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Brazilian martial art focusing on grappling and ground fighting

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Screaming in the Cloud
The “Banksgiving” Special with Tim Banks

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 34:54


About TimTim's tech career spans over 20 years through various sectors. Tim's initial journey into tech started as a US Marine. Later, he left government contracting for the private sector, working both in large corporate environments and in small startups. While working in the private sector, he honed his skills in systems administration and operations for large Unix-based datastores. Today, Tim leverages his years in operations, DevOps, and Site Reliability Engineering to advise and consult with clients in his current role. Tim is also a father of five children, as well as a competitive Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu practitioner. Currently, he is the reigning American National and 3-time Pan American Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu champion in his division.TranscriptCorey: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief cloud economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I am Cloud Economist Corey Quinn joined by Principal Cloud Economist here at The Duckbill Group Tim Banks. Tim, how are you?Tim: I'm doing great, Corey. How about yourself?Corey: I am tickled pink that we are able to record this not for the usual reasons you would expect, but because of the glorious pun in calling this our Banksgiving episode. I have a hard and fast rule of, I don't play pun games or make jokes about people's names because that can be an incredibly offensive thing. “And oh, you're making jokes about my name? I've never heard that one before.” It's not that I can't do it—I play games with language all the time—but it makes people feel crappy. So, when you suggested this out of the blue, it was yes, we're doing it. But I want to be clear, I did not inflict this on you. This is your own choice; arguably a poor one. We're going to find out.Tim: 1000% my idea.Corey: So, this is your show. It's a holiday week. So, what do you want to do with our Banksgiving episode?Tim: I want to give thanks for the folks who don't normally get acknowledged through the year. Like you know, we do a lot of thanking the rock stars, we do a lot of thanking the big names, right, we also do a lot of, you know, some snarky jabs at some folks. Deservingly—not folks, but groups and stuff like that; some folks deserve it, and we won't be giving them thanks—but some orgs and some groups and stuff like that. And I do think with that all said, we should acknowledge and thank the folks that we normally don't get to, folks who've done some great contributions this year, folks who have helped us, helped the industry, and help services that go unsung, I think a great one that you brought up, it's not the engineers, right? It's the people that make sure we get paid. Because I don't work for charity. And I don't know about you, Corey. I haven't seen the books yet, but I'm pretty sure none of us here do and so how do we get paid? Like I don't know.Corey: Oh, sure you have. We had a show on a somewhat simplified P&L during the all hands meeting because, you know, transparency matters. But you're right, those are numbers there and none of that is what we could have charged but didn't because we decided to do more volunteer work for AWS. If we were going to go down that path, we would just be Community Heroes and be done with it.Tim: That's true. But you know, it's like, I do my thing and then, you know, I get a paycheck every now and then. And so, as far as I know, I think most of that happens because of Dan.Corey: Dan is a perfect example. He's been a guest on this show, I don't know it has as aired at the time that this goes out because I don't have to think about that, which is kind of the point. Dan's our CFO and makes sure that a lot of the financial trains keep running on time. But let's also be clear, the fact that I can make predictions about what the business is going to be doing by a metric other than how much cash is in the bank account at this very moment really freed up some opportunity for us. It turned into adult supervision for folks who, when I started this place and then Mike joined, and it was very much not an area that either one of us was super familiar with. Which is odd given what we do here, but we learned quickly.The understanding not just how these things work—which we had an academic understanding of—but why it mattered and how that applies to real life. Finance is one of those great organizations that doesn't get a lot of attention or respect outside of finance itself. Because it's, “Oh, well they just control the money. How hard could it be?” Really, really hard.Tim: It really is. And when we dig into some of these things and some of the math that goes and some of what the concerns are that, you know, a lot of engineers don't really have a good grasp on, and it's eye opening to understand some of the concerns. At least some of the concerns at least from an engineering aspect. And I really don't give much consideration day to day about the things that go on behind the scenes to make sure that I get paid.But you look at this throughout the industry, like, how many of the folks that we work with, how many folks out there doing this great work for the industry, do they know who their payroll person is? Do they know who their accountant team is? Do they know who their CFO or the other people out there that are doing the work and making sure the lights stay on, that people get paid and all the other things that happen, right? You know, people take that for granted. And it's a huge work and those people really don't get the appreciation that I think they deserve. And I think it's about time we did that.Corey: It's often surprising to me how many people that I encounter, once they learn that there are 12 employees here, automatically assume that it's you, me, and maybe occasionally Mike doing all the work, and the other nine people just sort of sit here and clap when I tell a funny joke, and… well, yes, that is, of course, a job duty, but that's not the entire purpose of why people are here.Natalie in marketing is a great example. “Well, Corey, I thought you did the marketing. You go and post on Twitter and that's where business comes from.” Well, kind of. But let's be clear, when I do that, and people go to the website to figure out what the hell I'm talking about.Well, that website has words on it. I didn't put those words on that site. It directs people to contact us forms, and there are automations behind that that make sure they go to the proper place because back before I started this place and I was independent, people would email me asking for help with their bill and I would just never respond to them. It's the baseline adult supervision level of competence that I keep aspiring to. We have a sales team that does fantastic work.And that often is one of those things that'll get engineering hackles up, but they're not out there cold-calling people to bug them about AWS bills. It's when someone reaches out saying we have a problem with our AWS spend, can you help us? The answer is invariably, “Let's talk about that.” It's a consultative discussion about why do you care about the bill, what does success look like, how do you know this will be a success, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera, that make sure that we're aimed at the right part of the problem. That's incredibly challenging work and I am grateful beyond words, I don't have to be involved with the day-in, day-out of any of those things.Tim: I think even beyond just that handling, like, the contracts and the NDAs, and the various assets that have to be exchanged just to get us virtually on site, I've [unintelligible 00:06:46] a couple of these things, I'm glad it's not my job. It is, for me, overwhelmingly difficult for me to really get a grasp and all that kind of stuff. And I am grateful that we do have a staff that does that. You've heard me, you see me, you know, kind of like, sales need to do better, and a lot of times I do but I do want to make sure we are appreciating them for the work that they do to make sure that we have work to do. Their contribution cannot be underestimated.Corey: And I think that's something that we could all be a little more thankful for in the industry. And I see this on Twitter sometimes, and it's probably my least favorite genre of tweet, where someone will wind up screenshotting some naive recruiter outreach to them, and just start basically putting the poor person on blast. I assure you, I occasionally get notices like that. The most recent example of that was, I got an email to my work email address from an associate account exec at AWS asking what projects I have going on, how my work in the cloud is going, and I can talk to them about if I want to help with cost optimization of my AWS spend and the rest. And at first, it's one of those, I could ruin this person's entire month, but I don't want to be that person.And I did a little LinkedIn stalking and it turns out, this looks like this person's first job that they've been in for three months. And I've worked in jobs like that very early in my career; it is a numbers game. When you're trying to reach out to 1000 people a month or whatnot, you aren't sitting there googling what every one of them is, does, et cetera. It's something that I've learned, that is annoying, sure. But I'm in an incredibly privileged position here and dunking on someone who's doing what they are told by an existing sales apparatus and crapping on them is not fair.That is not the same thing as these passive-aggressive [shit-tier 00:08:38] drip campaigns of, “I feel like I'm starting to stalk you.” Then don't send the message, jackhole. It's about empathy and not crapping on people who are trying to find their own path in this ridiculous industry.Tim: I think you brought up recruiters, and, you know, we here at The Duckbill Group are currently recruiting for a senior cloud economist and we don't actually have a recruiter on staff. So, we're going through various ways to find this work and it has really made me appreciate the work that recruiters in the past that I've worked with have done. Some of the ones out there are doing really fantastic work, especially sourcing good candidates, vetting good candidates, making sure that the job descriptions are inclusive, making sure that the whole recruitment process is as smooth as it can be. And it can't always be. Having to deal with all the spinning plates of getting interviews with folks who have production workloads, it is pretty impressive to me to see how a lot of these folks get—pull it off and it just seems so smooth. Again, like having to actually wade through some of this stuff, it's given me a true appreciation for the work that good recruiters do.Corey: We don't have automated systems that disqualify folks based on keyword matches—I've never been a fan of that—but we do get applicants that are completely unsuitable. We've had a few come in that are actual economists who clearly did not read the job description; they're spraying their resume everywhere. And the answer is you smile, you decline it and you move on. That is the price you pay of attempting to hire people. You don't put them on blast, you don't go and yell at an entire ecosystem of people because looking for jobs sucks. It's hard work.Back when I was in my employee days, I worked harder finding new jobs than I often did in the jobs themselves. This may be related to why I get fired as much, but I had to be good at finding new work. I am, for better or worse, in a situation where I don't have to do that anymore because once again, we have people here who do the various moving parts. Plus, let's be clear here, if I'm out there interviewing at other companies for jobs, I feel like that sends a message to you and the rest of the team that isn't terrific.Tim: We might bring that up. [laugh].Corey: “Why are you interviewing for a job over there?” It's like, “Because they have free doughnuts in the office. Later, jackholes.” It—I don't think that is necessarily the culture we're building here.Tim: No, no, it's not. Specially—you know, we're more of a cinnamon roll culture anyways.Corey: No. In my case, it's one of those, “Corey, why are you interviewing for a job at AWS?” And the answer is, “Oh, it's going to be an amazing shitpost. Just wait and watch.”Tim: [laugh]. Now, speaking of AWS, I have to absolutely shout out to Emily Freeman over there who has done some fantastic work this year. It's great when you see a person get matched up with the right environment with the right team in the right role, and Emily has just been hitting out of the park ever since he got there, so I'm super, super happy to see her there.Corey: Every time I get to collaborate with her on something, I come away from the experience even more impressed. It's one of those phenomenal collaborations. I just—I love working with her. She's human, she's empathetic, she gets it. She remains, as of this recording, the only person who has ever given a talk that I have heard on ML Ops, and come away with a better impression of that space and thinking maybe it's not complete nonsense.And that is not just because it's Emily, so I—because—I'm predisposed to believe her, though I am, it's because of how she frames it, how she views these things, and let's be clear, the content that she says. And that in turn makes me question my preconceptions on this, and that is why she has that I will listen and pay attention when she speaks. So yeah, if Emily's going to try and make a point, there's always going to be something behind it. Her authenticity is unimpeachable.Tim: Absolutely. I do take my hat's off to everyone who's been doing DevRel and evangelism and those type of roles during pandemics. And we just, you know, as the past few months, I've started back to in-person events. But the folks who've been out there finding new way to do those jobs, finding a way to [crosstalk 00:12:50]—Corey: Oh, staff at re:Invent next week. Oh, my God.Tim: Yeah. Those folks, I don't know how they're being rewarded for their work, but I can assure you, they probably need to be [unintelligible 00:12:57] better than they are. So, if you are staff at re:Invent, and you see Corey and I, next week when we're there—if you're listening to this in time—we would love to shake your hand, elbow bump you, whatever it is you're comfortable with, and laud you for the work you're doing. Because it is not easy work under the best of circumstances, and we are certainly not under the best of circumstances.Corey: I also want to call out specific thanks to a group that might take some people aback. But that group is AWS marketing, which given how much grief I give them seems like an odd thing for me to say, but let's be clear, I don't have any giant companies whose ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon my keeping systems up and running. AWS does. They have to market and tell stories to everyone because that is generally who their customers are: they round to everyone. And an awful lot of those companies have unofficial mottos of, “That's not funny.” I'm amazed that they can say anything at all, given how incredibly varied their customer base is, I could get away with saying whatever I want solely because I just don't care. They have to care.Tim: They do. And it's not only that they have to care, they're in a difficult situation. It's like, you know, they—every company that sizes is, you know, they are image conscious, and they have things that say what like, “Look, this is the deal. This is the scenario. This is how it went down, but you can still maintain your faith and confidence in us.” And people do when AWS services, they have problems, if anything comes out like that, it does make the news and the reason it doesn't make the news is because it is so rare. And when they can remind us of that in a very effective way, like, I appreciate that. You know, people say if anything happens to S3, everybody knows because everyone depends on it and that's for good reason.Corey: And let's not forget that I run The Duckbill Group. You know, the company we work for. I have the Last Week in AWS newsletter and blog. I have my aggressive shitposting Twitter feed. I host the AWS Morning Brief podcast, and I host this Screaming in the Cloud. And it's challenging for me to figure out how to message all of those things because when people ask what you do, they don't want to hear a litany that goes on for 25 seconds, they want a sentence.I feel like I've spread in too many directions and I want to narrow that down. And where do I drive people to and that was a bit of a marketing challenge that Natalie in our marketing department really cut through super well. Now, pretend I work in AWS. The way that I check this based upon a public list of parameters they stub into Systems Manager Parameter Store, there are right now 291 services that they offer. That is well beyond any one person's ability to keep in their head. I can talk incredibly convincingly now about AWS services that don't exist and people who work in AWS on messaging, marketing, engineering, et cetera, will not call me out on it because who can provably say that ‘AWS Strangle Pony' isn't a real service.Tim: I do want to call out the DevOps—shout out I should say, the DevOps term community for AWS Infinidash because that was just so well done, and AWS took that with just the right amount of tongue in cheek, and a wink and a nod and let us have our fun. And that was a good time. It was a great exercise in improv.Corey: That was Joe Nash out of Twilio who just absolutely nailed it with his tweet, “I am convinced that a small and dedicated group of Twitter devs could tweet hot takes about a completely made up AWS product—I don't know AWS Infinidash or something—and it would appear as a requirement on job specs within a week.” And he was right.Tim: [laugh]. Speaking of Twitter, I want to shout out Twitter as a company or whoever does a product management over there for Twitter Spaces. I remember when Twitter Spaces first came out, everyone was dubious of its effect, of it's impact. They were calling it, you know, a Periscope clone or whatever it was, and there was a lot of sneering and snarking at it. But Twitter Spaces has become very, very effective in having good conversations in the group and the community of folks that have just open questions, and then to speak to folks that they probably wouldn't only get to speak to about this questions and get answers, and have really helpful, uplifting and difficult conversations that you wouldn't otherwise really have a medium for. And I'm super, super happy that whoever that product manager was, hats off to you, my friend.Corey: One group you're never going to hear me say a negative word about is AWS support. Also, their training and certification group. I know that are technically different orgs, but it often doesn't feel that way. Their job is basically impossible. They have to teach people—even on the support side, you're still teaching people—how to use all of these different varied services in different ways, and you have to do it in the face of what can only really be described as abuse from a number of folks on Twitter.When someone is having trouble with an AWS service, they can turn into shitheads, I've got to be honest with you. And berating the poor schmuck who has to handle the AWS support Twitter feed, or answer your insulting ticket or whatnot, they are not empowered to actually fix the underlying problem with a service. They are effectively a traffic router to get the message to someone who can, in a format that is understood internally. And I want to be very clear that if you insult people who are in customer service roles and blame them for it, you're just being a jerk.Tim: No, it really is because I'm pretty sure a significant amount of your listeners and people initially started off working in tech support, or customer service, or help desk or something like that, and you really do become the dumping ground for the customers' frustrations because you are the only person they get to talk to. And you have to not only take that, but you have to try and do the emotional labor behind soothing them as well as fixing the actual problem. And it's really, really difficult. I feel like the people who have that in their background are some of the best consultants, some of the best DevRel folks, and the best at talking to people because they're used to being able to get some technical details out of folks who may not be very technical, who may be under emotional distress, and certainly in high stress situations. So yeah, AWS support, really anybody who has support, especially paid support—phone or chat otherwise—hats off again. That is a service that is thankless, it is a service that is almost always underpaid, and is almost always under appreciated.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I'll take another team that's similar to that respect: Commerce Platform. That is the team that runs all of AWS billing. And you would be surprised that I'm thanking them, but no, it's not the cynical approach of, “Thanks for making it so complicated so I could have a business.” No, I would love it if it were so simple that I had to go find something else to do because the problem was that easy for customers to solve. That is the ideal and I hope, sincerely, that we can get there.But everything that happens in AWS has to be metered and understood as far as who has done what, and charge people appropriately for it. It is also generally invisible; people don't understand anything approaching the scale of that, and what makes it worst of all, is that if suddenly what they were doing broke and customers weren't built for their usage, not a single one of them would complain about it because, “All right, I'll take it.” It's a thankless job that is incredibly key and central to making the cloud work at all, but it's a hard job.Tim: It really is. And is a lot of black magic and voodoo to really try and understand how this thing works. There's no simple way to explain it. I imagine if they were going to give you the index overview of how it works with a 10,000 feet, that alone would be, like, a 300 page document. It is a gigantic moving beast.And it is one of those things where scale will show all the flaws. And no one has scale I think like AWS does. So, the folks that have to work and maintain that are just really, again, they're under appreciated for all that they do. I also think that—you know, you talk about the same thing in other orgs, as we talked about the folks that handle the billing and stuff like that, but you mentioned AWS, and I was thinking the other day how it's really awesome that I've got my AWS driver. I have the same, like, group of three or four folks that do all my deliveries for AWS.And they have been inundated over this past year-and-a-half with more and more and more stuff. And yet, I've still managed—my stuff is always put down nicely on my doorstep. It's never thrown, it's not damaged. I'm not saying it's never been damaged, but it's not damaged, like, maybe FedEx I've [laugh] had or some other delivery services where it's just, kind of, carelessly done. They still maintain efficiency, they maintain professionalism [unintelligible 00:21:45] talking to folks.What they've had to do at their scale and at that the amount of stuff they've had to do for deliveries over this past year-and-a-half has just been incredible. So, I want to extend it also to, like, the folks who are working in the distribution centers. Like, a lot of us here talk about AWS as if that's Amazon, but in essence, it is those folks that are working those more thankless and invisible jobs in the warehouses and fulfillment centers, under really bad conditions sometimes, who's still plug away at it. I'm glad that Amazon is at least saying they're making efforts to improve the conditions there and improve the pay there, things like that, but those folks have enabled a lot of us to work during this pandemic with a lot of conveniences that they themselves would never be able to enjoy.Corey: Yeah. It's bad for society, but I'm glad it exists, obviously. The thing is, I would love it if things showed up a little more slowly if it meant that people could be treated humanely along the process. That said, I don't have any conception of what it takes to run a company with 1.2 million people.I have learned that as you start managing groups and managing managers of groups, it's counterintuitive, but so much of what you do is no longer you doing the actual work. It is solely through influence and delegation. You own all of the responsibility but no direct put-finger-on-problem capability of contributing to the fix. It takes time at that scale, which is why I think one of the dumbest series of questions from, again, another group that deserves a fair bit of credit which is journalists because this stuff is hard, but a naive question I hear a lot is, “Well, okay. It's been 100 days. What has Adam Selipsky slash Andy Jassy changed completely about the company?”It's, yeah, it's a $1.6 trillion company. They are not going to suddenly grab the steering wheel and yank. It's going to take years for shifts that they do to start manifesting in serious ways that are externally visible. That is how big companies work. You don't want to see a complete change in direction from large blue chip companies that run things. Like, again, everyone's production infrastructure. You want it to be predictable, you want it to be boring, and you want shifts to be gradual course corrections, not vast swings.Tim: I mean, Amazon is a company with a population of a medium to medium-large sized city and a market cap of the GDP of several countries. So, it is not a plucky startup; it is not this small little tech company. It is a vast enterprise that's distributed all over the world with a lot of folks doing a lot of different jobs. You cannot, as you said, steer that ship quickly.Corey: I grew up in Maine and Amazon has roughly the same number employees as live in Maine. It is hard to contextualize how all of that works. There are people who work there that even now don't always know who Andy Jassy is. Okay, fine, but I'm not talking about don't know him on site or whatever. I'm saying they do not recognize the name. That's a very big company.Tim: “Andy who?”Corey: Exactly. “Oh, is that the guy that Corey makes fun of all the time?” Like, there we go. That's what I tend to live for.Tim: I thought that was Werner.Corey: It's sort of every one, though I want to be clear, I make it a very key point. I do not make fun of people personally because it—even if they're crap, which I do not believe to be the case in any of the names we've mentioned so far, they have friends and family who love and care about them. You don't want someone to go on the internet and Google their parent's name or something, and then just see people crapping all over. That's got to hurt. Let people be people. And, on some level, when you become the CEO of a company of that scale, you're stepping out of reality and into the pages of legend slash history, at some point. 200 years from now, people will read about you in history books, that's a wild concept.Tim: It is I think you mentioned something important that we would be remiss—especially Duckbill Group—to mention is that we're very thankful for our families, partners, et cetera, for putting up with us, pets, everybody. As part of our jobs, we invite strangers from the internet into our homes virtually to see behind us what is going on, and for those of us that have kids, that involves a lot of patience on their part, a lot of patients on our partners' parts, and other folks that are doing those kind of nurturing roles. You know, our pets who want to play with us are sitting there and not able to. It has not been easy for all of us, even though we're a remote company, but to work under these conditions that we have been over the past year-and-a-half. And I think that goes for a lot of the folks in industry where now all of a sudden, you've been occupying a room in the house or space in the house for some 18-plus months, where before you're always at work or something like that. And that's been a hell of an adjustment. And so we talk about that for us folks that are here pontificating on podcasts, or banging out code, but the adjustments and the things our families have had to go through and do to tolerate us being there cannot be overstated how important that is.Corey: Anyone else that's on your list of people to thank? And this is the problem because you're always going to forget people. I mean, the podcast production crew: the folks that turn our ramblings into a podcast, the editing, the transcription, all of it; the folks that HumblePod are just amazing. The fact that I don't have to worry about any of this stuff as if by magic, means that you're sort of insulated from it. But it's amazing to watch that happen.Tim: You know, honestly, I super want to thank just all the folks that take the time to interact with us. We do this job and Corey shitposts, and I shitpost and we talk, but we really do this and rely on the folks that do take the time to DM us, or tweet us, or mention us in the thread, or reach out in any way to ask us questions, or have a discussion with us on something we said, those folks encourage us, they keep us accountable, and they give us opportunities to learn to be better. And so I'm grateful for that. It would be—this role, this job, the thing we do where we're viewable and seen by the public would be a lot less pleasant if it wasn't for y'all. So, it's too many to name, but I do appreciate you.Corey: Well, thank you, I do my best. I find this stuff to be so boring if you couldn't have fun with it. And so many people can't have fun with it, so it feels like I found a cheat code for making enterprise software solutions interesting. Which even saying that out loud sounds like I'm shitposting. But here we are.Tim: Here we are. And of course, my thanks to you, Corey, for reaching out to me one day and saying, “Hey, what are you doing? Would you want to come interview with us at The Duckbill Group?”Corey: And it was great because, like, “Well, I did leave AWS within the last 18 months, so there might be a non-compete issue.” Like, “Oh, please, I hope so. Oh, please, oh, please, oh, please. I would love to pick that fight publicly.” But sadly, no one is quite foolish enough to take me up on it.Don't worry. That's enough of a sappy episode, I think. I am convinced that our next encounter on this podcast will be our usual aggressive self. But every once in a while it's nice to break the act and express honest and heartfelt appreciation. I'm really looking forward to next week with all of the various announcements that are coming out.I know people have worked extremely hard on them, and I want them to know that despite the fact that I will be making fun of everything that they have done, there's a tremendous amount of respect that goes into it. The fact that I can make fun of the stuff that you've done without any fear that I'm punching down somehow because, you know it is at least above a baseline level of good speaks volumes. There are providers I absolutely do not have that confidence towards them.Tim: [laugh]. Yeah, AWS, as the enterprise level service provider is an easy target for a lot of stuff. The people that work there are not. They do great work. They've got amazing people in all kinds of roles there. And they're often unseen for the stuff they do. So yeah, for all the folks who have contributed to what we're going to partake in at re:Invent—and it's a lot and I understand from having worked there, the pressure that's put on you for this—I'm super stoked about it and I'm grateful.Corey: Same here. If I didn't like this company, I would not have devoted years to making fun of it. Because that requires a diagnosis, not a newsletter, podcast, or shitposting Twitter feed. Tim, thank you so much for, I guess, giving me the impetus and, of course, the amazing name of the show to wind up just saying thank you, which I think is something that we could all stand to do just a little bit more of.Tim: My pleasure, Corey. I'm glad we could run with this. I'm, as always, happy to be on Screaming in the Cloud with you. I think now I get a vest and a sleeve. Is that how that works now?Corey: Exactly. Once you get on five episodes, then you end up getting the dinner jacket, just, like, hosting SNL. Same story. More on that to come in the new year. Thanks, Tim. I appreciate it.Tim: Thank you, Corey.Corey: Tim Banks, principal cloud economist here at The Duckbill Group. I am, of course, Corey Quinn, and thank you for listening.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The American Warrior Show
Show # 273 - Coffee with Rich | Will Wood Coined Member #426 on Emerging Threats Economy WWII-1971

The American Warrior Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 66:03


Show # 273 - Coffee with Rich | Will Wood Coined Member #426 on Emerging Threats Economy WWII-1971   On today's Coffee with Rich we have Will Wood.  Will has been flying since 12 years of age and has been a student of martial arts and self-defense for nearly as long.  After completing college at Southern Illinois University with degrees in Aviation Flight and Aviation Management the career path took him from instructing students in small single aircraft to his current position as a captain for a major US carrier. A lifelong interest in firearms led to a desire to develop and enhance those skills. To that end he has taken courses with Mike Seeklander (American Warrior Society) and some guy named Leatham (who says aiming is useless), Kyle Lamb (Viking Tactics), Paul Howe (Combat Shooting and Tactics), John Krupa (Spartan Tactical Training Group), and Blackwater. Will is also an active competitor in USPSA and trains Jeet Kun Do, boxing, and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. In his spare time, Will enjoys shooting, being on the lake with family and friends, and reading. Coffee with Rich Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/rhodieusmc/videos American Warrior Show: https://americanwarriorshow.com/index.html SWAG: https://shop.americanwarriorsociety.com/ American Warrior Society please visit: https://americanwarriorsociety.com/  

Jiu Jitsu Dummies
Robert Drysdale - JJD Ep.60

Jiu Jitsu Dummies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 72:12


Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast, Episode 60. Black Belt and best-selling author Professor Robert Drysdale joins The Dummies to discuss his upcoming documentary and best-selling book "Opening Closed-Guard: The Origins of Jiu-Jitsu in Brazil: The Story Behind the Film".   Instagram handles: @robertdrydalesjj @closedguardfilm @zenith_by_robertdrysdale   Help the Jiu Jitsu Dummies award their next 1-year Scholarship to an amazing person doing great things in their community by donating HERE Become a Podcast Patron and be entered into a $100+ monthly Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast Raffle at Patreon.com/jiujitsudummies     Thank you to Episode Sponsors:  FightBack CBD - 20% OFF your next order with code: JJD  DD214 Fightwear - 15% OFF you order with code: JJD Feito IT & AV Flow N Roll - 40% OFF your online order with code through the of Nov 2021: JJD Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast Store - Get 15% OFF with code: JJD Black Belt Digital Marketing   Special thanks to: We Defy Foundation, providing combat veterans coping with military-connected disabilities a long-term means to overcome their challenges through Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and fitness training. @WeDefyFoundation on Instagram. Donate now at https://www.wedefyfoundation.org/ Want us to Shout-Out you or your gym on the show? Visit https://www.patreon.com/jiujitsudummies to become a Show Patron for as little as $5 per month! Contact the Dummies @JiuJitsuDummies on Instagram, Facebook, Reddit, and Twitter or at info@jiujitsudummies.com to submit questions for consideration on the show. You can now also find us on TikTok @JiuJitsuDummiesPodcast Visit Jiu Jitsu Dummies for more details about the show, the foundation, becoming a Sponsor, and a list of sites and apps to download or view the podcast.

Mind of The Warrior
MOTW #97: Kyle Rittenhouse & Thanksgiving

Mind of The Warrior

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 49:05


Buy the book! https://www.amazon.com/Honed-Finding-Your-Edge-Over-ebook/dp/B09C11QYR4/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1L3GKMD0L3Z1H&dchild=1&keywords=honed+finding+your+edge+as+a+man+over+40&qid=1630362562&sprefix=honed%2Caps%2C210&sr=8-1   Greybeard Performance: https://greybeardperformance.com Mike Simpson has served over three decades in the military as an Airborne Ranger, a Special Forces Operator, and finally as a Doctor of Emergency Medicine assigned to the Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC). Throughout his career, Mike has deployed to 17 different countries, from counter-narcotics operations in the jungles of South America, to the Global War on Terror (GWOT) in Southwest Asia and North Africa. Along the way, Mike has been trained as a demolitions expert, SWAT Sniper, High Altitude Low Opening (HALO) parachutist, civilian paramedic, Special Forces Medic, Operations and intelligence Sergeant, and finally, a board certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Mike is also a martial arts enthusiast, who trains in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai. His passion for martial arts motivated him to become a practicing fight doctor. As one of the foremost experts in both tactical trauma medicine and combat sports medicine, Mike is highly sought after as a lecturer and instructor, working extensively with Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fighters, law enforcement, and military organizations providing medical care and training. He co-stars on Hunting Hitler on the History Channel. Email: doc@drmikesimpson.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DoctorMikeSimpson/ Instagram: @drmikesimpson Website: https://drmikesimpson.com Shop affiliates: https://drmikesimpson.com/new-page-1    Nutrition: https://www.freshly.com/subscriptions/1807965?clickid=SREyh7XScxyJTlPwUx0Mo3cTUknxrzxsKVe91A0&irgwc=1&utm_campaign=usa_plans_all-d_all-p_acq_cpa_Michael%20Simpson_&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_source=ignite&affsrc=1&utm_term=paid-affiliate&plan_id=422&promo_code=rad40 Merchandise: https://rangerup.com/collections/doc-simpson promo code: MOTW15 (Save 15%)

Life Almost Without Me
Episode 62 - Almost Turkey Day

Life Almost Without Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 26:59


Look I don't remember a word of what I said on this episode because i was feeling overwhelmed over recording another mediocre episode. ENJOYIf you enjoyed todays episode be sure to support by following and liking the channel below for updates on upcoming bonus episodesInstagramhttps://www.instagram.com/thelifeofhuggs/Artwork by Jayckob Hernandez https://www.instagram.com/jayysdoodles

Grappling Rewind: Breakdowns of Professional BJJ and Grappling Events
#211 Ruotolo Bros on GrappleFest 10 and World Pro 2021 Recap

Grappling Rewind: Breakdowns of Professional BJJ and Grappling Events

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 65:02


This week on the show Maine and Miranda recap the AJP World Pro, GrappleFest 10 and F2W 188.  In the news section of the show we discuss some ADCC news and Tye's interview about moving to -88kg.In the recap section of the show We kick it off discussing the results of grapplefest 10, with Dante Leon versus Oliver Taza for the interim 80kg belt, We discussed the game plan going into this match as well as Dante's consistent pressure from the top and his ability to chain back take attempts off of Tazas leglock entries .  We also discussed the winner of this match taking on Lachlan Giles.  In Kade Ruotolo vs Keith Krikorian We discussed the under 77 kg  North American trials winner Cade taking on the under 66 kg North American trials silver medalist.   we talked about the consistent top pressure and amazing game planning from Kade that consistently put him in the driver's seat in the match and allowed him to take the decision victory. In Tye Ruotolo vs Nick Ronan We talked about how close this match was and how Tye  leaned into his wrestling and was able to force top position off of it.  We also briefly touched on Dinu Bucalet vs Pierre-Olivier Leclerc, that saw Leclerc take the victory. In the recap of UAEJJF AJP World Pro We discussed all of the black belt finals for both the men's and women's divisions.  We discussed Micael Galvão submitting Espen Mathiesen with a straight ankle lock To become the youngest World Pro champion in history. We discussed the Falcon Eye replay system in Erich Munis vs Adam Wardzinski that featured some tricky scoring.  Plus another dominating performance from Gutemberg Pereira in his 15-0 points victory over Walter Santos.  In the women's brown and black belt finals we discussed Beatriz Mesquita fast loop choke finish of Margot Ciccarelli from closed guard for World Pro gold, and Gabrieli Pessanha close points victory over Yara Soares due to razor thin scoring. In the recap of fight to win 188 we discussed to Devonte Johnson versus Arnaldo Maidana that sawbones open up and secure a clean decision victory.  In the ourto we discussed our vacation and Thanksgiving plans and Maine's trip acrocc the east coast. Recorded 11-22-2021

That Jiu Jitsu Podcast
What Makes Some Fight Cards So Boring? | Competition Show Ep. 8

That Jiu Jitsu Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 8:01


UFC Vegas 43 was a very boring card. What makes a fight card boring? Are we getting too much of a good thing?You can watch the video version of every episode on our YouTube PageLearn more about the show on our WebsiteVisit our Shop for shirts and moreFollow our show at: @That_JiuJitsu_PodcastFollow Justin directly: @JustinLeskoSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/thatjiujitsupodcast)

Cleared Hot
Episode 208 - Chris Haueter

Cleared Hot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 120:52


Chris Haueter, is an American martial arts athlete and coach. Chris is one of the BJJ Dirty Dozen (first 12 Non-Brazilian recipients of the BJJ black belt), he received his black belt from Rigan Machado in 1996, and is the first American black belt to compete in the Mundials De Jiu-Jitsu in Brazil, and the first American black belt to win a black belt match. Over the years Chris has won multiple Pan American, and superfight victories. He is also a highly respected JKD practitioner directly trained under Dan Inosanto. He has promoted more than 40 students to black belts and is best known for his innovative teaching style and conceptual coaching ability. He named new positions as Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu rapidly developed in the mid-1990s, coining the term "combat base" as it related to shooting platform. He spread BJJ to the UK and across the US in the late 1990s. https://mtntough.com/clearedhot https://allform.com/clearedhot https://grammarly.com/clearedhot https://betterhelp.com/clearedhot  

Unhelpful Advice
Episode 82: What Kyle Rittenhouse is Actually Guilty Of

Unhelpful Advice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 74:58


The boys are back with their views on the Kyle Rittenhouse case as it has shocked the world with it's complex story. Justin and Hunter are dumbfounded by how the media has manipulated the story as they try to collect the facts. Hunter and Cole enlighten Justin on the Virginia Tech Football situation and why head coach Justin Fuente stepped down with just two seasons left in the season. Justin updates Hunter on possibly getting back into Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.  CALL THE ADVICE HOTLINE: (540) 358-1583 https://www.instagram.com/unhelpfuladvicepodcast/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/146927174112555/ https://twitter.com/unhelpfulpod Email: unhelpfuladvicepodcast@gmail.com 

Cigar Store Idiots Podcast
ALL ACCESS W/ BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU BLACK BELT CARLOS CATANIA- CIGAR STORE IDIOTS PODCAST SEASON 2 EP 126

Cigar Store Idiots Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 72:04


Rob, Jason, and PJ welcomes 4th degree BJJ Blackbelt Carlos Catania into the studio. Listen to Carlos talk about the life and love of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and the great things the sport has done for him. What an incredible journey and story of giving back to the community and people using Jiu-Jitsu. Music by Rancid --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rob-west8/support

That Jiu Jitsu Podcast
Episode 83: Why You're Not Getting Better at Jiu Jitsu

That Jiu Jitsu Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 10:46


To get a FREE t-shirt AND tons of bonus content for only $3 a month check out our Patreon!If you feel like you've hit a training plateau in your jiu jitsu life you're not alone and it happens to everyone. How do these plateaus happen? How can we avoid them? What can we do if we've stalled out? I've got some answers for you. Give Epic Roll a follow on Instagram and check out their Website - use code “Podcast15” for 15% off your orderYou can watch the video version of every episode on our YouTube PageLearn more about the show on our WebsiteVisit our Shop for shirts and moreFollow our show at: @That_JiuJitsu_PodcastFollow Justin directly: @JustinLeskoSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/thatjiujitsupodcast)

Jiu Jitsu Motivation
Episode 24: What it Takes to Become a Multiple Time World Champion - Leandro Lo

Jiu Jitsu Motivation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 25:40


Check out Leandro Lo's Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/leandrolojj/Sign up for the Jiu Jitsu Motivation Newsletter at https://jiujitsumotivation.com/newsletter/ For more great videos and content check out https://jiujitsumotivation.com/

Jiu Jitsu Dummies
JJD Ep.59 with BJJ Globetrotters founder Christian Graugart

Jiu Jitsu Dummies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 66:55


Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast, Episode 59. Black Belt Christian Graugart, founder of BJJ Globetrotters joins The Dummies to discuss his new documentary, issues with the IBJJF, and how BJJ Globetrotters got its start. Instagram handles: @graugart @bjjglobetrotters   Help the Jiu Jitsu Dummies award their next 1-year Scholarship to an amazing person doing great things in their community by donating HERE Become a Podcast Patron and be entered into a $100+ monthly Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast Raffle at Patreon.com/jiujitsudummies     Thank you to Episode Sponsors:  FightBack CBD - 20% OFF your next order with code: JJD  DD214 Fightwear - 15% OFF you order with code: JJD Feito IT & AV Flow N Roll - 40% OFF your online order with code through the of Nov 2021: JJD Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast Store - Get 15% OFF with code: JJD Black Belt Digital Marketing   Special thanks to: We Defy Foundation, providing combat veterans coping with military-connected disabilities a long-term means to overcome their challenges through Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and fitness training. @WeDefyFoundation on Instagram. Donate now at https://www.wedefyfoundation.org/ Want us to Shout-Out you or your gym on the show? Visit https://www.patreon.com/jiujitsudummies to become a Show Patron for as little as $5 per month! Contact the Dummies @JiuJitsuDummies on Instagram, Facebook, Reddit, and Twitter or at info@jiujitsudummies.com to submit questions for consideration on the show. You can now also find us on TikTok @JiuJitsuDummiesPodcast Visit Jiu Jitsu Dummies for more details about the show, the foundation, becoming a Sponsor, and a list of sites and apps to download or view the podcast.

IT'S TIME w/Bruce Buffer
Ep. 519: Jon Anik Talks UFC & NFL Football

IT'S TIME w/Bruce Buffer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 52:26


Bruce Buffer and TJ De Santis are joined by lead UFC play-by-play announcer Jon Anik.

Life Almost Without Me
Episode 61 - Benjamin a Flooring Crypto Man

Life Almost Without Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 71:00


Got the chance to sit down with a good friend of mine who i talk to on the daily and harass over religion and crypto. Enjoy the episode.If you enjoyed todays episode be sure to support by following and liking the channel below for updates on upcoming bonus episodesInstagramhttps://www.instagram.com/thelifeofhuggs/Artwork by Jayckob Hernandez https://www.instagram.com/jayysdoodles

Life Almost Without Me
Episode 60 -Seattle to Texas in 44 Hours

Life Almost Without Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 23:05


Jiutjitsu Worlds , driving 40 hours in 48 hours. and just little updates. enjoyIf you enjoyed todays episode be sure to support by following and liking the channel below for updates on upcoming bonus episodesInstagramhttps://www.instagram.com/thelifeofhuggs/Artwork by Jayckob Hernandez https://www.instagram.com/jayysdoodles

Grappling Rewind: Breakdowns of Professional BJJ and Grappling Events
#210 How to Heel Hook Legally in the Gi at IBJJF for $20,000

Grappling Rewind: Breakdowns of Professional BJJ and Grappling Events

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 56:48


This week on the show Maine and Josh recapped the IBJJF 2021 GP, Raw Grappling #1 and previewed Grapplefest 10.  Plus discussed new ADCC rules.In the news section of the show we discussed a new rule for ADCC  that banned spiking and slamming from the backpack position. The Gianni Grippo rule a Maine dubbed it has gone into effect to prevent grave injury of competitors from this position after the slam occurred during the trials last week.  Also in the news section we discussed Troy the Night Pigeon Everett receiving his black belt and how much Troy has done for the show as a support over the years.In the recap section of the show we discussed Raw Grappling first event that featured a Heavyweight tournament we discussed the quarterfinals where Josh Hinger took a close decision win over Bradley Hill, Patrick Gaudio winning a split decision over Thomas Bracher, Taylor Pearman submitting Steven Hill with a calf-slicer, and Yuri Simões defeating Jed Hue on points in the 2 minute overtimeIn the semi finals we talked about Patrick Gaudio defeating Josh Hinger via decision, after a deep heel hook attempt from Hinger, and Yuri Simões defeating Taylor Pearman on points in overtime. In the third place match we discussed a return to form from Josh Hinger that saw him submit Taylor Pearman with a modified guillotine.  In the finals we saw Yuri Simões defeat Patrick Gaudio via a close decision. We also discussed the superfight between Lucas Barbosa and Gerard Labinski that saw Hulk set up a mounted armbar and finish, and Rafael Lovato defeating Adam Wardzinski ina very close match decided on 1 penalty.In the recap of the IBJJF GP we discussed both the middleweight and heavyweight GP. In the Middleweight Final we discussed Tainan Dalpra defeating Jonnatas Gracie with a choke from the back in impressive quick fashion, and Josh picks Dalpra to wins this next months upcoming worlds.  In the Heavyweight Final we discussed the controversy over Victor Hugo Aoki lock finish of Mahamed Aly. We talked about the rules and the finishing mechanics of this particular foot lock, as well as some of the gray area surrounding why this particular submission is so difficult to define in the rules. As part of the event discussion we also broke down the semifinals of both brackets.In the preview section of the show we discussed Grapplefest 10  that features a number of exciting superfights including main event Dante Leon vs Oliver Taza for the under 80 kg interim title belt, the 2021 North American Trials winner at -77 kg Kade Ruotolo taking on the 3 time -66 kg silver medalist Keith Krikorian for the und 70 kg title, Tye Ruotolo vs Nick Ronan at under 77 kg, and Dinu Bucalet vs Pierre-Olivier Leclerc who is coming off an impressive trials performance. We also previewed F2W 188 in Chicago. In the outro section of the show we discussed training and upcoming events.Recorded 11-14-2021

On The Edge Podcast with Scott Groves
[Audio QuickTakes] All About The Mosaic Life - The Happy Podcast with Trey Kauffman

On The Edge Podcast with Scott Groves

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 21:03


Today we're talking with Trey Kauffman, host of the Mosaic Life Podcast. His podcast is all about happiness and how to find your version of it in your life. I'm so excited to have this positive change of pace on our show and share it with all of you! What is the key to life and the secret to happiness? Trey outlines what his version of happiness means and what it means to you. Your version of happiness is not the same as everyone else, and that's the first step to finding it. Trey talks about his journey about removing things from his life that do not serve him, starting with drinking. It wasn't because he had a problem, but just something to try. As time went on, it snowballed into more and more self discovery and success and is really what put this project in motion. We discuss the pros and cons of being driven by ego. A book called ‘Ego Is The Enemy' was part of the inspiration, and ego should not be ignored, but utilized. Do happy people watch the news? How do you remain informed without going insane with all of the crazy opinions and interpretations of current events? As Americans, it seems like we've moved away from the idea that we have a ‘higher purpose.' Politics have split us and made us fearful of our neighbors more than ever, which is something we used to be able to control but we've forgotten that we as people CAN control this. When do you think the switch was made? How can we get along as human beings because, after all, we're all more similar than we are different. What have you learned about the power of having one on one conversations? 29:57 - Have you gotten any cool or useful tips on how not to go sane in this new age of being alone a lot more often? What do you know about a ‘growth mindset?' 36:45 - Trey talks about the shift from listening to the radio to listening to podcasts. The radio, nor podcasts, were serving him. What are your takeaways from having your own podcasts? 44:50 - What is serving you well and what is not serving you well? How does minimization translate to creating happiness? We're all home a lot more, and have less ‘going out' distractions, do you have any advice for making that change? Check Trey's Podcast out at onemosaic.life, here on YouTube, and everywhere Podcasts are streamed ------------ Quickly- I'm Scott Groves - Husband, Father, Loan Officer, Coach, Author, Podcaster, and Recent Blue Belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. This podcast is paid for and brought to you by.... by me, Scott Groves :-) Because I think these kind of long form conversations are valuable, I pay for 100% of the production of this show out of my pocket. This channel is FAR from monetization and because of the subject matter, may never be monetized. I am a Mortgage Loan Officer & Loan Officer Coach in real life. It's the money that I earn, from helping home-buyers and home-owners obtain home-loans, that pays for this show. If you, your friends, or your family are looking for a home loan from an honest Loan Officer, please contact me at Scott@ScottGrovesTeam.com I can do the loan for you (our team is licensed in 8 states) - OR - I can refer you to an amazing loan officer in the state where you're searching. ON WITH THE SHOW!!!

Unmasked!  The Podcast
THE John Campbell!!!!

Unmasked! The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021


We talk with East Side Legend John Campbell! John is Top Level Gym's mma, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and kids boxing coach. He has a fantastic story and we had a great time talking to him!

IT'S TIME w/Bruce Buffer
Ep. 518: UFC Champ Rose Namajunas Talks UFC 268 Victory

IT'S TIME w/Bruce Buffer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 61:07


Bruce and TJ are joined by UFC strawweight queen "Thug" Rose Namajunas.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The American Warrior Show
Show # 272 - Coffee with Rich | Will Wood Commercial Pilot and Coined Member #426 on Economic Threats

The American Warrior Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 54:15


Show # 272 - Coffee with Rich | Will Wood Commercial Pilot and Coined Member #426 on Economic Threats   On today's Coffee with Rich (Emerging Threats Economy 1914-WWII) we have Will Wood.  Will has been flying since 12 years of age and has been a student of martial arts and self-defense for nearly as long. After completing college at Southern Illinois University with degrees in Aviation Flight and Aviation Management the career path took him from instructing students in small single aircraft to his current position as a captain for a major US carrier. A lifelong interest in firearms led to a desire to develop and enhance those skills. To that end he has taken courses with Mike Seeklander (American Warrior Society) and some guy named Leatham (who says aiming is useless), Kyle Lamb (Viking Tactics), Paul Howe (Combat Shooting and Tactics), John Krupa (Spartan Tactical Training Group), and Blackwater. Will is also an active competitor in USPSA and trains Jeet Kun Do, boxing, and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. In his spare time, Will enjoys shooting, being on the lake with family and friends, and reading. Coffee with Rich Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/rhodieusmc/videos American Warrior Show: https://americanwarriorshow.com/index.html SWAG: https://shop.americanwarriorsociety.com/ American Warrior Society please visit: https://americanwarriorsociety.com/  

That Jiu Jitsu Podcast
Episode 82: "Am I A Fraud?"

That Jiu Jitsu Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 15:39


This episode is a little different in that we're giving out advice and helping a friend of the show make some decisions about their jiu jitsu career. Give Epic Roll a follow on Instagram and check out their Website - use code “Podcast15” for 15% off your orderYou can watch the video version of every episode on our YouTube PageLearn more about the show on our WebsiteVisit our Shop for shirts and moreFollow our show at: @That_JiuJitsu_PodcastFollow Justin directly: @JustinLeskoSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/thatjiujitsupodcast)

On The Edge Podcast with Scott Groves
All About The Mosaic Life - The Happy Podcast with Trey Kauffman

On The Edge Podcast with Scott Groves

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 71:51


Today we're talking with Trey Kauffman, host of the Mosaic Life Podcast. His podcast is all about happiness and how to find your version of it in your life. I'm so excited to have this positive change of pace on our show and share it with all of you! 00:50 - What is the key to life and the secret to happiness? Trey outlines what his version of happiness means and what it means to you. Your version of happiness is not the same as everyone else, and that's the first step to finding it. 5:10 - Trey talks about his journey about removing things from his life that do not serve him, starting with drinking. It wasn't because he had a problem, but just something to try. As time went on, it snowballed into more and more self discovery and success and is really what put this project in motion. 10:00 - We discuss the pros and cons of being driven by ego. A book called ‘Ego Is The Enemy' was part of the inspiration, and ego should not be ignored, but utilized. 16:10 - Do happy people watch the news? How do you remain informed without going insane with all of the crazy opinions and interpretations of current events? 19:50 - As Americans, it seems like we've moved away from the idea that we have a ‘higher purpose.' Politics have split us and made us fearful of our neighbors more than ever, which is something we used to be able to control but we've forgotten that we as people CAN control this. When do you think the switch was made? How can we get along as human beings because, after all, we're all more similar than we are different. 27:30 - What have you learned about the power of having one on one conversations? 29:57 - Have you gotten any cool or useful tips on how not to go sane in this new age of being alone a lot more often? 33:00 - What do you know about a ‘growth mindset?' 36:45 - Trey talks about the shift from listening to the radio to listening to podcasts. The radio, nor podcasts, were serving him. What are your takeaways from having your own podcasts? 44:50 - What is serving you well and what is not serving you well? 49:38 - How does minimization translate to creating happiness? We're all home a lot more, and have less ‘going out' distractions, do you have any advice for making that change? Check Trey's Podcast out at onemosaic.life, here on YouTube, and everywhere Podcasts are streamed ------------ Quickly- I'm Scott Groves - Husband, Father, Loan Officer, Coach, Author, Podcaster, and Recent Blue Belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. This podcast is paid for and brought to you by.... by me, Scott Groves :-) Because I think these kind of long form conversations are valuable, I pay for 100% of the production of this show out of my pocket. This channel is FAR from monetization and because of the subject matter, may never be monetized. I am a Mortgage Loan Officer & Loan Officer Coach in real life. It's the money that I earn, from helping home-buyers and home-owners obtain home-loans, that pays for this show. If you, your friends, or your family are looking for a home loan from an honest Loan Officer, please contact me at Scott@ScottGrovesTeam.com I can do the loan for you (our team is licensed in 8 states) - OR - I can refer you to an amazing loan officer in the state where you're searching. ON WITH THE SHOW!!!

Life Almost Without Me
Episode 59 - Steve Portillo a Black Belt

Life Almost Without Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 96:46


Today I got the chance to sit down with Jiujitsu and Air Force veteran Steve Portillo, one of my coaches. Enjoy the podcastIf you enjoyed todays episode be sure to support by following and liking the channel below for updates on upcoming bonus episodesInstagramhttps://www.instagram.com/thelifeofhuggs/Artwork by Jayckob Hernandez https://www.instagram.com/jayysdoodles

Elbows Tight Podcast
Elbows Tight Podcast: Thomas Rozdzynski - Your Belt Isn't a Measure of Your Skill

Elbows Tight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 89:08


Thomas Rozdzynski is a third-degree black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, a black belt in Judo, he owns the ROL Academy, and is the host of The ROL Radio podcast. Thomas started his BJJ journey in the early 2000s when his boss, a blue belt, kept bugging him every day to join the academy. Thomas's first school was under the legendary Grandmaster Carlson Gracie Sr.  When first starting in jiu-jitsu, Thomas was told multiple times that he would never be a black belt. Multiple people told him it was because he was not tough enough, flexible enough, or skilled enough to obtain such a prestigious award. Thomas would eventually earn his blue belt under Grandmaster Carlson Sr. right before his passing. Thomas speaks highly of the life-changing events that came from starting jiu-jitsu. He lost 70 pounds, became more confident, and now is a third-degree blackbelt despite those early in his journey telling him it wouldn't happen. Thomas is a wealth of knowledge and makes you stop and think about viewing your journey. His insight into belt promotions, how to promote, what your belt means, and mindset still has us contemplating ways to improve our own midset. Anyone at any skill/belt level will find value in what Thomas shares in this episode, especially if you are starting your journey. Thomas Rozdzynski Social Media https://www.instagram.com/rozdzynskibjj/ https://rolacademy.tv/ https://www.instagram.com/therolradio/ https://www.therolradio.com/ LET'S EXCHANGE PATCHES! SEND A PATCH TO THE PO BOX, AND WE WILL SEND YOU A CUSTOM ELBOWS TIGHT PATCH BACK! Travis Motl PO Box 768 Seabeck, WA 98380 BOTD: https://skrewballwhiskey.com/ Check out Our New Website! https://elbowstight.com/ Best Gi When Starting BJJ: https://www.elbowstight.com/best-gi-when-starting-brazilian-jiu-jitsu/ The Equipment Behind Elbows Tight Podcast: https://kit.co/ElbowsTightPodcast Subscribe on YouTube! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuvHSgAUCczV4R_M6TsHcYw?view_as=subscriber Follow Our Social Media Pages! Instagram Podcast Page https://www.instagram.com/elbowstightpod/?hl=en Travis and Jon's https://www.instagram.com/travisetp/?hl=en https://www.instagram.com/jtcrash78_/?hl=en Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ElbowsTightPodcast

Jiu Jitsu Dummies
JJD Ep.58 with Thomas Rozdzynski, Host of The Rōl Radio Podcast

Jiu Jitsu Dummies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 85:30


Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast, Episode 58. Black Belt Thomas Rozdzynski, host of The Rōl Radio and owner of Rōl Academy in Orland Park IL, joins The Dummies. Instagram handles: @rozdzynskibjj @rol_academy @therolradio Help the Jiu Jitsu Dummies award their next 1-year Scholarship to an amazing person doing great things in their community by donating HERE Become a Podcast Patron and be entered into a $100+ monthly Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast Raffle at Patreon.com/jiujitsudummies     Thank you to Episode Sponsors:  FightBack CBD - 20% OFF your next order with code: JJD  DD214 Fightwear - 15% OFF you order with code: JJD Feito IT & AV Flow N Roll - 30% OFF your online order with code through the of Oct 2021: JJD Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast Store - Get 15% OFF with code: JJD Black Belt Digital Marketing   Special thanks to: We Defy Foundation, providing combat veterans coping with military-connected disabilities a long-term means to overcome their challenges through Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and fitness training. @WeDefyFoundation on Instagram. Donate now at https://www.wedefyfoundation.org/ Want us to Shout-Out you or your gym on the show? Visit https://www.patreon.com/jiujitsudummies to become a Show Patron for as little as $5 per month! Contact the Dummies @JiuJitsuDummies on Instagram, Facebook, Reddit, and Twitter or at info@jiujitsudummies.com to submit questions for consideration on the show. You can now also find us on TikTok @JiuJitsuDummiesPodcast Visit Jiu Jitsu Dummies for more details about the show, the foundation, becoming a Sponsor, and a list of sites and apps to download or view the podcast.

Life Almost Without Me
Episode 58 - Breaking Point

Life Almost Without Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 27:18


We all have those days where we fall short of our vision of stoicness. I wasn't going to post this but i feel transparency is just as important for the podcast and I was having a really bad day.If you enjoyed todays episode be sure to support by following and liking the channel below for updates on upcoming bonus episodesInstagramhttps://www.instagram.com/thelifeofhuggs/Artwork by Jayckob Hernandez https://www.instagram.com/jayysdoodles

That Jiu Jitsu Podcast
Can Kamaru Usman Be the GOAT? | Competition Show Ep. 7

That Jiu Jitsu Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 14:04


Consider supporting the show on Patreon to get access to the bonus Q&A Episode coming later this week for supporters only. Plus ad-free episodes, contests, bonus content, and more. Kamaru Usman is the current pound-for-pound king. Is he also the greatest fighter of all time?You can watch the video version of every episode on our YouTube PageLearn more about the show on our WebsiteVisit our Shop for shirts and moreFollow our show at: @That_JiuJitsu_PodcastFollow Justin directly: @JustinLeskoSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/thatjiujitsupodcast)

Between the Slides
PPP94: Welcome to Murder Yoga (Brazilian Jiu Jitsu)

Between the Slides

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 16:02


Sharing some quick tips to help brand new Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) trainees enjoy the first steps into the BJJ world.

Between the Slides
PPP94: Welcome to Murder Yoga (Brazilian Jiu Jitsu)

Between the Slides

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 16:02


Sharing some quick tips to help brand new Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) trainees enjoy the first steps into the BJJ world.

That Jiu Jitsu Podcast
Episode 81: Things to NOT DO at a Tournament

That Jiu Jitsu Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 12:26


Jiu Jitsu tournaments are the best. There's nothing better than that feeling of getting your hand raised when you win a match. But there are some self-sabotaging things you can do that will make winning much harder. Here is a list of 11 things to NEVER do at a tournament.Give Epic Roll a follow on Instagram and check out their Website - use code “Podcast15” for 15% off your orderYou can watch the video version of every episode on our YouTube PageLearn more about the show on our WebsiteVisit our Shop for shirts and moreFollow our show at: @That_JiuJitsu_PodcastFollow Justin directly: @JustinLeskoSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/thatjiujitsupodcast)

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Interview #44 Robert Drysdale Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu World Champion discusses the power of community, competition, and humility.

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 43:45


Robert Drysdale, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu IBJJF and ADCC World Champion, MMA Fighter, TEDx Speaker, and owner of Zenith Jiu-Jitsu talks the power of community, competition, and humility.Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: 0:00:05.9 Mischa Z: Welcome back, everybody, to the Tools For A Good Life Summit. And right now I would like to introduce to you Robert Drysdale, world champion, a BJJ Brazilian jiu-jitsu master. Is "master" an appropriate word or...0:00:25.6 Robert Drysdale: I go by coach or just Rob. I'm very simple.0:00:29.9 Mischa Z: Okay, fantastic.0:00:31.3 Robert Drysdale: No need for a lot of titles, it's all good.0:00:33.4 Mischa Z: I love it. Fantastic. That's one thing that drew me to you for this summit. Real quick, I'm gonna read your bio. Okay?0:00:41.7 Robert Drysdale: Sure.0:00:42.4 Mischa Z: Fantastic. Born in the USA, from a Brazilian mother and American father, and having spent his life between these two countries, Robert Drysdale remains the only American born to have ever won both the IBJJF and ADCC world championships, the two most prestigious tournaments in all of jiu-jitsu. Furthermore, he has also cultivated a career in MMA, both as a fighter and as a coach. The author also holds a bachelor's degree in History, as well as a long-held passion for this discipline. He lives in Las Vegas, Nevada, where he teaches Brazilian jiu-jitsu and MMA. And you are the co-founder of the international team, Zenith Jiu-Jitsu, and you are the father of two girls. So I've got two friends... I'm 53, I have two friends late 40s, and as I was putting together this summit, and really, I think there's so many great modalities out there to help us as we get a little bit older in age, perhaps an existential crisis, whatever it is. But there's all these great modalities, and I think Brazil...0:02:04.5 Mischa Z: Train going by, if you heard that. Brazilian jiu-jitsu and the martial arts, judo, are so powerful. So I've got these two buddies, both who are pushing 50, both who have started Brazilian jiu-jitsu or BJJ, for anyone who's listening and is unfamiliar with that term BJJ, and it's transformed their lives. One's been doing it for about a year and a half, and one's been doing it for about three years, so I was like, "I definitely need to get somebody on the summit who can speak to it, and why not somebody who's been in it his whole life?" And that's how I came to you. I have a couple of questions to start with. First off, can you speak to that just a little bit?0:03:06.5 Robert Drysdale: I think there's a variety of reasons why Brazilian jiu-jitsu is appealing to a whole plethora of people at different walks of life, everything from children, to mothers, to competitive athletes, to dads, to people who've never practiced any sports or they never really felt a calling to martial arts in general, maybe people that think that fighting was despicable, all of a sudden they're madly in love with Brazilian jiu-jitsu. I think there's a variety of things that come into play here, and it helps explain why Brazilian jiu-jitsu is such a worldwide phenom. I think, firstly, it has to do with we like challenges, we like things that are difficult enough for us to be able to overcome them, and I think Brazilian jiu-jitsu is like you're overcoming yourself one day at a time. Think of a video game that you play that you can beat the first time you play it, it's not very challenging, you're probably not gonna play it again. But if it's something that is constantly challenging you, if it's something that's constantly, there's new layer after layer after layer, and you can't defeat it, now you become more challenged by it, and that's what competition is. We are obsessed with competition, we enjoy competition. And competition is good, and there's a healthy way to be competitive, and I think jiu-jitsu is one of the many arenas where you can exercise that healthy competition.0:04:25.3 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:04:26.1 Robert Drysdale: I also think that people have become highly addicted to the endorphins from training, physical endorphins, and they get, some people call it a "runner's high" or whatever high you experience while you're working out, you experience that in jiu-jitsu as well. Granted, and I am biased here, I'm the first one who admit it, jiu-jitsu is chess with your body, it's highly, highly intellectual. It drives me crazy. It's a bit of a peeve of mine when people think of fighters as these brutes that don't know how to think, and that's why they fight. I cannot think of anything more intellectual than fighting, I really can't. It is one of the most extreme displays of human intelligence.0:05:04.7 Mischa Z: Yes, yes.0:05:05.9 Robert Drysdale: It's just that it's not seen that way for a variety of reasons. It's not sold that way, because if you pitch fighting that way, it might be less interesting to show business, but I've known these guys and some of these guys have never read a book in their lives, but they are some of the most intelligent people you've ever met in your life.0:05:21.3 Mischa Z: Yeah, can I say something to that real quick?0:05:23.9 Robert Drysdale: Sure.0:05:24.6 Mischa Z: Sure. So my one buddy, Kevin, he said that, he started a couple of years ago, but he said, initially, it's the physicality of it, but then you realize really quickly, it's the mental game, it's the mental process, it's the strategy, that chess, and the more... If you play chess, for example, the more you know, the more you realize you don't know and you need to know, kind of a thing. Is that a good analogy or...0:05:52.7 Robert Drysdale: It is infinite, it's infinite. We often compare it to chess. And I remember I had a friend of mine in college, back in Brazil, where he was a chess master, highly ranked, and we would argue, we'd always debate which one was more complex, chess or jiu-jitsu, and I'd win every time, 'cause you can't... Because chess is two-dimensional, and it's only got a few pieces, and the pieces only do so many moves. Human movement is three-dimensional, it has infinite movements, infinite movements. You add the emotional stress of fighting, that does... It's very few things in life can replicate that. I imagine war would be something even more stressful. I imagine a real life-threatening situation will be very stressful like that. But fighting is extremely stressful, and you gotta manage it, and it's not... It's the reason why most people are terrified of it, 'cause just the thought of it freaks them out. [chuckle]0:06:44.5 Robert Drysdale: Knowing that it's 7:00 PM on a Saturday, you're gonna have to step into a cage and fight against someone who's been trained their whole life to knock your head off. It's a terrifying thought, and it really is. And I have no issues admitting this, I was terrified every single time I stepped in there. You can't show it.0:07:01.3 Mischa Z: Really?0:07:02.1 Robert Drysdale: Oh, absolutely, absolutely, on the verge of crying, I was so scared. On the verge of crying. Actually, I would hope to get injured like the week of the fight, so I didn't have to fight, 'cause there's a part of me that was hoping I would get injured, so I didn't have to fight. That's how scary... And that's intelligence, that is intelligence. People don't see it, but it's to manage that, it's not for everyone. So, I think that... And then you add the physical element to it, it's extremely physical. They say that wrestling is one of the hardest things you'll do in life, and it's true, like trying to take someone down and then trying to stand back up, and you're holding them down. I think CrossFit is easy, and I'm not trying to discredit anyone, but, physical terms, and you can't compare... And then there's a technical layers to it. It's just layer after layer after layer.0:07:50.7 Mischa Z: Layer after layer.0:07:51.9 Robert Drysdale: 23 years of doing this, and I'm not even scraping the surface.0:07:55.4 Mischa Z: That's incredible.0:07:55.6 Robert Drysdale: And it really is infinite. I really feel like fighting, in general, is not appreciated as something that requires an enormous amount of intelligence and intellect in general. It's just that our definition of intelligence is so narrow, it's so limiting that we don't see it that way, we see two meatheads trying to knock each other out. But there's beauty in that, too, there's value. You're trying to defeat your opponent. It's like looking in through a mirror, you're trying to look through that mirror, trying to move faster than the mirror moves, and I think it's beautiful in many, many different levels. But it's something I think a lot of people miss, they only see a bar fight. I don't see a bar fight, I see a ceremony.0:08:37.2 Mischa Z: Yeah. I wanna speak to two things in that regard, and one is, my buddy, Kevin, I'm gonna drop their names 'cause they're gonna be so excited that they're collaterally involved in this. [laughter] But, Kevin said it's the most rigorous exercise for him, and that it beats the hell out of him, and he loves it. At 50 years old, he's like, "Yeah, it just kicks my ass, and it feels so good," and so there's that physical outlet, which is so powerful, especially as we get older, I think, to keep that movement, and just for longevity. It's so powerful. But my other buddy, Fernando, it transformed his relationships with people, and specifically with his girlfriend that he's been with for a while, and it was... He was talking about how in the judo, the Brazilian jiu-jitsu, how it's very meditative on one hand 'cause your mind has to focus, which is awesome, and then also the patience that it teaches you and the new perspective that it teaches him, and how he was able to bring that out and find patience with a new perspective with his relationships. Can you speak to that a little bit or is that your experience as well or...0:10:03.4 Robert Drysdale: It does help on a personal level, too. There's so many lessons. I often say that every lesson you're gonna learn in life, you're gonna learn it on the mats first. It's just that you may or may not see them, but they're all there. But there's something about... I think especially when it comes to men and women relationships, 'cause we're living in an age where we're taught that everything is exactly the same, and I don't believe that. I think that women expect a certain behavior from a man and vice versa, and I think that's the way nature is. I'm not suggesting there are fixed gender roles, but I think women do like a strong masculine figure. You just talk to them, and they'll tell you, like, "Who are you attracted to?" And they're gonna define what they're attracted to, and it fits a certain profile. There are exceptions; there might be women out there who love men who cry all the time, for example, or who show weakness or can't fix a door or can't open the door for them or can't carry groceries. These things might exist, but I think for the most part, women like a man being a man. And one thing that jiu-jitsu will do for you, or fighting in general, well, I think I'm biased towards jiu-jitsu, and obviously that's my background, but I think any kind of combat will do, is it does give you a certain level of confidence about being... You learn... Because you're gonna lose, you're gonna lose, you're gonna win.0:11:23.8 Robert Drysdale: I think that martial arts combat, the strife, the struggle, is something that, it puts you exactly where you need to be confidence-wise. I'll give you an example. Children that walk into my gym, they have the insecure child, right, the child that can't make eye contact, he's bullied, he's made fun of, he never wins at any sport, so he doesn't try. Parents bring them into jiu-jitsu as a last hope, last resort, "This my child is doomed." And what happens is that child, initially they lose and they lose, but every now then they win, and then they go, "Oh, wow, I didn't know I could do that, I just went around." And then they lose and lose again, and then they win another one. So what it does is as they win, as they lose, it brings their confidence level up to where it should be because they walked in they were very insecure. They're not over-confident because they still lose, but the wins, they teach them that they are more capable than they thought they were.0:12:17.4 Robert Drysdale: And then you get the child who is the bully, you get the child who is the over-confident child, perhaps because he's bigger or he's more confident, and he just walks in and he acts like he's gonna own the room, and then he walks into jiu-jitsu and he gets tapped by the nerdy kid with glasses. He loses a round after round after round to the kid, and now he's shocked, he's shocked that he just lost, like, "I didn't think that was possible." So, two things happen to the bully, he either leaves or he changes. He adapts and he goes, "Wait a second, I'm not as good as I thought I was." So it brings him down from that state of over-confidence, exactly where he's supposed to be, and then the bullied and the bully end up more or less in the same place, exactly as it's supposed to be. And when you find that happy place, you'll see the flaws in yourself, you'll see the weaknesses, but you'll see the strength too, and then you walk away with that, with a certain degree of confidence that I think it is just... Confidence is one of those things, you can't talk it, you can't. You just have to feel it, you have to be it. And jiu-jitsu changes you, it changes you from the inside in a very meaningful way.0:13:20.4 Robert Drysdale: So I think for people that start relating, not just romantically, but business-wise, they see something different. I was a very insecure teenager, very, very terrified of fighting, terrified of talking with a girl, I get very socially awkward, didn't have a whole bunch of friends, but jiu-jitsu changed me to the point where after I stepped into a cage, I'm going, "What's gonna intimidate me now?" I'll be in college, and there'll be an exam and everyone's terrified of it, everyone's worried, I'm like, "This is a piece of paper, people." [laughter] "There's no way that this is gonna scare me." And if you get used to that, having that battle, the win, the lose, and the struggling, that creates, in you, a certain medal that you don't get by talking about it, by reading a self-help book. You don't get it any other way, you have to experience it and that raises your... I think it improves on all your relationships, it makes you better at everything.0:14:19.5 Mischa Z: Yeah, I like it. I was just thinking too, I'm imagining as, at any age, it can be a haven to work out emotions, to work out thoughts, to go to the map, or... Is that a realistic assessment as well? Yeah. Okay.0:14:43.5 Robert Drysdale: Absolutely.0:14:44.1 Mischa Z: What's that?0:14:45.3 Robert Drysdale: No, absolutely, I said.0:14:46.7 Mischa Z: Yeah. Great. I have a question, I'm gonna lay out a scenario for you, and then I'm gonna ask you a question, and I'm looking forward to your answer. Okay?0:14:58.5 Robert Drysdale: Absolutely.0:15:00.5 Mischa Z: Fantastic. Think of life as a three-legged stool of relationships, finances and health, now think of someone who is or was successful and has two of those legs fall out from under them, this could be a combination of divorce, career, upheaval, financial stress, kids acting out or not going the direction that they want, there could be physical health challenges for themselves or for a loved one, maybe a death in the family and continued failed relationships, and to top it off there, pull yourself up from your bootstraps, there're fix it, there're push your way through it methods that served them so well are no longer working, they need new tools. And so for me, and as I was hitting my 40s, there was divorce, career upheaval, and success, and I'm sure you've...0:16:00.4 Mischa Z: Actually I watched your TED Talk, which was amazing, so you can relate. But there's that, there's success as a solution, there's money as a solution, and then, excuse my language, the shit hits the fan, for me it was divorce, career upheaval, failed relationships, both parents died in rapid succession, so it shook my foundations, and I was like, "I need some new tools, I need something more than just... I'm gonna go work more or make more money or... " You know what I mean? So this is my question to you, thinking of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, what are the exact next steps you would offer this person, so they know they are headed in the new right direction, that they will have positive momentum towards getting their life back on track?0:16:56.9 Robert Drysdale: Yeah, you go through cycles in life, I'm not the same me I was 10 years ago, and it's a painful transformation because you change your mind, you change your world view, you change your relationships, your world collapses on you at some point and nothing's working anymore. I've been through that as well. The one thing, and I recommend this. When people ask me, "Is jiu-jitsu healthy?" And I go, "For the body or for the mind?" Very different. [chuckle] It's not healthy on the body I don't, I don't care what people say, yeah, you'll have a good heart rate, your heart will be fine, but there's more to health than just your heart and lungs. But, mentally, it's very healthy. Mentally, it's kept me in a very good place. I've seen it do it to people with PTSD, autism, social anxiety, panic syndrome, double personality disorder, schizophrenia, you name it, people that are suicidal, drug addicts and alcoholics, and it just puts them... Because there's something missing in modern life. If you listen to my TED Talk, I've loved Nietzsche since I was a teenager, and he says that technology, comfort and science were gonna make life easier, but it's also gonna make them unhappier 'cause they're gonna be so comfortable they have nothing to fight for. And once you have nothing to fight for, how can you find happiness? How can you find satisfaction when everything is given to you?0:18:23.5 Robert Drysdale: If I give you a black belt, if I send you a black belt in the mail, how does that make you feel? It doesn't make you feel any better, it doesn't make you feel better about yourself, right? If you earn it, if you put 10 years of your life into something, struggle to achieve it, now it means something that is meaningful in a deeper way. And I think these are the things that martial arts do for you, they make you word hard for everything, and there's value in that, there's a satisfaction to that that you don't find in many other things in life. When you're in there, the lights are off, the sound is off, the world is off, there's no thinking, there's no stress, there's no time for anxiety, to think about your sex life, your romantic life, your financial life, there's someone trying to beat you, there's someone trying to choke you. [laughter] And you have to deal with all that, and it's... It's those two hours you're on the mats, it's peaceful, it's like ultimate form of therapy, these things are missing in human life, this is how we've lived our entire existence, 99% of our existence, we struggled every second of every day. And then you have technology, it comes in and makes life so easy, we're no longer struggling, poor people are obese. It's the first time in history it's ever happened, struggles are no longer the same struggles we had 500 years ago, 1000 years ago, 20,000 years ago.0:19:49.9 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:19:51.6 Robert Drysdale: And I think we're missing that, and I think martial arts is a space where we get to exercise that aspect of human nature that's been set aside. We don't have to work haRobert Drysdale to hunt an animal anymore, we go to Walmart, we buy meat. If you wanna see a beautiful view, you pull up a picture, you don't have to climb a mountain anymore. [chuckle]0:20:11.1 Robert Drysdale: We don't have to climb a mountain. You can buy a photo and frame a beautiful picture in your living room, is that right? Right? [chuckle]0:20:17.6 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:20:18.5 Robert Drysdale: So because of all these things, I think that it's... The lack of struggling is making people less happy. And I think this is one explanation for depression and suicide going through the roof. I'm not saying I have all the answer, I'm not proposing that, but I think that martial arts is an expression of something that is very primal, very human and necessary, like this is how we have lived, this is who we are. And it's a place to exercise all that in a healthy way. So...0:20:46.5 Mischa Z: Okay... Yeah, go on, sorry.0:20:48.9 Robert Drysdale: No. I'm just gonna wrap it up. And to your point, I think that that's... That's why people feel so good in there, that's why your friend feels so good losing, getting... He just got his ass kicked and he loved it. Because he's been taught his whole life that losing is bad, and losing is part of the process. You're gonna lose. The only people who don't lose are the people who don't throw themselves out there. If you don't throw yourselves out there, you're never gonna have a sense of achievement, because you're never gonna achieve anything, right?0:21:17.5 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:21:17.7 Robert Drysdale: Right. So, you just gotta take the good and the bad and you learn how to love both, you learn how to love your losses, too. I'm happy for my losses. Now looking back, every time I lost... At the time I was depressed, I'm like, "Oh, my life is over, I just lost, I've have dedicated a whole year to this com... " But now I look back and I'm so thankful for them. I'm like those made who I am, and I'm happy with who I am. So, it's a very healthy environment.0:21:40.8 Mischa Z: I love it. Let me ask you as well. So, let's say you got a 40, 50-year-old guy or girl, maybe late 30s, somewhere in that range who might feel intimidated or feel like, "I don't know if I could stand and ass kicking day one," or... How would you encourage somebody to get through the door for day one?0:22:07.5 Robert Drysdale: Yeah. I learnt that lesson the hard way as a business owner. It's easy to forget what it was like your first day, because your first day only lasts one day. And then by week three, you're very... It's your second home. But for someone who's just getting started, that first day is the hard one of the hardest days of their life for a lot of people. To just walk in through the door, it terrifies them.0:22:26.8 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:22:27.9 Robert Drysdale: In my gym, we created what we call a 15-day lesson program. There's no actual contact, it's just theory. So, it can be boring for someone who knows how to fight, but for someone who doesn't, it's still a lot of interesting information, where we teach you the basics of the basics. Basically, teaching you how to crawl before you're gonna walk. And new beginners love it, because they're not allowed to train their first 15 days, all they gotta do is... It's just like music theory before I hand the guitar. So, you're not gonna hold on to a guitar before you're done with day 15.0:22:55.6 Mischa Z: Yeah. Yeah.0:22:55.6 Robert Drysdale: You're just gonna be learning the theory of it. But if you don't know anything about music, maybe it's a little boring, you just wanna pick up a guitar, which some people do by day five, they're ready to rock and roll, but we give them the option. And so basically, everyone's gonna evolve at their own pace. It's not a race. It's you are racing against yourself, if there's any race going on. So, you're evolving at your own pace. So we have moms in there who have never done any... That haven't practiced sports since they were children, and they're overweight, and they're un athletic, and they're very insecure, and they're in their 50s, perhaps. And they jump in my class, and I have professional fighters on the mat. So, you'll imagine how they feel about that and... But the way we do it... And I can't speak for every gym, this is how I run my gym.0:23:38.3 Mischa Z: I love it.0:23:39.5 Robert Drysdale: We give them time. This is your pace, you wanna rest, you're rest. You wanna go to the bathroom, go to the bathroom. You wanna sit out, sit out. You wanna watch, you watch. And because you're in an environment... We follow our peers, like what people around us are doing, that's what we wanna do. So, if you see everyone around you and you created a culture where everyone around is competing in a healthy way, and they're trying to win and defeat each other in a healthy way, then you're watching that... And I'm telling you, I don't care if you're a mom, I don't care if you're 60 or 70, I don't care if your knees hurt, you're gonna watch, then you're gonna go, "I wanna be part of that. It looks like those people are having a blast" and they are. And then once you immerse yourself in that culture, and it's okay to lose and no one's gonna make fun of you, because that person just lost the previous round, and it's just part of what we do, that competition, it becomes highly addictive. There's a reason why... I've never seen anyone quit jiu-jitsu, because they didn't like it. I've seen people quit for work reasons, family reasons, health reasons. I've never seen anyone say, "You know what, I rolled around and someone beat me and I hated it." Granted, your first week, you should not get your ass kicked, because it's not for everyone.0:24:46.2 Mischa Z: Right.0:24:47.0 Robert Drysdale: It might be too intimidating. I am advocate of easing people in and let them be comfortable enough with the mats before you start pushing them. And then they're gonna ask to be pushed, even moms do, they want to be pushed.0:25:00.6 Mischa Z: I love that. So we've got day one through 15, learn about it, get comfortable with the environment, super soft entry, and you just see the... How good it is and how vital... I don't know if vital is a good woRobert Drysdale, but I'm sensing that. And so what happens next? Do you have a day 16 to 30 or...0:25:23.0 Robert Drysdale: Well, and then we throw you in the beginners class. So now, you're in a class with the other... So, we have a class before you went to the beginner class, a preparation class, so to speak. Beginner class, you're gonna be there for anywhere between a year to two years, depending on your attendance level. And obviously, how quickly you progress, and people progress at different rates. Like a 22-year-old is gonna progress faster than an eight-year-old or a 65-year-old, for example. Athletic ability does count. So there is some differences. So anywhere between a year and two years, and then we move you to my advanced class. Sorry about that, it's the dog.0:25:58.8 Mischa Z: That's okay. Dog saying hi. [chuckle]0:26:01.8 Robert Drysdale: But then you move into the advanced class where the instruction is gonna be a little more sophisticated, and the class is a little bit long or becomes physically a little bit harder. It's just a more... It's just a little... You just raise the bar for them, and then they're in that class for the rest of their lives.0:26:20.7 Mischa Z: So, beginner, one to two years and then are... So I get the sense, and tell me if this is true, and I'm sure you've seen it, but again, let's say we've got somebody 30, 40, 50 or a mom who's like, "Yeah, I wanna do this." Or a dad or what have you, and... Or you mentioned somebody who's got PTSD. The transformation or the mental freedom starts right away, right? It's not like... Is that an accurate sense that I have like, "Hey, the baby steps just are beautiful." Is that a... Is that...0:27:03.2 Robert Drysdale: You'll get something out of it day one, but it's one of those things the more you do it... Like compare it to music. Your first day with a guitar may not be the most rewarding day, because you can't really play anything.0:27:13.4 Robert Drysdale: Yeah.0:27:13.9 Mischa Z: Alright, but the more... The first time you can hear that sound, or the first chord that you can hear nice and clear, you're gonna go, "Oh, wow, I can do this." Okay. Now, I know what people are doing, I just gotta get better at it." And this practice will... Next thing you know, you can play a whole song.0:27:28.8 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:27:29.4 Robert Drysdale: And it's very similar, but it doesn't end. At the same time, there's no I know or I don't know. It's not binary. It's a spectrum, and it's infinite. 23 years in, my body is destroyed, and I only wish my health were better, so I can keep training and keep improving.0:27:44.1 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:27:45.0 Robert Drysdale: But there's... And it's not an age thing, it's more of a miles thing. It's like a car. It could be 2020 and have 150,000 miles on it.0:27:53.8 Mischa Z: Yes.0:27:54.6 Robert Drysdale: So it's kinda how I'm... At 39, it's kind of how I feel. I got arthritis all over my body, but I mean, it was worth it. I wouldn't go back and change anything.0:28:02.3 Mischa Z: Of course.0:28:03.3 Robert Drysdale: But it's baby steps. You get more out of it the more you do it. It is really is a marathon and it's... Your life will end before the marathon ends.0:28:14.5 Mischa Z: Fantastic. Tell me, off the top of your head, of somebody who's, again, our age, and I'll... I'm a little older than you, so I apologize for saying our age, but sort of a transformation that you've seen from somebody perhaps on the door of suicide, not guaranteeing that someone's gonna have this transformation, but have you seen, literally, people on... Mentally at the bottom and then come through that? Can you walk me through that?0:28:48.1 Robert Drysdale: Yes. We had one veteran, she was an Iraq veteran and... I don't even know what she went through. I was too scared to ask, but she was very traumatized. Her social anxiety was through the roof, she had a dog with her 24/7. I think to make matters worse, she had no family or very little family. She was very distant from her family. She basically had like... She'd be at home all day living off whatever she was getting from her... As a veteran. She was wounded, too, so she had problems moving. She would use a wheelchair, and she didn't get off the wheelchair. But it was a bad scenario, man, it was just awful. And it kind of broke my heart, because you could see she was a very lonely person, and she was really struggling mentally, but she would come to the gym every day.0:29:39.3 Robert Drysdale: She would come to the gym every single day, and I... And she couldn't do much. She was so injured that there was not much she could do, but she was there every day, and you can see her improving, just being on the mats with us, everyone was really nice and patient and understanding. It sort of gave her like a... It gave her a second family, a place... Or a first family perhaps, a place to belong, a place to be, a place to be happy and people would joke around with her. And that's the other thing, marshal arts environment is an environment where people are treated equally, truly, not pretentiously, like truly. If we like you, we make fun of you just like everyone else. It's a brotherhood or a sisterhood, if you will. There's no such thing as, "I have to keep the appearances," and you gotta talk to people." You remove the social mask, like, "Hey, man, I've seen you almost cry from losing. It's okay." It's a very naked kind of relationship.0:30:35.8 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:30:36.2 Robert Drysdale: So it's very honest. It's very honest, and I think people appreciate that. We treated her like she was one of us. She got treated exactly like everyone else. It wasn't like, "Oh, my God, she's a veteran, and she's injured. Let's give her special treatment." It was none of that. There was no special treatment. It was like, "Now you're one of us." Okay, you're on a mat like everyone else. No one went easy on her in the sense where... We respected her disability, but no one is treating her like someone who's handicapped. She got treated like a normal human being, and that's how I think... If someone has a handicap, that's how you treat them, like it's... I've heaRobert Drysdale that the worst thing you can ask a cancer patient is, "How are you doing? How you feeling?" Like a dying cancer patient.0:31:16.6 Robert Drysdale: It's the worst thing you can do, is ask them how they're feeling. Like, why would you do that? Do you think that's gonna make them feel better if it is asked repeated for the 10th time and they feel like shit? They have cancer, they're gonna die, and they know that, how do you think you're helping? If you wanna make... Do something for that person, make them laugh, tease them about the old times or remember something that will happen in... 10 years. "Oh, remember that one time you did... That was retarded." Make fun of them and then make them laugh, and they can make fun of you, and you just treat them equal, treat them like you would treat your best friend. I think that's what people are looking for, and martial... At least, in my environment, I try to cultivate that. I try to be blunt with people and just treat them the way I would wanna be treated. And that involves just more than just being nice to them. It's being truly like a friend, you treat them like a friend. And that means, you normally make fun, you don't feel too sorry for them. Pick your self up. Come on, one more rep, one more rep. Let's go. Now don't be lazy. Get up. Do it again."0:32:20.4 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:32:20.9 Robert Drysdale: You know, and I think that people, they... It's uncomfortable, but people crave that. People need that. You need the push, you... You know what's funny about being a coach that acts that way, is that first they're shocked, like, "How could you talk to me like that?" Or, "How could you make me... " And then eventually, you gain their respect because deep down, that's what they wanted.0:32:42.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, they just wanna be treated... They want that humanness, right? That...0:32:49.1 Robert Drysdale: That involves everything. Humanness involves everything, and that's... It's not just being nice to people, not just being polite or political about it. Humanness involves everything, the pretty and the ugly. It involves, "Hey, argue with me, disagree with me."0:33:02.5 Mischa Z: Yeah. I like that.0:33:03.5 Robert Drysdale: Right, right. It's okay. You can disagree with me.0:33:05.2 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:33:05.5 Robert Drysdale: "Oh, my gosh, someone disagreed with me. I can no longer be your friend." "No, it's okay. We'll grab lunch afterwards, but you're still wrong." You'll call him an idiot, and we'll go grab lunch, grab a beer afterwards, and it's all good.0:33:14.7 Mischa Z: Right.0:33:14.9 Robert Drysdale: But we're so sensitive and...0:33:17.2 Mischa Z: God, we're sensitive. It's insane, man.0:33:19.4 Robert Drysdale: And it's gotten to the point of just ridiculous. This isn't... Where historians will make fun of us in the future, 'cause... Remember those people in the 21st century, right, where you couldn't make fun of each other, because people will get offended. I went to a comedy show the other day, and I can't remember the comedians name, I wish I could, because I would like to give him credit. And he goes, "Comedy is the last bastion of free speech."0:33:41.0 Mischa Z: Oh, really? Yeah.0:33:43.8 Robert Drysdale: I'm like, "Amen." That's the only place that you can actually speak your minds. It's like Dave Chappelle and Bill Burr, they have that privilege to just fire from...0:33:50.6 Mischa Z: Just let it rep. Right?0:33:53.1 Robert Drysdale: Rep and it's comedy, so they can get... If I said it, I'd go to prison. I think martial arts is appealing, because it's kind of like comedy in a way where it's very blunt, very naked, and very real, very human.0:34:06.1 Mischa Z: So did you see this vet, this woman who... And obviously, you got to see a progression and a profound effect, she came out of her shell and... Or tell me more. You got to see some cool results?0:34:20.6 Robert Drysdale: Oh, yeah, absolutely. Next thing you know she's smiling. Next thing you know, she's... It became a ever happy place. I shouldn't have moved, so we don't have her any more, but she... There was a progression there in terms of helping her, happiness, and she couldn't do much jiu-jitsu because of her disability. There really wasn't much she could do, but she just loved being with us and doing her best to do the moves, and we would push her and... We worked around her engines. We have another lady, she's close to 60 now, and she can barely... She's all beat up, but she's on the mat almost every day, and everyone's patient with her, but we push her still.0:34:54.5 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:34:54.7 Robert Drysdale: Whenever she goes on her knees, I'm like, "No no no, off your knees, off your knees, push ups. On your toes." And people are like, "Oh, you're making me uncomfortable." But then they're like, "You know, I'm glad coach did that, because that's what I really wanted." We've had alcoholism, and people that struggle with that. And they come to the gym every day. It's like their therapy. I don't think they go to AA anymore. As long as they're on the mats every day, it kind of gives them the strength to fight that addiction.0:35:21.0 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:35:22.2 Robert Drysdale: And we don't talk about it... Yeah.0:35:23.7 Mischa Z: Honestly, I think atheist or agnostic or not, or whatever, but I mean, it clearly it's, if you want to believe this or take it that far, it's gotta be providing a connection to a source or God or call it whatever you want. Like, it's gotta be tapping into something that... Into that, yeah?0:35:43.2 Robert Drysdale: There are corners of human nature that we don't always tap into. You don't tap into that unless you have a very strong sense of community, right? And for some people, that's God; for some people, that's just spiritual; for some people, that's just... I mean, call it what you will, but it's... There are feelings that we need to experience as humans that are very rich. We don't call them rich, because they're free. But just because they're free doesn't mean everyone has them.0:36:08.4 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:36:08.6 Robert Drysdale: But I think we need that. Some of my best moments in life, looking back, were not me on the podium with the gold medal around my neck. They were me on the mats making... With my friends after the practice, we're all covered in sweat, and we just tried to kill... We were trying to kill each other five minutes ago, but now we're laughing in front of each other and exchanging information and teaching each other the moves or... There's a sense of community that you get from that brotherhood that is very unique. I've heard this from soldiers, veterans, they come back from wars, and they go, "Rob, I don't believe in the war, but I feel like I have to go back because my brothers are there." So they go back more for that brotherhood than they do because of the cause. They don't believe in it anymore, but if my friends are there, I have to be there for them.0:36:54.6 Mischa Z: That's supporting them.0:36:55.0 Robert Drysdale: They probably miss that bond that they've created being in that... Struggling, the situation of struggle for as long as they have. You're risking your life every day, and there's someone there that is willing to take a bullet for you.0:37:07.3 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:37:07.8 Robert Drysdale: That's a very unique bond. And I've never been to war, but the mats are that on a smaller scale, but I know how that feels. I have friends that I know they would take a bullet for me, and I'll take a bullet for them.0:37:19.5 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:37:20.4 Robert Drysdale: And that's... These are the kind of people... It's a kind of friendship you don't dissolve very easily. And it's funny, because if you saw us training, you would think that we hated each other.0:37:27.2 Mischa Z: Yeah. Yeah, I love that aspect of it, that community, that friendship, that connection, that's so powerful. And I think as we get more into the tech as a world, as a society, those... That community is splintering, and it's become illusory or there's that... The connection through the phone or through that swipe or whatever is not perhaps enough, and I love... Go ahead.0:37:56.9 Robert Drysdale: No, I just want to capitalize on it, 'cause I think social media is a huge problem. I think it's... It is the reason why suicide and anxiety are going through the roof. There's no real connection anymore, and we think it is. And it is addictive. I spend six hours a day on my phone. I'm not saying I'm not part of... I'm telling you, I'm the part of the problem, but I see what it does to you. You become highly addicted. And the worst part is that, not only are you not creating those bonds, but you become dependent on it for an approval to feel good about yourself, right?0:38:26.3 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:38:27.1 Robert Drysdale: It's what the world... The world sets my value. No longer, I don't set my own value, the world sets my value. And that's a... And there's no way that wouldn't lead to a sad life.0:38:37.5 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah. I tell you what, I think this is a good place to end. I have a list of amazing questions that I would just want to say that we didn't touch on this much, because I really wanted to offer everybody some, some... The hope or, that tool of what you offer, that Brazilian jiu-jitsu, that strength of mind, resolve, the mental, the community is just so powerful, and it's out there. And obviously, it's growing like mad, so... But I think... You've traveled the world, anybody can watch your TED talk, and they'll get a... They'll get an inkling of sort of your emotional experience with Brazilian jiu-jitsu, which I believe for you is, on one hand was this blessing, but on the other hand is the curse, right?0:39:31.2 Mischa Z: There's that duality, and it almost kills you, but at the same time, it's your your source. So in the bonus round, we're gonna get into that. I've got some awesome, amazing questions. Perhaps we can get into some of your exploits. I'm excited to talk family with you in round two and some other super fun stuff. So anybody listening, if you've enjoyed Robert and his insights, there's going to be a lot more in our bonus session, so click on the VIP access. And Robert also does, does... Obviously, you have studios, you do retreats, but Robert is gonna offer up some amazing bonuses where perhaps you can join Robert in the fray, literally. So we have that to look forward to. And then where... You can always find Robert at robertdrysdale.net, and a Google search, you can see his TED Talk. And then I'm just going to your site, zenithbjj.com. You can find Robert and all your fun stuff there. You've got a YouTube channel. Any final thoughts to share that we did not get a chance to cover in this first round, Robert?0:40:54.9 Robert Drysdale: No, man. That was just... That's about it. I think the mats are for everyone. There's no such thing as... And if it's not the mats, it's some other competitive endeavor. You have to find that. You need that place to manifest that other side of you. If you don't have that, you need to find it, your life will be more complete.0:41:13.6 Mischa Z: Yeah. Fantastic. Thank you so much. This has been amazing and... Yeah, I love your insights. So stay tuned for round two. Click on the VIP, all access pass.

IT'S TIME w/Bruce Buffer
Ep. 517: Bruce Buffer Discusses Having COVID, UFC 268 Preview

IT'S TIME w/Bruce Buffer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 50:22


Bruce Buffer discusses having COVID-19. Plus, Bruce previews UFC 268 with producer TJ De Santis.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

On The Edge Podcast with Scott Groves
[Audio Quicktakes] What is AN ACCREDITED INVESTOR & Why Wealth Management Is So Important - On The Edge Podcast

On The Edge Podcast with Scott Groves

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 21:41


This is an abbreviated version of the full podcast, also available here! Why do ACCREDITED INVESTORS get access to investments that rest of us don't have access to? WHAT is an accredited investor? Why do ACCREDITED INVESTORS make greater returns with LESS RISK. We've got the guy to answer those questions!!! Frederick is an accomplished entrepreneur with more than 25 years of success spanning financial services and technology. He is responsible for founding Creative Capital Wealth Management Group, growing the firm to 15 states, and building a unique retainer-based wealth management program. He also president of Retainer-based Academy LLC, a coaching and intellectual property firm. Frederick is an innovative leader with a keen eye for unique solutions and vast knowledge in alternative wealth creation strategies. He received his Behavioral Financial AdvisorTM, BFATM for short, certification as of July 2018. As a seasoned board member Frederick has held board positions with Phoenixville Regional Chamber of Commerce, The Andy Talley Bone Marrow Foundation, Rotary, Kiwanis, LGBT Equality Alliance, the Phoenixville Senior Center, Cornerstone for Hope, Phoenixville Area Community Services, and the West Chester School of Business Advisory Council. He is married to Elizabeth, has nine-year-old twins James and Abigail. His hobbies include technology, cigars, eagles' football, and cars (mostly Tesla). Why do Ivy League Universities need to invest? The investments in colleges go toward their foundations and scholarship programs, and also the investments keep their accreditation status. There are only a few business that qualify to be in an upper tier of status, and many of these colleges sit in this category. WHAT is an ACCREDITED INVESTOR? For a person to be accredited, you need to have a certain amount of income or net worth to qualify. Once you qualify for accreditation, the world of investing really opens up to you. As Frederick explains, it's like being in the same restaurant but you get a different menu when it comes to investing. What is retainer based planning? What does your company do that makes it unique from other investment companies? Scott clarify's exactly what Fredericks company does and he puts it into simple terms. Learn about the advice they give to their clients, which help them invest their money properly while keeping their current investments in themselves active. Things like your business and 401K remain the same, but other income can be dispersed more effectively for passive investment. When you bring an accredited investor idea to a client, what exactly are you referring to? What are these investments and why haven't most people heard of them yet? Who can access them? How does inflation play a role in investing these days? It seems everything is at an all time high, so how do you decide what to invest in? It's hard to ‘buy low' these days so where do you find your in? Frederick provides some examples on how the rich are investing their money to remain in the upper tier of society, and how they can infinitely increase their holdings based on making the right investments. Frederick further explains the benefits of being a AAA accredited investor, and what you can and can't invest in UNLESS you're in this group. Frederick explains the concept behind the (so far non-existent) “Debt Jubilee.” Frederick goes over some life stories that led him to the conclusion to always say Yes when provided with an opportunity. ------------ Quickly- I'm Scott Groves - Husband, Father, Loan Officer, Coach, Author, Podcaster, and Recent Blue Belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. This podcast is paid for and brought to you by.... by me, Scott Groves :-)

Dear Church
#131 “Doubting God”

Dear Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 36:09


In This Episode, Chris McCurley is joined by Cliff Sabroe  to discus the “Doubting God” Clif Sabroe is the Preaching Minister a West Visalia Church of Christ. Have questions? Email chris.mccurley@rippleoflight.com. 

Jiu Jitsu Dummies
JJD Ep.57 with Kody Steele

Jiu Jitsu Dummies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 76:58


Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast, Episode 57. Black Belt Kody Steele joins The Dummies to discuss MMA, backflips, combat jiu-jitsu, and more. Instagram handle: @kody_steelebjj Help the Jiu Jitsu Dummies award their next 1-year Scholarship to an amazing person doing great things in their community by donating HERE Become a Podcast Patron and be entered into a $100+ monthly Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast Raffle at Patreon.com/jiujitsudummies     Thank you to Episode Sponsors:  FightBack CBD - 20% OFF your next order with code: JJD  DD214 Fightwear - 15% OFF you order with code: JJD Feito IT & AV Flow N Roll - 30% OFF your online order with code through the of Oct 2021: JJD Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast Store - Get 15% OFF with code: JJD Black Belt Digital Marketing Tribal Paddle Board by: @thistribalguy_ on Instagram, find more at This Tribal Guy   Special thanks to: We Defy Foundation, providing combat veterans coping with military-connected disabilities a long-term means to overcome their challenges through Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and fitness training. @WeDefyFoundation on Instagram. Donate now at https://www.wedefyfoundation.org/ Want us to Shout-Out you or your gym on the show? Visit https://www.patreon.com/jiujitsudummies to become a Show Patron for as little as $5 per month! Contact the Dummies @JiuJitsuDummies on Instagram, Facebook, Reddit, and Twitter or at info@jiujitsudummies.com to submit questions for consideration on the show. You can now also find us on TikTok @JiuJitsuDummiesPodcast Visit Jiu Jitsu Dummies for more details about the show, the foundation, becoming a Sponsor, and a list of sites and apps to download or view the podcast.

Life Almost Without Me
Episode 57 - Self Fulfilling Prophecies

Life Almost Without Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 28:59


Interview recording fell through so you get me on another solo cast this Thursday. If you enjoyed todays episode be sure to support by following and liking the channel below for updates on upcoming bonus episodesInstagramhttps://www.instagram.com/thelifeofhuggs/Artwork by Jayckob Hernandez https://www.instagram.com/jayysdoodleswww.LifeAlmostWithoutMe.com 

Bad Etiquette
Mat Brain #5

Bad Etiquette

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 103:30


This week we are addressing the fears of Jiu-Jitsu tournaments, balancing coaching and competing, losing at the gym vs losing in the real world, each of our local celebrity sightings, trying combat jiu-jitsu, and American vs Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. 

The A Game Podcast: Real Estate Investing For Entrepreneurs
Amazing Details of A Group Of Jiu Jitsu & Military Vets Implementing A Rescue Mission During Hurricane Ida | Mark Turner

The A Game Podcast: Real Estate Investing For Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 74:53


Join Nick Lamagna on The A Game Podcast with guest Mark Turner (Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Black Belt, Business Owner, Investor and Former United States Marine) as he returns to the podcast for a third time to share an absolutely amazing story detailing out how he put together a rescue mission after Hurricane Ida hit New Orleans. Using his connections through the United States Marine Corps, special forces, the Brazilian Jiu Jitsu community and vets from other branches of the military you will be blown away at this detailed recap of four brave men who hopped in a van with no plan but to selflessly help people in need.  This is an important episode for many reasons as you will hear the struggles people go through in times of crisis and natural disaster and the sobering lack of resources and help that are actually non existent in these troubling times.  Mark is looking to expand his team and mission by bringing more attention to what they are doing.  Whether you can get this interview in front of people who want to assist in their 501c3, people who are experienced that can help with logistics of future missions or anyone who wants to be a hands on team member who is qualified and properly trained for the mental and physical tasks needed to carry out these missions across the country please contact Mark today and pass this along to anyone who can help. We also end the episode with a fun discussion about out night out watching the always entertaining Bryan Callen.   Check out Naked Warrior Recovery and please subscribe to the podcast.  See show notes for all the ways to connect with Mark and The BJJ Lab Naperville and contact Nick to start doing some real estate deals together! ~ Connect with Mark Turner: Website: https://bjjlabnaperville.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/markturnerbjj/ Email: markturnerbjj@gmail.com --- Connect with Nick Lamagna www.NickNickNick.com Click here discounted CBD from Naked Warrior Recovery!!! Subscribe and Share If you like what you hear please leave a review by clicking here   Make sure you're subscribed to the podcast so you get the latest episodes on Platforms by Clicking Here To Subscribe Find all social media connections at Social media Links for Facebook, IG, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. Rate and Review The A Game Podcast on Apple Click Here to Review

John Bartolo Show
Dr. Mike Simpson - Veteran and Doctor

John Bartolo Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 96:03


Mike is a practitioner of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, currently holding the rank of purple belt, and works as a Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fight physician. As one of the foremost experts in both tactical trauma medicine and combat sports medicine, Mike is highly sought after as a lecturer and instructor, working extensively with MMA fighters, law enforcement, and military organizations providing medical care and training. Mike is a frequent guest on both medical and MMA podcasts, and also hosts his own podcast titled "Mind of The Warrior". Thanks to our main sponsors:   Go Check this months feature sponsor:   http://advancewarriorsolutions.com Special Thanks to: https://www.sigsauer.com https://ritonoptics.com https://inforce-mil.com https://www.pulsar-nv.com/glo/ https://www.gallowtech.com https://rhinosafe.com/ https://www.galcogunleather.com/​​​​​ https://blackwaterworldwide.com www.JohnBartoloShow.com Visit our Friends: Kenzies Optics https://www.kenziesoptics.com Visit Microtech Knives https://microtechknives.com #johnbartoloshow #johnbartolo

No Drop-in Fee Podcast
#36 - Jacob Propst

No Drop-in Fee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 66:59


On this episode, we meet up over Facebook Video with the owner and head instructor of Consecution Jiu-Jitsu Academy, Jacob Propst. We explore his latest event, the Agiad Combat Trials, in great detail. We also catch up with him about his plans for competing in the ADCC North American Trials in early November, and what his goals are for this upcoming event and further.Check out our episode page: http://nodropinfee.com/episode/36Follow UsInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nodropinfeeFacebook: http://facebook.com/nodropinfeeWeb: http://nodropinfee.comSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/nodropinfee)

Life Almost Without Me
Episode 56 - I Guess Sad Finance?

Life Almost Without Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 44:25


Two different recordings in this one. Thanks for sticking with me. Go over finance and overall feeling low. Emotional finance hahaIf you enjoyed todays episode be sure to support by following and liking the channel below for updates on upcoming bonus episodesInstagramhttps://www.instagram.com/thelifeofhuggs/Artwork by Jayckob Hernandez https://www.instagram.com/jayysdoodles

Grappling Rewind: Breakdowns of Professional BJJ and Grappling Events

This week on the show Maine and Miranda recap Fight to Win 186 and Fury Frappling 2 plus preview ADCC East Coast trials.In the news section of the podcast we preview the names announced for the IBJJF middleweight GP.  In the recap section we discuss the main event of F2W 186 Elisabeth Clay vs Thamara Ferriera, that saw dueling toe holds and Thamara Ferriera finish a tight toe hold on Clay.In the recap of Fury Grappling 2 We discussed the main event and co-main event featuring Daniel kelly.  In the preview section of the show we discuss all the names announced for ADCC East Coast Trials, plus our schedule of coverage for the event.  We also Discuss the rules for the event including all of the points and ways that points are able to be scored plus we discussed the referees seminar and rules video that was recently produced and put out by Mo jassim.   we also discuss and take a look at some of the specific situations that differ for this tournament versus other grappling events that we cover more frequently.We take a look at the under 66 kilogram division the under 77 kg division the under 88 kg division the under 99 kg Division and the over 99 kilogram division as well as the women's plus 60 kg Division and the women's under 60 kg division and discuss some of the defining characteristics of the Grapplers announced for these divisions so far understanding that we are still missing 95 + percent of the entrance at time of recording.In the outro section we discuss the lead-up to the trip to Atlantic City, New Jersey for trials.Recorded 10-31-2021

Alberto Crane Show
ACS #182 Ruben Miribyan- BJJ IN ARMENIA

Alberto Crane Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 38:12


Ruben Miribyan founded the Armenian Jiu-Jitsu Federation and Legacy Yerevan in the City Center of Yerevan and has been instrumental in the growth of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in Armenia. It's always a pleasure to have him here locally training and grateful to him for always taking good care of me when i visit Armenia and for our friendship over the years.

That Jiu Jitsu Podcast
The Oldest Champ Ever: UFC 267 Recap | Competition Show Ep. 6

That Jiu Jitsu Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 6:27


UFC 267 was a great event with some amazing fights. Let's look at some of the highlights. You can watch the video version of every episode on our YouTube PageLearn more about the show on our WebsiteVisit our Shop for shirts and moreFollow our show at: @That_JiuJitsu_PodcastFollow Justin directly: @JustinLeskoSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/thatjiujitsupodcast)

Beauty Gains
From the Mats to the Drag Strip (Ft. Rachel Schonewolf)

Beauty Gains

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 62:06


Snoot sits down with Rachel Schonewolf, owner of WolfBJJ in Sicklerville NJ. Rachel is a purple belt in Brazilian jiu jitsu but she's also a badass off the mats as well, drag racing with her team Bankrupt Raceteam. The girls discuss how they met while competing against each other in Brazilian jiu jitsu in 2019. In the podcast they talk all about drag racing, competing, injuries and also academy life. A big emphasis of episode is geared towards navigating boundaries with teammates and how to keep the academy a safe and comfortable place for everyone.

Jiu Jitsu Dummies
JJD Ep.56 - Nick Rahn from Veterans Action Report joins us to discuss his Cancer Scare

Jiu Jitsu Dummies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 98:46


Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast, Episode 56. Purple Belt Nick Rahn from the Veterans Action Report and Warriors Next Adventure joins Milton and Miguel to discuss his recent cancer scare and a whole lot more. Believe it or not, this was a hilarious episode.   Instagram Handles: Nick Rahn: @nick_explores_everything Warriors Next Adventure: @warriorsnextadventure Veterans Action Report: @veteran_action_report   Help the Jiu Jitsu Dummies award their next 1-year Scholarship to an amazing person doing great things in their community by donating HERE Become a Podcast Patron and be entered into a $100+ monthly Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast Raffle at Patreon.com/jiujitsudummies     Thank you to Episode Sponsors:  FightBack CBD - 20% OFF your next order with code: JJD  DD214 Fightwear - 15% OFF you order with code: JJD Warriors Next Adventure - DONATE HERE Feito IT & AV Flow N Roll - 30% OFF your online order with code through the of Oct 2021: JJD Jiu Jitsu Dummies Podcast Store - Get 15% OFF with code: JJD Choke Responsibly Jiu-Jitsu Tees - 20% OFF with code: CRJJD Black Belt Digital Marketing   Special thanks to: We Defy Foundation, providing combat veterans coping with military-connected disabilities a long-term means to overcome their challenges through Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and fitness training. @WeDefyFoundation on Instagram. Donate now at https://www.wedefyfoundation.org/ Want us to Shout-Out you or your gym on the show? Visit https://www.patreon.com/jiujitsudummies to become a Show Patron for as little as $5 per month! Contact the Dummies @JiuJitsuDummies on Instagram, Facebook, Reddit, and Twitter or at info@jiujitsudummies.com to submit questions for consideration on the show. You can now also find us on TikTok @JiuJitsuDummiesPodcast Visit Jiu Jitsu Dummies for more details about the show, the foundation, becoming a Sponsor, and a list of sites and apps to download or view the podcast.

Unlocking Your Inner Strength
Life Lessons from Jiu-Jitsu

Unlocking Your Inner Strength

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 11:29


Life Lessons from Jiu-Jitsu   It's hard for me to believe that I have already been going to Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for 4 years already.     I remember the nervous, excited energy when I made that decision.    I felt like a fish out of water for the first 3 months, at least!   I figured it would be timely to reflect on some life lessons from BJJ that I feel might benefit  you   in some way.     It does not matter if you  know anything about jiu-jitsu or not, the lessons will be  applicable.

Mind of The Warrior
MOTW #96: Get out of your own way

Mind of The Warrior

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 38:33


Buy the book! https://www.amazon.com/Honed-Finding-Your-Edge-Over-ebook/dp/B09C11QYR4/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1L3GKMD0L3Z1H&dchild=1&keywords=honed+finding+your+edge+as+a+man+over+40&qid=1630362562&sprefix=honed%2Caps%2C210&sr=8-1   Greybeard Performance: https://greybeardperformance.com Mike Simpson has served over three decades in the military as an Airborne Ranger, a Special Forces Operator, and finally as a Doctor of Emergency Medicine assigned to the Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC). Throughout his career, Mike has deployed to 17 different countries, from counter-narcotics operations in the jungles of South America, to the Global War on Terror (GWOT) in Southwest Asia and North Africa. Along the way, Mike has been trained as a demolitions expert, SWAT Sniper, High Altitude Low Opening (HALO) parachutist, civilian paramedic, Special Forces Medic, Operations and intelligence Sergeant, and finally, a board certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Mike is also a martial arts enthusiast, who trains in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai. His passion for martial arts motivated him to become a practicing fight doctor. As one of the foremost experts in both tactical trauma medicine and combat sports medicine, Mike is highly sought after as a lecturer and instructor, working extensively with Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fighters, law enforcement, and military organizations providing medical care and training. He co-stars on Hunting Hitler on the History Channel. Email: doc@drmikesimpson.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DoctorMikeSimpson/ Instagram: @drmikesimpson Website: https://drmikesimpson.com Shop affiliates: https://drmikesimpson.com/new-page-1    Nutrition: https://www.freshly.com/subscriptions/1807965?clickid=SREyh7XScxyJTlPwUx0Mo3cTUknxrzxsKVe91A0&irgwc=1&utm_campaign=usa_plans_all-d_all-p_acq_cpa_Michael%20Simpson_&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_source=ignite&affsrc=1&utm_term=paid-affiliate&plan_id=422&promo_code=rad40 Merchandise: https://rangerup.com/collections/doc-simpson promo code: MOTW15 (Save 15%)

The Results Engine Podcast
TRE 189 - Greg Jackson - Push Through Disappointment

The Results Engine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 49:50


Coach Greg Jackson is a mixed martial arts trainer who co-owns Jackson Wink MMA Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico, widely considered the top MMA training camp globally. Coach Jackson has trained many successful fighters, including former UFC Welterweight Champion Georges St-Pierre, former UFC Light Heavyweight Champion Jon Jones, former UFC Heavyweight Champion Andrei Arlovski, and countless other professional MMA athletes and champions. Greg comes from a family of pacifists, and he grew up in a rough neighborhood. Because he needed to learn how to defend himself, he began learning martial arts. While the young Jackson was occasionally passive in fighting, he would also be an aggressor in brawls and was suspended from school on more than one occasion. After graduating High School, he founded his martial art, Gaidojutsu, which combines rudimentary techniques from wrestling and kickboxing with basic judo locks. He then developed his craft by adding techniques from other styles such as wrestling, grappling, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, and kickboxing. His school officially turned into an MMA school in 2000. In 2007 Jackson teamed up with striking coach Mike Winkeljohn, and since then, the gym has been known by the name Jackson Wink MMA Academy.