed to identify new streams of revenue beyond grants in order to become fully self-sustaining. Editor In Chief Dana Coester and Executive Editor Ashton Marra recently wrote a report for Better News on how 100 Days began experimenting with reader revenue and community membership to move beyond philanthropy. Read the Report. The Better News podcast is a partnership between It's All Journalism and the American Press Institute to a) showcase innovative/experimental ideas that emerge from the Knight-Lenfest Local News Transformation Fund and b) share replicable strategies and tactics that benefit the news industry as a whole. Sign up for the Better News newsletter to receive news about the latest resources, case studies, and insights. For more news about the It's All Journalism podcast and future episodes of Better News, sign up for the weekly IAJ newsletter.

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller
Afua Bruce: Tech, Equity, and Philanthropy [Ep. 265]

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 21:51


Afua Bruce is a leading public interest technologist whose career has spanned the government, non-profit, private, and academic sectors, as she has held senior science and technology positions at the White House, the FBI, IBM, and the nonprofit sector. Her new book, The Tech That Comes Next: How Changemakers, Philanthropists, and Technologists Can Build an Equitable World, explores how technology can advance equity. Resources The Tech that Comes Next: How Changemakers, Philanthropists can Build a More Equitable World by Amy Sample Ward and Afua Bruce @afua_bruce

We Are For Good Podcast - The Podcast for Nonprofits
267. The Rise of Corporate Social Impact + How Nonprofit Missions Can Meet the Moment - Olivia Khalili

We Are For Good Podcast - The Podcast for Nonprofits

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 50:35


Meet Olivia. She's been on a lifelong quest to create community-based workplace cultures that fuel good while helping the bottom line. And now that company PagerDuty, a real-time impact response platform, is driving the effort of societal benefits through business and its employees. As social impact and philanthropy are becoming more important in attracting top talent, Olivia explains how connecting social impact to success is game-changing.

Pencil Leadership with Chris Anderson
There is no Life-Harmony Business?; Episode 159 with Todd Randall

Pencil Leadership with Chris Anderson

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 38:00


Thanks for tuning in!Connect with Todd on Linkedin.Connect with Chris on Instagram.Support the show

Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it
Episode 263: The Man Who Understood Democracy (Part Two)

Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 78:20


This is the second and final part of my conversation with Olivier Zunz about his new biography of Alexis de Tocqueville, The Man Who Understood Democracy, just published by Princeton University Press. When last we left Tocqueville, he had just experienced a brilliant success with the publication of the first volume of Democracy in America. In this conversation, we will as promised discuss Tocqueville's formative trip to Britain, and how it influenced his writing of volume II of Democracy; his political career; his experiences of the revolution of 1848, and the Second Empire; his great work The Ancien Régime and the French Revolution; and his death at a moment when it seemed that in both France and America the experiment to which he had devoted his life was on the point of failure. Olivier Zunz is the James Madison Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Virginia. He is the author, most recently, of Philanthropy in America: A History (also published by Princeton University Press ). He has edited the Library of America edition of Democracy in America, Tocqueville's Recollections: The French Revolution of 1848 and Its Aftermath, Alexis de Tocqueville and Gustave de Beaumont in America: Their Friendship and Their Travels, all in collaboration with the translator Arthur Goldhammer. He has also co-edited The Tocqueville Reader: A Life in Letters and Politics. For Further Investigation Exploring American Democracy with Alexis de Tocqueville as Guide: a 2015 seminar led by Olivier Zunz and Arthur Goldhammer at the University of Virginia still has a website, with an unparalleled collection of resources, including bibliographies of magnificent detail. Arthur Goldhammer describes his collaboration with Olivier Zunz: a "harmonious collaboration" that became an "intellectual friendship" The benchmark historical-critical edition of Democracy in America by Eduardo Nolla

Wealth On Any Income
Episode 89: Making an Irresistible Offer with Rob Goyette

Wealth On Any Income

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 15:23


For Episode 89 of the Wealth On Any Income Podcast, Rennie is joined by Rob Goyette. Rob has been serving heart-centered coaches since 2007. Over that time, he's built a multi-six figure business by building and nurturing an email list, then making them irresistible offers. Rob lives with his wife and 2 sons in Puerto Rico.In this episode, Rennie and Rob cover:01:44 Who Rob works with and why.02:37 Rob's favorite charity – it will be familiar to this audience – Shelter to Soldier.03:54 What Rob considers his biggest failure and how Rennie's course helped him to identify it.05:25 The most common mistake that Rob sees his client's making before working with him.06:32 Rob's Laser Coaching Model and a case study of a coach who used it to create his success.08:16 Rob's recommendation on implementing the Laser Coaching Model.09:02 Where you can opt in for a free report, which goes through that Laser Coaching model in a lot more detail. Here is the affiliate link https://smpl.ro/al/vudgdjzTtkN2jGvVJ3oF1TwB/10706-Rennie-Gabriel10:35 How taxes were Rob's biggest expense and how Rob's move to Puerto Rico helped him with this and how you can get more information on that option.Get Rob's free report: https://smpl.ro/al/vudgdjzTtkN2jGvVJ3oF1TwB/10706-Rennie-GabrielTo learn more about Rob visit: https://www.robgoyette.com/If you'd like to know how books, movies, and society programs you to be poor, and what the cure is visit wealthonanyincome.com/tedx. You'll hear Rennie's TEDx talk and can request a free 27-page Roadmap to Complete Financial Choice® and receive a weekly email with tips, techniques, or inspiration around your business or money. AND if you'd like to see how you can increase your wealth and donate to the causes that touch your heart. Please check out our affordable program ‘Wealth with Purpose'.Rennie's Books and Programshttps://wealthonanyincome.com/books/Wealth with Purpose:https://wealthonanyincome.com/wealthwithpurposeRennie's 9 Days to Financial Freedom program:https://wealthonanyincome.com/programsConnect with Rennie Websites:WealthOnAnyIncome.comRennieGabriel.comEmail: Rennie@WealthOnAnyIncome.comLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/renniegabriel/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WealthOnAnyIncome/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RennieGabrielYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdIkYMOuvzHQqVXe4e_L8PgInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/wealthonanyincome/

The Small Nonprofit
involving your board in fundraising with Elizabeth Abel

The Small Nonprofit

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 27:33


We constantly hear that if you don't have a fundraising board, you won't be able to raise funds as an organization. I don't believe that! In fact, I've had a lot of fundraising success without board fundraising. I know - call all the “gurus” and report this sacrilegious statement!How do we build a board that is all the things we require in leadership (subject matter experts, lived experience, community members) AND get them to love and embrace fundraising?In this episode of The Small Nonprofit Podcast, we talk to Elizabeth Abel, about how to motivate board members to fundraise. Elizabeth is the Senior Vice President at CCS Fundraising, a global fundraising consulting firm for nonprofits and an instructor at the University of Pennsylvania. She has designed, advised, and directed development initiatives and capital campaigns that have collectively raised nearly half a billion dollars, positively impacting tens of thousands of lives.Myths that Elizabeth  wants us to walk away from:Board members can't be involved in fundraising: Board members can be one of the greatest assets to any nonprofit's fundraising efforts because they champion your mission, engage their networks and provide financial support. Board members should focus on major gifts:  You need to figure out how your board members want to be involved in fundraising, find out what are their strengths? And then how can you create that synergy that allows them to be fantastic multipliers and fundraising ambassadors?Corporate giving is better than individual giving: According to  Giving USA 2021: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2020, individuals drove 69% of total giving in the US, which was about $324 billion. Corporations are estimated to have declined by 6.1% in 2020 to only about 17 billion. So there is a huge gap between where people think corporations are and where they are relative to individuals. Elizabeth's Tips on Engaging Board Members to FundraiseFundraising Ambassadors. They bring a diverse set of experiences and skills and talents.  They are multipliers of all that you're doing programmatically, operationally, and of course your philanthropy.Recruiting and Engaging Boards. Many people just don't necessarily know what's expected of them so you can begin with setting expectations and educating board members in their role in fundraising. Best practices.  When considering how our board members can support our fundraising efforts, we want to prioritize relationship building. Elizabeth uses small events to engage and connect with donors as an example. Favourite Quotes from Today's Episode“It's figuring out the ways in which your board members want to be involved in fundraising, what are their strengths? And then how can we create that synergy that allows them to be fantastic multipliers and fundraising ambassadors? ”Resources from this EpisodeElizabeth LinkedIn Elizabeth Instagram The Good PartnershipOur friends at Keela are offering you 40% off your first year's subscription of their donor database. Click the link to book a demo: https://www.keela.co/partner/certified-partner?ref=cindy72Support the show

The Acting Realtor Podcast
[VIDEO] “Surrounding Yourself with the Right People”

The Acting Realtor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 9:14


Over the last few weeks, I've mainly focused on our own internal struggles and insecurities that keep us from taking the necessary steps to better our situation. Our past failures, fear, and overall self-doubt make up just some of the voices that swirl around inside our head and keep our feet nailed to the floor. These voices must be silenced if you ever hope to pursue something your passionate about as a career. However, there is something else that keeps us from taking the most thrilling leap of our lives. How do we silence the voices of those around us who want to keep us from believing we can achieve more?

Jewish Philanthropy Podcast
Topic: Changing the Landscape of Women in Orthodoxy

Jewish Philanthropy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 69:41


Topic: Changing the Landscape of Women in Orthodoxy Guest: Ann Pava Ann Pava, President of Micah Philanthropies, is an activist, philanthropist, and thought leader. A natural community builder, Ann strives to embody the core Jewish values that animate her work, as expressed by the prophet Micah - “Only to do justice, to love kindness and to walk humbly with your God.” As a philanthropist, Ann takes the lead in innovative giving while making all who participate feel counted, and treats all those they support as valued partners. As an activist, she has the unique ability to bring all types of people together, analyze challenges, and devise solutions. Ann believes that one of the strongest avenues to success for any organization is a strong lay and professional partnership. She is an articulate and passionate ambassador for the organizations and leaders she supports. A hallmark of her success over her career is her ability to inspire, mentor, and empower others, especially women, to lead and to make the world a better place. Ann is the immediate past chair of Prizmah: Center for Jewish Day Schools and a past chair of National Women's Philanthropy of the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA). She is Founding Chair of the Hebrew High School of New England, and past chair of the Jewish Federation of Western MA. She currently serves on the boards of the Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance,(JOFA) Yeshivat Maharat, Prizmah, JFNA, and the Jewish Federation of Greater Hartford. She serves as Committee Chair for the Graduate Program for Advanced Talmud Studies for Women (GPATS) at Yeshiva University. Ann is a past recipient of the JFNA Kipnes-Wilson Friedland Award for outstanding women philanthropists. She also received the Harold Grinspoon Foundation's Lay Leadership Award for Excellence in Jewish Education. She and Jeremy received the Connecticut ADL Torch of Liberty Award. Ann enjoys spending time with her husband Jeremy and their beautiful family including their three married children and three grandchildren and has become the world's best babysitter. She is a new and determined runner, an avid reader of any type of fiction, and loves to cook for company.   In this new episode, we cover:   1. Kindness as a guiding light 2. Loving the Underdog 3. The Beauty of Giving 4. The influence & inspiration of Harold Grinspoon 5. How to Ask for & How to Give Money 6. Big Tent Approach 7. A Different ball game in Jewish Life 8. Impacting Schools & Shuls And a whole lot more!  

Work Rest Slay
Work Rest Slay - Episode 9 featuring Sinead McSweeney

Work Rest Slay

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 66:47


Welcome to Work Rest Slay, the monthly podcast featuring honest interviews with inspirational guests. Work Rest Slay is the place to come to for stories about achievement, burnout, success and inspiration as well as tips to help us strive towards more balanced and fulfilling lives. Episode 9 features Sinead McSweeney, MD of Twitter Ireland and VP of Twitter's Global Public Policy & Philanthropy, in conversation with Melanie Morris. Sinead shares the insights she has gained since her move into a leadership position at Twitter, the responsibilities of that role and key management tips.

Bat'HER Up
Talking Sports Philanthropy, Baseball and Mental Health with Toni Nocita.

Bat'HER Up

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 55:25


Toni Nocita owns Impact Sports Marketing- a sports agency centered around helping professional athletes find and support causes that matter to them. You can find learn more about it here: https://www.impactsportsmarketing.com/our-story Follow Toni on Instagram: @toniceleste Follow Impact Sports Marketing on Instagram: @impactsportsmarketing   Follow the pod on Instagram: @batherup_pod   Rate, review, subscribbbeee. 

Conversations with Chanda
It's All Community: A Conversation with Robert Ashcraft

Conversations with Chanda

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 61:03


Dr. Robert Ashcraft is the Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation Executive Director at Arizona State University. Chanda connected with Robert to talk about nonprofit leadership, community building, and the direction of philanthropy.

The Nuts & Bolts of Real Estate Investing
PhilanthroInvesting with Ivan Anz - Philanthropy & Real Estate Investing

The Nuts & Bolts of Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 59:28


Ivan Anz is revolutionizing the industry with his Philanthro Investing process! It's an incredibly imaginative way of combing philanthropy and real estate investing for those that want the upsides and to help humanity. If that feels like you… you will LOVE this podcast and should get involved!

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: The Fed's Best Weapon To Fight Inflation Is Gold: Why Won't The Fed Use It?

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 3:21


The Fed says its actions on Wednesday show it's now serious about fighting inflation. The trouble is, it won't use the best weapon possible: gold. Steve Forbes on the Fed's continued battle with inflation and on how the central bank won't even consider our most formidable, reliable, time-tested tool to keep the dollar stable in value, a gold standard.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

Humanity Chats with Marjy
Community Service and Philanthropy - Ghanaian Women's Association of Georgia

Humanity Chats with Marjy

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 43:16


Adiza Harruna, the immediate past president of the Ghanaian Women's Association of Georgia talks about community and international impact.Headquartered in Atlanta, the Ghanaian Women's Association of Georgia (G-WAG) is a 501(c)(3) organization that promotes entrepreneurship for minority women in Georgia, and empowers women in underserved communities in Ghana by supporting initiatives in healthcare and education that create a positive social impact.Learn more at www.ghanawomen.orgHumanity Chats - a conversation about everyday issues that impact humans. Join us. Together, we can go far. Thank you for listening. Share with a friend. We are humans. From all around the world. One kind only. And that is humankind. Your friend, Marjy Marj

Collective Impact Forum
Building System Leadership Skills with Advance Together

Collective Impact Forum

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 49:45


What kinds of dedicated skill-building can help prepare system leaders for the monumental job of coordinating complex collaborations? In this episode, we learn about Advance Together, a cohort of collective impact initiatives in Texas that focus on education and workforce development. Organized by the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, with support from funders including the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Advance Together cohort members participated in a capacity-building program dedicated to expanding their system leadership skills. Listen in as we explore how the program got started, the impact of the program, and the specific system leadership skills that surfaced as most critical for backbone leaders. Joining us today to share their experiences as part of Advance Together are Rumeli Banik of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Kseniya Benderskaya of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Chris Thompson of Civic Collaboration Consultants, LLC, and Adrian Vega of Education Partnership for the Permian Basin. Moderating this discussion is Collective Impact Forum executive director Jennifer Splansky Juster.Resources and FootnotesAdvance TogetherEducation Partnership of the Permian BasinDoris Duke Charitable FoundationCivic Collaboration Consultants LLCMore on Collective ImpactInfographic: What is Collective Impact?Resource List: Getting Started in Collective ImpactThe Intro music, entitled “Running,” was composed by Rafael Krux, and can be found here and is licensed under CC: By 4.0.The outro music, entitled “Deliberate Thought,” was composed by Kevin Macleod. Licensed under CC: By.Have a question related to collaborative work that you'd like to have discussed on the podcast? Contact us at: https://www.collectiveimpactforum.org/contact-us/

Untapped Philanthropy
Will trust-based philanthropy solve the funder to nonprofit power imbalance?

Untapped Philanthropy

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 37:42


The Trust-Based Philanthropy Project is a five-year peer-to-peer funder initiative designed to address the inherent power imbalances between foundations and nonprofits. The work of the Trust-Based Philanthropy Project is deeply aligned with our work and mission here at Fluxx. We believe that it's not only possible — but also essential — for technologists to partner with philanthropists in order to build pathways to deeper and more trusting partnerships between funders and grantees. That's why we are especially thrilled to welcome Executive Director, Trust-Based Philanthropy Project, Shaady Salehi to this week's Untapped Philanthropy podcast!To learn more about Fluxx visit Fluxx.ioTo learn more about the Trust-Based Philanthropy Project visit trustbasedphilanthropy.orgEpisodes of Untapped Philanthropy are edited, mixed, and mastered by Rocket Skates Recording.

Philanthropy Today
Big Brothers Big Sisters - Philanthropy Today Episode 60

Philanthropy Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 11:26


Big Brothers Big Sisters changes lives.  Michelle Sink, Central Kansas Director of BBBS talks about the impact made in the lives of littles...AND bigs!  We also will learn about a new term on Philanthropy Today, "Friendraising!"  Learn how you can help BBBS by hosting a simple event.Michelle also gives us a preview of "The Manhattan," a fundraising event scheduled for October 6th at the Prairiewood Retreat and Reserve.www.kansasbigs.orgwww.4kidsake.org

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: Russia-Ukraine Conflict: Can We Stop Putin From Waging Nuclear Warfare?

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 3:40


Vladimir Putin grossly miscalculated the war in Ukraine. And now Putin and other Russian officials have warned that Moscow may use nuclear weapons in Ukraine. Is this move unthinkable? How can we stop Putin from waging nuclear warfare? Steve Forbes on the immeasurable stakes at hand and on what could be done to deter Putin from such a move. Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

The Influential Nonprofit
Lynn Wester: How To Keep The Donors You Worked So Hard To Aquire

The Influential Nonprofit

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 41:05


Lynne Wester strongly believes that donor relations is the key to unlocking fundraising success and that organizations must be as dedicated to the donor experience, or DX, as they are to the ask itself. Sometimes referred to as the Olivia Pope of fundraising, Lynne helps organizations when they need it the most – when crisis or opportunity arrive.Lynne and her teammates at the Donor Relations Guru Group partner with nonprofits large and small on a variety of initiatives from developing sound strategy and vision to utilizing technology and creating meaningful donor engagement - all designed to positively affect the fundraising bottom line. Her guidance has led her clients to be recognized on the national stage for fundraising innovation, creative communication, and groundbreaking donor relations work.The DRG website in a unique industry tool filled with resources, samples and thought leadership on donor relations and fundraising. Lynne is regularly featured in publications such as the Washington Post, Chronicle of Philanthropy, and CASE Currents and has authored three books of her own on a myriad of industry topics.Lynne received her B.A. from the University of South Carolina, holds a Masters in Strategic Fundraising and Philanthropy from BayPath University, and proudly sports a DUCKtorate from the Disney Institute. Key Takeaways:Getting hung up on money is what's causing a lot of nonprofits to not be optimized. Prioritize donors more than donations. Also, keeping donors is more important than getting new donors.  Focus on charitable people, stop spending time and effort converting uncharitable people. Personalize and point out what makes your donor special in your “thank you” messages. As an organization, set yourself up as a giver, not a taker. You want to give content, give appreciation, give opportunities - don't put a “donate now” button in every email that you send.  “The number one thing that I think challenges nonprofits is their desire for more money and basing their success on how much money they raise, not on how many donors they keep.”“If we look at the top 10 or 20 motivations as to why a donor makes a gift, an organization's goal is not in those top 10 or 20. ”“I never thank the donor for their gift, I thank the donor for who they are.” - Lynn Wester Reach out to Lynn Wester at:Twitter: https://twitter.com/DonorGuruWebsite: https://www.donorrelationsguru.com/Blog: http://donorguru.blogspot.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lynnewester/ Be more confident, credible & convincing to your board & supporters without feeling rejected, ineffective, or pushy.Learn to manage your mindset, lead yourself and others more effectively and have the meaningful conversations that drive your most important work. Get your free starter kit today at  www.theinfluentialnonprofit.com 

Stories of Inspiring Joy

Tamra Ryan is the CEO of Women's Bean Project, a Colorado 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with the mission to change women's lives by providing stepping stones to self-sufficiency through social enterprise. They believe that all women have the power to transform their lives through employment. So they hire women who are chronically unemployed and they teach them to work by making nourishing products. They learn to stand tall, find their purpose and break the cycle of poverty. Because they believe when you change a woman's life, you change her family's life. Throughout the episode Tamra shares the stories of some of the women she's met in her tenure - and every story and experience will inspire you and touch you. Her reflections on the power of the resiliency of the human spirit, the women she's met at the Bean Project who have faced and overcame insurmountable odds, and how it's changed her - from being a “hard hearted business focused woman” to a woman who wants and needs to know each woman's story, will remind you that what we have in common as people, is far stronger than anything that might divide us. Today, Tamra leads the Bean Project's strategic direction and is instrumental in putting the organization on the national and international map, as a high-performing and impactful social enterprise. She is a former board member of Social Venture Partners-Denver, currently chairs the Board of Directors for the Social Enterprise Alliance and is on the advisory board for the Barton Institute for Philanthropy and Social Enterprise at the University of Denver. To connect with Tamra and Women's Bean Project you can visit their website www.womensbeanProject.com and you can find Tamra on Twitter @tamraryan and via email Tamra.ryan@womensbeanproject.com and you can find Women's Bean Project on Instagram @womensbeanproject on Twitter @womensbean and Facebook @womensbeanproject Stories of Inspiring Joy is a production of Seek The Joy Media and created by Sydney Weiss. To learn more click here. *Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this episode are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Stories of Inspiring Joy.

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
A Social Impact Journey: Building Long Lasting Social Change In Vietnam | Rosi Happi S8E9

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 61:07


Rosi Happi is the Creative Director of The Happievent and Managing Founder of Social ChangeMakers. She spent time studying and living in Europe (Germany, Spain, France & England) and Australia before returning to Vietnam.She is an atypical Vietnamese - a mixed soul: half traditional, half modern.In this episode we talk about;- making herself visible in the Australian hospitality industry as an Asian female- the causal racism found in some Australians- her social impact journey: from personal charity to philanthropy- how she is building long lasting social changes- helping the process of Vietnam moving from a developing country to developedFollow Seven Million Bikes on Facebook or Instagram.Buy us a coffee.-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Audio Engineer Luke Digweed.These are the programs we use to create A Vietnam Podcast.These are affiliate links so they will give us a small commission, only if you sign up , and at no extra cost to you! You'll be directly supporting Seven Million Bikes too.Editing - Descript Host - Buzzsprout Design - Canva Support - Fiverr Website - 10 Web Support independent podcasting and A Vietnam Podcast Vietnam by joining the Seven Million Bikes Community. Start from just 90k a month, stop at any time, get episodes early, bonus content, free tickets to shows, invites to member-only events next 5 people to join up will get an SMB reusable mask for free! (Worth 129k) Did That Really Happen? A new comedy podcast from Seven Million BikesListen and Subscribe/FollowApple Podcasts / Spotify / Podcast Addict /

Mission-Driven
Chris Mann '00

Mission-Driven

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 80:58


Welcome to Season 3!  New episodes will be released througout the spring and summer of 2022. The first episode of season 3 features a conversation with Chris Mann '00.  Chris has built his career around making a difference in the lives of others.  He's joined in conversation with JP Cunningham '23.  They discuss Chris' time at Holy Cross and how he has carried the HC mission to serve others throughout his life and career. Interview originally recorded in November 2021. -- Chris: And so, I think you're seeing companies really say, "This is about our values and being clear on what our values are." Because our most important stakeholders, our people are saying that that's what matters to them and that's what they care about. And so, I think we just think about business differently. Maura: Welcome to Mission-Driven, where we speak with alumni who are leveraging their Holy Cross education to make a meaningful difference in the world around them. I'm your host Maura Sweeney from the class of 2007, Director of Alumni Career Development at Holy Cross. I'm delighted to welcome you to today's show. This episode features Chris Mann from the class of 2000. Maura: Chris's career has spanned roles that have one thing in common, making a positive impact on people and communities. He graduated from Holy Cross with a psychology major and art history minor. With this foundation, he joined the Dana-Farber and Jimmy Fund team, and his career flourished. Skilled at fundraising, event planning, marketing, and communications, Chris flexed his talents and roles at New Balance, Cone Communications, Reebok, and City Year. Maura: At the time this podcast was recorded, Chris worked as the Senior Vice President of Development for City Year. At the time this podcast is aired, Chris will have assumed a new role at Bain Capital as the first Vice President of Community Affairs, leading their philanthropy, employee volunteerism, events, and sponsorship. Chris is joined in conversation by JP Cunningham from the class of 2023. Maura: Their conversation is far-reaching but starts with the transformative years that Chris spent at Holy Cross, his time on the track and field team, and serving as senior class president, as well as his experiences during immersion programs and running summer orientation helped shape who he is today. Better yet, he can count the ways that the Holy Cross Alumni Network has supported him through each step in his career. A proud alumnus, Chris exemplifies the impact that one person can make by committing their talents to mission-driven work. JP: Hello, everyone. Thank you all for listening. I'm JP Cunningham. I'm a junior here at Holy Cross. And I'm joined by Chris Mann. Chris, how are you doing today? Chris: Hey, JP. I'm good. Good to be here with you today. JP: Thank you. So, yeah, I guess with that, we'll get right into it. I wanted to start with a little bit before your time at Holy Cross. So, my first question is, during your college search, what were some of the factors that drew you to the college? And was it your top choice? Yeah, if you can touch on that. Chris: Yeah, absolutely. So, like most high school students, I was looking at a lot of different schools. I didn't quite know what I wanted. I was the first and oldest child in my family, so I hadn't any brothers or sisters go through the college application process before. And at the time, this was in the mid-'90s, there wasn't as much information. It was kind of the glossy books you got in the mail and things like that, and word of mouth. But I knew a couple of things. Chris: I knew living in Andover, Massachusetts and growing up there, I wanted to be close enough to home that I could get back and forth. So, that kind of kept me looking at New England colleges for the most part. And as I started exploring, I knew about Holy Cross's reputation from an academic standpoint, but also had a couple of people at my high school, Andover High School, that I remember really respecting and looking up to in some ways that had gone to Holy Cross a couple of years before me. Chris: So, Chris Sintros, who was a class of '98, and Christine Anderson, class of '99. And I think it just piqued my interest to say, "Hey, those are people that I think I want to be like, and they chose this school." I actually got really fortunate to end up at Holy Cross. It was one of, I think, five schools I applied to, and I was waitlisted. So, I actually didn't know that I was going to get in until right to the end, and was really relieved and excited when I got in off the waitlist. Chris: And it ended up being a great scenario because I came on campus as the only person from my high school going to Holy Cross in that class. And I was matched up with three roommates in a quad in my freshman year. And it really helped me build some relationships and a network right away in a new place, new environment. JP: Awesome. That's really cool. Yeah, I can kind of relate to that, too, because both my dad and my sister went here, and then a lot of just friends and older classmates at my high school went to Holy Cross. And they're all just role models. And I felt the same way like, wow, this seems like a good place to be and that's what drew me there, too. So, it's great. Chris: Yeah. And I would say too, in visiting the school and seeing it, I mean, I certainly fell in love with the classic New England brick college, IV and setting, and it's a beautiful campus, as you know. And so, that, I was really excited about. And I started to get more and more of a field just as I came to visit a couple of different times. Chris: And as you started to read in and hear about the college's mission, and talking about being men and women for and with others, that all started to really resonate for me and felt a little different compared to some of the other schools that I had been visiting, and I loved that. I also really thought that the size was right for me. I was somewhat of a shy kid. I think I was trying to figure out where my place was. Chris: And I liked the idea of being in a school that felt a little smaller and where I wasn't going to get lost in the shuffle. And I think that ended up being a really big thing for me over the course of the four years, too. JP: Yeah, I couldn't agree more. I feel like people might say it's cliche, but I feel like at Holy Cross, the sense of community, just being on campus that first time, at least for me too, visiting that first time, there's something about it that really draws you and makes you feel like, "Hey, this is the place for me." Yes. I guess moving into the next question, after you became a student here, what were some of the things you were involved in during your time on the Hill? And was there one that you were most passionate about? Chris: I got to do a lot of different things, which was to our earlier point, the benefit of going to a smaller school with a lot of opportunities. Off the bat, athletics ended up being a big thing for me, which wasn't something I had planned. I had done sports in high school all three seasons. Really, I was passionate about basketball and track and field, but hadn't expected to be able to do that in college. Chris: And I showed up on campus and I remember, I think it was probably the first week of school, I got a phone call from Larry Napolitano who was the captain of the track team just saying, "Hey, we saw you did track and field in high school. Would you be interested in coming out and joining the team?" And I said, "Yes", and it was one of the great experiences of my time on the Hill being able to be part of that team. Chris: I certainly wasn't a phenomenal athlete or setting any records, but being part of that team environment, getting a chance to get into the daily routine that athletes do I think really benefited me. The structure was really helpful. I think it prepared me for life after college and having a busy schedule of going from weightlifting, to workouts, to classes, to other things. Chris: And just the relationships you build with teammates and coaches and the life lessons of athletics were really valuable and it helps cement a lifelong practice of fitness and health that exists to this day. So, that was foundational. That was a big one. And then, later in my time at Holy Cross, my senior year, I ended up getting encouraged to run for student government. And I ended up being elected president of the senior class of 2000. Chris: And that was a really powerful experience for me, too, so having a broader role in leading fellow students and thinking about our voice on campus. And to be honest, putting myself out there more publicly to run and be elected was not something I was very comfortable with or used to. So, building up that courage and having people believe in me to do that was also really important. And I think it started to show me that maybe I could do some things that I hadn't previously been confident enough to do or thought I could do. Chris: So, that was another big experience. And same thing, balancing those commitments with academics, with athletics really prepared me for life after college and the working world. JP: That's great. Yeah. I feel like balancing all those activities, being a full-time student athlete while being the president of your class can only help you in the long run and having that structure to your schedule and balancing different activities. Because I don't play any sports, but just balancing activities week by week with the schoolwork and all that, it definitely... I feel like it can only help you for after you graduate. JP: So, yeah, going off that, I guess a little more shifting towards the academics. One of the great things about Holy Cross in liberal arts education in general is that you really have the opportunity to major in anything that piques your interest, and then go out and succeed in business or whatever field you choose. So, I know you're a psychology and art history major. Were there any specific skills that you developed from your course of study that have helped you in your professional career? Chris: Yeah, it's interesting. It was another case of I didn't know what I wanted to study. When I came to Holy Cross, I started taking a few different classes in different areas to try and understand what resonated with me and that was what attracted... the liberal arts education attracted me to Holy Cross as well because I didn't know what I wanted to do. Chris: And I found myself really intrigued in the early psychology classes that I took, whether it was Intro to Psychology, or we had some ones later, behavioral psychology and other things, that just fascinated me between the... both the science and the depth of that field, but then also the ways in which humans interact and the way in which our environment influences us just fascinated me. And I really found myself loving that. Chris: And then, on the flip side, I ended up getting a minor in art history, similarly, because I just found myself interested and passionate in the subject matter and human experience behind that. I wouldn't have thought at the time that either of those would translate into a career path or job. I wasn't going to be a psychologist. I certainly wasn't an artist, but I have found over time that I think there are some lessons in the specifics of that. Chris: And in my current job in previous iterations where I'm a fundraiser, and in essence, I sell people on City Year's mission and investing in City Year's mission, some of the experiences and the lessons from psychology come out there, and understanding how you engage and connect with and influence people. So, that is certainly there. Chris: But more broadly, I just think the liberal arts' approach and specifically Holy Cross and the rigor of the academics forced me to really get tight and concise with my thinking, with how to make an argument, with how to take in information, synthesize that and consolidate it and communicate in a really effective, clear way, both verbally, written, visually, et cetera. Those are things I lean on on a daily basis. And I don't think I appreciated it at the time. Chris: But in talking with friends and colleagues and others whose college experiences were very different, either giant lecture halls or other things, the time, the attention, the rigor of the academics was really valuable. And I don't think I realized it until much later. JP: Yeah, I agree. I feel like everyone... and that's also one of the things that drew me to the liberal arts education is the fact that people say, obviously, you study what's interesting to you, but then being able to develop those skills like critical thinking, communication, and just being able to use those skills effectively go a long way in the professional world. So, you touched on some of the activities you were involved in when you are here at Holy Cross. JP: And since you graduated, there have been a number of new programs, activities. For example, the Ciocca Center for Business, Ethics, and Society was established in 2006. Are there any programs or activities happening now that you've become aware of at Holy Cross that stand out to you or you wish were around when you were a student? Chris: I think the Ciocca Center would have been something I would have really enjoyed getting a chance to participate in. I think this idea of business and ethics and where those intersect, and how companies can have an impact on society has been the centerpiece of my career and the different jobs that I've had. So, I think I would have really enjoyed going deeper there in a more formal way, for sure. Chris: I also really appreciate what the college has done in the last few years as we think about diversity at Holy Cross and how is the Holy Cross experience accessible to all. That is, I think, one takeaway from my time. Certainly, we had some level of diversity when I was at Holy Cross, but it was not nearly what it needs to be and what it should be going forward. And I think particularly for fellow classmates that were of color or came from different backgrounds and the majority of students, I think it was a really challenging thing for them and continues to be. Chris: And so, I think the idea of having a college community that does have more representation, does have more diversity across all levels and spectrums of how diversity shows up is valuable because I think, to be honest, it creates a better learning environment, it creates better dialogue, it creates better understanding. And I think that was a challenge, to be honest, during my time at Holy Cross. Many of the students were just like me coming from the same families, communities, et cetera. Chris: And so, that's something that I've been very encouraged to see over the last few years. JP: Yeah, absolutely. I feel like as a student for me and talking to alumni like yourself and just other people I've spoken to, people just say it's awesome to see the way the college is changing for the better, both academically and socially, like you just touched on. Moving a little away from strictly Holy Cross, can you maybe run through your career or professional path starting after you graduated from the college? Chris: Yeah. So, I was really lucky, and this is an area where I talk to current students or students that are considering Holy Cross, and the network of alumni really stepped up and helped me start my career and pursue the opportunities I've had. And I've been really fortunate to come across Holy Cross graduates at every role, every organization that I've been in, which speaks to the power of even the network of a small school overall. Chris: So, I was trying to decide what I wanted to do after graduation. As we mentioned, I had done activities in track and field. I was big into sports, so I was thinking sports marketing and those areas. I also got a chance, while I was on campus, to do a couple of spring break trips via Habitat for Humanity and build some houses down in Tallahassee, Florida for two spring breaks in a row. Chris: That and an internship at the Special Olympics while I was a student started to spark my interest in having a job where I can actually give back and support causes I cared about, and earn beyond a paycheck feel like I was having an impact on a daily basis in my work. So, that was interesting to me. And we had also run and started summer orientations program, the Gateway Summer Orientation Program. Chris: I was fortunate to be part of that first summer orientation program as a leader and then later, one of the co-leads of it. And I found myself really liking and being attracted by events and the planning that would go into preparing for an orientation program or some other event, and then seeing that come together and seeing people have a great time interacting and being part of that event. So, I was looking at sports marketing. I was looking at event management. I was thinking about nonprofits and exploring different things. Chris: And I was talking with John Hayes, who's class of '91. And he was the director of Holy Cross Fund at the time. He was our advisor for our Senior Class Gift. And John said, "Hey, you should really go talk to my friend Cynthia Carton O'Brien now, a class of '93, who was working at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund." And so, he connected me to Cindy via informational interview. I went and learn more about Dana-Farber and the Jimmy Fund, and just loved the idea of it. Chris: It was a cancer hospital, obviously in Boston, doing amazing work for patients and their families, but also had this deep connection in history to the Red Sox. So, as a sports fan, I was excited about that. And I ended up applying for a couple of different jobs there coming out of school. And on the fundraising side, one was potentially to work in plan giving, so helping people think about their giving benefiting those beyond their lifetimes and resourcing the organization for the future. Chris: And then, the other one was going to be a rotational role, which was going to work on different areas of fundraising, the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk, donor advance and stewardship events, and then also cause marketing, which at the time was a fairly new thing that companies were starting to do. And so, I ended up getting that second job on the rotation. And it was just a phenomenal opportunity experience to get to learn different parts of fundraising and to work with some really, really great team. Chris: So, when I think about advice for people coming out of school and what to think about, I think finding a job where you can learn as much as possible and get exposed to as many different things as you can certainly really worked out for me. And it gave me a chance to understand what parts of fundraising and events that I really liked and what worked well for me. And I was also really lucky to work with just some amazing people. Chris: In particular, my first boss and my first teams on the Jimmy Fund Walk, which later included a couple of Holy Cross grads in the years after me that we hired as well, was just a perfect first start into the working world, for sure. JP: Definitely. So, you may have just answered this next question, but I'll still pose it to you. I know you talked about your experience with the Gateway's orientation. So, would you say that was something that from your time at Holy Cross that greatly influenced your post-grad experience and career? Or were there few other things? Chris: Gateways did influence me mostly in that I realized that I really enjoyed working in a team environment and it was with a lot of students from across different grades that I hadn't met or didn't know before. And I think that idea of working in a team that had some diversity in their experiences, et cetera, is definitely something that's resonated longer term and I've realized leads to a great work environment and a great end product in that Gateway's orientation. Chris: I definitely love the event planning piece of it. And so, I think that steered me towards my first job, for sure. As I got older, I realized I didn't love the always on and the stress of the event planning and so I've since moved to other areas. But I think the idea of that camaraderie and coming together to build something bigger than yourselves was really valuable for me. And I also loved being able to share my experiences with others and with other students. Chris: And so, getting a chance to really talk to people and help share my experience was something that I valued. I think it was probably an early stage mentorship. I don't think I realized it at the time, but I think that's what drew me to it was being able to work with students who were coming into a Holy Cross environment, nervous about it, not sure what to do, and really saying, "Hey, this is going to be a great experience for you. And here's all the reasons why or here are some things to look at." Chris: I realized I think later that that idea of being a mentor and having that mentoring relationship is something that I really value and enjoying doing. But again, I don't think I realized it at the time. But I think it was one of those foundational things, for sure, at least in the early jobs. JP: Absolutely. Yeah, that's awesome. I feel like it's cool to think back on the different ways certain events or activities that you took or spend so much time participating in can go such a long way in your life and the decisions you made, and things like that. Chris: I think so. I think other experiences, too, that I had probably more steered in that direction of what I wanted to do for career, I think having the opportunity to do an internship during my junior year with the Special Olympics of Massachusetts and help to do the marketing and recruitment for a Polar Plunge event that they did sparked an interest in, "Oh, you can do marketing, and you can do these types of business things that I want to do that have an impact for our cause." Chris: And Special Olympics was near and dear to my heart because my mom was a special education teacher. And so, I saw firsthand the power that that can have when you have inclusive opportunities for all young people, and give them a chance to participate in athletics and have those same experiences and lessons that I did from it was really valuable. So, I think the idea and the spark of having a job that can have an impact started there. Chris: And then, I had a summer experience in between my junior and senior years at Holy Cross, where I worked in an educational camp for kids called Super Camp and spent a few weeks on a college campus working with students that were struggling academically. And what we learned in the process when you get to meet these kids and work with them is that, in most cases, it wasn't because they didn't have the ability to learn or to do those that work. Chris: It was because there were other things going on in their lives that were either being a distraction or creating additional challenges that made it hard for them to show up in the education environment or in school in the way that they could or they should. And I think that in hindsight really is why I find myself loving the work that we do at City Year right now. And it's come full circle in that way because we see that talent is absolutely equally distributed and it's everywhere, but access and opportunity are not equally distributed. Chris: So, that's part of what we get to do at City Years is to say, "How can we make sure that every student gets the opportunities that they deserve to really tap into their talent and see success in their futures?" And I think that experience at Super Camp really gave me the first understanding of what education can look like when it works for everyone. JP: Yeah, absolutely. So, while we're looking in hindsight and reflecting on your experience post-Holy Cross, I know there's a lot to say about the strength of Holy Cross's Alumni Network. Could you tell a little bit about how that network has influenced your professional career? Chris: Yeah, it's influenced my professional career because I've been lucky to work with Holy Cross grads in every step of the way in every job almost that I can think of. So, at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund, we hired Joe Robertson, who was a track and field classmate of mine, class of '02, Rebecca Manikian in the year before, '01. So, I got to work with both of them on the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk and had a community and a shared experience with the two of them. Chris: Worked with Kristina Coppola Timmins at Cone Communications. And Rebecca and Joe also were ended up being Cone alumni at different points. And then, now, a huge number of Holy Cross grads, past and present, that I have worked through, including my current boss, AnnMaura Connolly, class of '86. So, I think at every step, I've seen Holy Cross alumni show up both in the work environment and help in the broader network. Chris: There's not a question that I would have or a connection I'd be trying to make that I couldn't reach out to somebody at Holy Cross and just say, "Hey, we share this background. Can you help?" And there's been countless times where I've had Holy Cross grads that I either know or don't know be willing to offer advice or make a connection, no questions asked and right away all the time. And I think that's fairly rare, at least in my experience. Chris: And it always surprises me how we'll be having a conversation and somebody will say, "Oh, they went to Holy Cross." It's amazing I think how people show up, particularly in the space that I'm in where you're working in the nonprofit field or in other jobs that are trying to have an impact on society. I think that's where the Jesuit teachings I think resonate for folks. And they really internalized that learning and those values, and I think it shows up in their career choices, and it certainly did for me. JP: Definitely. Yeah. Even for me as a student, I feel like something everyone can agree on is the strength of the Holy Cross alumni network. And something I always think about, even before I became a student here, just like walking around, wearing either a Holy Cross hat or that purple shirt, I was surprised and people would be surprised based on how many times you would get stopped, like, "Oh, you went to Holy Cross. I was a grad from this class." And I think that's something really special about that network. Chris: Happens all the time. And you see it in families, too. I mean, you're seeing it in your own with your sister being a grad. And I'm hopeful that my kids will end up being graduates as well. But I think you see that legacy in a lot of ways among families, among communities, where that becomes more than just an individual experience. It's a shared family experience, which is a pretty special thing. JP: Yeah, definitely. And even the fact that, like you mentioned, even just being a student, the fact that any alumni you either reach out to or you meet, they're just so willing to sit down and talk for as long as you need and give you advice or whatever the purpose is for that phone call or that meeting. They really just sit down and are willing to help in any way possible. So, I think that's something that's awesome about the college. JP: So, moving along, I think one of the great things about this podcast is that it highlights and showcases the different ways that Holy Cross mission of men and women for others can play into so many different careers and stories of different alumni. So, I guess just to start, what mission or values fuel your professional work today? Chris: Yeah. It's interesting, I think I've been fortunate to work at this intersection of companies and causes coming together to drive better business and greater good. And it's happened throughout my career and gone full circle starting on the nonprofit side at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund and moving over to the corporate side at New Balance Athletic Shoe and later Reebok, and then now in my current role at City Year. Chris: Seeing how companies can work with nonprofits and advising some of them on how to do that, when I was at Cone Communications and advising clients on those pieces, it's just always fascinated me that you can have a social impact. And it doesn't have to just be about charity, it doesn't have to be just about volunteerism or working in a nonprofit that there's all kinds of ways in which everybody can do that individually and collectively. Chris: Companies have a tremendous opportunity and tremendous power to be able to do that. And so, for me, I realized early on through those internships, experiences that I knew I was motivated by doing something kind of more than earning a paycheck, that I wanted to see that impact. Personally, I want to have a job that at the end of the day, I could feel like we were doing something bigger. And I think that was always a core value. Chris: I think, for me, that came from my parents. I think my example was seeing my mom be a special education teacher and work with students to give them that opportunity and to address some of that inequity and make sure that education was tailored to their needs and their situation, paired with my dad who was an executive in an enterprise rent a car for his whole career, high powered, highly growing business, and getting to see that side of it. Chris: And I think those two sensibilities really steered what I was looking for and seeing it as an example. I wanted to dig into business problems. I love the how do you think deeply about that? How do you try and solve those? How do you get somebody to buy your product or support your company or do something? So, the marketing and advertising and those pieces of it were fascinating to me intellectually, but I wanted to see an impact at the same time. Chris: And so, I think I was searching for that through each role of saying, "How do we combine those two things? And how does that show up?" In my time at the Jimmy Fund, it was really good for two things. I think my first job there was working a lot with families that were participating in the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk. And what I realized really quickly was, it was such a huge crash course in empathy and in building relationships and in listening. Chris: Because in most cases, I was just helping people that were participating in the event get registered, get their team organized and set up, get the T-shirts for the event, help them with their fundraising, things like that. But in most cases, I was talking with people that were either in the midst of the worst experience of their life because they were having somebody in their family facing cancer, or they were remembering the worst experience of their life and having lost somebody to cancer. Chris: And so, I think what I found is, you'd have a lot of conversations where people would get frustrated or they'd be angry or emotional, all rightfully so because they were dealing with really hard things. And I think I learned to be able to pick up on that and to connect with them and to try and find ways to encourage and support. And I think it was just a hugely valuable early experience in saying, "How do you connect with people and how do you build relationships?" Chris: "And how do you not take for granted both your own health and good fortune, but also how you'd be there when somebody else is struggling and understand what they're dealing with? And can you lift that load in some small way?" And I certainly was not doing anything significant in that regard and in that role, but I could make their day a little bit easier or solve a problem for them, et cetera. I started to really get excited about the ability to do that. And I found that was really motivating for me. Chris: So, the idea of having a purpose and being able to help somebody in a process during that day was, I think, started to become foundational. I think it also gave me a lot of perspective. You could be having a rough day in your job or something else going on. You could walk down the hall to the Jimmy Fund clinic and see the kids there that are coming in for treatment. It puts it in perspective pretty quick on your challenges and what's tough in your life when you're seeing that with a kid. Chris: So, for me, I think it helped build an immense sense of both opportunity to have an impact but then also an immense sense of gratitude for how fortunate I was. And I think those were two foundational pieces of that experience. And then, later, the second big lesson that I learned and this sparked the longer term career path was, I started to work more with the companies that were participating in the Jimmy Fund Walk, either that were sponsoring the event in different ways or they were getting their employees actively walking and fundraising. Chris: And that gave me a different side of it. It gave me exposure to stuff that I hadn't thought of, which was why would businesses do these types of things? Why would businesses want to have some sort of impact socially, which at the time was still relatively, I wouldn't say uncommon, but it wasn't as clear and upfront as it is today. Philanthropy was something that companies did on the side. It was nice to do because they wanted to be good citizens. But it wasn't a business strategy. Chris: It wasn't something that people were asking them about on a daily basis. It wasn't something that they thought about as part of their broader work as an organization and in their community. And so, that just fascinated me was like, why would companies want to do this outside of a classic kind of capitalist structure where they just have to add value for shareholders in the old Adam Smith lessons and things like that? Chris: And what I realized was, there was so much potential and so many resources that companies could bring to bear to help solve social issues. They had incredible skill and knowledge and power behind what they were doing in a lot of cases, really sophisticated ways to do things as businesses. Two, they had amazing people that they can deploy to have an impact in different ways, whether that was volunteering their time or giving access to their customers, things like that. Chris: And then, three, they can really tell a powerful story. Many companies can reach huge numbers of people and customers in a way that nonprofits can't and don't have the dollars or the access to be able to do. So, they could raise awareness and shine a light on different issues and get people to engage and support in a way that no nonprofit could ever hope to do. And I just became fascinated by that, on what a company could potentially do to have an impact in their community. Chris: And so, I think that job gave me two foundational experiences that I think have started to show up in each of the subsequent jobs that I started to have and really got me on that path. So, I think that's where the kind of being men and women for others started to show up for me was it was like a light went on, like, "Oh, this is how I can do that. This is where I can kind of have that be part of my daily life." JP: Yeah, that's amazing. I think what stuck out to me there was the perspective that you gained and you're sharing with us today is going back to at work or at school, you could be having a really bad day and that's that. I mean, obviously, no one enjoys having a bad day and it happens. But being able to just realize that oftentimes it could be way worse, and there's people, there are children and other people struggling, and they may be having a way worse day than you, I think that's a really important perspective for people to develop and take with them day by day. Chris: Yeah, I think so. Now, we have to acknowledge that that's easy for me to do as a white male, heterosexual, affluent, man of privilege in every possible dimension you can probably think of. I've had every advantage I could possibly have. And so, I think it's easy to say, "Have gratitude and appreciate those things when your life is what my life has been." And that doesn't mean we haven't had challenges and I haven't face things that have been tough, but I think it does give you a bit of a perspective. Chris: And I think gratitude and appreciation for those advantages and those experiences I've had is something that's driven a lot of the work for me and the why. But I would say within that, it's not uncommon, people come to try to have a social impact in many ways because of either guilt or a feeling of charity, like, "This is something I should pay it back. I should give back," and I certainly did. I think that was my perspective. I've been given a lot of opportunity. Chris: I owe it to others to give back in that way. I think when you start to do the work and you start to get proximate and really work on different issues, whatever it is, whether it's education or hunger or any way in which racism shows up in all of our systems, you start to realize that you move on the scale from charity to social justice, and really saying, "This isn't about me giving back or appreciating the opportunities I've had. This is about changing a system that is not just." Chris: "And it's my responsibility to play a deeper role there and to do what I can with the resources I have to drive some change there." So, I think you move from charity to social justice as you start to get proximate and more exposed to issues. And I think Holy Cross planted the ideas behind it and the early experiences, whether it was Habitat or other areas where I could start to see and get exposed to that. Chris: But I think later in my career and particularly at City Year, I started to see that more clearly and I think that's why my career has moved more in that direction. JP: Definitely. Yeah. So, I think you also, with those remarks you made, answered the next question I had, but I wanted to just emphasize. Is there something specific that drives you to work hard each and every day? And my takeaway from all you've just said is, I feel like the common theme of impact and purpose. That's what I picked up on, just whether it's you impacting someone or something, or the company you're working for, or just being able to realize the impact that someone else is having or that greater company is having on a specific cause. JP: That was my takeaway. And I think that's awesome just from a professional standpoint, being able to live by those themes of purpose and impact. That's really great. Chris: I think that's right. I think purpose and impact is the right way to frame it. I do think about that, hopefully, every day. Am I having a purpose and am I having an impact? In the day to day, I think you don't probably get up and get out of bed and think about that immediately. But I do think, as I thought about how I want to work and what jobs I want to take and what organizations I want to be at, I think in those times of reflection, certainly grounding back into purpose and impact has absolutely been the question I asked myself. Chris: Where can I feel connected and closest to a purpose? And where can I have the greatest impact in either my experience or in an organization that's working on a really hard problem? So, certainly, when I thought about coming to City Year and in my most recent role, that's absolutely what I was thinking about is, I had missed being close to the impact in a way that I had at Dana-Farber. Chris: And even at New Balance where I was on the corporate side but working closely with a lot of our nonprofit partners, I got to see that impact on a daily basis. When I moved into Cone Communications and advising nonprofit clients and business clients on their programs and their impact, I loved it. It was mentally fascinating and rigorous and an amazing training ground on all kinds of things around strategy and marketing and communications. Chris: Really tremendous skills and experience. But I found myself too far away from the people that we were serving, and I missed that. I wanted to get closer and back to that. And I think that's what drew me back to the nonprofit side at City Year was a chance to really work among people that were having that level of idealism and impact on a daily basis. Chris: And I also felt like it was a chance to take experiences and skills that I gained from other jobs and put them to really good use in helping, so you think about how we work with companies. Yeah. And I think the working hard piece to our earlier conversation, I think the rigor of Holy Cross academically and then all the other things that I got to be involved in really built that work habit in to where you show up and you do the work every day. Chris: And I think good things happen if you consistently spend the time and put in the effort. And again, I would say I had great examples, whether it's my parents or whether it's coaches and others, that really ingrain that work ethic and constantly trying to move forward for something bigger, whether it was a team that you were part of or whether it was the organization and the issue you were trying to support. JP: Definitely. Yeah. So, I guess to shift gears a little bit here, I wanted to talk about the Boston Marathon. Correct me if I'm wrong here, but you ran the Boston Marathon not once, not twice, but three times. Is that- Chris: Four actually. JP: Four, okay. So, the Boston Marathon, four times. At least in my opinion, being able to run the marathon one time is one heck of an achievement. So, could you tell me a little bit about what drove you to do that again and again and again and again? Chris: Yeah, yeah. It was working at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute really was the big thing in our first event. And that I got to work on the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk. I got exposed to the course because there was a fundraising walk along the route of the Boston Marathon. And we'd have thousands of people walk and fundraise for Dana-Farber along the route. So, I got to know the marathon course, its history. Chris: I got a really good opportunity to work with people like Dave McGillivray, the director of the Boston Marathon, and get to know him and his amazing team and learn from them. And just started to fall in love with that event. I would volunteer at the marathon and see it. And as a former track and field athlete, I wasn't a distance runner by any means, but I started to get it into my head that it would be a really challenging athletic experience. And so, that was interesting. Chris: To be honest, it was my wife that steered me in that direction. She ran the marathon first a couple of times for Dana-Farber and fundraise for them. And so, I got to see her experience doing that. And I'm kind of a competitive guy, so I decided that I wanted to do it myself. And I couldn't just let her have all the fun. So, I did, I signed up and ran for Dana-Farber. I actually got a chance to run that first marathon with my wife who, God bless her, waited for me and dragged me along those last few miles because I was struggling, and she was kind and carried me along. Chris: And then, I had a chance to do it a couple more times, which was great, including when I didn't finish, which was a huge disappointment and a physical struggle. But I got to come back in another year and completed, and it's some of my greatest memories and experiences of participating in that event and being part of fundraising for Dana-Farber, for City Year as part of that. The marathon is a really special event for Boston. Chris: And I think what you learn in that event is that people are always surprised and super like you were complimentary about being able to run that marathon. I fully believe that most people can run a marathon, and I've seen it firsthand on the course. I think what it gets to is our earlier conversation about how do you go pursue your goals and do those things. And anybody that's run a marathon can tell you that the race day is the reward. Chris: It's the thing at the end, it's the countless hours, the 16 weeks before where you're going and you're running three, four, five, six, depending on what your training schedule is, days a week. And putting in countless miles in good weather, bad weather, darkness, snow, rain, cold, your ability to get up and do that each day and keep consistently growing the mileage and keeping the training, that's what leads to the marathon and the success at the end. Chris: So, it's really about, can you do that work on a daily basis? And can you progress over time by sticking with it through the ups and the downs? And then, I was really lucky to train with great groups of people each time. And I think that's another lesson of it is, it's pretty hard thing to go train by yourself and go run a marathon by yourself. Most people that do it have done their training with a group of friends and other people that are running that helped motivate them, support them, and inspire them. Chris: And then, day off, all the people that are out there are cheering you on, supporting you, helping you get to that day. It's truly a team effort. So, I just got to get the rewards of doing it four times. JP: Yeah, that's an awesome achievement. And I have a ton of respect for you and anyone who does that. In fact, one of my buddies here at Holy Cross, Colman Benson, he's a sophomore, and he ran this past marathon. And just seeing him go through that training earlier in the fall, I'd be like, "Oh, what are you doing tomorrow?" He's like, "Oh, I'm running 12 miles in the morning, then I'm going to class." And I just think that's very impressive and definitely an awesome achievement. Chris: Yeah, it's not too late, JP. You can start training, too. JP: Yeah. So, I read in a previous interview that one of your most memorable achievements is your support of Susan G. Komen for the Cure while you're with New Balance. Can you speak a little to that? Chris: Yeah. So, after my first couple jobs at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund, I mentioned I found myself just becoming so fascinated by what companies could do. And I realized that I really wanted to experience it from a company's perspective. I wanted to get over to that side of the work. Around that time, I also decided that I wanted to go deeper into business. I was working with companies. Chris: I was asking them to support us, but I didn't really understand business in a deep way. And so, I ended up going back to graduate school at night to get my MBA while I was working at Dana-Farber. And I ended up making the switch over to New Balance and taking a job there really that was the opposite or the flip side of what I had been doing at the Jimmy Fund. Chris: So, instead of asking companies to support us and asking them to sponsor and have their employees participate in our events, and have an impact in that way, I was helping to guide New Balance's investment in different nonprofits in the community and thinking about how we showed up with our dollars, with our products, with our people to support those efforts. And so, the job was to manage what New Balance called their cause marketing work at the time. Chris: I sat in the marketing department at New Balance. I was measured in the same ways that other marketers were on driving awareness of New Balance's brand, consideration of our product and trying on footwear and apparel and things like that, and then ultimately sales of that product, which was great. And I loved it because I got a chance to really get into the marketing and science of that, which was fascinating, and do it at a brand and in a field of athletic footwear and apparel that I was personally passionate about as a runner and as an athlete. Chris: So, best of both worlds there. And it was just a great opportunity to take what I knew from the nonprofit side and bring that sensibility into the corporate environment into how we showed up and work with our nonprofit partners, whether it was Susan G. Komen for the Cure or Girls on the Run, which was our other major partner. And I just loved it. And I think that really crystallized, this is the career path for me. Chris: I can work with cool products and in areas that I really liked, but I can have an impact in that way. And it just opened my eyes to what was possible for companies. New Balance was such a special place because it was a privately held, family-owned company, had a tremendous number of people that I worked there for years. It really felt like a community of people in ways that the Jimmy Fund and Holy Cross actually felt very similar to me, and that's what I loved about being there at the time. Chris: And we got to do some really cool things, whether it was working on all the different Komen events. I had a chance to meet Joe Biden, President Biden, when he was vice president at the time at an event for Komen and New Balance, which was amazing. We got to do great things, marketing our products, and attending different events, and meeting celebrities. I went on The Ellen Show to give away million dollars for breast cancer research and got to have the big chat out there and hand that to Ellen. Chris: So, amazing, unique experiences that I wouldn't have other ever anticipated getting a chance to do as a result of that job. It's a really special company. And later, I got a chance to really go deep and work with Girls on the Run after my time at New Balance. After I left New Balance, I had a chance to join the board of Girls on the Run and serve on their board and chair their board for a few years. Chris: And to get to work with that amazing nonprofit that focuses on women's leadership development and girls empowerment through a running curriculum and really social-emotional skill building curriculum was just an amazing experience to, again, work for another world-class nonprofit and get a chance to see it grow. So, another really fortunate opportunity for me. JP: Yeah, that's incredible. That seems like such an overall special, I guess, group of things that you got, meeting the president and going on The Ellen Show. That's awesome. So, I guess, it seems like it's hard to top those experiences. But has anything changed in terms of your most memorable milestone since then in your career? Chris: I think you start to look at what are the skills and experiences and most importantly, the relationships you build over your career. And each of those are really cool memories and experiences. But I think what matters is the relationships that you start to have and build over time. So, when I think about those different jobs, it's more about the people that I got a chance to work with and get to learn from. Chris: And I think City Year as my current job and organization now for the last eight years, that's what I start to think about and focus on is how have I gotten the chance to work with and learn from really great people, and continued. I think, even in this kind of midway through my career and later in my career, I feel like I'm still learning and growing on a daily basis, and getting better both at what I do tangibly functionally in my work. Chris: But also as a manager, as a boss, as a co-worker, as a parent, I think you start to pick up those lessons. And I think for City Year in particular, it's by far the most powerful place that I've ever seen as far as helping people really build connection to one another and to help us really explore who we are and how do we show up as our full selves at work on a daily basis. And how do we do that for other people, whether it's our co-workers or whether it's the students we work with in the schools we serve in. Chris: I think that's the amazing lesson and opportunity of City Year. So, I would say I hope I haven't hit the highlights of the careers. I got a lot of work left to do. And I think we've got a lot more to accomplish and learn. So, I'm excited about that. JP: Definitely. The best is yet to come. All right. So, now, to shift over, I know earlier, you talked about the idea of cause marketing and how that plays into your career. And I know that's been around for quite some time now and is becoming increasingly popular and being leveraged by businesses and nonprofits. So, for those who are listening who might not know a lot about it, could you speak a little about cause marketing and what that means to your career, past, present and future? Chris: Yes. It's interesting, you've seen a real change over the decades in how companies think about their responsibility and impact to society. And early on, it was very much about volunteerism and employees coming out doing different things. Or it might be about the company writing a check and the CEO handing it over to an organization. There wasn't really a business strategy. It was, "Hey, we recognize we're part of this community. We want to support our community and we find ways to do that." Chris: And then, what you started to see late into the '90s, early 2000s is companies started to read realize this could actually have a deeper business impact. People want to support companies that are doing good things in their communities. And we can tell that story via our marketing, our public relations efforts, via sponsorships and other things, kind of classic marketing and sales approaches. And so, they started to integrate cause into that. Chris: And so, you start to see opportunities like buy this product, we'll donate XYZ. And then, you started to see buy one, give one like TOMS and other new models of cause marketing come in. But in the early days, it was still very much kind of a business strategy using cause to drive it. So, it was, "We know people care about this cause. And if we talk about being associated with it, it would get them to buy our product or get them to take this action." Chris: And what we've seen over the last decade plus is that's really evolving and going deeper. I think what we started to see, particularly when I was working at Cone Communications and advising clients, we started to say, "What's unique about your company and the work that you do, the industry that you're in, the expertise that you have? And how could you connect your philanthropy to an issue that is aligned with your business?" Chris: "So, if you're in the pharmaceutical industry or other areas, how do you align with health and determinants of health? If you're working in other areas, like cable and telephone and others, how do you think about connectivity and digital connectivity being something that you can provide and connect to?" And so, how do you align the strategy and the impact you can have with your business so that those two things are working in harmony in reinforcing one another? Chris: And so, I think there was an understanding that it can actually drive business. And it's not just a nice thing to do that's over on the side, it's an important strategy to drive business. And so, during my time at New Balance and Cone and later at Reebok, I think we were more in that era of saying, "How do we integrate it into the business? And how do we really see it as a unique business driving strategy?" Chris: Now, I think you're in an even different environment, both with young people like yourselves coming into work and into the environment and being aware of social issues in a way that is deeper and more common than I think it was maybe of my generation and earlier, really wanting to have a purpose at work, and looking at your companies and saying, "How are you helping me do that?" And I only want to be here if I'm having a chance to put my passion and my values front and center in a way that was different than I think previous generations thought about work. Chris: And then, two, I think we're realizing, particularly over the last two years with the pandemic, with the murder of George Floyd, certainly the cracks in our system and how it is not equitable, how racism really shows up across all kinds of dimensions to prevent others from having opportunity that they should, and saying, "That's not okay." And people are saying, "We expect to both individually have an opportunity to affect that." Chris: "And we expect companies to be vocal and to step up and to show what their values are. And if you're not, then that's not going to be a company that I'm going to invest my time in personally as an employee. Or I'm not going to invest my dollars in as a customer." And I think you're seeing a whole new era of companies leading and being vocal in a lot of ways around social issues and taking a stand. Chris: And if they're not, people kind of questioning what's going on and why not. So, I think it's been really impressive and powerful to see. There's a lot that still needs to be done, right? There's a tremendous amount of inequity even within companies. And we see examples every day of bad behavior or other things that companies need to do better and need to do differently. Chris: But I will say, in working with many different Fortune 100 companies on a daily basis, the understanding of issues, the way they talk about social issues, the way they talk about their own diversity, equity, and inclusion and belonging efforts within the company is a huge sea change compared to what I saw even five, 10 years ago, which gives me a lot of hope for where we're going. I think we're realizing that capitalism is an amazing system of value creation. It's done tremendous things to grow and build our company. Chris: And the kind of American dream did a tremendous number of things, certainly for my family and many others, but that that's no longer the case for everyone and it probably never was, to be honest. And so, how do we own that and how do we address that? And I think companies are wrestling with that in a more authentic way. And I hope they continue to do that. It's part of what I think my life's work is, is to try and help companies do that. JP: Yeah, definitely. I feel like that, in my opinion, that idea of cause marketing is something that's... I feel like that's got to be something that's just going to become, I guess, take over in terms of marketing. And just seeing it present today, I guess I've been seeing it firsthand with the new Worcester Red Sox at Polar Park in terms of sports marketing. Their whole thing is... I think the program is like In Debt to a Vet. JP: So, they're marketing that product of going to the game and all. And then, every strike out at home, they donate X amount of money to veterans. And then, they also have just other organizations like fighting food insecurity and things like that. So, I feel like I've just been learning more and more about that. And I feel like that's got to be something like revolutionary in terms of marketing and business today. Chris: Yeah. And do you find yourself deciding who to buy from and who to work with as a result of that? Do you see it show up in the decisions you make? JP: Yeah. Definitely, I feel like these days, I see, even buying clothing and things like that, some... off the top of my head, I can't think of any. And shoes too, especially I've been seeing. They advertise the materials they make their shoes out of and stuff like that. And X percent of the money they take in goes to this cause or that cause. So, yeah, I've definitely been seeing it become more and more present today. Chris: I think it's true. I think as a marketer, and I don't even like the term cause marketing anymore because it feels so transactional, and we're well beyond that. I mean, it is a strategy that is useful and valuable, and company should still do. But I think what you've seen is now that you interact with a company and their products and a brand all the time, whether it's in social media or online or in other places, it used to be such a tightly controlled thing. Chris: You kind of created a marketing message, you put it out there in a campaign. You spent weeks developing it and controlling the advertising message and putting it out there. That's just not how we market and how customers engage anymore. It's year round, minute to minute brand building and engagement. It's a very different thing. And so, what you've seen is companies have to evolve to respond to that and say, "Okay, we need to be talking about not just cause marketing, but it's about what are our values." Chris: "And how do those show up in every action that we do, because it's not just the messaging that we put out from a marketing or an advertising standpoint. It's how somebody experienced us in the store, or an interaction they had with an employee, or something our CEO said, or some way they experienced our product." And it's 24-7-365. And so, I think you're seeing companies really say, "This is about our values, and being clear on what our values are." Chris: Because our most important stakeholders, our people are saying that that's what matters to them and that's what they care about. And so, I think we just think about business differently. JP: Absolutely, yeah. And actually, even aside from just that marketing aspect, the whole idea of impact investing and companies just needing to evolve now based on ESG and sustainability and things like that, it's just becoming more and more just the norm. And I feel like more and more businesses have no choice but to evolve and match what other businesses are doing because that's such a pressing topic in today's time as well. Chris: A hundred percent. And you have to, to compete, to succeed. And all the data tells you that companies that invest and do deep things and are high performing when it comes to the environmental, social, and governance measures outperform other companies and succeed. So, it's not just a nice thing to do, an important thing to do for the planet, a good thing to do. It's an imperative. If you want to continue to build a business and have it thrive, you have to lean in those areas. JP: Definitely. So, could you speak about the back and forth relationship you've seen between business and nonprofits throughout the span of your professional career? Chris: Absolutely. That's a great question. I think to our earlier conversation, early on, I think it was more transactional. It was kind of checkbook philanthropy. And we developed some relationships, and hopefully we get some money. And what we've seen, certainly in my time at City Year and why I was excited to come to City Year and work on it, is that changed. And companies were increasingly looking at a much deeper and holistic way to support issues. Chris: And so, they wanted certainly the branding and the visibility, and being able to talk about themselves as being good citizens, and for nonprofits to help validate and help them have opportunities to do that. They wanted to have employees actively volunteering and spending time, whether that was doing different kind of done-in-a-day volunteer projects or weeks of service, days of service, things like that. Chris: Or deeper ongoing skills-based volunteerism where I can share my expertise in marketing or somebody can share their expertise in web design or other things with the nonprofit and help that nonprofit build its capabilities or its skills. And really being able to set ambitious goals, which is what we're seeing a lot of companies do now, and to say, "This is what we care about from a social impact standpoint. Here's how we're going to try and have some impact. And here's some ways we're going to hold ourselves accountable and measure against it." Chris: And so, now, nonprofits are more partners in that process. And certainly, there's a dynamic of where the dollars come. And we certainly are trying to raise money from companies and have contractual pieces of what we do. But in many ways, we're sitting at the table with our corporate partners, and they view us as experts in the space that help them, at least for City Year, understand education, understand urban education, understand racial issues and how those show up in the education space, and are looking for our help and our guidance on how they can have a deeper impact. Chris: And we often think collaboratively and advise and coach them on some of the things they're thinking about. And in many cases, they can offer tremendous support to help us do different things. We've been fortunate to work with Deloitte Consulting as an example at City Year for decades now, and have benefited from having pro bono case teams and others really come and think about how do we grow City Year as an organization. Chris: So, I would say it's much less of a transactional thing and much more of a collaborative partnership, which has been amazing to see. And I think that's the part that I've been fortunate to have worked on the nonprofit side, the corporate side, the agency side, and seeing that from all angles that I think it hopefully helps me be a better partner to our colleagues. But I think there's such a willingness to say, "These are huge social issues that cannot be solved by any individual nonprofit, any individual organization." Chris: And we have to come together and figure out how we work collectively on them to change them. So, I think the level of expertise sharing, information sharing, and collaboration is greater than it's ever been. So, I'm excited about that. JP: Cool, yeah. Thank yo

Positive Impact Philanthropy Podcast
Episode 50: An Interview with Elizabeth Abel Senior VP of CCS Fundraising

Positive Impact Philanthropy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 21:53


Join Lori and her guest, Elizabeth Abel as they discuss how it's like to work with nonprofit leaders and their teams in raising the money they need. In what ways does she support these organizations in making a greater impact on the communities they serve? Stay tuned! Here are the things to expect in this episode: What are the causes very close to her heart? The types of campaigns she runs to help nonprofits. The importance of having the right leaders and a strong campaign vision. Incorporating legacy as part of the campaign process. Philanthropy is an expression of one's values. And much more!   Connect with Elizabeth! Website: https://www.ccsfundraising.com/people/elizabeth-abel LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elizabethabel Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elizabethberniabel/   Free resources: Philanthropic Landscape Report. This report, published each summer and grounded in the annual Giving USA data, offers an overview of the philanthropic landscape and key trends in giving. This year's edition also includes actionable insights on the impact of the pandemic and racial and social injustice on fundraising. It's one of my favorite data sets! Philanthropy Pulse Survey. CCS launched the Philanthropy Pulse Survey in late 2021 to understand how nonprofits are approaching and reimagining their development efforts. Released last month, the report summarizes responses from over 870 participating organizations and offers valuable data and insights to navigate the year ahead   Connect with Lori Kranczer! Website: https://www.everydayplannedgiving.com/  Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/positiveimpactphilanthropy  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lorikranczer/  

Get Busy Livin’
10. Listening for the Bigger Story with Anne O'Neil

Get Busy Livin’

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 4:21


I've shared a bit about my high school and college basketball career in previous episodes, and in today's episode, I want to highlight one of the most pivotal games of my career. Flashback to a snowy game night on the outskirts of Cedar Rapids, Iowa一just a typical Tuesday in the middle of winter for my Kennedy High School team. Two of our biggest fans, Ryan and Greg, were in the crowd. They had differing mental capabilities and were known throughout the town for going to all of the city's sporting events. The warmups and 20minute countdown to tip-off were going as planned, when all of the sudden, the legendary University of Tennessee Head Coach Pat Summitt, and her assistant coach Mickie DeMoss, walked in. Summit accrued 1,098 career wins, the most in college basketball history at the time of her retirement, and took home eight NCAA Division I basketball championship titles, so you can imagine what an honor it was to have her recruiting and watching my game. You would think that's what made the game so special, but it was actually the car ride home that sticks in my memory. My parents and I gave Ryan and Greg a ride home, and they shared passionately about their upcoming Special Olympics game. This conversation sparked a shift in my relationship with them, and I started to view them as true friends and fellow athletes instead of superfans. Listen to today's episode to hear more about how I first learned about the Special Olympics and discovered what it meant to be a part of something bigger than myself. Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, TuneIn, Simplecast, or on your favorite podcast platform. Topics Covered:A peek into my junior year basketball season The larger role that Ryan and Greg played in my life outside of basketball The inclusive team spirit of the Special Olympics Why I love connecting with other people and hearing what lights them up Special Offers: If there's a topic or charity you want me to highlight on the podcast, DM it to me on Instagram @getbusylivin_podFollow Us:Get Busy Livin' Podcast WebsiteGet Busy Livin' Podcast Instagram Get Busy Livin' Podcast TwitterAnne's Website Anne's LinkedInAnne's InstagramAnne's Twitter

ROI’s Into the Corner Office Podcast: Powerhouse Middle Market CEOs Telling it Real—Unexpected Career Conversations

Leo Resig is the Chief Executive Officer & Co-Founder at Atmosphere, the world's leading streaming TV service for businesses.  A graduate of Indiana University with a degree in Management, Leo tested a range of career paths -- everything from screenwriting to personal banking -- before discovering digital advertising in its nascent stages in 2002. He cut his teeth on the agency side as a digital media Ad Ops manager in Hollywood at Crew Creative. He then joined Gorilla Nation (now Evolve Media), on the publisher side with roles in ad operations and graphic design.  Leo and his brother, John Resig, started theCHIVE.com in 2008 as a one-stop shop for viral photos and videos. theCHIVE became a global lifestyle movement and CHIVE Media Group became the umbrella company for theCHIVE.com, their ecommerce business The Chivery, a 501c3 non-profit called Chive Charities, and streaming OTT app, CHIVE TV.  The brothers spun the idea for Atmosphere TV over beers at a local bar, after realizing that the experience of consuming content on TV's outside the home could be elevated. This was the birth of CHIVE TV, which became the flagship channel within Atmosphere's streaming platform, which now houses over 50 TV channels.  Along the way, Leo also went on to co-found a golf apparel company called William Murray Golf with Bill Murray and his brother John. He also launched a top 50 US-brewery called Resignation Brewery in 2014 selling KCCO Beer. Philanthropy has always been important to Leo and he and his brother established Chive Charities in 2011 which has helped raise and donate over $20M to help individuals with rare medical disorders, veterans and first responders.  Family has always come first for Leo. He is a proud father to two amazing children and husband to his wife, Tiffany. Hailing from Fort Wayne, Indiana, Leo now resides in Austin, TX by way of Chicago and Venice Beach

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: Democrats' Proposed Tax Hike Is Reckless And Not The Solution To Inflation

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

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