Podcasts about Northridge

  • 593PODCASTS
  • 1,894EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 8, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Northridge

Show all podcasts related to northridge

Latest podcast episodes about Northridge

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 73 – Unstoppable Visionary and Two-Time Cancer Survivor with Howard Brown

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 76:06


Yes, Howard Brown is a two-time cancer survivor. As you will discover in our episode, he grew up with an attitude to thrive and move forward. Throughout his life, he has learned about sales and the concepts of being a successful entrepreneur while twice battling severe cancer.   Howard's life story is one of those events worth telling and I hope you find it worth listening to. He even has written a book about all he has done. The book entitles Shining Brightly has just been released, but you get to hear the story directly from Howards' lips.   About the Guest: Howard Brown is an author, speaker, podcaster, Silicon Valley entrepreneur, interfaith peacemaker, two-time stage IV cancer survivor, and healthcare advocate. For more than three decades, Howard's business innovations, leadership principles, mentoring and his resilience in beating cancer against long odds have made him a sought-after speaker and consultant for businesses, nonprofits, congregations, and community groups. In his business career, Howard was a pioneer in helping to launch a series of technology startups before he co-founded two social networks that were the first to connect religious communities around the world. He served his alma mater—Babson College, ranked by US News as the nation's top college for entrepreneurship—as a trustee and president of Babson's worldwide alumni network. His hard-earned wisdom about resilience after beating cancer twice has led him to become a nationally known patient advocate and “cancer whisperer” to many families. Visit Howard at ShiningBrightly.com to learn more about his ongoing work and contact him. Through that website, you also will find resources to help you shine brightly in your own corner of the world. Howard, his wife Lisa, and his daughter Emily currently reside in Michigan. About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Hi, and welcome to another episode of unstoppable mindset. Today, we get to interview Howard Brown, I'm not going to tell you a lot because I want him to tell his story. He's got a wonderful story to tell an inspiring story. And he's got lots of experiences that I think will be relevant for all of us and that we all get to listen to. So with that, Howard, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Howard Brown  01:44 Thank you, Michael. I'm really pleased to be here. And thanks for having me on your show. And excited to talk to your audience and and share a little bit.   Michael Hingson  01:54 Well, I will say that Howard and I met through Podapolooza, which I've told you about in the past and event that brings podcasters would be podcasters. And people who want to be interviewed by podcasters together, and Howard will tell us which were several of those he is because he really is involved in a lot of ways. But why don't you start maybe by telling us a little bit about your, your kind of earlier life and introduce people to you and who you are. Sure, sure.   Howard Brown  02:23 So I'm from Boston. I can disguise the accent very well. But when I talked to my mother, we're back in Boston, we're packing a car. We're going for hot dogs and beans over to Fenway Park. So gotta get a soda. We're getting a soda, not a pop. So we add the Rs. They call my wife Lisa, not Lisa. But I grew up I grew up in the suburbs of Boston, a town called Framingham. And I'm a twin. And I'm very unusual. But a girl boy twin, my twin sister Cheryl. She goes by CJ is five minutes older. And I hold that I hold that now against her now that we're older and she didn't want to be older, but now she's my older sister, my big sister by five whole minutes.   Michael Hingson  03:09 Well, she's big sister, so she needs to take care of her baby brother   Howard Brown  03:12 says exactly. And she did. And we're gonna get to that because it's a really important point being a twin, which we'll get to in a second. But so Britta she Where does she live now? So she lives 40 minutes away from me here in Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:25 Oh my gosh, you both have moved out of the area.   Howard Brown  03:27 So she she moved to Albany, New York. I moved to Southern then California, LA area and the beaches, and then Silicon Valley. And then the last 17 years we've all lived close. And we raised our families together here in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:40 What got you to all go to Michigan?   Howard Brown  03:43 Well, for me, it was a choice. My wife is from Michigan, and I was in Silicon Valley. And we were Pat had a little girl Emily, who's four. There's a story there too. But we'll we decided we wanted her to grow up with a family and cousins and aunts and uncles and my in laws live here. My wife grew up here. And this made it closer for my parents and Boston suburbs to get here as well. So great place to raise a family very different from Silicon Valley in Palo Alto, California.   Michael Hingson  04:12 Yeah, but don't you miss Steve's ice cream in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:15 I do. I miss the ice cream. I missed the cannolis in the Back Bay. I missed some of the Chinese food. So in the north end, but it just it I do, but I have not lived there. I went to college there at Babson College number one school for entrepreneurship. And then when I got my first job, I moved out to Ohio but then I moved back and well there's a whole story of why I had to move back as well but we'll get   Michael Hingson  04:41 there. So are your parents still living in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:46 They are and so my dad I call myself son of a boot man. My dad for 49 years has sold cowboy boots in New England in the in the in the western you know the states New York Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts. And that's, you know, anyone who stayed somewhere for 49 years got to be applauded. And he's a straight commission boot salesman and he sold women's shoes prior to that. So he he's, he's a renaissance man.   Michael Hingson  05:15 Wow. So does he sell cowboy boots with snow treads as it were for the winter?   Howard Brown  05:21 No snow trends but, you know, like out west when you're working on, you know, on with cattle and working out west and sometimes it's a fashion statement. Not not too many places in New England like that. But he, he made a living, he enjoyed it. And he's, he's just about to retire at the age of 79. This year.   Michael Hingson  05:39 I remember living in Boston and and when I wear shoes with just leather soles, I slid around a lot on the sidewalks and all that so did get rubber rubbers to go over my boots and then later got real boots.   Howard Brown  05:54 Right. So I have the big hiking boots, the Timberlands, but I too have a pair of a you know, in Boston, we call them rabbits, rabbits, robins. And they basically are slip ons that gave you grip. They slipped right over your leather shoes. And you wore them when anyway in the snow and in those sloshing in the mess. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  06:12 And they worked really well. They did. So you went off to college. And I gather kind of almost right from the beginning you got involved in the whole idea of entrepreneurship.   Howard Brown  06:23 Well, I did I transferred to Babson from a liberal arts school called Connecticut College. I just I found out it wasn't for me and Babson College changed the trajectory of my entire life. i i I knew that I wanted to do sales and then later technology. But Babson was the catalyst for that. They just they support entrepreneurship of all kinds, no matter how you define it, and I just drank it in and I loved, I loved my time there. I love my learning there. And I continue to stay involved with Babson very closely as a past president of the Alumni Association, a former trustee, and very actively recruit students to go there and support student businesses. So it was a big impact on me and I continue to give back to it.   Michael Hingson  07:11 That's pretty cool. So how, how did you proceed as far as a career and entrepreneurial involvement as it were in in sales and all that?   Howard Brown  07:22 So I had an internship, I had wanted cellular one when cellular phones came out and I was basically learning the business. This is really early 1984 And five, and then I got another internship at NCR Corporation if you remember national cash register 120 year old company based out of Dayton, Ohio, and now it's in Atlanta, and it's, it's just not the same company. But I took an internship there a lot of Babson folks work there. And I worked as a trainer, sales installation rep. I trained waitresses, waiters, bartenders, hotel clerks, night audits, how to use cash register computer systems. So I was the teacher and a trainer. And I would, you know, talk to waitresses and waiters and bartenders and say you can make more tips by providing better service. But the way that you do that is you type you the order into a computer, it zaps it to the order station or the back to the back of the house to cook to prepare the foods or for the drinks. And you can spend more time servicing your table which should translate into higher tips. Well, about a third of them said nope, not for me, a third of them were need to be convinced and a third of them are like I'm in. I had a lot of fun doing that. And then after the shift, the either the manager or the owner would come over and they'd give you a savior at a Chinese food restaurant. They give you a poopoo platter to go to take home to your dorm room.   Michael Hingson  08:46 So I had a lot of fun, a lot of fun and a lot of good food.   Howard Brown  08:50 Sure sure. So that's what really started me off and hired me   Michael Hingson  08:55 so did that did that concept of tips and all that and advising people ever get you to translate that to Durgin Park?   Howard Brown  09:03 I actually did install the cashiers to computers area ago Daniel hall so the checkerboard you know draped you know cloth on the table and so you know it's there's a lot of good restaurants in Boston, you know the union Oyster House with a toothpick but I did countless restaurants hotels bars, you know it was I was basically at the whim of the Salesforce and there was a couple of us that went to go train and teach people and take the night shift and make sure everything was going smoothly as they installed the new system of course the no name restaurant and other one but well you know for for your listeners that no name was a place to get, you know, really great discounted seafood but you sat on a park bench. Remember that?   Michael Hingson  09:50 Right? Oh yeah, definitely. It wasn't. Well, neither was Durgin park, but I haven't kept up Is it still there?   Howard Brown  10:00 Yes, I believe it's still there.   Michael Hingson  10:01 Oh, good. I heard somewhere that, that it might not be because of COVID. But we enjoy   Howard Brown  10:07 down it shut down for a while during COVID I hope it's back open. I'm gonna have to go now. Yeah, you're gonna make me go check to see if it's open. But you know, many of them are still there. And obviously restaurants turn over. But that's a mainstay that's got a lot of history.   Michael Hingson  10:19 Oh, it does. And we had a lot of fun with the waitresses and so on at their Compac. I know, once we went there, and you know, the whole story, that Durgan is a place where you sit at family tables, unless we actually have four people then they'll let you sit at one of the tables for for around the outside. Well, there were three of us and my guide dog when we went in one time. And the hostess said, we're gonna put you at one of the tables for for just to give more room for the puppy dog. And she sat us down there. Then the waitress came over and as they are supposed to do at Durgan Park, she said, you're not supposed to sit here. There are only three of you. And I said there's a dog under the table. No, there's not. You can't fool me with that. And the waitress isn't supposed to be snotty, right. And she just kept going on and on about it. And I kept saying there is a dog under the table. She went away. And then she came back a little bit later. And she said, You've got to move and I said no. Why don't you just look, there's a dog under the table. You're not gonna make me fall for that. She finally looked. And there are these Golden Retriever puppy eyes staring back at her. She just melted. It was so much fun.   Howard Brown  11:26 Wouldn't be Boston if you didn't get a little attitude. Well, yeah, that's part of what it's all about your right next seating. And they just they sit you in a and they say, meet each other and be married.   Michael Hingson  11:38 Yeah, yeah. And it was a lot of fun. So how long did it take you to get to Silicon Valley?   Howard Brown  11:44 Well, so the story is that I did. I worked for NCR and I got hired by NCR, but I wanted out of the hospitality business. You know, even though he's young work until two, three in the morning, once they shut the restaurant or bar down or the hotel down, and then you do the night audit and you do the records. It was a hard life. So I looked and I did my research. And I said, you know who's who's making all the money here at NCR in the banking division. And it was really the early days of the outsourcing movement, punch cards, and you're outsourcing bank accounts, over 1200 baud modems. And I said, Well, that's interesting. And so I went to NCRs training at Sugar camp to learn how to be a salesperson were they actually in the early days, they filmed you, they taught you negotiation skills, competitive analysis, Industry Skills, it was fantastic. It's like getting an MBA today. But they did it all in six months, with mixing fieldwork in with, you know, training at this education facility in Dayton, Ohio. And I came out as a junior salesperson working for for very expansive experience, guys. And they just, I knew one thing, if I made them more productive, they'd make me money. And I did. And I, they sent me to banks and savings and loans and credit unions all over New England. And I basically learned the business of banking and outsourcing to these banks. And they made a lot of money. So that was how my career started. You can't do better than that. But to answer the question, because it's a little more complex than that. But it took me NCR in 1988. And then I moved out to Los Angeles in 1991, after a big health scare, which we'll talk about, and then I moved up in 2005. So there's the timeline to get me to Silicon Valley.   Michael Hingson  13:29 So you, you definitely moved around. I know that feeling well, having had a number of jobs and been required to live in various parts of the country when going back and forth from one coast to another from time to time. So you know, it's it's there. So you, you did all of that. And you You ended up obviously making some money and continuing to to be in the entrepreneurial world. But how does that translate into kind of more of an entrepreneurial spirit today?   Howard Brown  14:00 So great question, Michael. So what happened was is that I built a foundation. So at that time when you graduated school, and as far as for technology, the big computer shops like IBM Unisys, NCR, Hewlett Packard, what they did is they took you raw out of college, and they put you through their training program. And that training program was their version of the gospel of their of their products and your competitors and all that. And that built a great foundation. Well, I moved to Los Angeles after this big health scare, which I'm sure we're gonna go back and talk about, and I moved into the network products division. So I didn't stay in the banking division. I looked at the future and said voice data and video. I think there's the future there and I was right and AT and T bought NCR and, unfortunately, this is probably 1992. They also bought McCaw cellular they had just bought all of Eddie computer. They were a big company of five 600,000 employees and I have To tell you, the merger wasn't great. You felt like a number. And I knew that was my time. That was my time where I said, I got my foundation built. It's now time to go to a startup. So your time had come. My time had come. So at&t, offered early retirement for anyone 50 and older, and then they didn't get enough takers. So they offered early retirement for anyone that wanted to change. And so the talk around the watercooler was, let's wait they'll make a better offer. And I was like, I'm 26 and a half years old. I what am I waiting for? So they made a tremendously generous offer. I took early retirement, and I moved to my first true startup called avid technology that was in the production space. And we basically were changing film and television production from analog to digital. And I never looked back, I basically have been with startups ever since. And that, but that foundation I felt was really important that I got from NCR, but I prefer smaller companies and build the building them up from scratch and moving them forward.   Michael Hingson  16:07 Yeah, when you can do more to help shape the way they go. Because the the problem with a larger a lot of larger companies is they get very set in their ways. And they tend not to listen as much as maybe they should to people who might come along with ideas that might be beneficial to them, as opposed to startups as you say,   Howard Brown  16:27 Well, it depends. I mean, you know, you want to build a company that is still somewhat innovative. So what these large companies like Google and Facebook do, and Apple is they go acquire, they acquire the startups before they get too big or sometimes like, it's like what Facebook did with Instagram, they acquired six people, Google acquired YouTube, and they acquire the technology of best of breed technology. And then they shape it, and they accelerate it up. So listen, companies like IBM are still innovative, Apple, you know, is so innovative. But you need to maintain that because it can get to be a bureaucracy, and with hundreds of 1000s of employees. And you can't please everybody, but I knew my calling was was technology startups. And I just, I needed to get that, get that foundation built. And then away away I went. And that's what I've done. Since   Michael Hingson  17:16 you're right. It's all about with with companies, if they want to continue to be successful, they have to be innovative, and they have to be able to grow. I remember being in college, when Hewlett Packard came out with the HP 25, which was a very sophisticated calculator. Back in the the late 19th, early 1970s. And then Texas Instruments was working on a calculator, they came out with one that kind of did a lot of the stuff that HP did. But about that same time because HP was doing what they were doing, they came out with the HP 35. And basically it added, among other things, a function key that basically doubled the number of incredible things that you could do on the HP 25.   Howard Brown  17:58 Right, I had a TI calculator and in high school.   Michael Hingson  18:02 Well, and of course yeah, go ahead HPUS pull reverse Polish notation, which was also kind   Howard Brown  18:09 of fun. Right and then with the kids don't understand today is that, you know, we took typing, I get I think we took typing.   Michael Hingson  18:19 Did you type did you learn to type on a typewriter without letters on the keys?   Howard Brown  18:23 No, I think we have letters I think you just couldn't look down or else you get smacked. You know, the big brown fox jumped over the you know, something that's I don't know, but I did learn but I I'm sort of a hybrid. I looked down once in a while when I'd say   Michael Hingson  18:39 I remember taking a typing course in actually it was in summer school. I think it was between seventh and eighth grade. And of course the typewriters were typewriters, typewriters for teaching so they didn't have letters on the keys, which didn't matter to me a whole lot. But by the same token, that's the way they were but I learned to type and yeah, we learned to type and we learned how to be pretty accurate with it's sort of like learning to play the piano and eventually learning to do it without looking at the keys so that you could play and either read music or learn to play by ear.   Howard Brown  19:15 That's true. And And again, in my dorm room, I had Smith Corona, and I ended up having a bottle of or many bottles of white out.   Michael Hingson  19:25 White out and then there was also the what was it the other paper that you could put on the samosa did the same thing but white out really worked?   Howard Brown  19:33 Yeah, you put that little strip of tape and then it would wait it out for you then you can type over it. Right? We've come a long way. It's some of its good and some of its bad.   Michael Hingson  19:43 Yeah, now we have spellchecker Yeah, we do for what it's worth,   Howard Brown  19:49 which we got more and more and more than that on these I mean listen to this has allowed us to, to to do a zoom call here and record and goods and Bad's to all of that.   Michael Hingson  19:58 Yeah, I still I have to tell people learning to edit. Now using a sound editor called Reaper, I can do a lot more clean editing than I was able to do when I worked at a campus radio station, and had to edit by cutting tape and splicing with splicing tape.   Howard Brown  20:14 Exactly. And that's Yeah, yeah, Michael, we change the you know, avid changed the game, because we went from splicing tape or film and Betamax cassettes in the broadcast studios to a hard drive in a mouse, right? changed, we changed the game there because you were now editing on a hard drive. And so I was part of that in 1994. And again, timing has to work out and we had to retrain the unions at the television networks. And it was, for me, it was just timing worked really well. Because my next startup, liquid audio, the timing didn't work out well, because we're, we were going to try to do the same thing in the audio world, which is download music. But when you do that, when you it's a Sony cassette and Sony Walkman days, the world wasn't ready yet. We we still went public, we still did a secondary offering. But we never really brought product to market because it took Steve Jobs 10 years later to actually sell a song for 99 cents and convince the record industry that that was, you know, you could sell slices of pizza instead of the whole pizza, the whole record out   Michael Hingson  21:17 and still make money. I remember avid devices and hearing about them and being in television stations. And of course, for me, none of that was accessible. So it was fun to to be able to pick on the fact that no matter what, as Fred Allen, although he didn't say it quite this way, once said they call television the new medium, because that's as good as it's ever gonna get. But anyway, you know, it has come a long way. But it was so sophisticated to go into some of the studios with some of the even early equipment, like Avid, and see all the things that they were doing with it. It just made life so much better.   Howard Brown  21:52 Yeah, well, I mean, you're not I was selling, you know, $100,000 worth of software on a Macintosh, which first of all the chief engineers didn't even like, but at the post production facilities, they they they drank that stuff up, because you could make a television commercial, you could do retakes, you could add all the special effects, and it could save time. And then you could get more revenue from that. And so it was pretty easy sale, because we tell them how fast they could pay off to the hardware, the software and then train everybody up. And they were making more and more and better commercials for the car dealerships and the local Burger Joint. And they were thrilled that these local television stations, I can tell you that   Michael Hingson  22:29 I sold some of the first PC based CAD systems and the same sort of thing, architects were totally skeptical about it until they actually sat down and we got them in front of a machine and showed them how to use it. Let them design something that they could do with three or four hours, as opposed to spending days with paper and paper and paper and more paper in a drafting table. And they could go on to the next project and still charge as much.   Howard Brown  22:53 It was funny. I take a chief engineer on to lunch, and I tried to gauge their interest and a third, we're just enthusiastic because they wanted to make sure that they were the the way that technology came into the station. They were they were the brainchild they were the they were the domain experts. So a third again, just like training waitresses and waiters and bartenders, a third of them. Oh, they wanted they just wanted to consume it all. A third of them were skeptical and needed convincing. And a third of whom was like, that's never going out on my hair anywhere. Yeah, they were the later and later adopters, of course.   Michael Hingson  23:24 And some of them were successful. And some of them were not.   Howard Brown  23:28 Absolutely. We continue. We no longer. Go ahead. No, no, of course I am the my first sales are the ones that were early adopters. And and then I basically walked over to guys that are later adopters. I said, Well, I said, you know, the ABC, the NBC and the fox station and the PBS station habit, you know, you don't have it, and they're gonna take all your post production business away from you. And that got them highly motivated.   Michael Hingson  23:54 Yeah. And along the way, from a personal standpoint, somebody got really clever. And it started, of course at WGBH in Boston, where they recognize the fact that people who happen to be blind would want to know what's going on on TV when the dialog wasn't saying much to to offer clues. And so they started putting an audio description and editing and all that and somebody created the secondary audio programming in the other things that go into it. And now that's becoming a lot more commonplace, although it's still got a long way to go.   Howard Brown  24:24 Well, I agree. So but you're right. So having that audio or having it for visually impaired or hearing impaired are all that they are now we're making some progress. So it's still a ways to go. I agree with you.   Michael Hingson  24:36 still a ways to go. Well, you along the way in terms of continuing to work with Abbott and other companies in doing the entrepreneurial stuff. You've had a couple of curveballs from life.   Howard Brown  24:47 I have. So going back to my promotion, I was going driving out to Dayton, Ohio, I noticed a little spot on my cheekbone. didn't think anything of it. I was so excited to get promoted and start my new job. up, I just kept powering through. So a few weeks after I'd moved out to Dayton, Ohio, my mom comes out. And she's at the airport and typical Boston and mom, she's like, What's that on your cheek? What's that on your cheek? And I was like, Mom, it's nothing. I kind of started making excuses. I got hit playing basketball, I got it at the gym or something. And she's like, well, we got to get that checked out. I said, No, Mom, it's okay. It's not no big deal. It's a little little market. Maybe it's a cyst or pebble or something I don't know. So she basically said she was worried, but she never told me. So she helped set up my condo, or an apartment. And then she left. And then as long Behold, I actually had to go speak in Boston at the American Bankers Association about disaster recovery, and having a disaster recovery plan. And so this is the maybe August of 1989. And I came back and that spot was still there. And so my mom told my dad, remember, there was payphones? There was no cell phones, no computers, no internet. So she told my dad, she didn't take a picture of it. But now he saw it. And he goes, Let's go play tennis. There's I got there on a Friday. So on a Saturday morning, we'd go do something. And instead of going to play tennis, he took me to a local community hospital. And they took a look at it. And they said off its assist, take some my antibiotic erythromycin or something, you'll be fine. Well, I came back to see them on Monday after my speech. And I said, I'm not feeling that great. Maybe it's the rethrow myosin. And so having to be four o'clock in the afternoon, he took me to the same emergency room. And he's and I haven't had the same doctor on call. He actually said, You know what, let's take a biopsy of it. So he took a biopsy of it. And then he went back to the weight room, he said, I didn't get a big enough slice. Let me take another. So he took another and then my dad drove me to the airport, and I basically left. And my parents called me maybe three weeks later, and they said, You got to come back to Boston. We gotta go see, you know, they got the results. But you know, they didn't tell us they'll only tell you. Because, you know, it's my private data. So I flew back to Boston, with my parents. And this time, I had, like, you know, another doctor there with this emergency room doctor, and he basically checks me out, checks me out, but he doesn't say too much. But he does say that we have an appointment for you at Dana Farber Cancer Institute at 2pm. I think you should go. And I was like, whoa, what are you talking about? Why am I going to Dana Farber Cancer Institute. So it gets, you know, kind of scary there because I show up there. I'm in a suit and tie. My dad's in a suit down. My mom's seems to be dressed up. And we go, and they put me through tests. And I walk in there. And I don't know if you remember this, Michael. But the Boston Red Sox charity is called the Jimmy fund. Right? And the Jimmy fund are for kids with blood cancers, lymphoma leukemias, so I go there. And they checked me in and they told me as a whole host of tests they're going to do, and I'm looking in the waiting room, and I see mostly older people, and I'm 23 years old. So I go down the hallways, and I see little kids. So I go I go hang out with the little kids while I'm waiting. I didn't know what was going on. So they call me and I do my test. And this Dr. George Canalis, who's you know, when I came to learn that the inventor of some chemo therapies for lymphomas very experienced, and this young Harvard fellow named Eric Rubin I get pulled into this office with this big mahogany desk. And they say you have stage four E T cell non Hodgkins lymphoma. It's a very aggressive, aggressive, very aggressive form of cancer. We're going to try to knock this out. I have to tell you, Michael, I don't really remember hardly anything else that was said, I glossed over. I looked up at this young guy, Eric Rubin, and I said, What's he saying? I looked back out of the corner of my eye, my mom's bawling her eyes out. My dad's looks like a statue. And I have to tell you, I was really just a deer in the headlights. I had no idea that how a healthy 23 year old guy gets, you know, stage four T cell lymphoma with a very horrible prognosis. I mean, I mean, they don't they said, We don't know if we can help you at the world, one of the world's foremost cancer research hospitals in the world. So it was that was that was a tough pill to swallow. And I did some more testing. And then they told me to come back in about a week to start chemotherapy. And so, again, I didn't have the internet to search anything. I had encyclopedias. I had some friends, you know, and I was like, I'm a young guy. And, you know, I was talking to older people that potentially, you know, had leukemia or different cancer, but I didn't know much. And so I I basically showed up for chemotherapy, scared out of my mind, in denial, and Dr. RUBIN comes out and he says, we're not doing chemo today. I said, I didn't sleep awake. What are you talking about? He says, we'll try again tomorrow, your liver Our function test is too high. And my liver function test is too high. So I'm starting to learn but I still don't know what's going on. He says I got it was going to field trip. Field Trip. He said, Yeah, you're going down the street to Newton Wellesley hospital, we're going to the cryogenic center, cryo, what? What are you talking about? He goes, it's a sperm bank, and you're gonna go, you know, leave a sample specimen. And it's like, you just told me that, you know, if you can help me out what why I'm not even thinking about kids, right now. He said, Go do it. He says what else you're going to do today, and then you come back tomorrow, and we'll try chemo. So thank God, he said that, because I deposited before I actually started any chemotherapy, which, you know, as basically, you know, rendered me you know, impotent now because of all the chemotherapy and radiation I had. So that was a blessing that I didn't know about until later, which we'll get to. But a roll the story forward a little more quickly as that I was getting all bad news. I was relapsing, I went through about three or four different cycles of different chemotherapy recipes, nothing was working. I was getting sicker, and they tight. My sister, I am the twin CJ, for bone marrow transplant and she was a 25% chance of being a match. She happened to be 100% match. And I had to then gear up for back in 1990 was a bone marrow transplant where they would remove her bone marrow from her hip bones, they would scrub it and cleanse it, and they would put it in me. And they would hope that my body wouldn't immediately rejected and die and shut down or over time, which is called graft versus host these that it wouldn't kill me or potentially that it would work and it would actually reset my immune system. And it would take over the malignant cells and set my set me back straight, which it ended up doing. And so having a twin was another blessing miracle. You know that, you know, that happened to me. And I did some immunotherapy called interleukin two that was like, like the grandfather of immunotherapy that strengthened my system. And then I moved to Florida to get out of the cold weather and then I moved out to California to rebuild my life. I call that Humpty Dumpty building Humpty Dumpty version one. And that's that's how I got to California in Southern California.   Michael Hingson  32:15 So once again, your big sister savedthe day,   Howard Brown  32:19 as usual.   Michael Hingson  32:21 That's a big so we go,   Howard Brown  32:23 as we call ourselves the Wonder Twins. He's more. She's terrific. And thank God she gave part of herself and saved my life. And I am eternally grateful to her for that,   Michael Hingson  32:34 but but she never had any of the same issues or, or diseases. I gather. She's been   Howard Brown  32:41 very healthy, except for like a knee. A partial knee replacement. She's been very healthy her whole life.   Michael Hingson  32:48 Well, did she have to have a knee replacement because she kept kicking you around or what?   Howard Brown  32:52 No, she's little. She's five feet. 510 So she never kicked me. We are best friends. My wife's best friend. I know. She is just just a saint. She's She's such a giving person and you know, we take that from our parents, but she she gave of herself of what she could do. She said she do it again in a heartbeat. I don't think I'm allowed to give anybody my bone marrow but if I could, would give it to her do anything for her. She's She's amazing. So she gave me the gift, the gift of life.   Michael Hingson  33:21 So you went to Florida, then you moved to California and what did you do when you got out here?   Howard Brown  33:24 So I ended up moving up to northern California. So I met this girl from Michigan in Southern California, Lisa, my wife have now 28 years in July. We married Lisa Yeah, we got married under the Jewish wedding company's wedding canopies called the hotpot and we're looking at the Pacific Ocean, we made people come out that we had that Northridge earthquake in 94. But this is in July, so things are more settled. So we had all friends and family come out. And it was beautiful. We got it on a pool deck overlooking the Pacific. It was gorgeous. It was a beautiful Hollywood type wedding. And it was amazing. So we got married in July of 94. And then moved up to Silicon Valley in 97. And then I was working at the startups. My life was really out of balance because I'm working 20 hours, you know, a day and I'm traveling like crazy. And my wife says, You know what, you got to be home for dinner if we're going to think about having a family. And we're a little bit older now. 35 and 40. And so we've got to think about these things. And so I called back to Newton Wellesley hospital, and I got the specimen of sperm shipped out to San Jose, and we went through an in vitro fertilization process. And she grew eight eight eggs and they defrosted the swimmers and they took the best ones and put them back in the four best eggs and our miracle baby our frozen kids sickle. Emily was born in August of 2001. Another blessing another miracle. I was able to have a child and healthy baby girl.   Michael Hingson  34:58 So what's Emily doing today?   Howard Brown  35:00 Well, thank you for asking that. So, she is now in Missoula, Montana at a television station called K Pax eight Mountain News. And she's an intern for the summer. And she's living her great life out there hiking, Glacier National Park. And she ran I think she ran down to the Grand Tetons and, and she's learning about the broadcast business and reporting. She's a writer by trade, by trade and in journalism. And she likes philosophy. So she'll be coming back home to finish her senior year, this at the end of the summer at the University of Michigan. And so she's about to graduate in December. And she's, she's doing just great.   Michael Hingson  35:35 So she writes and doesn't do video editing us yet using Abbott or any of the evolutions from it.   Howard Brown  35:41 No, she does. She actually, when you're in a small market station, that's you. You write the script, she does the recording, she has a tripod, sometimes she's she films with the other reporters, but when she they sent her out as an intern, and she just covered the, this, you know, the pro pro life and pro choice rallies, she she records herself, she edits on Pro Tools, which is super powerful now, and a lot less expensive. And then, when she submits, she submits it refer review to the news director and to her superiors. And she's already got, I think, three video stories and about six different by lines on written stories. So she's learning by doing, it's experiential, it's amazing.   Michael Hingson  36:23 So she must have had some experience in dealing with all the fires and stuff out at Yellowstone and all that.   Howard Brown  36:31 So the flooding at Yellowstone, so I drove her out there in May. And I didn't see any fires. But the flooding we got there before that, she took me on a hike on the North Gate of Yellowstone. And she's she's, you know, environmentally wilderness trained first aid trained. And I'm the dad, and I'm in decent shape. But she took me out an hour out and an hour back in and, you know, saw a moose saw a deer didn't see any mountain lion didn't see any Grizzlies, thank God, but we did see moose carcass where the grizzly had got a hold on one of those and, and everybody else to get it. So I got to go out to nature weather and we took a road trip out there this summer, it was a blast. It's the those are the memories, when you've been through a cancer diagnosis that you just you hold on to very dearly and very tight. It was a blast. So that's what he's doing this summer. She'll be back. She'll be back in August, end of August.   Michael Hingson  37:22 That's really exciting to hear that she's working at it and being successful. And hopefully she'll continue to do that. And do good reporting. And I know that this last week, with all the Supreme Court cases, it's it's, I guess, in one sense, a field day for reporters. But it's also a real challenge, because there's so many polarized views on all of that.   Howard Brown  37:44 Well, everybody's a broadcaster now whether it's Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and all the other ones out there, tick tock. So everybody's sort of a reporter now. And you know, what do you believe, and unfortunately, I just can't believe in something in 140 characters or something in two sentences. Yeah, there's no depth there. So sometimes you miss the point, and all this stuff. And then everything's on 24 hours on CNN, on Fox on MSNBC, so it never stops. So I call that a very noisy world. And it's hard to process. You know, all this. It's coming at you so fast in the blink of an eye. So we're in a different time than when we grew up, Michael, it was a slower pace. Today in this digital world. It's, it's, it's a lot and especially COVID. Now, are we just consuming and consuming and binging and all this stuff, I don't think it's that healthy.   Michael Hingson  38:36 It's not only a noisy world, but it's also a world, it's very disconnected, you can say all you want about how people can send tweets back and forth, text messages back and forth and so on. But you're not connecting, you're not really getting deep into anything, you're not really establishing relationships in the way that as you point out, we used to, and we don't connect anymore, even emails don't give you that much connection, realism, as opposed to having meaningful dialogue and meaningful conversations. So we just don't Converse anymore. And now, with all that's going on, in the very divided opinions, there's there's no room for discussion, because everybody has their own opinion. And that's it, there's no room to dialogue on any of it at all, which is really too bad.   Howard Brown  39:21 Yeah, I agree. It's been divisive. And, you know, it's, it's hard because, you know, an email doesn't have the body language, the intent, the emotion, like we're talking right now. And, you know, we're expressing, you know, you know, I'm telling stories of my story personally, but you can tell when I get excited, I smile, I can get animated. Sometimes with an email, you know, you don't know the intent and it can be misread. And a lot of that communication is that way. So, you know, I totally get where you're coming from.   Michael Hingson  39:55 And that's why I like doing the podcasts that we're doing. We get to really have conversation isn't just asking some questions and getting an answer and then going on to the next thing. That's, frankly, no fun. And I think it's important to be able to have the opportunity to really delve into things and have really good conversations about them. I learned a lot, and I keep seeing as I do these podcasts, and for the past 20 plus years, I've traveled around the world speaking, of course, about September 11, and talking about teamwork, and trust, and so on. And as I always say, if I don't learn more than I'm able to teach or impart, then I'm not doing my job very well.   Howard Brown  40:35 So that's exactly and that's, that's where I'm going after the second health concern. You know, I'm now going to teach, I'm gonna inspire, I'm going to educate. And that's, that's, that's what I do, I want to do with the rest of my time is to be able to, you know, listen, I'm not putting my head in the sand, about school shootings, about an insurrection about floods about all that. You gotta live in the real world. But I choose, as I say, I like to live on positive Street as much as possible, but positive street with action. That's, that's what makes the world a better place at the end of the day. So you sharing that story means that one we'll never forget. And you can educate the generations to come that need to understand, you know, that point in time and how it affected you and how you've dealt with it, and how you've been able to get back out of bed every day. And I want to do the same.   Michael Hingson  41:26 Well, there's nothing wrong with being positive. I think that there is a need to be aware. But we can we can continue to be positive, and try to promote positivity, try to promote connectionism and conversations and so on, and promote the fact that it's okay to have different opinions. But the key is to respect the other opinion, and recognize that it isn't just what you say that's the only thing that ever matters. That's the problem that we face so much today.   Howard Brown  41:58 Right? Respect. I think Aretha Franklin saying that great. She   Michael Hingson  42:01 did. She did. She's from Motown here. There you go. See? When you moved out to California, and you ended up in Silicon Valley, and so on, who are you working for them?   Howard Brown  42:14 So I moved up, and I worked for this company called Liquid audio that doesn't exist anymore. And it was just iTunes 10 years too early on, there was real audio, there was Mark Cuban's company was called Audio net and then broadcast.com used for a lot of money. And so the company went public and made a lot of money. But it didn't work. The world wasn't ready for it yet to be able to live in this cassette world. It was not ready. I Napster hadn't been invented, mp3 and four hadn't been invented. So it just the adoption rate of being too early. But it still went public a lot. The investors made a ton of money, but they call that failing, failing forward. So I stayed there for a year, I made some money. And I went to another startup. And that startup was in the web hosting space, it was called Naevus. site, it's now won by Time Warner. But at that time, building data centers and hosting racks of computers was very good business. And so I got to be, you know, participate in an IPO. You know, I built built up revenue. And you know, the outsourcing craze now called cloud computing, it's dominated by the folks that like Amazon, and the folks at IBM, and a few others, but mostly, you know, dominated there, where you're basically having lots of blinking lights in a data center, and just making sure that those computers stay up to serve up the pages of the web, the videos, even television, programming, and now any form of communication. So I was, I was early on in that and again, got to go through an IPO and get compensated properly unduly, and, but also my life was out of balance. And so before we were called out for the sperm and had a baby, I transitioned out when Silicon Valley just the pendulum swung the other way, I ended up starting to work at my own nonprofit, I founded it with a couple of Silicon Valley guys called Planet Jewish, and it was still very technologically driven. It was the world's first Community Calendar. This is before Google Calendar, this is in 2000. And we built it as a nonprofit to serve the Jewish community to get more people to come to Jewish events. And I architected the code, and we ran that nonprofit for 17 years. And before calendaring really became free, and very proud of that. And after that, I started a very similar startup with different code called circle builder, and it was serving faith and religions. It was more like private facebook or private online communities. And we had the Vatican as a client and about 25,000 Ministries, churches, and nonprofits using the system. And this is all sort of when Facebook was coming out to you know, from being just an edu or just for college students. And so I built that up as a quite a big business. But unfortunately, I was in Michigan when I started circle builder. I ended up having to close both of those businesses down. One that the revenue was telling off of the nonprofit and also circuit builder wasn't monetizing as quickly or as we needed as well. But I ended up going into my 50 year old colonoscopy, Michael. And I woke up thinking everything was going to be fine. My wife Lisa's holding my hand. And the gastroenterologist said, No, I found something. And when I find something, it's bad news. Well, it was bad news. Stage three colon cancer. Within about 10 days or two weeks, I had 13 and a half inches of my colon removed, plus margins plus lymph nodes. One of the lymph nodes was positive, install a chemo port and then I waited because my daughter had soccer tournaments to travel to but on first week of August in 2016, I started 12 rounds of Rockem sockem chemotherapy called folfox and five Fu and it was tough stuff. So I was back on the juice again, doing chemotherapy and but this time, I wasn't a deer in the headlights, I was a dad, I was a husband. I had been through the trenches. So this time, I was much more of a marine on a mission. And I had these digital tools to reach out for research and for advocacy and for support. Very different at that time. And so I unfortunately failed my chemotherapy, I failed my neck surgery, another colon resection, I failed a clinical trial. And things got worse I became metastatic stage four that means that colon cancer had spread to my liver, my stomach linings called the omentum and peritoneum and my bladder. And I had that same conversation with a doctor in downtown Detroit, at a Cancer Institute and he said, We don't know if we can help you. And if you Dr. Google, it said I had 4% of chances of living about 12 to 18 months and things were dark I was I was back at it again looking looking at the Grim Reaper. But what I ended up doing is research and I did respond to the second line chemotherapy with a little regression or shrinkage. And for that you get more chemotherapy. And then I started to dig in deep research on peritoneal carcinoma which is cancer of the of the of the stomach lining, and it's very tricky. And there's a group called colon town.org that I joined and very informative. I there then met at that time was probably over 100 other people that had had the peritoneal carcinoma, toma and are living and they went through a radical surgery called cytoreduction high pack, where they basically debulk you like a de boning a fish, and they take out all this cancer, they can see the dead and live cells, and then they pour hot chemo in you. And then hot chemo is supposed to penetrate the scanning the organs, and it's supposed to, in theory kill micro cell organism and cancer, although it's still not proven just yet. But that surgery was about a 12 and a half hour surgery in March of 2018. And they call that the mother of all surgeries. And I came out looking like a ghost. I had lost about 60 pounds, and I had a long recovery. It's that one would put Humpty Dumpty back together. It's been now six years. But I got a lot of support. And I am now what's called no evidence of disease at this time, I'm still under surveillance. I was quarterly I just in June, I had my scans and my exams. And I'm now going to buy annual surveillance, which means CAT scans and blood tests. That's the step in the right direction. And so again, I mean, if I think about it, my twin sister saved my life, I had a frozen sperm become a daughter. And again, I'm alive from a stage four diagnosis. I am grateful. I am lucky, and I am blessed. So that's that a long story that the book will basically tell you, but that's where I am today.   Michael Hingson  48:50 And we'll definitely get to the book. But another question. So you had two startups that ran collectively for quite a period of time, what got you involved or motivated to do things in the in the faith arena?   Howard Brown  49:06 So I have to give credit to my wife, Lisa. So we met at the Jewish Federation of Los Angeles at this young leadership group. And then they have like a college fair of organizations that are Jewish support organizations. And one of them happened to be Jewish Big Brothers, now Jewish Brothers and Big Sisters of Los Angeles. Suppose you'd be a great big brother. I was like, well, it takes up a lot of time. I don't know. She's like, you should check it out. So I did. And I became I fill out the application. I went through the background checks, and I actually got to be a Jewish big brother to this young man II and at age 10. And so I have to tell you, one of the best experiences in my life was to become a mentor. And I today roll the clock forward. 29 years in is now close to 40 years old or 39 years old. He's married with a son who's one noble and two wife, Sarah, and we are family. We stayed together past age 18 Seen, and we've continued on. And I know not a lot of people do that. But it was probably one of the best experiences I've ever done. I've gotten so much out of it. Everyone's like, Oh, you did so much for in? Well, he did so much for me and my daughter, Emily calls him uncle and my wife and I are we are his family, his dad was in prison and then passed away and his mom passed away where his family now. And so one of the best experiences. So that's how I kind of got into the Jewish community. And also being in sales I was I ended up being a good fundraiser. And so these nonprofits that live their lifeblood is fundraising dollars. I didn't mind calling people asking them for donations or sitting down over coffee, asking them for donations. So I learned how to do that out in Southern California in Northern California. And I've continued to do that. So that gave me a real good taste of faith. I'm not hugely religious, but I do believe in the community values of the Jewish community. And you get to meet people beyond boards and you get to raise money for really good causes. And so that sort of gave me another foundation to build off of and I've enjoyed doing that as a community sermon for a long time.   Michael Hingson  51:10 I'll bite Where does Ian live today?   Howard Brown  51:13 Okay, well, Ian was in LA when we got matched. I had to move to San Francisco, but I I petitioned the board to keep our match alive because it was scholarship dollars in state right. And went to UC Santa Cruz, Florida State for his master's and got his last degree at Hastings and the Jewish community supported him with scholarships. And in was in very recently was in San Francisco, Oakland area, and now he's lives in South Portland, Oregon.   Michael Hingson  51:39 Ah, so you haven't gotten back to Michigan yet? Although he's getting into colder weather. So there's a chance?   Howard Brown  51:45 Well, let me tell you, he did live with us in Michigan. So using my connections through the Jewish community, I asked if he could interview with a judge from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals a friend of mine, we sat on a on a board of directors for the American Jewish Committee, Detroit. And I said, she's like, well, Howard, I really have to take Michigan kids. I said, You know what? No problem. You decide if he's if he's worthy or not go through your process, but would you take the phone call? So she took the phone call, and I never heard anything. And then Ian called me and he said, I got it. I as a second year loss. Going to be a second year law student. I'm going to be clerking for summer interning and clerking for this judge Leanne white. And again, it just it karma, the payback, it was beautiful. So he lived with us for about four and a half months. And when he came back, and it was beautiful, because Emily was only about four or five years old. And, and he lived with us for that time. And it was beautiful.   Michael Hingson  52:43 But that's really great. That, that you have that relationship that you did the big brother program. And I'm assuming you've been big brother to other people as well.   Howard Brown  52:53 No, no. I have not actually. Because what it did is it trained me to be a dad. So when I had Emily, it was more it was more difficult actually to do that. And so no, Ian has been my one and only match. I mentor a lot of Babson students, and I mentor and get mentored by some cancer patients and, and some big entrepreneurs. Mentorship is a core value of mine. I like to be mentored. And I also like to mentor others. And I think that's, that's what makes the world go round. So when Steve Gates when Bill Gates, his wife, Melinda, just donated 123 million to the overall arching Big Brothers, Big Sisters of America. And that money will filter to all those, I think that that's such a core value. If a young person can have someone that takes interest in them, they can really shape their future and also get a lot out of it. So mentorship is one of my key values. And I hope it's hope it's many of your viewers and yours as well. Michael,   Michael Hingson  53:52 absolutely is I think that we can't do anything if we can't pass on what we've learned and try to help other people grow. I've been a firm believer my entire life of you don't give somebody a fish, you teach them how to fish and however, and wherever that is, it's still the same thing. And we need to teach and impart. And I think that in our own way, every one of us is a teacher and the more we take it seriously, the better it is.   Howard Brown  54:18 Well, I'm now a student not learning podcasting. I learned how to be a book author and I'm learning how to reinvent myself virgin Humpty Dumpty, version two coming out.   Michael Hingson  54:29 So you had been a national cancer survivor advocate and so on. Tell me a little bit about that if you would.   Howard Brown  54:35 So I respect people that want to keep their diagnosis private and their survivorship private. That's not me. I want to be able to help people because if I would have been screened at age 40 or 42, I probably wouldn't have had colon cancer and I was not, but this is a preventable disease and really minorities and indigenous people as they need to get screened more, because that's the highest case of diagnosis for colorectal cancer. But what I think that that's what his needs now it's the second leading killer of cancer right now. And it's an important to get this advocacy out and use your voice. And so I want to use my voice to be able to sound the alarm on getting screening, and also to help people survive. There's I think, 16 million growing to 23 or 4 million by 2030. Cancer survivors out there, cancer diagnosis, it sucks sex all the way around, but it affects more than the patient, it affects your caregiver, it affects your family affects relationships, it affects emotions, physical, and also financial, there is many aspects of survivorship here and more people are learning to live with it and going, but also, quite frankly, I live with in the stage for cancer world, you also live with eminence of death, or desperation to live a little bit longer. You hear people I wish I had one more day. Well, I wish I had time to be able to see my daughter graduate high school, and I did and I cherished it. I'm going to see her graduate college this December and then walk at the Big House here in Michigan, in Ann Arbor in May. And then God willing, I will walk her down the aisle at the appropriate time. And it's good to have those big goals that are important that drive you forward. And so those are the few things that drive me forward.   Michael Hingson  56:28 I know that I can't remember when I had my first colonoscopy. It's been a while. It was just part of what I did. My mother didn't die of colon cancer, but she was diagnosed with colon cancer. She, she went to the doctor's office when she felt something was wrong. And they did diagnose it as colon cancer. She came home my brother was with her. She fell and broke her hip and went into the hospital and passed away a few days later, they did do an operation to deal with repairing her hip. And but I think because of all of that, just the amount that her body went through, she just wasn't able to deal with it. She was 6970. And so it was no I take Yeah, so I was just one of those things that that did happen. She was 71, not 70. But, you know, we've, for a while I got a colonoscopy every five years. And then they say no, you don't need to do it every five years do it every 10 years. The couple of times they found little polyps but they were just little things. There was nothing serious about them. They obviously took them out and autopsy or biopsy them and all that. And no problems. And I don't remember any of it. I slept through it. So it's okay.   Howard Brown  57:46 Great. So the prep is the worst part. Isn't it though? The preps no fun. But the 20 minutes they have you under light anesthesia, they snipped the polyps and away you go and you keep living your life. So that's what I hope for everyone, because I will tell you, Michael, showing through the amount of chemotherapy, the amount of surgeries and the amount of side effects that I have is, is I don't wish that on anyone. I don't wish on anyone. It's not a good existence. It's hard. And quite frankly, it's, I want to prevent about it. And I'm just not talking about colon cancer, get your mammogram for breast cancer, get your check for prostate cancer, you know, self care is vital, because you can't have fun, do your job, work Grow family, if your hell if you're not healthy, and the emotional stuff they call the chemo brain or brain fog and or military personnel refer to it as PTSD. It's real. And you've got to be able to understand that, you know, coming from a cancer diagnosis is a transition. And I'll never forget that my two experiences and I I've got to build and move forward though. Because otherwise it gets dark, it gets lonely, it gets depressing, and then other things start to break down the parts don't work well. So I've chosen to find my happy place on the basketball court be very active in sounding the alarm for as an advocate. And as I never planned on being a book author and now I'm going to be a published author this summer. So there's good things that have come in my life. I've had a very interesting, interesting life. And we're here talking about it now so I appreciate it.   Michael Hingson  59:20 Well tell me about you in basketball seems to be your happy place.   Howard Brown  59:24 So everyone needs to find a happy place. I'll tell you why. The basketball court I've been playing since I was six years old and I was pretty good you know, I'm not gonna go professional. But I happen to like the team sport and I'm a point guard so I'm basically telling people what to do and trash talk and and all that. But I love it a

covid-19 god america tv new york university amazon california children google english hollywood apple los angeles zoom new york times san francisco michigan chinese ohio italy japanese oregon mom african americans cancer detroit jewish abc greek hospitals ptsd respect cnn mba supreme court harvard nbc massachusetts stage sony middle east silicon valley pc captain muslims blind southern california los angeles lakers stitcher connecticut new england march madness thunder cat ambassadors montana sugar southern korean oakland pacific bill gates ebooks iv ibm behold pbs vermont new hampshire usc steve jobs mentorship peacemakers kindle ohio state polish rhode island unstoppable ipo boston red sox judaism michigan state university msnbc northern california san jose salesforce hp vatican hats ministries visionary cj hindu yellowstone national park aretha franklin abbott mark cuban liquid albany motown appeals rutgers university ann arbor grizzlies rs florida state pacific ocean leanne cancer survivors rubin hastings palo alto reaper cad converse hewlett packard us news american red cross avid field trip uc irvine uci grim reaper macintosh fenway park time warner missoula two time big house golden retrievers google calendar babson college jerry west zod northridge humpty dumpty uc santa cruz national federation pro tools e.t. chaldeans glacier national park texas instruments wonder twins grand tetons dana farber cancer institute betamax ncr framingham alumni association big brothers jewish federation connecticut college wgbh babson big sisters back bay howards sony walkman mccaw ninth circuit court arab muslims exxon mobile noac hodgkins northgate federal express scripps college fred allen chief vision officer south portland burger joint cancer institute howard brown american jewish committee american bankers association iraqi christians community calendar timberlands k pax michael hingson ncr corporation american humane association oyster house durgin lisa yeah thunder dog hero dog awards ncrs naevus
Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina
Santa Barbara Talks: Dale Francisco Talks Santa Barbara Elections

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 54:42


Former Santa Barbara City Councilman Dale Francisco breaks down the Santa Barbara Election with his smart views on all the contests. Francisco offers his expertise on the candidates and offers predictions on how he thinks some of the contests will turn out. Francisco dishes on Salud Carbajal, Gregg Hart, Mike Stoker, Chrisy Lozano, Brad Allen, Dan La Berge, Phebe Mansure, Gabe Escobedo and more. He also offers his views on Elon Musk's 44B purchase of Twitter and what that means for viewpoint diversity.Check it out! Please hit subscribe to this podcast and visit www.santabarbaratalks.com to make a donation. Joshua Molina is a journalist and college instructor who interviews a wide variety of people on the issues of education, housing, politics, culture and business. Molina is a former reporter at the San Jose Mercury News and teaches at Cal State University, Northridge and Santa Barbara City College. Visit SantaBarbaraTalks.com to sign up for his newsletter and make a contribution to this individually owned podcast.

Pod Meets World
TGI - Episode 117 (“The Fugitive”)

Pod Meets World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 64:48


Let's get Emo with this week's recap! Not only is it the most dramatic episode of BMW yet, it was filmed just mere days after the massive Northridge earthquake. In fact, the cast could feel the aftershocks all the way to the table-read. But as they say, ‘the show must go on' - and it definitely did for Rider. Learn exclusive behind the scenes stories for what most fans think is Rider's most memorable episode, and why he says it was a critical turning point for Shawn. Plus, Will tells a story of talking to a film class at UCLA and how the students put him in check. Climb through the window and hide under the bed, but don't make any noise - It's another episode of Pod Meets World!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

All Things Physical Therapy Podcast
S2 Ep9: Changing roles and continuing to navigate insurance barriers as a Physical Therapist - Matt Huey PT, MPT

All Things Physical Therapy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 51:32


Matt Huey earned his master's of physical therapy at California State University, Northridge in 2010 and has worked in outpatient orthopedics throughout his career. He obtained his certification in MDT in 2013, became a certified manual trigger point therapist in 2015, a Diplomat in MDT in 2018, and a Fellow of the AAOMPT in 2020. He has run clinics throughout several states where he was able to develop PTs and PTA's along with mentoring students. He has volunteered with the APTA at the state level in Mississippi and Texas and also helped the state of Mississippi pass House Bill 309 which is the licensure compact. He is now serving as a delegate with the state of Texas. He is also active on Instagram and TikTok, as well as his website. @matt_pt_dip_mdtwww.mattthept.comSubscribe, download, and rate!Follow @dpt.stephwww.dptsteph.com

Tavis Smiley
Dr. Wendy Thelese Talley & Terrence Stewart on "Tavis Smiley"

Tavis Smiley

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 42:40


Topic: Black Men & Mental Health Dr. Wendy Thelese Talley - Corporate Wellness Expert and has worked in the mental health field for 22 years. Dr. Talley is the Founder and CEO of Thelese Consulting Group, LLC, a corporate group practice providing mental health treatment. Terrence Stewart is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker who earned his Master's in Social Work from California State University of Northridge. Terrence has 10+ years of experience in mental health, which includes working in schools, juvenile placements, and reintegration programs. Both will join Tavis for a conversation on Black men and mental health – in light of the recent Kanye West fallout

Weaving Magick
43: Honoring Your Inner Writer with Skye Horn

Weaving Magick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 59:07


Welcome to the Weaving Magick Podcast!Skye Horn is the author of the bestselling Kingdoms of Faerie series. She graduated with her bachelor's degree in English with a focus on Creative Writing from California State University, Northridge. When she's not weaving romantic stories full of magic, myths, and legends for her readers, you can find her adventuring around the world with her husband, hiking the mountains with her fur babies, or curled up by the fireplace with her favorite paperback. Have you wondered how to fit your dreams into your daily life while managing another job? In this episode with Skye Horn, Tara & Alyssa chat about ways to find joy throughout your life by taking intentional steps toward your dreams. You are never too old or too late to take steps in the direction of what makes you happy! Affirm: I am (whatever you are choosing to step into).To learn more about Skye, follow her on Instagram @skyehorn_author and subscribe to her newsletter at skyehorn.com. This Week's Challenge:  Jot down the thoughts and  creative ideas that run through your brain throughout the day.We would love to create magick with you in our Weaving Magick Community!Connect with us on our Weaving Magick socials:InstagramTikTokTwitterYoutubeTo get to know Tara:InstagramTikTokTo get to know Alyssa:InstagramTikTok Support the show

Goshen News Sports Podcast
S4E14: Westview, Northridge have successful weekends

Goshen News Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 49:19


Topics on this week's Goshen News Sports Pocast include: -Notre Dame football struggles again, losing to Stanford (start-6:10) -Boys soccer regional recap, featuring Westview winning a Class 1A title (6:10-15:10) -Recapping the girls soccer season coming to a close (15:10-19:00) -Volleyball sectional recap, including NorthWood winning a Sectional 20 title (19:00-27:30) -A look at cross country regionals and a look ahead to this weekend's semistate (27:30-34:05) -Westview's Isaiah Hostetler going to the individual boys tennis state tournament (34:05-36:34) -A preview of this week's football sectional games (36:34-45:30) -Maple Leaf Minute with Dante Stanton, and the end the show (45:30-end)

Playmaker's Corner
Playmaker's Corner Episode 207: Week 8 and Inaugural Colorado Girls High School Flag Football State Tournament Recap

Playmaker's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 181:49


Not only do Kodey, Simon, and Gideon get you all squared away on league matchups, power rankings and playmakers of the game/week, but Simon and Kodey also found their way to UCHealth Training Facility to watch the VERY FIRST Girls Flag Football tournament in Colorado where a state champ was crowned and with every down history (or should we say HERSTORY) was made! Listen for full details! Timestamps 0:00-1:21 Code Red Coaching and Intro 1:22-13:45 Thursday Night Scores Recap 13:46-27:11 Northridge vs. Roosevelt 27:12-44:57 Friday Night Scores Recap 44:58-52:55 Mullen vs. Legacy 52:56-1:13:36 Colorado Springs Christian vs. Banning Lewis Academy 1:13:37-1:32:14 Longmont vs. Monarch 1:32:15-1:36:47 Saturday Scores Recap 1:36:48-1:39:18 Inaugural Colorado Girls Flag Football State Tournament (intro) 1:39:19-1:43:30 Columbine Flag vs. Kennedy Flag 1:43:31-1:47:47 Eaglecrest (Black) Flag vs. Denver East Flag 1:47:48-1:49:34 Evergreen Flag vs. Smoky Hill Flag 1:49:35-1:53:29 Cherry Creek vs. Northfield 1:53:30-1:57:00 Denver South vs. Kennedy 1:57:01-1:59:41 Chatfield vs. Eaglecrest 2 1:59:42-2:05:55 Eaglecrest 1 vs. Evergreen 2:05:56-2:09:12 Arvada West Flag vs. Cherry Creek Flag 2:09:13-2:14:04 Arvada West Flag vs. Evergreen Flag 2:14:05-2:18:05 Chatfield Flag vs. Denver South Flag 2:18:06-2:27:36 Arvada West Flag vs. Chatfield Flag 2:27:45-2:38:33 Playmakers of the Week 2:38:34-2:42:36 5A PMC Power Rankings 2:42:37-2:46:45 4A PMC Power Rankings 2:46:46-2:52:44 3A PMC Power Rankings 2:52:45-2:57:30 2A PMC Power Rankings 2:57:31-2:59:48 1A PMC Power Rankings 2:59:49-3:01:44 Outro/Announcements https://linktr.ee/PlaymakersCorner Social Media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/PlaymakerCorner Tik Tok: Playmakers Corner Instagram: https:https://www.instagram.com/playmakerscorner/?hl=en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PlaymakerCorner Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUEcv0BIfXT78kNEtk1pbxQ/featured Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/playmakerscorner Website: https://playmakerscorner.com/ Listen to us on: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4rkM8hKtf8eqDPy2xqOPqr Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-cycle-365/id1484493484?uo=4 Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/the-cycle-365 Google Podcasts: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9mODg4MWYwL3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz

Brave and Strong and True
Garry Lennon

Brave and Strong and True

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 63:42


My guest is Garry Lennon. Garry joined Summer Stage in 1978 and contributed 13 years of service, first as a performer, and then as a designer, and a director. His love of theatre and his accumulated experiences led to a career in theatre designing, directing, and teaching at California State University, North Ridge for the past two decades. I hope you enjoy our conversation, so, come along and have some fun. . . We all have stories to tell and they can be heard here.Welcome to Brave and Strong and True, a podcast created to engage Summer Stage alumni of all ages. I'm Bob Falkenstein. You can discover more about Garry's design work at Garry Lennonwww.csun.edu/TADW is Garry's summer workshop programhttps://mixedblood.com/ is a theatre company run by Mark Valdez, Garry's husband.Brave and Strong and True relies on financial support from its listeners. Please click the “Support the Show” link at the bottom of the show notes to support the show.Our music is composed and performed by Neil McGettigan https://neilmcgettiganandtheeleventhhour.bandcamp.com/releasesPlease subscribe to Brave and Strong and True on Apple Podcasts. While you're there, please rate the show and leave a comment.  Apple chooses to promote shows that receive a lot of ratings and comments.If you want to be a guest on Brave and Strong and True, please contact me at braveandstrongandtrue@gmail.com. You must have a desktop or laptop computer running the latest version of the Google Chrome browser. It helps if you have an external microphone and headphones, but Apple earbuds work too.Support the show

The Best Thing I Ever Ate
At a Deli ft. Duff Goldman, Geoffrey Zakarian and Alton Brown

The Best Thing I Ever Ate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 16:12


Flavorful tender brisket, corned beef, an incredible Rueben with a twist and a torpedo-sized hoagie: These are just a few of the foods Duff, Alton Brown, Claire Robinson, Ted Allen and others say are The Best Thing I Ever Ate.Duff Goldman kicks things off with a brisket Ted Allengoes for the noodle kugel Claire Robinson loves the reuben from Jimmy & Drew's Marc Summers heads to Northridge, CA for a corned beef sandwich Adam Gertler can't resist the junk yard special in Philadelphia, PA Rocco DiSpirito keeps it classic with an everything bagel from Tal Bagels Geoffrey Zakarian goes for the beef on weck Alton Brown is in New York City for a chopped herring salad sandwich Hungry for more Food Network? Go to discoveryplus.com/bestthing to start your free trial today. Terms apply.

The Man Enough Podcast
Jamey, Liz and Andy Grammer on What Makes A Good Man

The Man Enough Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 50:14


In this episode Jamey, Liz and Andy discuss positive changes men can make to close the divide between “men” and “good men.” Andy shares his personal experiences performing masculinity and gifts our audience with a surprise spoken word performance from his tour opener! The Man Enough Podcast is delighted to have Andy join us for a few episodes of our second season. You can expect to see Andy in a number of upcoming episodes, alternating with Justin as he tours his new book, Boys Will Be Human.  About Andy Grammer:  Multi-platinum performer Andy Grammer is a gifted songwriter with a bent toward contemporary soul and pop and hits like"Keep Your Head Up" and "Fine by Me." A native of Los Angeles, Grammer is the son of children's music artist Red Grammer, and grew up in New York State. He later returned to California to earn his B.A. in music industry studies from California State University, Northridge. While attending school, Grammer began performing around Los Angeles and even spent time as a street performer to help publicize himself. Much of his career is dedicated to his mother who passed when he was 25. In 2015, Grammer returned with his sophomore album, Magazines or Novels, featuring the singles "Back Home" and "Honey, I'm Good," the latter of which reached number nine on the Billboard chart. (It also helped him become the first male pop artist since John Mayer to reach the Top Ten at adult pop radio on his first two singles.) Show Notes  03:15 - Welcome Andy Grammar  04:00 - The infamous “Laundry” Conversation (Original Episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KK2d5Qy-zWk)  11:54 - What's a Good Man? 15:40 - The Science of Testosterone 24:11 - Andy's New Show Opener: Spoken Word  28:13 - Performing Masculinity, Getting Status from Other Men 30:26 - “Do Straight Men Even Like Women?” 38:31 - Showing Up Through Actions and Recognizing Inequality in the Chore Gap  47:11 - What Brings You Joy Key Quotes from the Episode:  Do I need to be edgier, do I need to curse? What do I need to do to get this thing that I don't want?  If you want a star for the culture game, I am not your man…but far too often I start conversations apologizing for who I am.  Do straight men even like women?  What does it mean to be there in solidarity for someone? It's to listen, and not only to listen, but believe. JOIN THE MAN ENOUGH COMMUNITY:  https://instagram.com/wearemanenough https://tiktok.com/wearemanenough https://twitter.com/WeAreManEnough https://facebook.com/wearemanenough https://youtube.com/WeAreManEnough Subscribe to the Man Enough newsletter for behind the scenes, updates, sneak peeks of new episodes, and positive masculinity content: https://manenough.com/newsletter Read the Man Enough book: https://manenough.com/books Pre-Order the Boys Will Be Human book: https://boyswillbehuman.com  ANDY GRAMMER LINKS: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/andygrammer/?hl=en Twitter: https://twitter.com/andygrammer?lang=en Site: https://andygrammer.com Facebook: ​​https://www.facebook.com/andygrammer/ Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/2oX42qP5ineK3hrhBECLmj FOLLOW THE HOSTS: Justin Baldoni https://instagram.com/justinbaldoni https://www.tiktok.com/@justinbaldoni https://facebook.com/justinbaldoni https://twitter.com/justinbaldoni Text: +1 (310) 845-6909 Liz Plank https://instagram.com/feministabulous https://tiktok.com/@lizplank https://facebook.com/feministabulous https://twitter.com/feministabulous http://www.elizabethplank.com/ Jamey Heath https://instagram.com/jamey_heath_ https://tiktok.com/@jameyheath https://twitter.com/jamey_heath_ https://facebook.com/jameyjaz http://www.jameyheath.com/ SPECIAL ADVERTISER OFFERS FOR YOU Chime Financial  Go to https://www.chime.com/manenough to sign up for a Chime Credit Builder Visa Credit Card today! Thanks to Chime for supporting the show. #goodman #relationships #heterosexual #spokenword #andygrammer To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Weekend Warrior with Dr. Robert Klapper

Delicious Bakery in Northridge has this ring of sweetness.

Heroes of Reality
Episode 193: Where There is a Need, There is a Way

Heroes of Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 48:04


Eileen Greene is a 93 year old empowered and fearless woman who strongly believes that there's no age-limit to achieving your goals and dreams. After raising her three sons, Eileen went on an unrelenting campaign to educate herself and experience life to the fullest; earning her bachelor's degree from California State University, Northridge at 50 years young. For Eileen, it's never too late, even today, she is an active Life Coach using Hypnotherapy and Psychotherapeutic methods to help her clients. Her Ted Talk (at the age of 87) focused on how it's never too late to do anything your heart wants you to do in this lifetime. Her biggest message is that we are all going to go, some of us sooner rather than later, but while you are still here, you have an opportunity to contribute. What are your “coulda, shoulda, wouldas”? No matter your age, make your list, pick one and do it now.

BizTimes MKE: Milwaukee Business Insights
Weekly Debrief: Maybe, just maybe, something will finally happen with Northridge Mall

BizTimes MKE: Milwaukee Business Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 20:17


Andrew Weiland and Arthur Thomas from BizTimes Media get together to discuss the news of the week, including a judge lifting an injunction against a raze order for the former Northridge Mall. Andrew and Arthur discuss if this will finally lead to action on the demolition of the former mall, which closed in the early 2000s. Insider Spotlight Stories:Cudahy-based CR Industries acquired by former Lucas-Milhaupt leadersGannett sells former Journal Sentinel printing plant in West Milwaukee for $26 millionBig Story:Judge lifts injunction against Northridge Mall raze order – says owner must demolish buildings

The Conversation Weekly
Secretive lawsuits by fossil fuel companies could hold back climate action

The Conversation Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 41:04


A new barrier to climate action is opening up in an obscure and secretive part of international trade law which fossil fuel investors are using to sue countries if policy decisions go against them. We speak to experts about the investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) mechanism and how it works. Many are worried that these clauses in international trade deals could jeopardise global efforts to save the climate – costing countries billions of dollars in the process.Featuring Kyla Tienhaara, Canada research chair in economy and environment at Queen's University, Ontario in Canada, Emilia Onyema, reader in international commercial Law at SOAS, University of London in the UK, Lea Di Salvatore, PhD researcher at the University of Nottingham in the UK and Maria-Rita D'Orsogna, anti-oil activist and professor of mathematics at California State University, Northridge in the US.This episode was produced by Gemma Ware and Mend Mariwany, with sound design by Eloise Stevens. Gemma Ware is the executive producer. Our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. Full credits for this episode are available here. A transcript will be available soon. Sign up here for a free daily newsletter from The Conversation.Further reading:How treaties protecting fossil fuel investors could jeopardize global efforts to save the climate – and cost countries billionsEnergy charter treaty makes climate action nearly illegal in 52 countries – so how can we leave it?British investors could sue Australia over climate action if UK joins trans-Pacific trade pact Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

TNT Radio
Pat Jordan on The Bryan McClain Show - 07 October 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 55:47


On today's show we discuss the politics of a natural disaster. GUEST OVERVIEW: Patrick J. Jordan is a 38-year veteran and retired Chief of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Chief Jordan has extensive experience in Municipal Law Enforcement and local Corrections. He has served as the former Chief of Police and Security for the Los Angeles County Metro Transit System and the Regional Metrolink Rail System. Additionally, Chief Jordan has experience in; the protection of critical infrastructure from terrorism, homelessness, bail reform, implementing anti recidivism programs and criminal justice reform efforts. Chief Jordan currently serves on the Foundation Board for the Los Angeles Mission which continues to meet the needs of the homeless in Downtown Los Angeles' Skid row. Chief Jordan was born and raised in Detroit Michigan but has resided in Los Angeles County for over forty years. He has a Bachelor of Art in Political Science from California State University at Northridge and is a graduate of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security Executive Leadership Program.

Bob and Brian Podcasts
Northridge Mall

Bob and Brian Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 8:37


Northridge Mall by 102.9 The Hog

TNT Radio
Patrick Jordan on The Hrvoje Morić Show - 30 September 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 55:47


GUEST OVERVIEW: Patrick J. Jordan is a 38-year veteran and retired Chief of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Chief Jordan has extensive experience in Municipal Law Enforcement and local Corrections. He has served as the former Chief of Police and Security for the Los Angeles County Metro Transit System and the Regional Metrolink Rail System. Additionally, Chief Jordan has experience in; the protection of critical infrastructure from terrorism, homelessness, bail reform, implementing anti recidivism programs and criminal justice reform efforts. Chief Jordan currently serves on the Foundation Board for the Los Angeles Mission which continues to meet the needs of the homeless in Downtown Los Angeles' Skid row. Chief Jordan was born and raised in Detroit Michigan but has resided in Los Angeles County for over forty years. He has a Bachelor of Art in Political Science from California State University at Northridge and is a graduate of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security Executive Leadership Program.

TNT Radio
Pat Jordan on The Bryan McClain Show - 01 October 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 55:46


On today's show Pat Jordan talks about the FEMA response for Hurricane Ian. GUEST OVERVIEW: Patrick J. Jordan is a 38-year veteran and retired Chief of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Chief Jordan has extensive experience in Municipal Law Enforcement and local Corrections. He has served as the former Chief of Police and Security for the Los Angeles County Metro Transit System and the Regional Metrolink Rail System. Additionally, Chief Jordan has experience in; the protection of critical infrastructure from terrorism, homelessness, bail reform, implementing anti recidivism programs and criminal justice reform efforts. Chief Jordan currently serves on the Foundation Board for the Los Angeles Mission which continues to meet the needs of the homeless in Downtown Los Angeles' Skid row. Chief Jordan was born and raised in Detroit Michigan but has resided in Los Angeles County for over forty years. He has a Bachelor of Art in Political Science from California State University at Northridge and is a graduate of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security Executive Leadership Program.

On My Way to Wealth
125: Growing Up Latino with Uziel Gomez

On My Way to Wealth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 53:04


Uziel is a first-generation college graduate. He was born and raised in San Fernando, California, where his parents migrated after leaving their native country, Mexico. Uziel's dad is a construction worker, and his mom is a homemaker. Growing up in a low-income household, Uziel explored careers where he could serve as a resource to empower his family and community. Uziel graduated from California State University, Northridge, with a bachelor's degree in Financial Planning. He's currently completing a Financial Planning Residency at a fee-only RIA firm. Uziel is passionate about helping people navigate their financial journeys to help them reach their goals. Uziel also volunteers in the BLX internship program to promote diversity and inclusion. The BLX internship program helps place aspiring Black and Latinx financial planners with meaningful internships in fee-only RIA firms. Notes: In this episode Luis and Uziel discuss: How Uziel is working to have a direct impact on his community Pursuing your passion and creating your own opportunities Building wealth through educating the Latino community on the importance of finances Uziel's advice for those who want to become a Financial Planner Resources: Uziel's LinkedIn  Uziel's Twitter Download the 3 Fundamental “Money Moves” to Make Before Turning 45  LatinXcellence, more than a brand, it's a movement!  Luis' LinkedIn  Luis' Twitter  Luis' IG  On My Way To Wealth YouTube channel 

The Real Entrepreneurs Podcast
EP 4. The Upbringing of Eva Angelina! - The REAL Entrepreneurs Podcast

The Real Entrepreneurs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 35:56


Eva Angelina was born and raised in Los Angeles, California. She graduated from California State University, Northridge, and continued her Graduate studies at various universities in business and entrepreneurship.  Eva moved to Nashville, TN, in 2012 and is the current Broker/Owner of C21 Capital Properties and co-owner of Solace Oral Surgery and SOMOSS. She strives to develop leaders within her companies through mentorship, teaching, and leadership opportunities.     Eva began an early career as an educator in inner-city high schools in Los Angeles, where she taught business development and leadership. She has devoted most of her life to service through leadership – in her profession and her community as an educator, mentor, and philanthropist.    Eva Angelina was the founding president of the NAHREP Nashville, launched in 2016. She currently serves on the board of the CBOG - Midwest Region, the American Red Cross, TLACC (Tennessee Latin American Chamber of Commerce), HOLA (Hispanic Leaders and Achievers), ELLA (Entrepreneur Latina Leaders of America) and is the current president of the HDSA (Huntington's Disease of America) TN Chapter.      In her free time, Eva enjoys travel, fitness, and spending time with her family. 

The Nicole Sandler Show
20220927 Nicole Sandler Show - Earthquakes or Hurricanes: Which is Worse?

The Nicole Sandler Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 68:14


That was a question posted in the YouTube chat today. Since I've been through both a major hurricane (Andrew in 1992) and earthquake (Northridge 1994), I'm an expert, and gave my well thought out and long-winded answer... Yes, it's raining hard and the wind is blowing, but where I live in Broward County, FL, we're outside of the ring of uncertainty. That's something you learn about at an early age here in Floriduh. Prepared as we can be, we sit like ducks waiting for the storm to hit. Actually, we wait for days, willing the winds to shift ever so slightly, steering the beast away from where we are. It worked for me this time. The storm track moved further and further to the west, so it will slide up Florida's west coast and make landfall around Tampa. Certainly not good for them, but just what the doctor ordered for Miami/Ft. Lauderdale. But we're still getting outer bands and tomorrow has been called off. Well, not the whole day, just the Jan 6 hearing that we were ready for... Damn. But the optics. I get it. So today, we'll talk... Phones are open for anything you'd like to discuss. And I have some clips to share and stories to tell... Showtime 5ET/2PT

TNT Radio
Pat Jordan on Deprogram with Michael Parker - 21 September 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 55:46


GUEST HOST: Owen Stevens GUEST OVERVIEW: Patrick J. Jordan is a 38-year veteran and retired Chief of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Chief Jordan has extensive experience in Municipal Law Enforcement and local Corrections. He has served as the former Chief of Police and Security for the Los Angeles County Metro Transit System and the Regional Metrolink Rail System. Additionally, Chief Jordan has experience in; the protection of critical infrastructure from terrorism, homelessness, bail reform, implementing anti recidivism programs and criminal justice reform efforts. Chief Jordan currently serves on the Foundation Board for the Los Angeles Mission which continues to meet the needs of the homeless in Downtown Los Angeles' Skid row. Chief Jordan was born and raised in Detroit Michigan but has resided in Los Angeles County for over forty years. He has a Bachelor of Art in Political Science from California State University at Northridge and is a graduate of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security Executive Leadership Program.

Peak Performance Life Podcast
EPI 60: Dr. Cheyenne Bryant On How To Transform Your Thoughts And Reprogram Your Mind To Get The Life You Want

Peak Performance Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 41:39


If you look around, there is always someone in the world who grew up in a similar place, time, and situation as you, who managed to change their life for the better. But just because it's possible to change your life doesn't mean it's easy.   In today's episode, we are joined by Author, Psychology Expert, Life Coach, and Motivational Speaker, Dr. Cheyenne Bryant, to talk about the power of the mind to get you the life you want. She also shares a few steps you can start doing to change your thoughts and mindset to ultimately change your life.   Dr. Cheyenne Bryant is a Psychology Expert, renowned Life Coach, Teen Mom Life Coach on MTV, ranked #1 Author in SUCCESS Magazines top 20, the President of NAACP; branch #1069, Founder of Dr. Bryant Institute, Founder of Dr. Bryant Foundation, author of the award-winning Readers Favorite Five-Star book, “Mental Detox,” Motivational Speaker, community activist, host, and brand ambassador.   Dr. Bryant's mission is to spread her message and expertise on how to lead a healthier, happier, balanced, and more fulfilling life. For years, she has shared her wisdom, awareness, mastery, and insight through her private practice, book, lectures, workshops, and assisting individuals with life impairments and challenges. Dr. Bryant embarked on a similar journey as the one you are undertaking, assisted by Iyanla Vanzant, Oprah Winfrey, Marriane Williamson, and many more. Dr. Bryant's passion for healing, encouraging, and empowering others is what led her to become a Doctor of Psychology and Life Coach.    Dr. Bryant attended the Cal State University of Northridge at the age of 17. While there, she obtained a double degree in Psychology and Pan African studies. During her first two years, she was undecided as to what field she should pursue as a career. Organically, she ended up choosing psychology. She still wasn't quite sure why, however. She didn't realize what had triggered her interest until she entered the Master's Program at the University of Phoenix. She was about halfway through the Master's program, and boom! It hit her! She had A LOT of healing within herself that needed to be done. Dr. Bryant's desire for self-fulfillment, healing, peace, and balance within herself and others drew her to the field of psychology. Being the overachiever that she is, Dr. Bryant decided to pursue her Doctorate degree in Counseling Psychology from Argosy University.   Learn more about Dr. Cheyenne at: Website: https://drbryant.co/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/DrCBryant IG: https://www.instagram.com/_drbryant/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/_DrBryant Grab a copy of her book at: https://amzn.to/3QWBbT7 Show notes: [1:51] Dr. Cheyenne's brief background and how she got to where she is [7:59] The importance of self-regulation [11:53] Her advice for the people who know that they can be more than who they are now [15:58] How do you change your thoughts? [22:18] Clutter and momentum can not coexist [27:50] On boredom and what we can do to overcome it [30:35] Safeguarding what you allow into your mind [32:22] What you can do to train your mind [39:23] Where to find Dr. Cheyenne? [41:12] Outro     Links and Resources: Peak Performance Life Peak Performance on Facebook Peak Performance on Instagram

Writerly Lifestyle
Finding Your Perfect Literary Agent with Kimberly Brower of Brower Literary & Management

Writerly Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 36:50 Transcription Available


5 Minute Writer Newsletter (Grab Your 1st Edition Here)ArticleBrower Literary & Management Connect with Kimberly on Twitter!Connect with David on Twitter3 BIG TAKEAWAYSHow to edit your bookIntangibles that will help you find an agentWhat agents are looking for in debut authorsEPISODE INFO:In today's episode, Kimberly and I discuss finding the RIGHT literary agent for you. What agents are looking for in a writer. Plus, she shares some of the editing advice she gives her own clients. Last time on the interview series I talked to book coach, Megan Clancy about how to edit your own work. Don't miss it! BIO:Kimberly fell in love with reading when she picked up her first Babysitter's Club book at the age of seven (Super Special editions were her favorites) and hasn't been able to get her nose out of a book since. She holds a BS in Business Administration from California State University, Northridge and received her JD from Loyola Law School, Los Angeles. After spending a decade in the business world, it was kismet that she found herself in publishing. She previously worked for over two years at a boutique literary agency before starting her own. When not providing individual attention to her clients, Kimberly manages all of the day-to-day operations of the agency. This includes overseeing the management of the foreign, audio and all other subsidiary rights for all the authors in the agency. 

Messages at BBC
Washing Feet - Sean Thome' - Expand Northwest

Messages at BBC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 27:21


About Sean: In 1995 Sean married Angel, the love of his life. They now have four children together as well as a fantastic son-in-law. Born in Tokyo, Japan, and raised in Las Vegas, Nevada, Sean moved to Orange Country, California where he was introduced to Jesus as a teenager. Having radically altered his path by the life-changing hope of Jesus, he decided to attend Hope International University, where he earned a BA in Biblical Studies and Church Growth. Sean served ten years as a student ministry pastor in Northridge, California, and Tigard, Oregon. In 2004, Sean and Angel planted a church with Expand Northwest where he served as the lead pastor for ten years. Sean has been the Executive Director for Expand Northwest since 2011. Sean and his family live in Tigard, Oregon. He enjoys a strong cup of bold roast coffee, a good day of surfing on the Oregon coast and spending quality time with his family. His passion is to see Jesus Christ exalted and the kingdom of God expanded through encouraging and equipping God's people. About Chapel: The focus for this year in Chapel is to simply belong to Jesus and serve Jesus. The purpose of the fall Chapel messages is to challenge the members of the college family to take on the character of Christ to BE like Jesus, so that people can see Jesus in us. Then the emphasis of the spring Chapel messages will encourage our campus community to live out our lives in a Christlike way so that others see Jesus working through us. We are seeking to be a discipleship community where each one of us simply seeks to be Jesus' for the sake of others to see, know, and belong to God. Learn more at www.boisebible.edu. Music by www.bensound.com

Convo By Design
2022 Remote Design House – Tulsa featuring Gail Davis and A Superbly Chill Club Room

Convo By Design

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 119:03 Transcription Available


I'm Josh Cooperman and this is Convo By Design with a long overdue introduction to a new concept in design houses. Remote and virtual Design. Check out the video here. Fist things first. I am a native Angeleno, born and raised in Los Angeles, The Valley to be more specific. In the 1980's when Valley Girls, parachute pants, mini-trucks, and Depeche Mode were part of my everyday life. I wasn't into design and architecture at that time. It was only after leaving, and returning to LA did I realize an appreciation for the amazing design surrounding me. I grew up in a mid-century traditional, a California Ranch House that was once a stage coach stop and later a train station in Chatsworth and much later, a Dingbat that was toppled in the Northridge earthquake. So when Tulsa, Oklahoma was selected as the site for the 2022 Remote Design House - Tulsa, most people I spoke with about the concept didn't really understand the idea behind it. The idea is so simple that it gets lost from the start. The pandemic created a forced shelter-in-place which affected home and office design more than most other industries.  The core ideas of both home and office have changed forever. And rightfully so. At the same time, the very nature of what architects and designers do hasn't changed at all, while their means, methods, processes and procedures certainly have. The remote nature of this design house is in direct response to designers responding to clients that they could not see in person at the time and, for those who have left their current city or state but love their designer and want to remain with them. If I live in Los Angeles and move to Aspen, I might want my designer to to work on my project. But if my designer doesn't know how to work remotely, or virtually, that can and will be a problem.  Remote Design is the practice of working in one place on a project in another.  Virtual Design is the process of working on a project that does not currently exist. Thank of it as an idea without a physical embodiment. The Remote Design House - Tulsa is a real project, using real designers who will never physically step foot in the project house. All the work is being done virtually, and remotely with local trades and artisans doing the work.  This project will also not have tours and there are no tickets for events or parties. No matter where you are listening to this, you will have access to the final project through videos, before and after segments, product features and an intimate look at the project house, neighborhood and City of Tulsa. Side note. I was recently in Los Angeles for a design event (May) and as I was telling many in the trade about the project, the most common response was, “eww, why Tulsa.” This has been a common response since I started planning this project in 2020. There is a visceral, negative response to the idea of Tulsa, Oklahoma and the Midwest from many I have met in LA, New York, San Francisco and the other “tier one” design destinations. My response is always the same, “oh, when was the last time you were in Tulsa?” Not a single person with that response has ever been to Tulsa because had they been, they would know what a special city this is. Which is exactly why it was selected over Austin, Nashville, St. Louis, Kansas City, Seattle and Denver. Nothing against those cities, but Tulsa is special and over the next year, you are going to find out why. The Family | The Jennings's, Michael (45), Rachael (42) and their children, Davis (19) and Rose (17) are transplants from New York City. The family learned that they could work remotely from anywhere in the country and sought out a city where they could slow down, focus on family and still grow their business, make friends, finish high school and pursue a higher quality of life. The desire was to slow down, focus and decrease the rat race pace and find their space. Michael is a TV producer. He is an avid cook, not a chef.

Northridge Groups
The Inside Scoop With Drew Karschner, ReGroup Leader Training, September 2022

Northridge Groups

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 18:27


At the Re:Group Leader Training for our Community Group Leaders on September 11, 2022, Drew Karschner shared updates and info about what God has been up to at Northridge and vision for our future as we look at launching new campuses and spreading the Gospel across our city and region.

Preps Rewind – 1310 KFKA
September 10 – Jeremy Hayden, Dean Grable and Troy Hoffman

Preps Rewind – 1310 KFKA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 42:29


Northridge head coach Jeremy Hayden joins Clark.  Also, Clark revisits his interview with Dean Grable and Kyle Johnson's interview with Troy Hoffman.

Intermediate Spanish Stories
E42 Northridge 1994

Intermediate Spanish Stories

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 29:05 Transcription Available


The 1994 Northridge earthquake that struck the densely populated San Fernando Valley in southern California, U.S., on January 17, 1994, was the third major earthquake to occur in the state in 23 years and was the state's most destructive one since the San Francisco earthquake of 1906 and the costliest one in U.S. history. The earthquake occurred just after 4:30 AM local time along a previously undiscovered blind thrust fault in the San Fernando Valley. Its epicenter was in Reseda, a suburb located about 23 miles (37 km) west-northwest of downtown Los Angeles. The major shock lasted 10–20 seconds and registered a magnitude of 6.7.Fatality estimates range from just under 60 to more than 70 people killed. The timing of the earthquake (early morning during a federal holiday) is thought to have prevented a higher death toll, as most residents were in their beds, rather than on failed freeways or in other collapsed structures (such as office buildings or parking lots). Most casualties occurred in wood-frame apartment buildings, popular in the San Fernando Valley, particularly those with weak first floors or lower-level parking garages. (This episode is dedicated to my friend John Orendoff who shared this experience with me, here to a long-lasting friendship)You will find the full transcript at https://interspanish.buzzsprout.comIf you have an episode suggestion, you can reach me at: Email: InterSpanishPodcast@gmail.comYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUn1MRmbmxL0ePiYDGfsJVwFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/interspanishPodcast/about/?ref=page_internalInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/interspanish/Twitter: https://twitter.com/InterSpanishPod

Behind The Baller Podcast with Ben Baller
EP 307 - @MeetTheCarlins (Power Couple & Owners of ResidualPayment.com) + Lunch with Colin Morikawa, Paying For The Necessary, NBA2K23 Scan & more

Behind The Baller Podcast with Ben Baller

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 80:41 Very Popular


His name is Ben Baller, not Ben Humble, having lunch with Colin Morikawa, having to take London to the hospital, health care & paying for what's necessary, having to cancel a day & more. Then it's an honor & a privilege to have David & Patricia Carlin aka @MeetTheCarlins (Power Business Couple & Owners of ResidualPayment.com) on Behind The Baller Podcast with Ben Baller to discuss: Where they're based, who they were before they found each other, how they were in school, How they met, the pros and cons of being business partners, Top 3 main business focuses, deep diving on their Instagram, having to overcome adversity, How the BTB ARMY can lock in and be on your same level, residual income off of credi cards & "the middle man" where they see the internet going, Why they put conferences on, how they re-invest, reaching out to The Carlins, creating content for their businesses & more. Then Ben brings it back for the Outro to discuss: Getting scanned for NBA2K23, picking up Nic from the airport, standing up for family, if you could change past mistakes, heading to Seattle, CaptainPicks this Sunday at Dave & Buster's in Northridge & more. Visit: www.ResidualPaymentsRetreats.com Follow them @meetthecarlins on Instagram & DM there. Signup at www.MyBookie.AG with Promo Code: BenBaller Visit: www.BenBallerShop.com If you are interested in MLB, Soccer, UFC & more Picks daily, weekly or monthly subscribe at www.CaptainPicks.com & Follow @TheCaptainPicks on Instagram Produced by: DBPodcasts www.dbpodcasts.com Follow @dbpodcasts on Instagram & Twitter Music by @lakeyinspired Available on all Podcast Platforms, YouTube & BehindTheBallerPod.com Behind The Baller Theme Music  Artist: Illegal Kartel (@illegal_kartel_mikal_shakur) Produced by: Gene Crenshaw @yuyuthemaker

Speaking Up with Andrew Pledger
Why I Became a Cult Expert - Rachel Bernstein LMFT - BONUS

Speaking Up with Andrew Pledger

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 111:47


Rachel Bernstein, therapist, and world-renowned cult expert shares her story for the first time. Rachel is the host of the “IndoctriNation” podcast. For 30 years, she has helped former cult members and those who have loved ones in cults and highly manipulative relationships. Rachel has helped people from over 300 cults throughout her career. She provides individual counseling, family counseling, and, when possible, group therapy for former cult members. She also helps families trying to reach out to their loved ones in the cult.She has led workshops and classes at USC in the School of Social Work and the Department of Psychiatry, at California State University at Northridge, and at various colleges and universities in the New York area. She is also a yearly presenter at the International Cultic Studies Association conferences and was a guest lecturer for the Clergy Emergency League and Wisconsin Council of Churches. She has presented at the Pacific Rim Conference for people in Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and China who are affected by cults and relationships with narcissists, and, with colleagues, developed the program "Stronger After", a free 5-session program for initial support and education for people newly out of highly controlling, abusive, and restrictive environments.Connect with Rachel BernsteinHer Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/1prXo4iIxUfjYpfX671cUD?si=KOWPMrAsROyysB1vXNu3dwSupport Her Work: https://www.patreon.com/indoctrination?utm_campaign=creatorshare_fanLinktree: https://linktr.ee/indoctrinationIG: https://instagram.com/indoctrinationpodcast?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=Connect with Andrew PledgerLinktree: https://www.liinks.co/4ndrewpledgerSocials - @4ndrewpledger Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Kari Assad Ghost Detective
The Hufflepuff of the Ravenclaw of Northridge with Holly Brown

Kari Assad Ghost Detective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 65:23


Kari and James help solve the case for Holly Brown (@hollybrowncomedy) who was ghosted by a longtime close friend. Check out Holly's show, Salty AF at the Hollywood Improv every month. The next show is Friday the week this comes out with Langston Kerman and Laurie Kilmartin! Tickets at the Hollywood Improv website. Follow this podcast on IG @kariassadshostdetective. You can find Kari on IG at @assadkarirocks and Twitter @kariassad. Kari Assad Ghost Detective is Recorded, Edited and Produced by James Hillmer @jdhillmer.

TNT Radio
Pat Jordan on Deprogram with Michael Parker - 07 September 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 55:45


GUEST OVERVIEW: Patrick J. Jordan is a 38-year veteran and retired Chief of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Chief Jordan has extensive experience in Municipal Law Enforcement and local Corrections. He has served as the former Chief of Police and Security for the Los Angeles County Metro Transit System and the Regional Metrolink Rail System. Additionally, Chief Jordan has experience in; the protection of critical infrastructure from terrorism, homelessness, bail reform, implementing anti recidivism programs and criminal justice reform efforts. Chief Jordan currently serves on the Foundation Board for the Los Angeles Mission which continues to meet the needs of the homeless in Downtown Los Angeles' Skid row. Chief Jordan was born and raised in Detroit Michigan but has resided in Los Angeles County for over forty years. He has a Bachelor of Art in Political Science from California State University at Northridge and is a graduate of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security Executive Leadership Program.

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina
Santa Barbara Talks: Luz Reyes-Martin

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 56:16


In the latest edition of Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina, Luz Reyes-Martin joins the podcast to talk about her plans for the Goleta City Council. She is running for District in the Nov. 8 election, looking to unseat incumbent Roger Aceves. Reyes-Martin is currently a member of the Goleta School Board. She's also the Communications Director for the Planned Parenthood, and serves on a variety of nonprofit boards. Reyes-Martin talks about the importance of diversity in elected office, and how she's walking through her District to see what the residents want to see from their elected officials. Reyes-Martin also shares the story of growing up in Los Angeles, and how teachers encouraged her to attend Stanford University, where she graduated with a planning degree. Please subscribe to @Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina You Tube channel. Consider a donation to this podcast at www.santabarbaratalks.com Subscribe to this podcast at @Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina Josh Molina has been a journalist in Santa Barbara for 20 years. He also covered City Hall for the San Jose Mercury News. In addition to working as a reporter at Noozhawk, he teaches journalism at Cal State University, Northridge and Santa Barbara City College. Please subscribe to his You Tube channel for more content.

Preps Rewind – 1310 KFKA
September 3 – Jeremy Hayden, Joe Resenbrock, and Eric Tonkin

Preps Rewind – 1310 KFKA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 39:59


Northridge football coach Jeremy Hayden, Brush football coach Joe Resenbrock, and Poudre football coach Eric Tonkin join guest host Kyle Johnson.

Gem City Sports Network
09/02/2022 Northridge at Carlisle (High School Football)

Gem City Sports Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 151:08


The high school football game between 2-0 Northridge and 2-0 Carlisle is now available on demand at NO CHARGE!

96.1 FM WSBT Radio
Mishawaka Football v Northridge 9-2-22

96.1 FM WSBT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 169:08


Mishawaka battles Northridge in Northern Lakes Conference opener. Brian Miller and Matt Rendall have the call.

Southwestern Vermont Health Care's Medical Matters Weekly

Season 2 | Episode 35 | August 31, 2022Matilde Castiel, MD, a nationally recognized leader in population health and health equity programs in Worcester, MA, is the guest on Medical Matters Weekly with Dr. Trey Dobson on August 31.  Dr. Castiel is the City of Worcester's commissioner for Health and Human Services, where she oversees the divisions of public health, youth services, human rights and disabilities, veterans' affairs, and elder affairs.In 2009, Dr. Castiel founded the Latin American Health Alliance (LAHA), a nonprofit organization in Worcester dedicated to combating homelessness and substance use for Latino males. Born in Camaguey, Cuba, and raised in California, she completed her medical training at the University of California, San Francisco, after earning a bachelor's in Cellular and Molecular Biology from California State University, Northridge. She completed her residency at UMass Memorial and has worked as a board-certified physician in Internal Medicine in the Worcester community for more than 28 years, including as an associate professor of Internal Medicine, Family Medicine and Psychiatry at UMass Medical School. Along with serving as medical director with LAHA, Dr. Castiel has served on the boards of many of Worcester's nonprofit organizations. She has been honored with many awards, including the Public Citizen of the Year Award from the National Association of Social Workers, Massachusetts Chapter. In 2020 – 2021, Dr. Castiel was a major force behind the city's Culture of Health Prize, awarded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.Medical Matters Weekly features the innovative personalities who drive positive change within health care and related professions. The show addresses all aspects of creating and maintaining a healthy lifestyle for all, including food and nutrition, housing, diversity and inclusion, groundbreaking medical care, exercise, mental health, the environment, research, and government. The show is produced with cooperation from Catamount Access Television (CAT-TV). Viewers can see Medical Matters Weekly on Facebook at facebook.com/svmedicalcenter and facebook.com/CATTVBennington. The show is also available to view or download a podcast on www.svhealthcare.org/medicalmatters.Underwriter: Mack Molding

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina
Santa Barbara Talks 129: Santa Barbara School Board Candidate Dan La Berge

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 45:05


Dan La Berge, is the executive director of Mothers' Helpers, a nonprofit that provides baby accessories to families in need. Now, he's running for the Santa Barbara Unified School District Board of Trustees. La Berge is a parent of three children and believes his experience as a father provides him with a lens to understand the important issues facing the Santa Barbara Unified School District. LaBerge in this podcast talks about why his decided to run for the seat. He also talks about Mothers Helpers, and shares the compelling story of he and his wife Robin Unander La Berge became parents of their third child. He also talks about his dislike of partisan politics. Please subscribe to @Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina You Tube channel. Consider a donation to this podcast at www.santabarbaratalks.com Subscribe to this podcast at @Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina Josh Molina has been a journalist in Santa Barbara for 20 years. He also covered City Hall for the San Jose Mercury News. In addition to working as a reporter at Noozhawk, he teaches journalism at Cal State University, Northridge and Santa Barbara City College. Please subscribe to his You Tube channel for more content.

Bertcast's podcast
# 533 - Ryan Sickler & ME

Bertcast's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 129:25


Today, I sit down with comedian, Ryan Sickler. We get high and talk about our first time getting stoned, The Osbournes, the Northridge earthquake, getting involved with a kingpin, being a twin and much more!   Follow Ryan Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ryansickler/?hl=en  Twitter: https://twitter.com/ryansickler?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor  Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheHoneyDew    This episode is also brought to you by Helix. Get up to $200 off all mattress orders and 2 free pillows at http://www.helixsleep.com/bert    This episode is brought to you by Ladder. Go to http://www.ladderlife.com/bert to find out if you're approved today!   This episode is also brought to you by Mizzen+Main. Go to http://www.mizzenandmain.com to receive $25 off any regular price order of $130 or more with the code “BERTCAST”   This episode is also brought to you by Mad Rabbit Tattoo. Go to http://www.madrabbit.com/bertcast and use the promo code “BERTCAST” for 25% off.    This episode is also brought to you by Wine Enthusiast. Go to http://www.wineenthusiast.com or text “BERT” to 511511 to check out all of Wine Enthusiast's Labor Day sale.    This episode is also brought to you by NextEvo. Get 25% off your first order of $40 or more with the promo code “BERT” at http://www.nextevo.com    For all TOUR DATE & MERCH click HERE: http://www.bertbertbert.com  Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/bertkreischer  Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/BertKreischer  Instagram: http://www.Instagram.com/bertkreischer  Youtube: http://www.Youtube.com/user/Akreischer 

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina
Geordie & Josh Talk Seinfeld, Golden Girls, Good Times, and childhood TV shows

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 59:59


The Geordie & Josh podcast is back with an entertaining discussion about their favorite TV shows. The two college professors talk how shows influenced them in their childhood. They banter about Seinfeld, M*A*S*H, Good Times, Three's Company and much more. Geordie offers her intellectual insight into why the shows were relevant at the time, and the reasons they mattered to her. Molina shares the shows that were impactful to him. The professors talk about the characters played by Lisa Bonet, Bea Arthur, Jerry Seinfeld, Jerry Stiller, Jason Alexander, Ernest Thomas, Suzanne Somers, and many more. This hour-long podcast offers a smart look at how these shows shaped their complicated lives. Armstrong is a full-time teacher at Santa Barbara City College. Check out her article on feminism here: http://www.ayww.org/new-blog/2016/2/27/is-feminist-the-new-f-word-and-what-does-that-have-to-do-with-2020-ayww Armstrong, a professor of geography, teaches a variety of classes, including Human Geography, World Regional Geography, California Geography, Physical Geography, and Economic Geography. Please visit You Tube and subscribe to Santa Barbara Talks. Visit SantaBarbaraTalks.com and consider a financial contribution. Joshua Molina is a journalism instructor at Cal State University, Northridge and Santa Barbara City College. He brings his years of experience, intuition and listening skills to this podcast to help create amazing conversations with interesting and intriguing individuals. Thanks for listening and watching. Share with a friend and ask them to subscribe.

Post In Black
Jesse Dodd, ADR and Foley Re-Recording Mixer Discusses Decades-Long Career in Hollywood

Post In Black

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 39:27


Born and raised in South Central, Los Angeles, ADR and Foley Re-Recording Mixer, Jesse Dodd has an astonishingly long list of credits that span decades. The California State University, Northridge grad's earliest projects were huge films, The Bodyguard and Thelma and Louise. Later on, Jesse's body of work expanded to include Abbott Elementary, Hacks, Bel-Air, Nope, Angelyne, Interview with the Vampire, Us, Black Panther, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, P-Valley, How to Get Away with Murder, Jurassic World and more. From an early age, Jesse knew all along that the entertainment industry was an area of interest. Couple that with the inherent desire to 'pull things apart and put them back together again,' Jesse self-describes as a tinkerer, hence the perfect combo for the vast arena that is post-production. During this interview, we cover technical aspects of ADR and what a foley mixer does, including how the pandemic ushered in a whole range of expanded and accessible technologies. We discuss older and newer barriers of entry and ways around those barriers for those interested in the work as well as the lack of people of color in these kind of post-production roles and why awareness is crucial. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/postinblack/support

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina
Santa Barbara Talks 128: Ethan Bertrand

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 57:14


Ethan Bertrand is the newest member of the Goleta School Board! In this great podcast, Bertrand shares his incredible story, growing up in New Jersey, finding Santa Barbara City College, which turned his life around, transferring to UCSB, and getting involved in activism and politics. Bertrand leads of the podcast talking about his plans for serving the K-6 district, which has about 3,000 students. Bertrand offers about his goals for the district and his intention to focus on inclusion and students of color. Bertrand, the founding president of the Isla Vista Community Services District, also shares details about his work in Isla and success at making students feel safer and helping them to find better living conditions. Bertrand grew up in New Jersey and talks about his experiences in the public school system, how counselors and teachers shaped him, and his close relationship with his parents and brothers. Bertrand, district representative for Second District Santa Barbara County Supervisor Gregg Hart, discusses county politics, what it's like to work for Hart, and how the office responded during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. Betrand, an accomplished musician, also talks about his love for singing and songwriting. Bertrand is a bright and rising star! Please subscribe on You Tube. Please subscribe to @Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina You Tube channel. Consider a donation to this podcast at www.santabarbaratalks.com Subscribe to this podcast at @Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina Josh Molina has been a journalist in Santa Barbara for 20 years. He also covered City Hall for the San Jose Mercury News. In addition to working as a reporter at Noozhawk, he teaches journalism at Cal State University, Northridge and Santa Barbara City College. Please subscribe to his You Tube channel for more content.

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur
1293 – Tell Your Story with Sand And Shores' Tonya McKenzie

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 18:30


In this episode of the Thoughtful Entrepreneur, your host Josh Elledge speaks with the Founder of https://www.sandandshores.com/ (Sand & Shores), Tonya McKenzie. Sand & Shores is a public relations firm that works primarily with nonprofits, law enforcement, and authors. Tonya explains that the public needs to see good public relations from civic organizations to build trust. Many individuals worry that sharing their strong suits will come off as insincere or similar to bragging to their audience. Tonya explains that this is not bragging as you are sharing information as to what you are good at. Civic organizations can start building a rapport with their community simply by actively listening to their community members. It is also important for organizations to listen to understand rather than listening to defend.  Tonya explains that leaders or members of an organization that notice a lack of communication as well as a rock block in productivity, are good candidates for her services. She wants to help organizations become comfortable with engaging in difficult conversations for the betterment of the organization as well as the community it serves. Tonya advises to use the contact me tab on her website to set up a time to chat. Explaining your current situation and why you reached out to Tonya will help get the conversation moving in the right direction.    Key Points from the Episode: What Sand & Shores is and who they work with The importance of public relations for civic organizations  How to handle objective feelings about “bragging” Ways civic organizations can start building a rapport with their community The negative effects of listening to defend Ideal Clientele How to engage with Tonya    About Tonya McKenzie: As the founder of Sand & Shores, Tonya McKenzie brings more than 20 years of experience in media relations, marketing, and client relations. Her non-profit experience includes being an Associate Executive Director, raising over a million dollars to open a new YMCA in Northern California and serving as a Los Angeles County Commissioner. Tonya McKenzie has built and led marketing departments for various companies. Tonya published Real Estate Agent Magazine in 2016 and hosts 2 successful podcasts. Tonya is a member of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. and chartered a graduate chapter in Northern California. You can find Mrs. McKenzie highlighted in the book, https://www.amazon.com/Amazing-Moms-Hogan-Hilling/dp/1628654821 (“AMAZING MOMS: Parents of the 21st Century” ) Tonya McKenzie is a child advocate and staunch supporter of children's rights. She is the author of “A Child's Memories of Cartoons & Murder”, a memoir discussing her own (adverse childhood experiences) A.C.E.s. She co-authored the F.I.T. Kids Manual utilized by the Pittsburg School District (California), established several unique youth wellness programs and served as a  Youth Commissioner for Contra Costa County Supervisor Federal Glover http://federalglover.com/ (http://federalglover.com/).  She is a graduate of California State University, Northridge with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology. Currently, Tonya serves as the Past President of the http://www.nrbba.org/ (North Redondo Beach Business Association), is the first African American woman elected to the https://www.redondochamber.org/board-of-directors.html (Board of Directors of the Redondo Beach Chamber of Commerce), holds a seat on the https://www.redondo.org/depts/police/about_rbpd/chief_of_police/default.asp (Redondo Beach Police Department) Community Engagement Board, and https://www.redondo.org/depts/community_development/planredondo/general_plan_advisory_committee.asp (The City of Redondo Beach GPAC). She serves as the Vice President of https://www.instagram.com/bprsla/ (Black Public Relations Society – Los Angeles) and on the Board of Directors for http://betteryouth.org/NewBY/ (Bet