Podcasts about Environmental science

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The integrated, quantitative, and interdisciplinary approach to the study of environmental systems.

  • 1,213PODCASTS
  • 1,887EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Aug 9, 2022LATEST
Environmental science

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Best podcasts about Environmental science

Show all podcasts related to environmental science

Latest podcast episodes about Environmental science

The Takeaway
Can Dimming the Sun Prevent Climate Catastrophe?

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 16:07


The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says that the earth's temperature will rise by almost 35 degrees Fahrenheit by 2040 if we don't curb our greenhouse gas emissions. But what if there was another way — what if we could simply shade the planet from the sun's hot rays? It sounds like something right out of a science fiction movie, but research into making it a reality has recently won some powerful financial backers. Solar geo-engineering, as the idea is called, doesn't just pose environmental and technological challenges, but also questions of international cooperation and governance.  Dr. Alan Robock, Distinguished Professor of climate science in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Rutgers University, joined us to explain the research, the technology, and the unintended consequences.

Beyond Zero - Community
Working Together to Solve the Mental Health Impacts of Climate Change

Beyond Zero - Community

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022


Presented and produced by Carly Dober This panel discussion hosted by University of Queensland, and the UQ Mental Health in Climate Change Transdisciplinary Research Network discusses communities' mental health affected by extreme weather events. Hear from field experts and academic researchers as they share key insights and observations.  Guests Associate Professor Fiona CharlsonSchool of Public Health, The University of Queensland, The UQ Mental Health in Climate Change Transdisciplinary Research Network Collin SivalingumState Emergency Services Manager, Australian Red CrossSelena GomersallChief Advocacy Officer / Founder, Outback FuturesBen NorrisManager Mental Health Drought and Disaster Team, Queensland HealthDr Jo LongmanSenior Research Fellow, The University Centre for Rural Health, University of Sydney Dr Rebecca PatrickSenior Lecturer, School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Sustainable Health Network  Associate Professor Karen McNamaraSchool of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Queensland,  The UQ Mental Health in Climate Change Transdisciplinary Research Network ContactLiz Shaw, Research Network Managerliz.shaw@uq.edu.au 

CPG Insiders
Sustainability, Inflation, Looking Ahead - an Interview with Julie DiNatale - Ep. 55

CPG Insiders

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 45:21


Content Outline: 1. Segment 1: Organic Farming (costs, results, future casting) 2. Segment 2: Can you leverage this into messaging for brands? 3. Segment 3: With continued inflation hitting these “more expensive” brands what does that look like in the future? Julie DiNatale has been working in sustainability and agriculture for over two decades and is Truterra's Commercial and Strategic Partnerships Leader. Julie has been involved in the emerging ecosystem services markets and regenerative agriculture programs across North America. Prior to joining Truterra, Julie worked for Corteva Agriscience, an ag tech start-up, consulted for large agribusinesses, and was an ag-sector analyst for a sell-side Wall Street firm. Before her career in agriculture, Julie spent a decade in sustainability, health, and safety for a large chemical manufacturer. Julie grew up in Western New York where she spent summers on her cousin's dairy farm. Julie earned a B.S. from Michigan State University's College of Agriculture, and an M.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Rochester. Website: https://www.truterraag.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/juliedinatale/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/juliedinatale4

EWN - Engineering With Nature
EWN On The Road: The San Joaquin River National Wildlife Refuge: A Natural Landscape Revived

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 6:26


Welcome to the summer feature podcast miniseries—EWN On The Road. As we teased in Episode 5, in this special series, Todd Bridges, Senior Research Scientist for Environmental Science with the US Army Corps of Engineers and the National Lead of the Engineering With Nature® Program, is sharing some highlights of his travels across the country over the past 2 years visiting people, places, and projects relevant to EWN.    The miniseries includes 4 episodes and will post August 3, 10, 17 and 24:    Episode 1—The San Joaquin River National Wildlife Refuge: A Natural Landscape Revived Episode 2—The San Joaquin Valley: Past, Present, Future and from the Air  Episode 3—The Heartland Tour: Five Rivers in One Day  Episode 4—Rivers as Resources to be Valued    We hope you'll find these special podcast episodes enlightening and easy listening for your summer travels. You can read more about Todd's travels and see additional pictures in the EWN On The Road blog on the EWN Website.  In this epsiode, Todd Bridges talks about his visit to the San Joaquin River National Wildlife Refuge where he observed the effects of restoration efforts and ongoing management of the area by the US Fish and Wildlife Service; the California Department of Water Resources; the US Army Corps of Engineers; and River Partners, a nonprofit engaged in river and riparian restoration in the region. Over the last 15 years, 600,000 native trees have been planted as a part of the restorations. As Todd describes it, “The landscape that is emerging from these efforts is getting close to what I imagine Pedro Fages and his companions saw as they became the first Europeans to venture into the San Joaquin Valley in 1772.” Aligning natural and engineering processes produces a host of environmental, social, and economic benefits for flood risk management. “My visit to the Refuge has inspired me to think about how Engineering With Nature could support scaling-up restoration and nature-based solutions across the San Joaquin Valley and the nation to achieve a balance between humans and nature on our shared landscapes.” Related Links EWN Website ERDC Website Todd Bridges at EWN Todd Bridges at LinkedIn EWN On The Road EWN On The Road: The California Swing San Joaquin River National Wildlife Refuge San Joaquin River Restoration Program USFWS San Joaquin River Restoration Program River Partners San Joaquin River NWR CA DFW San Joaquin River Restoration Program EWN Podcast S2E7: EWN Collaboration with the California Department of Water Resources USACE Lower San Joaquin River Project

Disrupt Everything
Monique Schiess: practising imagining, creativity as a vector for change, playing and experimenting for thriving in life, lessons and highlights from co-founding Afrika Burn, and designing the Apocalypse - Disrupt Everything #209

Disrupt Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 93:05


"Accessing your creativity is a huge healing thing, individually and collectively" - Monique Schiess Isra Garcia interviews Afrika Burn Creative Development Director and Liason, Monique Schiess. A conversation that turns around creativity, leadership, change, disruption, imagination, experimentation and iteration, play and imagination as tools for thriving and finding joy, creating a movement that matters, the power of building a tribe of makers, Afrika Burn as a world-transformation artefact, and why values and principles matter most than anything.  "The whole world is disrupted" Monique Schiess is a change-maker responsible for cofounding Afrika Burn in 2077, the Burning Man regional event a Southafrika and one of the most relevant burns in the world. She has been running the coordination of the creative projects since then. She was also a partner in the Mother City Queer Projects, has two degrees in Environmental Science and Social Anthropology, and had an incarnation as a game ranger. "Keep doing the next right thing" - Monique Schiess "I was living in the bush for some years, even without electricity" After fifteen years in the desert of Tankwa Karoo (South Africa), Monique Schiess has a doctorate in driving rebar pegs into rock and shale, and a PhD in the economics of artistic chaos and wrangling itinerant misfits and renegades. "Milestones at Afrika Burn happened when we were not planning anything" - Monique Schiess She is a fire-starter of sorts, an instigator and incubator of creative projects across the board. "Artists are the tricksters of the world" She makes sport of poking people in their creative ribs, and believes that fun and waking up creativity is a most powerful vector for change in this world. "Honor your creative and believe you can create change" "I'm not a brand; I'm Monique" Interview main topics (and index) Intro, Afrika Burn and more. Life milestones, why and what was the essential learning in each of them. What Afrika Burn has taught Monique about creativity that she can apply in everyday life. Leadership lessons. Leading and coordinating teams and departments at Afrika Burn. Self-knowledge learnings in seven years of Afrika Burn. Biggest 2022 Afrika Burn takeaway. Monique Schiess has used three things from her work at Afrika Burn that have improved her life. Three things from her creative background have helped her to improve Afrika Burn. A process for developing creative projects. The biggest challenge for Monique at Afrika Burn and how she overcame it. How we can have a healthy creative life, Monique personal experience. Top skills for staying creative. On copying with stress. Monique's most successful habits and why. The tools, knowledge and wisdom to redesign her life again Memorable moments at Afrika Burn that she will never forget. The most impressive thing she has seen in the desert so far. The thing that Monique feels most excited about and why. She feels weird behaviour is funny and cannot get rid of it. Advice to her college self after her first significant rejection. A closer look at Monique Schiess' pursuit of happiness. The lowest point that has become a catalyst in her career. Monique's recipe for a remarkable life. "You create a community first, and then, the rest will happen by itself" - Monique Schiess Podcast show notes: Monique Schiess TEDxTalk. Afrika Burn. Monique's Instagram account. Isra Garcia's 2018 Afrika Burn experience. Reflections about Isra Garcia's personal experience at Afrika Burn 2019. "What a privilege to be on this journey" - Monique Schiess

Citizens' Climate Lobby
CCR 74 What Are LGBTQ Responses to Climate Change?

Citizens' Climate Lobby

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 119:44


Speaking with five different guests, host, Peterson Toscano, takes a deep dive to explore how climate change and extreme weather affect lesiban, gay, bisexual, transgender, gender non-binary, and queer (LGBTQ+) people.  Leo Goldsmith (he/him) is one of the co-authors of Queer and Present Danger: Understanding the Disparate Impacts of Disasters on LGBTQ+ Communities. Together with Dr. Michael Mendez, Assistant Professor of Environmental Planning and Policy at the University of California, Irvine Vanessa Raditz from Out in Sustainability who is a PhD student at the University of Georgia, they researched the unique vulnerabilities of this community in disaster relief; the myth of gay affluence; how faith-based groups have a history of discriminatory practices in disaster relief; how cohesive is the LGBTQ community and how race is a problem even in LGBTQ groups. Leo also provides practical ways community members and leaders can build stronger, more resilient LGBTQ+ communities that can bounce back from extreme weather events.  Nokwanda Maseko (she/her/they) is a South African economist who identifies as a Queer Black person. As senior economist at Trade and Industrial Policy Strategies, she has written position papers about what a just transition can look like, especially for women and the large sector of the Black South African population who because of unemployment and informal employment are not often part of the conversations around just transition.  Isaias Herandez (he/him) aka Queer Brown Vegan was born in Los Angeles, California, also known as Tongva Land. As someone who grew up in a community that faced environmental injustices, Isaias developed an interest to learn about his environment. Living in Section 8 affordable housing, using food stamps growing up, and witnessing pollution affect his body. Isaias turned his anger and sadness to becoming an environmental educator. He earned a B.S. in Environmental Science at the University of California, Berkeley. He works on a variety of diversity inclusion work in environmental spaces, academic research, and creative work. Isaias' work is centered on environmental justice with a lens of localization. Isaias works as a full-time content creator and public speaker on QueerBrownVegan. The Art House EJ Baker (they/them)  and Rae Binstock (she/her) tell us about Good Energy Stories, a story consultancy for the age of climate change. Their mission is to inspire, support, and accelerate stories in scripted TV and film that reflect the world we live in now–and help us envision a better tomorrow.  They talk about the kind of stories and approaches to storytelling that move audiences to feel empathy for those suffering an enthusiasm for solutions that make the world a better place.   Rae Binstock is a playwright and screenwriter. Her plays include That Heaven's Vault Should Crack (The New Group, Lark Development Center, T. Schreiber's Studios), land of no mercy (Landing Theatre Company, Salt Lake Acting Company, Princess Grace finalist), and WALKERS (The Shelter, O'Neill Conference semifinalist, Jerome Fellowship finalist). Her work has appeared in Samuel French Off-Off Broadway Festival, Jewish Plays Project, and the Fresh Fruit Festival, among others. Rae's pilot Homecoming was selected for the 2020 WriteHer List, and she is a two-time semifinalist for the Sundance Episodic Lab. Rae is a Dramatists Guild Fellow, a Rita Goldberg Playwrights Workshop Fellow at the Lark, and a 2019 NYSCA/NYFA Artist Fellow. She has attended numerous residencies, including the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center, the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation, PLAYA Summer Lake, and the Ragdale Foundation. Rae served as the Writers' Assistant on both FX Networks' FOSSE/VERDON and Apple+'s shows Schmigadoon and IF/THEN. She is also one of the two authors of the Climate Storytelling Playbook, a writing guide for climate change stories published by Good Energy. She lives in Los Angeles with her cat, Black Cat. EJ Baker (they/them) i As creative director, EJ talks about the unique color palette they chose for the Good Energy website. They explain why you will not find a spot of green anywhere! They are a co-founder of Maybe Ventures, an art and strategy collective focused on envisioning more just, sustainable, and beautiful new worlds. EJ's work has been featured in Fast Company, Variety, Typewolf and Fonts in Use. Hailing from the forests of upstate New York, they now live amongst the urban cottontails and sidewalk dandelions of Somerville, MA.  Dig Deeper Queer Communities Often Left Out of Disaster Planning, Research Shows on KQED Out 4 Sustainability #Qready 72 hour LGBTQ+ check list Climate Justice Must Include All Women from Atmos.earth Iranti is a Johannesburg-based media-advocacy organisation which advocates for the rights of LGBTI+ persons, with specific focus on lesbian, transgender (including gender non-conforming) and intersex persons in Africa. Iranti works within a human rights framework raising issues on gender identities, and sexuality, through the strategic use of multimedia storytelling, research and activism. Just transition in South Africa: the case for a gender just approach by Nokwanda Maseko (TIPS) It Doesn't Have to be This Way, an LGBTQ+ climate novel by South African author Alistair Mackay. Read the interview with the author in Scaffold Culture.  LGBTQ+ short radio plays about climate change. Bigger Love and Mentoring Session #4 Unemployment and sustainable livelihoods: Just Transition interventions in the face of inequality by Nokwanda Maseko (TIPS) “Queer and Present Danger”: The LGBTQ+ Community Adapts to Climate Change. America Adapts podcast interview with Leo Goldsmith and Dr. Michael Mendez CCR Episode 59 Tykee James and Black Birders Week Understanding Non-Binary People: How to Be Respectful and Supportive from National Center for Transgender Equality Good News Report Leo Goldsmith tells us about QReady, a new resource created by Out for Sustainability (Out4S.) Qready began as a disaster-preparedness packing list specific for the LGBTQ+ community, which you can access below. They are now planning to expand the program to provide multi-scale offerings for individuals, organizations, and disaster professionals to foster the resilience of LGBTQ+ communities, with a focus on the needs of queer and trans Black and Indigenous people of color (QTBIPOC). This program expansion was developed by Vanessa Raditz through a multi-year fellowship with Out4S and serves as the official Qready Project Director. Vanessa is also the director of Out4S' first fiscally-sponsored project: “Fire & Flood: Queer Resilience in the era of Climate Change”. The completion of this project is the first step of Out for Sustainability's expanded Qready initiative! We always welcome your thoughts, questions, suggestions, and recommendations for the show. Leave a vall our listener voicemail line: (619) 512-9646. +1 if calling from outside the USA that number again. (619) 512-9646. You can hear Citizens' Climate Radio on: iTunes Spotify SoundCloud Podbean Stitcher Radio Northern Spirit Radio PlayerFM TuneIn Radio Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens' Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.  

Citizens Climate Radio
LGBTQ+ Responses to Climate Change

Citizens Climate Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 119:44


Speaking with five different guests, host, Peterson Toscano, takes a deep dive to explore how climate change and extreme weather affect lesiban, gay, bisexual, transgender, gender non-binary, and queer (LGBTQ+) people. Leo Goldsmith (he/him) is one of the co-authors of Queer and Present Danger: Understanding the Disparate Impacts of Disasters on LGBTQ+ Communities. Together with Dr. Michael Mendez, Assistant Professor of Environmental Planning and Policy at the University of California, Irvine Vanessa Raditz from Out in Sustainability who is a PhD student at the University of Georgia, they researched the unique vulnerabilities of this community in disaster relief; the myth of gay affluence; how faith-based groups have a history of discriminatory practices in disaster relief; how cohesive is the LGBTQ community and how race is a problem even in LGBTQ groups. Leo also provides practical ways community members and leaders can build stronger, more resilient LGBTQ+ communities that can bounce back from extreme weather events. Nokwanda Maseko (she/her/they) is a South African economist who identifies as a Queer Black person. As senior economist at Trade and Industrial Policy Strategies, she has written position papers about what a just transition can look like, especially for women and the large sector of the Black South African population who because of unemployment and informal employment are not often part of the conversations around just transition. Isaias Herandez (he/him) aka Queer Brown Vegan was born in Los Angeles, California, also known as Tongva Land. As someone who grew up in a community that faced environmental injustices, Isaias developed an interest to learn about his environment. Living in Section 8 affordable housing, using food stamps growing up, and witnessing pollution affect his body. Isaias turned his anger and sadness to becoming an environmental educator. He earned a B.S. in Environmental Science at the University of California, Berkeley. He works on a variety of diversity inclusion work in environmental spaces, academic research, and creative work. Isaias' work is centered on environmental justice with a lens of localization. Isaias works as a full-time content creator and public speaker on QueerBrownVegan. The Art House EJ Baker (they/them) and Rae Binstock (she/her) tell us about Good Energy Stories, a story consultancy for the age of climate change. Their mission is to inspire, support, and accelerate stories in scripted TV and film that reflect the world we live in now–and help us envision a better tomorrow. They talk about the kind of stories and approaches to storytelling that move audiences to feel empathy for those suffering an enthusiasm for solutions that make the world a better place. Good News Report Leo Goldsmith tells us about QReady, a new resource created by Out for Sustainability (Out4S.) Qready began as a disaster-preparedness packing list specific for the LGBTQ+ community, which you can access below. They are now planning to expand the program to provide multi-scale offerings for individuals, organizations, and disaster professionals to foster the resilience of LGBTQ+ communities, with a focus on the needs of queer and trans Black and Indigenous people of color (QTBIPOC). This program expansion was developed by Vanessa Raditz through a multi-year fellowship with Out4S and serves as the official Qready Project Director. Vanessa is also the director of Out4S' first fiscally-sponsored project: “Fire & Flood: Queer Resilience in the era of Climate Change”. The completion of this project is the first step of Out for Sustainability's expanded Qready initiative! We always welcome your thoughts, questions, suggestions, and recommendations for the show. Leave a message on our listener voicemail line: (619) 512-9646. +1

BETTER with Mark Brand
Rhett Butler - DEFENDING NATURE

BETTER with Mark Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 56:49


Rhett Butler is an award-winning journalist whose reporting is actively saving rainforests. I met him at a climate conference in Sun Valley, Idaho, and immediately felt pulled to the sense of hope and action that exists in his work as the founder and CEO of Mongabay—a non-profit Conservation & Environmental Science news platform that has been raising human awareness of both wild lands and wildlife for 20+ years.  “I didn't have a big vision,” he said. “I just achieved little things along the way. Then you wake up 20 years later and…”  I jumped in to finish his sentence because Rhett is humble, but his work is not. The power of the information he's gathered has impacted the livelihood of our planet in profound ways.  His platform, Mongabay, is special for so many reasons, but one, in particular, is that it allows other outlets to use its information, its storytelling, research, data, science, all for free—and, in that act, Mongabay has successfully aided in the preservation of precious ecosystems and changed the very fate of our planet more than once.  This episode is a double-triple listen in that it gives us tangible mental health tools that can actively turn our climate despair into the hope we need to create planet-saving action.  It's also a visual listen. We get to see inside the very real threat environmental defenders, like Rhett and his team, experience globally. You'll hear stories that will make the hair on your forearms spiderweb all the way up, with visuals that take you into the environments he protects and then back with information to armor you for the fight of preserving our existence here on Earth.  We get real on the issues and talk misinformation (the WHY and the WHO) and then dig into what each of us can do to level up our information intake in a way that protects us all from mistruths.  We get all of this alongside the very real hope that rises up when we dedicate ourselves to local acts of change. And if you know me, if you know this show, you know one thing: solutions are my love language.  Let's go. WORKS:- founder and CEO of Mongabay—a non-profit Conservation & Environmental Science news platform… with over 20 years dedicated to raising awareness and appreciation for wild lands and wildlife- Editor-in-chief and CEO of Mongabay- founder, WildMadagascar.org, a site that highlights the spectacular cultural and biological richness of Madagascar and reports on environmental news for the Indian Ocean island nation- co-founder of Tropical Conservation Science (acquired by SAGE Publications in August 2016), an open-access academic journal that aims to provide opportunities for scientists in developing countries to publish their research- co-founder, Tropical Forest Network, a social network in the San Francisco Bay Area broadly interested in tropical forest conservation and ecology-  information source for The Economist, BBC, CNN, CBS, NBC, Fox News, National Geographic, the Wall Street Journal, Fortune Magazine, Business Week, Bloomberg, the Discovery Channel, Animal Planet, Reuters, Voice of America, the Associated Press, the San Francisco Chronicle, the L.A. Times, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and Forbes, among many other media outlets Tools You'll Get from This Episode:- Tips to support your mental health in the face of climate despair - Critical thinking tools that help us understand how we've been misinformed and why- Insight into how corporations purposefully intend to mislead us for their capital gain- Awareness of the very real threats that journalists and advocates defending nature experience- Insights into what drives global change (and what local action to take)- Stories to inspire sustained action    LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT:
BETTER is recorded on the unceded and ancestral territory of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ and Sḵwx̱wú7mesh speaking peoples, the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), and səlilwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations, and has been stewarded by them since time immemorial.  BETTER with Mark Brand is produced by Pamela Rothenberg of I HEAR YOU STUDIOS and Adam Karch with Orbyt Media

Town Hall Ohio
Conservation Priorities in Ohio

Town Hall Ohio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 48:09


The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)has announced a second round of funding through the Environmental Quality Incentives (EQIP) Cover Crop Initiative. The program provides an investment of $38 million to 11 states, including Ohio, to help agricultural producers mitigate climate change through the adoption of cover crops. This second round of funding expands program eligibility to all state producers. On this Our Ohio Weekly, we will learn more about this program and the many other conservation initiatives being prioritized by NRCS. 00:00 - Ohio's new State Resource Conservationist with NRCS, Eric Schwab talks about the natural resource priorities NRCS has in the state, and how partners and producers have made a measurable impact. 16:50 - Cathann Kress, vice president for agricultural administration and dean of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences talks about her reappointment to the post and Delaware County Farm Bureau member Kelly Harsh discusses her reelection to the National Corn Growers Association Corn Board. 23:50 - On this “To the Beat of Agriculture” we continue to spotlight Ohio Farm Bureau state trustees. This week we'll hear from the District 3 representative for the Ohio Farm Bureau. She'll share her memories from growing up on a dairy farm and how she eventually transitioned the farm to beef cattle. 32:20 - Benefit in the Barn is coming up on August 20th. The event, hosted by Delaware and Union County Farm Bureaus, brings the community together to raise awareness and funds for neighbors in need. Doug Loudenslager has the details. 42:20 - Can you trim a tree overhanging the property line? Who is liable if a tree from a neighboring property falls and damages your property? Ohio Farm Bureau Policy Counsel Leah Curtis answers the most common questions about Ohio laws regarding trees and property rights.

RFD Today
RFD Today July 28

RFD Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 53:01


Thursday's show features a conversation with Dr. Sarah Low. She is the new head of the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences at the University of Illinois. We also talk energy market stuff with GROWMARK's Scott Wilson. We finish the show with an update from the Illinois Corn Growers Association.

Transformers | The sustainability change makers
Johan Rockström (part 1) | A minute to midnight: Reversing environmental tipping points

Transformers | The sustainability change makers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 27:02


Professor Johan Rockström is the Director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research and a Professor at the Institute of Earth and Environmental Science at Potsdam University. Meet Professor Johan Rockström in 3 programmes: –  A minute to midnight: Reversing environmental tipping points. – 8 years left to transform the future of humanity or destabilize … Johan Rockström (part 1) | A minute to midnight: Reversing environmental tipping points Read More »

The Academic Minute
Evan Larson, University of Wisconsin Platteville – Bringing People into the Wilderness

The Academic Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 2:30


How we think of certain spaces may need to be reimagined. Evan Larson, professor of environmental sciences & society at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville, looks at one example. Evan Larson (he/him/his) is a Professor of Environmental Sciences & Society at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville, a primarily undergraduate institution in the beautiful rolling hills of the […]

Ohio's Country Journal & Ohio Ag Net
Ohio's Country Journal & Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 262 | Dean's Steer Show - Good Steers, Good Cause

Ohio's Country Journal & Ohio Ag Net

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 61:37


Matt, Dusty, and Dale sit down with Dean Cathann Kress, who is the Dean of the College of Food, Agriculture, and Environmental Science at The Ohio State University to talk about the Dean Charity Steer Show at the Ohio State Fair. Dale also catches up with Kirt Walker, CEO of Nationwide, to discuss his role in the Dean Charity Steer Show. The GrowNextGen Staff of the Ohio Soybean Council talk with Dale about their activities at the Ohio State Fair. Matt then chats with Braden Moore who is a 4-H Dad in Fairfield County and Delaney Moore who is a 4-H and FFA Member also in Fairfield County about the importance of showing livestock amid growing input cost. All this and more thanks to AgriGold!    0:00:00 Intro and OCJ/OAN Staff Update 0:25:19 Kirt Walker – CEO Nationwide 0:31:33 GrowNextGen Staff 0:41:43 Braden Moore – 4-H Dad 0:52:14 Delaney Moore – 4-H and FFA Member 1:00:42 Closing

Town Hall Ohio
An Ohio State Fair Preview

Town Hall Ohio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 48:10


After a two-year hiatus, The great Ohio State Fair is back this week! The 167th edition of the fair will have everything that we are used to when it comes to walks through the barn, the iconic butter cow, some deep-fried food on a stick, concerts, music, Smokey Bear and so much more. It is a very busy time for fair manager Virgil Strickler and assistant manager Alicia Shoults, but they take some time to tell us everything we need to know before getting back to the giant slide, sky glide and foods we have never tried. 00:00 - Virgil Stricker, General Manager of the Ohio State Fair and Alicia Shoults, Assistant General Manager give all of the details of what to see and do when you visit the 167th Ohio State Fair, July 27th through August 7th. 23:50 - On this week's “To the Beat of Agriculture”, hear from a man who left his career to work alongside his father-in-law on the farm. Learn how he became involved in Ohio Farm Bureau and the skills he acquired through Farm Bureau's AgriPOWER program. 32:20 - When you are at the Ohio State Fair, you don't want to miss the Land and Living Building, sponsored by Ohio Farm Bureau. This year's State Fair interns, Carlie Cluxton, Raegan Feldner and Jacob Zajkowski share what they have been working on for fairgoers to enjoy. 42:20 - The 2022 Dean's Charity Steer Show will be at The Ohio State Fair on August 2nd. Our Ohio Weekly host Ty Higgins and Ohio Farm Bureau president, Bill Patterson will be participating to raise money for Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Ohio. Cathann Kress vice president for agricultural administration and dean of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences has all the details. Donate to team “Bill and Ty's Excellent Adventure to help generate funds for a very worthy cause. - give.osu.edu/higginspatterson

TNT Radio
Dr Karen Benn on Politically Incorrect - 23 July 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 55:49


GUEST OVERVIEW: Dr Karen Benn holds a Bachelor degree, Masters degree and PhD in Environmental Science (and Sociology for her PhD). She has a post-graduate degree in Deafness Studies to work with hearing impaired adults. Karen has worked for a Green NGO (Greening Australia), and has also worked for 5 State Government Departments (Dept of Ed VIC., Dept of Agriculture VIC., Melbourne Water (Sewerage) VIC., EPA NSW, EPA QLD).

Historia de Aragón
Ágora - 22/07/2022 - Una batería con forma de flor imita el ciclo de vida de una planta

Historia de Aragón

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 15:40


Una batería con raíz, tallo y hojas que, a través de su sistema de fluidos, es capaz de imitar el ciclo de vida de una planta y generar energía. Así es la batería biodegradable con forma de flor y basada en papel que ha sido creada en el Instituto de Microelectrónica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM) del Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), y de la que ahora se publican resultados en Energy & Environmental Science. Lo cuentan en Ágora Marina Navarro, científica del Instituto de Microelectrónica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM), primera autora de la publicación, y Juan Pablo Esquivel, Investigador Ikerbasque del Centro Vasco de Materiales, Aplicaciones y Nanoestructuras.

Principled
Listen again | Trust is at stake, and other insights from Edelman's 2022 Trust Barometer

Principled

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 44:20


What you'll learn in this podcast episode Trust is foundational to business and society, so much so that the global public relations firm Edelman releases an extensive annual survey covering whom and what the public trusts. However, their 2022 Edelman Trust Barometer reveals a concerning insight: people are increasingly more inclined to distrust than trust. In this episode of the Principled Podcast, host Emily Miner explores key findings from the 2022 report, “A Cycle of Distrust,” with David M. Bersoff, Head of Global Thought Leadership Research at Edelman Data and Intelligence. Listen in as the two discuss what drives trust, why public trust in certain institutions is eroding, and how businesses can help rebuild trust moving forward.   Additional resources: Get a copy of the 2022 Edelman Trust Barometer. Read our blog post on takeaways from this year's report.   Featured guest: David M. Bersoff, Ph.D. David oversees Edelman Data & Intelligence's (DxI) global Thought Leadership research including the annual Trust Barometer and Brand Trust studies. In this capacity, he is responsible for questionnaire development, leading all data analysis and insight gleaning activities, and developing new frameworks for understanding trust, credibility, and consumer-brand relationships. Prior to joining Edelman DxI, Dr. Bersoff spent 18 years as a consumer insight and marketing strategy consultant at The Futures Company. In his last 5 years with the organization, he served as its Chief Insights Officer and was a member of its global board of directors. Prior to entering the consulting world, David spent 12 years engaged in social science research at various Ivy League institutions, including 4 years as an assistant professor of social psychology and research methodology at the University of Pennsylvania.   Featured Host: Emily Miner Emily Miner is the Director of LRN's Ethics & Compliance Advisory practice. She counsels executive leadership teams on how to actively shape and manage their ethical culture through deep quantitative and qualitative understanding and engagement. A skilled facilitator, Emily emphasizes co-creative, bottom-up, and data-driven approaches to foster ethical behavior and inform program strategy. Emily has led engagements with organizations in the healthcare, technology, manufacturing, energy, professional services, and education industries. Emily co-leads LRN's ongoing flagship research on E&C program effectiveness and is a thought leader in the areas of organizational culture, leadership, and E&C program impact. Prior to joining LRN, Emily applied her behavioral science expertise in the environmental sustainability sector, working with non-profits and several New England municipalities; facilitated earth science research in academia; and contributed to drafting and advancing international climate policy goals. Emily has a Master of Public Administration in Environmental Science and Policy from Columbia University and graduated summa cum laude from the University of Florida with a degree in Anthropology.

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast
The many uses of melanin

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 58:16 Very Popular


For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Dyoplosaurus, links from Maria McNamara, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Dyoplosaurus-Episode-399/Join us at www.patreon.com/iknowdino for dinosaur requests, bonus content, ad-free episodes, and more.Dinosaur of the day Dyoplosaurus, an ankylosaurid that lived in the Late Cretaceous in what is now Alberta, Canada (in the Dinosaur Park Formation).Interview with Maria McNamara, a paleobiologist and professor of paleontology at the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences at University College Cork. Follow her on twitter @MariaMcN_palaeoSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19 wastewater data available online

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 4:19


Wastewater testing for Covid-19 has shown a spike in the last two weeks due to the BA.5 variant. Earlier this week Dr Ashley Bloomfield estimated that half of all positive Covid-19 cases were going unreported, making wastewater testing one of our most valuable metrics. Dr Brent Gilpin is from the Institute of Environmental Science and Research, which has developed a new public dashboard for testing data. He spoke to Susie Ferguson.

Finding Genius Podcast
How Environmental And Societal Health Can Be Preserved By Combating Air Pollution

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 30:18


Here on the podcast to contribute her knowledge on climate science is Eri Saikawa. Eri is an Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Emory University. She primarily focuses her research on how emissions affect humans and the environment, and what economic policies may be able to reduce this problem. Join us now to explore: The impact of plastic burning on human health in the global south.  The role scientists play in working with governments to tackle climate change via economic policy. The importance of raising awareness about the damaging effects of emissions.  How agricultural emissions contribute to poor air quality. How can scientists work with governments to take action against air pollution? Eri Saikawa and researchers like her are committed to finding innovative ways to tackle this issue and others like it.  Click here to learn more about Eri Saikawa and her work! Episode also available on Apple Podcast: http://apple.co/30PvU9C

Get Out Alive
Ep 31:The Truth About Hyenas (feat. Christine Wilkinson)

Get Out Alive

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 78:46


We are joined by Christine Wilkinson (PhD in Environmental Science, Policy and Management from UC Berkeley and current Postdoc at UC Berkeley, NatGeo Explorer and Co-founder of Black Mammalogists Week) to discuss all things hyena - what kinds are there? How often do they attack humans? And what's a pseudo-penis? Discover the answers to those questions and many more in this fact-filled episode.Resources mentioned in episode:Series of attacks in Ushetu district of Tanzania: https://www.aa.com.tr/en/africa/hungry-hyenas-terrorize-villagers-in-tanzania/2465592Hyena Man of Harar NatGeo article: Meet The Man Who Lives With Hyenas AZA Accreditations: https://assets.speakcdn.com/assets/2332/aza-accreditation-standards.pdfblackmammalogists.comChristine's website: scrappynaturalist.comChristine's Tiktok: @thescrappynaturalistChristine's Twitter: @ScrapNaturalistChristine's Instagram: @christine_eleanorCover Photo Cred: Allie RichardsonOUR MERCH STORE IS LIVE! Support the show by shopping at www.getoutalivepodcast.com/shopFollow us on Instagram,  Facebook, and check out our website GetOutAlivePodcast.com and join us on Patreon!You can find Ashley @TheAngryOlogist on Twitter and Nick loves you all but loves being off of social media more.Support the show

Upstream
How Degrowth Will Save the World with Jason Hickel (In Conversation)

Upstream

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 58:10


It may not come as a surprise to most of you to hear that capitalism is the root cause of climate change. But if we unpack this a little bit, we see that it's a specific component of capitalism that's mostly responsible: the need for exponential and perpetual expansion. Growth isn't just a byproduct of capitalism, it's an imperative — an imperative to which we are all hostage. That's why, according to our guest in this week's Conversation, unless the climate movement centers degrowth in its strategies and policy proposals, nothing will fundamentally change. Jason Hickel is an economic anthropologist, Professor at the Institute for Environmental Science and Technology at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, and author most recently of Less is More: How Degrowth will Save the World. We first spoke with Jason five years ago on his book The Divide: A Brief Guide to Global Inequality and its Solutions, and then again in 2020 on international capitalism during the pandemic. In this conversation, Jason explains why 'growthism' is so problematic for our health and the health of the planet. He talks us through alternatives to growth, and shares how we could realistically unhook from perpetual expansion and transition to a post-growth, post-capitalist economic system where we are all living healthier, happier lives on a thriving planet. Thank you to Mazzy Star for the intermission music. Upstream theme music was composed by Robert Raymond. Support for this episode was provided by the Guerrilla Foundation and by listeners like you. Upstream is a labor of love — we couldn't keep this project going without the generosity of our listeners and fans. Please consider chipping in a one-time or recurring donation at www.upstreampodcast.org/support Also, if your organization wants to sponsor one of our upcoming episodes, we have a number of sponsorship packages available. Find out more at upstreampodcast.org/sponsorship For more from Upstream, visit www.upstreampodcast.org and follow us on social media: twitter.com/UpstreamPodcast Instagram.com/upstreampodcast You can also subscribe to us on Apple Podcast and Spotify: Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/upstream/id1082594532 Spotify: spoti.fi/2AryXHs

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON
Most Crops Here - Decent. Europe - Not So - Hineberg

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 50:00


Most farms you visit probably have a dog.  Some dogs are greeters and companions - while others actually contribute by working for the farm.  Allison Lund talks to Lori Perry from the Working Stock Dog Association about how much work goes into training a viable work dog. Wisconsin corn and soybean growers aren't real thrilled with their crops so far this year - and apparently, neither are our WI Strawberry Growers.  Darrel Schoenberg hosted the WI Berry Growers Summer Field Day and says he was hearing stories from all corners of the state on the poor performance in patches. UW-River Falls is starting to anticipate fall enrollment in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences.  Dean Dale Gallenberg says while numbers may be a little low right now, they can change quickly. John Hineberg, market advisor with Total Farm Marketing in West Bend joins Pam Jahnke.  Most crops across the United States are looking fairly good - and that's wonderful news considering how heat is impacting the European crop.  He also talks about the swings that have been witnessed in the dairy complex, despite reasonable demand in the marketplace.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The FizzicsEd Podcast
STEM in Environmental Education with Meridith Ebbs

The FizzicsEd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 43:36


Want to incorporate STEM into environmental education? Meridith Ebbs is someone to guide you through this! Meridith is a highly experienced teacher with a real passion for teaching students in natural environments whilst using different technologies. Hosted by Ben Newsome from Fizzics Education About Meridith Ebbs Meridith is an experienced teacher with a background in Education, Environmental Science and Digital Technologies. She is currently exploring applications for STEM and technology while learning outside and applications for STEM in low-cost real-world projects. She facilitates the hashtags #STEMnNature and #STEMinTheWorld on social media and shares knowledge and ideas using the handles @iMerinet and @MakeCreateEducate  In the past, Meridith worked for 4 years as the CSER NSW Project Officer on the Digital Technologies project with the University of Adelaide. Meridith has experience teaching students K-10 and she is an experienced facilitator of adult workshops, with experience working in both school and corporate environments. She has worked as an instructional designer documenting computer systems and creating training materials. Meridith is accredited as a Makey Makey ambassador, an Apple Teacher, an Apple Teacher in Swift Playground and Sphero Lead Educator.  Contact Meridith https://withkoji.com/@iMerinet  - one link for all contacts https://www.instagram.com/imerinet/ https://www.facebook.com/makecreateeducate https://twitter.com/iMerinet https://www.youtube.com/c/MeridithEbbsiMerinet/videos https://makecreateeducate.blogspot.com/  More information about Meridith https://imerinet.weebly.com/  Resources for more information What is Citizen Science - https://citizenscience.org.au/10-principles-of-citizen-science/  Project Finder https://www.csiro.au/en/education/get-involved/citizen-science  https://citizenscience.org.au/ala-project-finder/ https://biocollect.ala.org.au/acsa#isCitizenScience Projects mentionedInternational: Great Southern Bioblitz 2022 https://www.greatsouthernbioblitz.org/about-1  iNaturalist https://www.inaturalist.org/ Backyard Bioblitz https://www.backyardbio.net/ Australian: Frog ID Project https://www.frogid.net.au/  Dead Tree Project ​​https://biocollect.ala.org.au/acsa/project/index/77285a13-e231-49e8-b212-660c66c74bac About the FizzicsEd podcastHosted by Ben Newsome from Fizzics Education With interviews with leading science educators and STEM thought leaders, this science education podcast is about highlighting different ways of teaching kids within and beyond the classroom. It's not just about educational practice & pedagogy, it's about inspiring new ideas & challenging conventions of how students can learn about their world! https://www.fizzicseducation.com.au/ Know an educator who'd love this STEM podcast episode?  Share it!The FizzicsEd podcast is a member of the Australian Educators Online Network (AEON )http://www.aeon.net.au/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Will We Make It Out Alive?
S3E4 - Plugging Away at the South Salish Lowland Prairies

Will We Make It Out Alive?

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 53:14


Welcome to Episode 4, Plugging away at the South Salish Lowland Prairies, all about conservation programs with the WA Sustainability in Prisons Project. In this episode we will learn a little about the umbrella Conservation Programs with Kelli Bush, and then we chat with Carl Elliot about the Conservation Nursery Program.This season is all about the Sustainability in Prisons Project (otherwise referred to as SPP), how they bring education, nature and training into the prisons to reduce recidivism and protect and enhance our environment. We now know that this season is at least 6 episodes long and it still could be 7 episodes long. In the first episode we got into how it all started; Episode 2 provided a background on the prison system and an introduction to SPP. Episode 3 was all about partnerships, which is really what SPP is, a network of partners working to bring education and nature into the prison system.According to an article “Conservation Projects in Prison,”“The pace of habitat destruction and loss of biological diversity globally exceeds the current capacity of societies to restore functioning ecosystems. Working with prison systems to engage inmates in habitat conservation and ecological science is an innovative approach to increase our ability to reestablish habitat and at-risk species, while simultaneously providing people in custody with opportunities for reciprocal restoration, education, therapeutic activities, safer conditions, and lower costs of imprisonment. We present the benefits of working with prisons to conduct habitat conservation through nursery production of plants and captive rearing of animals, combined with educational experiences...”Interviewees this EpisodeKelli Bush is the co-director of the Sustainability in Prisons Project. She helps bring nature, science and environmental education into prisons in Washington. She also leads staff from The Evergreen State College that coordinate programs in the prisons. She has a Bachelor's degree in Agriculture Ecology from The Evergreen State College. Carl Elliot is the Program Manager of the Conservation Nursery Programs with the Sustainability in Prisons Project. Carl has a B.S. and a Masters of Environmental Science from The Evergreen State College. Prior to his work with the Sustainability in Prison Project, he had over twenty years of experience in horticulture and sustainable agriculture. He was a founding board member of the Seattle Youth Garden Works, which trains homeless children and other at-risk youth in skills for employment and healthy living. He began working for SPP in 2011 as the Conservation and Restoration Coordinator and has expanded the Conservation Nursery Program from one to four prisons in Washington.SPP Conservation ProgramsIn this episode we chat with Kelli Bush about the overarching Conservation Program, its goals and some of the different types of programs. She also shares a little about some conservation programs on the horizon; like the Sagebrush in Prisons Project, which grows sagebrush in prisons to help restore sagebrush habitat. We get off on a little tangent, but it leads us to talking about another potential partnership with UC Davis Center for Community and Citizen Science.Next we talk to Carl Elliot about the Conservation Nursery Programs. He starts with some background in the South Salish Lowland Prairies (say that five times fast!) and the work over the last 20 years or so to restore this habitat. He also shares how he got his start with SPP and why he was ultimately the ideal candidate to help further develop the Conservation Nursery Program (spoiler alert, it was because he was not just looking at it as cheap prison labor). He also talks about what is grown at the nurseries and why. He also shares about how biological technicians participate in the program, including a discussion about how ideas are shared and how he fosters and encourages new ideas from all people involved. He shares some of the benefits of participating in the program; technicians are learning, they can get college credit and in the end those things ultimately benefit our communities. He also shares about his personal experience working with a program in a prison and what working with incarcerated individuals is like.“I rarely meet an incarcerated individual that can not add something to the conservation community.” -Carl ElliotCarl provides a solid foundation to the restoration of South Salish Lowland Prairies. This includes discussion about some of the locations of remaining prairie near Olympia, WA.Wolf Haven is working with many partners to help restore 36 acres of Mima Mound Prairie found on their property.JBLM includes the largest remaining intact Prairie in the South Salish Basin (which happens to be a live artillery range). The artillery impact area at JBLM contains some of the highest quality prairies in the Pacific Northwest and some of the few remaining natural populations of Taylor's checkerspot butterflies. Out of all of the glacial outwash prairie that previously existed there is only 5% remaining and of that, JBLM is home to about 95%!!!Glacial Heritage Preserve, a 1,134-acre preserve, including 650 acres of grassland, located in Thurston County south of Olympia, Washington. In 1988, Thurston County purchased the land, recognizing the potential for restoring several native ecosystems on the variable site. The Nature Conservancy began managing the land in 1995, a role that was taken over by the Center for Natural Lands Management in 2014. Today, CNLM sees to all aspects of maintenance on this private preserve: managing controlled burns, removing invasive plants by pulling or herbicide use, and reintroducing native plants through seeding and planting. They open up the prairie each spring to the public for Prairie Appreciation Days.Did you know that there's a Prairie Landowner Guide for Western Washington?!Western Washington Prairies BackgroundDid you know? Prairies are one of the rarest ecosystems in Washington State! Only 3% of the original prairies remain.Prairies west of the Cascade Mountains were created by glaciers. When the glaciers started to recede about 15,000 years ago, they left behind dry gravelly soils perfect for prairies. These prairies were a natural landscape habitat in this area during the earlier dryer and warmer climate. Between 6000 and 5000 years ago the pollen signature shifted to a wetter and cooler climate, resulting in a natural plant succession that shifted the ecosystem to oak and then Douglas fir dominated forests. However some of the prairies persisted and this has been attributed to the Coast Salish tribes, who likely grew to depend on the prairies and so they continued to maintain them through burning. This type of landscape management was used to maintain prairie areas from Vancouver Island south to Eugene. The prairies in the South Salish Lowlands were traditional use areas for the Nisqually, Squaxin Island, Upper Chehalis and Cowlitz tribes. Prairies in the South Salish Lowlands have faced many ecosystem pressures. Current restoration efforts are as varied as the sites they are trying to restore. Typical methods include invasive species removal methods (mowing, herbicide, hand pulling), prescribed burning, and native plant restoration (seeding, plugging, planting). Adaptive management is the name of the game as they try to improve their restoration techniques. Until Next Time…WE HOP TO SEE YOU NEXT EPISODE!Thank you so much for joining us this episode! We hope you learned more about the SPP Conservation Program and the Conservation Nursery Programs and how they impact our communities and our environment. We think the biggest take away from this episode is that bringing nature and education into prisons can be rewarding for all involved, from the individuals, to the ecosystem, to the community. Maybe most importantly, these programs often change the way that people view themselves. We also want to reiterate that these programs are really about bringing education, nature and training into prisons. We hope you also learned more about prairie ecosystems and some of SPP's conservation and restoration efforts both for the prairies themselves and for endangered species like the Taylor's checkerspot butterfly. Carl also shared what it's like to grow plants in a conservation nursery and what it looks like to bring this kind of science and education into the prison. This episode showcases what a big partnership with SPP might look like. While this might not be the right fit for every organization, it certainly seems to be very beneficial for those who have a big idea about bringing science and nature into prisons.Please join us on August 2nd for our next episode which will be all about the SPP Conservation Partnership for the Taylor's Checkerspot Butterfly Recovery Program. We will let Kelli rest for one episode and chat with Mary Linders (again) and introduce Liz Louie, former butterfly technician. Please don't forget to rate, review and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts (like Tune In, Castbox Himalaya, iheartradio, etc). Please let us know what you think in the comments below or on our Facebook page.

EWN - Engineering With Nature
A Conversation about Leadership and EWN with Colonel Gant, Commander of the USACE South Pacific Division.

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 41:11


Leadership and vision are essential to implementing Engineering With Nature to create landscape-scale climate resilience. We're focusing on leadership and EWN in conversations with two inspirational USACE Division leaders – Colonel (P) Antoinette Gant, Commander, and Division Engineer of the South Pacific Division (SPD), and Brigadier General Jason Kelly, Commander of the South Atlantic Division (SAD).    In Episode 6, Host Sarah Thorne, and Todd Bridges, Senior Research Scientist for Environmental Science with the US Army Corps of Engineers and the National Lead of the Engineering With Nature® Program are talking with COL Gant about the challenges and opportunities facing the South Pacific Division, and how EWN and leadership are being applied to meet those needs.    COL Gant grew up as the child of two teachers with the dream of being a chemist, until she met Patricia Sullivan, one of her mother's students and a USACE employee, who introduced her to civil engineering. “It was just mind blowing to me what you could do as a civil engineer, the impacts that you could actually have on your community, and how you could change things. My mother always told me, ‘be the change you want to see.' So, I decided that I would try my hand at civil engineering.” COL Gant joined the Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) as a way to pay for college and has served in the Army for 28 years. She has risen through the ranks and is slated to be promoted to Brigadier General soon. One of the ways she pays it forward is by being a strong advocate for STEM/STEAM—Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics—and speaking to young people about her journey whenever she has the opportunity.    COL Gant leads the South Pacific Division, which covers a lot of territory—Sacramento, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Albuquerque Districts—and has a diverse and complex set of missions and projects. As Todd notes: “The challenges—and opportunities—that we face today with respect to climate change are unprecedented and there are few places where this is more evident than in the West, where people have brought significant changes to the landscape (for example see EWN Podcast S3E8 about changes in agriculture and water use in California). COL Gant agrees: “I always say climate change is real. The rate of change is really accelerating. Where we used to see a hurricane every once in a while, we're seeing them almost every year. Wildfires are the same. How do you prepare differently for the same wildfire, the rising tides? These are all things that we are looking to design and implement, adaptive and equitable solutions that will work over time, and work for everyone.” As we learn in our conversation, environmental justice plays a prominent role in COL Gant's thinking about these challenges and in her decision making about solutions.   We discuss how EWN provides solutions that can produce a broader array of benefits than traditional engineering approaches, while supporting opportunities for substantive engagement with communities, including vulnerable populations and under-represented communities. As Todd explains, infrastructure must be a source of service and benefit to our communities: “What we're seeking to do with EWN is to diversify that benefit. So, when we make an investment in infrastructure—say a flood risk management project in a river that runs through a community like the Guadalupe River in San Jose—we are intentional, purposeful, about looking for opportunities to diversify the value that can be created for that community in that project.” He adds, “there's so much evidence emerging in the scientific literature showing how important access to nature is, in particular for marginalized or disadvantaged communities.”   COL Gant agrees. Under her command, the South Pacific Division is taking a strong leadership role: “We're making a commitment to be the first Division that is a Proving Ground for Engineering With Nature. We're working with our Districts to be on the forefront of incorporating EWN and environmental justice principles in everything that we do. It's not just an afterthought. It's something that is incorporated from the beginning.” She explains that this means changing the way SPD does business and changing the way SPD staff work with partners, like the California Department of Water Resources (see S2E7 on working with the CA DWR), and other states and communities to build the relationships needed to produce dynamic teams that solve problems in new and innovative ways.   These efforts are being recognized by top USACE leaders and COL Gant says she is getting a lot of support from other leaderships in USACE: “That's one of the positives today. USACE—in support of the Administration's initiatives—understands that projects can't just be about a benefit ratio number. We have to look at the other items of benefit that a project brings to a community, then say ‘yes, these are the type of projects that we need to do.'” She notes that recently, the USACE's Chief of Engineers, Lieutenant General Spellmon, toured projects in the San Francisco District. District staff were able to show him the benefits of EWN, for example, how flood risk management projects can provide opportunities for recreation, biking and walking in nature. COL Gant relayed LTG Spellmon's enthusiasm for EWN after seeing the benefits of the approach first-hand, “He said: ‘You guys already are out here doing these things. We've got to figure out how to get everybody else to see how this is actually working—creating environments where people are willing to lean on each other, where they're willing to learn, where they're willing to think outside the box.'”   Todd agrees, underscoring the importance of COL Gant and the Division's leadership on EWN: “I'm so grateful and excited about the leadership that COL Gant and her team are taking on, owning EWN. As you listen to COL Gant talk about it—and her team members too—there's such a maturity in SPD in terms of what is involved in leading this kind of transformation and innovation and practice. It's clear to us that when you're doing something important and fundamental and substantive like this, you don't do it by yourself. You do it with others and partnership is the key to being able to fully realize the power and benefit that can be achieved from EWN. I look so forward to engaging and supporting the South Pacific Division in any way that we can. It's such an important opportunity and, under COL Gant's command, they're poised to do great things.”   Related Links EWN Website ERDC Website Todd Bridges at EWN Todd Bridges at LinkedIn COL Gant at USACE South Pacific Division COL Gant at LinkedIn USACE South Pacific Division   Patricia Sullivan – Associate Director ERDC Ginkgo Bioworks Cultivate Fellowship: Growing the Black STEM Community Upper Guadalupe River Flood Risk Management Project South San Francisco Bay Project California Department of Water Resources   EWN Podcast S2E7: EWN Collaboration with the California Department of Water Resources EWN Podcast S3E8: The Dreamt Land – California Water, Sustainability, and EWN

EWN - Engineering With Nature
A Conversation about Leadership and EWN with Brigadier General Kelly, Commander of the USACE South Atlantic Division

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 39:45


Leadership and vision are essential to implementing Engineering With Nature to create landscape-scale climate resilience. We're focusing on leadership and EWN in conversations with two inspirational USACE Division leaders – Colonel (P) Antoinette Gant, Commander, and Division Engineer of the South Pacific Division (SPD), and Brigadier General Jason Kelly, Commander of the South Atlantic Division (SAD).    In Episode 7, Host Sarah Thorne and Todd Bridges, Senior Research Scientist for Environmental Science with the US Army Corps of Engineers and the National Lead of the Engineering With Nature® Program are talking with BG Kelly about the challenges facing the South Atlantic Division. From restoration in the Everglades, to deepening the Charleston Harbor, to ongoing flood control initiatives, to disaster preparedness, we're talking about the leadership needed to address landscape-scale challenges in innovative ways and how Engineering With Nature is an important part of infrastructure solutions.    With an education in mathematics and statistics from Georgia Tech, BG Kelly spent the first 20 years of his career as “time in a formation with a rifle and a pistol” leading men and women as soldiers. When he took command of the Norfolk District in 2015, he was unsure if he would be as excited about navigation, recreation, aquatic ecosystem restoration, and regulatory permitting as he had been about preparing soldiers for combat, but he found that he was: “I'm curious by nature, so, this job certainly fits the bill. I come into work every day and have the opportunity to engage subject matter experts, folks that know more—have forgotten more—than I'll learn during my tenure as the Division Commander in SAD. We're all committed. We're all trying to deliver for the nation.” He is driven by curiosity, a desire to collaborate, and a personal quest to become a better communicator: “I strive to better communicate as an ambassador for the great work that's happening in my organization. I'm excited about what we're doing.”   The South Atlantic Division faces many challenges—and opportunities—from hurricanes and impacts from climate change, to moving populations, and a range of issues related to aging infrastructure. The USACE is leading innovation to deliver 21st century engineering and infrastructure solutions that leverage EWN to solve problems and create value. From BG Kelly's perspective, leadership is critical: “I think it's important that the senior most members of our organization lean in. As the senior leader in the South Atlantic Division, I am afforded the opportunity to know the EWN solutions that are available, but that's not always the case for some of the practitioners in the districts. I think it's important that the senior-most leaders get active, specifically with my position as a Major Subordinate Commander, sitting at the nexus of execution in the districts and policy in Washington, DC – rules and tools – trying to make all of that come together so we can do some collateral good. I don't think it happens without that nudge from leaders. Leadership matters.”   Todd agrees: “Hearing leaders talk about, communicate, and message about EWN and innovative approaches, is so important for the vertical team within the Corps, but also to our sponsors and stakeholders and those that we're building things for. They need to hear us talk about what we're trying to do and how we're going to achieve it.”   BG Kelly notes that strengthening communication is being strongly promoted by the Honorable Michael Connor, Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works as one of his ‘lines of effort', along with other factors that directly relate to EWN: “His insistence that we strengthen communications and relationships to solve water resource challenges, is front and center. I try to do that from my perch in Atlanta. His insistence that we modernize our Civil Works programs to better serve the needs of disadvantaged communities means ‘full contact.' We've got to get out and be talking and be active to understand people's needs. His ask that we build innovative climate resilient infrastructure to protect communities and ecosystems brings us right into this space of EWN and incorporating natural and nature-based features. Figuring out how to make these priorities part of all that we're doing is something I'm excited about. Those lines of effort are from our most senior leaders. And they are essential to solving the water resource challenges faced by the USACE.”    SAD's Civil Works program is diverse. It includes commercial navigation, flood and storm damage risk reduction, and ecosystem restoration for ports, navigation channels, and waterways in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands. As BG Kelly notes, “These are places that are critical to our economy, places that are consistently and persistently in the news. Everything we do matters.” He relates a string of challenges, from disaster response in Puerto Rico to Everglades Restoration, to the rebuilding of Tyndall Air Force Base (see EWN Podcast S1E3), to projects in the ports of Savannah, Mobile, Charleston, and Miami, in response to climate change and resilience. “It's an exciting time. We have some complex challenges, and we've got talented folks. Each day, I say thank you for our success—we're winning. But when I say thank you, I'm asking for more. I've got another problem that I need my team to take on. For me, the reality is that we've got more work than time, and time is absolutely not on our side. But I'll tell you, SAD is game.”   As Todd notes, “The Division is waging a different kind of battle that is relevant to our discussion of EWN—from the 20th century engineering approach of trying to conquer nature, to now trying to embrace nature—essentially partnering with nature—by applying EWN principles and natural and nature-based solutions to create infrastructure solutions that enhance community resilience and diversify value. BG Kelly agrees: “I think we've got to reframe our thinking to solve these complex challenges—think about how we can, and quite frankly, should be partnering with nature. One of the things I struggle with is our plan formulation. Our processes don't always lend themselves to that solution set. I think what Mr. Connor has asked us to do in modernizing our Civil Works program is to figure out how to make sure we're valuing these solutions. We have to think through cost sharing requirements for non-structural natural and nature-based features that would encourage communities to do some things differently. It will also encourage our engineers to think about those solutions in a different way.”   Project decision making in USACE is changing. As BG Kelly notes, “I've engaged key stakeholders to alert them that the Army Corps of Engineers is not wedded to only concrete and steel. As a leader I'm trying to telegraph my thinking that we're going to make the decisions that consider natural and nature-based features—ways that we partner with nature. Everything is on the table to solve the challenge.” Todd adds that the USACE Chief of Engineers, Lieutenant General Spellmon, uses an image of the USACE logo as a Castle where the drawbridge is down and the windows are open: “I think that imagery is so good because we need to open up as an organization so that we can co-develop solutions with our partners and with our communities. Some of us are going to be interested in the numbers and the math, and some of us are going to be interested in the bugs and the bunnies. But we can come together in an open process of co-developing solutions.” BG Kelly agrees, noting the diverse group of stakeholders who are impacted by Corps' decisions: “Collaboration is a very key ingredient. We're talking about America's water resources, rivers, wetlands, inland and coastal waterways and billions of dollars in recreation and commerce. I think you have to let everyone under the tent and when we are making decisions, when we're trying to think about these competing alternatives. I'm an advocate for all things being considered and letting that be our point of origin as we move forward. With this approach, I think we'll get some good outcomes.”   Todd agrees: “It's a positive time within the Corps, with LTG Spellmon and Mr. Connor's leadership, and yours, BG Kelly. With the organization, the potential, and the strong program the Corps has, we must embrace the idea of delivering projects and innovating at the same time to be the organization that we need to be today, as well as in the future.” A great example is the South Atlantic Coastal Study. It is the largest coastal risk assessment ever conducted by the Corps. According to BG Kelly, it covers more than 60,000 miles of shoreline, six states, and two territories: “It's just a mammoth undertaking and a great example of our goal to maximize the use of research and development, while promoting community resilience through partnering. It's a great illustration of our effort to overcome those institutional barriers that I mentioned and adapt to climate change and sea level rise in our quest to better partner with nature.”  Leadership is critical, and it is evolving. As Todd concludes, “BG Kelly, you're bringing people with you, you're not directing them. As you know, you don't really get effective change through exceptional force. You're describing a kind of social leadership. That's what we need to make progress as the Corps of Engineers, and progress with our partners, for the benefit of our communities. I think the future of Engineering With Nature in the South Atlantic Division is bright, bright, bright.”  Related Links EWN Website ERDC Website Todd Bridges at EWN Todd Bridges at LinkedIn General Kelly at USACE South Atlantic Division General Kelly at LinkedIn USACE South Atlantic Division Michael Connor, Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works EWN Podcast S1E3: Using Natural Infrastructure to Increase Resilience for Military Installations Everglades Restoration Projects Restoring America's Everglades Charleston Harbor Navigation Projects Tyndall AFB Reconstruction South Atlantic Coastal Study

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON
Dean Gallenberg Previews CAFES Enrollment

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 14:18


Colleges across Wisconsin are looking ahead to the fall semester and are beginning to anticipate class sizes. With this year being the first "normal" year back from the pandemic, colleges are also looking to bring back pre-pandemic opportunities, such as travel.  Dr. Dale Gallenberg is the Dean of the College of Agriculture, Food, and Environmental Science at UW-River Falls. He gives a look at enrollment numbers for the fall and shares more about an exciting new program for students. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 632 (7-18-22): Checking on the Chesapeake's Condition

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:30).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-15-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of July 18 and July 25, 2022. SOUNDS – ~6 sec Those sounds of shorebirds and Chesapeake Bay waves open an episode on the condition of that bay, which we last explored in an August 2020 episode.  We set the stage with the instrumental opening of a song whose title calls to mind some colors of the Chesapeake region's waters, lands, sky, and creatures.  Here's about 30 seconds of “The Deep Blue Green,” by Andrew VanNorstrand. MUSIC – ~31 sec – instrumental In June 2022, the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental Science issued its latest annual Chesapeake Bay and Watershed Report Card, for conditions in 2021.  For the report's first part, to assess Bay waters, the report compares the status of several physical, chemical, and biological indicators to established goals, in order to generate condition scores ranging from zero to 100%.  Combining the indicator scores, the overall score for 2021 was 50, an increase from the 45 score for 2020 data; the report characterized the 50 score as “moderate health” and gave it a letter grade of C.  The score when the Report Card started in 1986 was 48; the highest score since then was 55 in 2002, and the lowest was 36 in 2003. For the report's second part, the overall watershed assessment, the report for 2021 looked at three categories of indicators: ecological, societal, and economic.  These resulted in a score of 56, characterized as “moderate health” and given a letter grade of C+.  This was the first year that three categories of indicators were used for the watershed assessment, so the results aren't directly comparable to previous years. Besides the Maryland center's annual report, several other Bay condition reports are regularly available.  These include the Chesapeake Bay Program's annual “Bay Barometer” report; the Bay Program's “Chesapeake Progress” Web site, with updates on progress toward the goals of the 2014 Chesapeake Bay Agreement; the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's biennial “State of the Bay” report; and reports by various groups on specific Bay areas, such as the James River Association's “State of the James” reports.  All depend on data gathered by various sources, including universities; governmental agencies at the federal, state, and local levels; and non-governmental organizations. The Chesapeake Bay is the United States' largest estuary.  Monitoring its condition is a large part of decades-old efforts to improve and sustain this irreplaceable water body. Thanks to Andrew VanNorstrand for permission to use “The Deep Blue Green.”  We close with about 50 seconds of another musical selection, created for our previous episode on Chesapeake Bay conditions.  Here's “Chesapeake Bay Ballad,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC – ~51 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The waves sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio at the Chesapeake Bay on Kent Island, Maryland, June 22, 2010. The shorebirds sound was taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, http://digitalmedia.fws.gov/cdm/; the specific audio file was “Shore birds close,” online at https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/audio/id/66/rec/8. “The Deep Blue Green,” from the 2019 album “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” is copyright by Andrew VanNorstrand, used with permission.  More information about Andrew VanNorstrand is available online at https://greatbearrecords.bandcamp.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 504, 12-23-19. “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 604, 11-22-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES (Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) View of the Chesapeake Bay looking downstream from the Bay Bridge-Tunnel (between Virginia Beach and Northampton County), October 7, 2007.View of the Chesapeake Bay looking upstream from Sandy Point State Park in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, March 21, 2010.Summary charts for Chesapeake Bay waters (upper) and watershed (lower) from the “Chesapeake Bay & Watershed 2021 Report Card” (covering data through 2021; published in June 2022), University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.  Images accessed from the report PDF, online at https://ecoreportcard.org/site/assets/files/2560/2021-chesapeake-bay-watershed-report-card.pdf, as of 7-18-22. SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Foundation, “State of the Bay,” online at https://www.cbf.org/about-the-bay/state-of-the-bay-report/. Chesapeake Bay Program, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/.  Specific pages used were the following:“Slight improvements in Bay health and new economic data added in 2021 Chesapeake Bay Report Card,” June 7, 2022, news release by Caroline Grass;“Bay Barometer,” April 2021 (for 2019-20 data), online (as a PDF) at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/documents/Bay_Barometer_2019-2020_Web.pdf;“Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement” (signed June 16, 2014), online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/what/what_guides_us/watershed_agreement;“Chesapeake Progress,” online at https://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/;“The Estuary,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/the_estuary_system.Jeremy Cox and Timothy Wheeler, “Maryland, Virginia clamp down on crab harvests; cuts imposed as crab population hits record-low,” Bay Journal, June 30, 2022. Maryland Department of Natural Resources, “2022 Blue Crab Winter Dredge Survey,” online at https://dnr.maryland.gov/fisheries/Pages/blue-crab/dredge.aspx.Maryland Department of Natural Resources, “Eyes on the Bay,” online at http://eyesonthebay.dnr.maryland.gov/.See http://eyesonthebay.dnr.maryland.gov/eyesonthebay/whatsitmean.cfmfor “Data Available for Viewing” (dissolved oxygen, pH, salinity, turbidity, algal blooms, and temperature).See http://eyesonthebay.dnr.maryland.gov/eyesonthebay/links.cfmfor links to other Bay water-quality data and information sources.University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, online at https://www.umces.edu/.The “Chesapeake Bay & Watershed Report Card” is online at https://ecoreportcard.org/report-cards/chesapeake-bay/; note links for “Bay Health,” “Watershed Health,” and “Indicators.”A June 6, 2022, news release on the report of 2021 data is online https://www.umces.edu/news/chesapeake-bay-health-score-held-steady-in-2021.A PDF of the report of 2021 data is online at https://ecoreportcard.org/site/assets/files/2560/2021-chesapeake-bay-watershed-report-card.pdf. Virginia Institute of Marine Science, “How big is the [Chesapeake] bay?”  Online at https://www.vims.edu/bayinfo/faqs/estuary_size.php. For More Information about the Chesapeake Bay and its ConditionChesapeake Bay Program, “Discover the Chesapeake,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, “Chesapeake Bay Map,” online at https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/products/vmrc-chesapeake-bay-map/.Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Chesapeake Bay,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/chesapeake-bay. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS):“Bay Info,” online at https://www.vims.edu/bayinfo/index.php;“SAV Program: Monitoring and Restoration,” online at https://www.vims.edu/research/units/programs/sav/index.php;“Virginia Coastal and Estuarine Observing System,” online at http://vecos.vims.edu/. Virginia Marine Resources Commission, online at https://mrc.virginia.gov/links.shtm. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category.  The previous episode on Chesapeake Bay conditions was Episode 537, 8-10-20, Following are links to some other episodes on the Chesapeake Bay. Bay Barometer and other reports – Episode 305, 2-29-16.Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan – Episode 115, 6-18-12.Bay TMDL, Phase III Watershed Implementation Plan – Episode 475, 6-3-19.Chesapeake Bay Commission – Episode 496, 10-28-19.Estuaries introduction – Episode 326, 7-25-16.Oysters and nitrogen (Part 1) – Episode 279, 8-24-15.Oysters and nitrogen (Part 2) – Episode 280, 9-7-15.“Smart” buoys – Episode 538, 8-17-20.Submerged aquatic vegetation (“Bay grasses”) – Episode 325, 7-18-16.Winter birds of the Chesapeake Bay area – EP565 – 2/22/21. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music.“A Little Fright Music” – used in Episode 548, 10-26-20, on water-related passages in fiction and non-fiction, for Halloween; and Episode 601, 10-31-21, connections among Halloween, water, and the human body.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Flow Stopper” – used in Episode 599, 10-18-21, on “Imagine a Day Without Water.”“Geese Piece” – used most recently in 615, 2-7-22, on Brant.“Ice Dance” – “Ice Dance” – used most recently in Episode 606, 12-6-21, on freezing of water.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year's Water” – used most recently in Episode 610, 1-3-22, on water thermodynamics and a New Year's Day New River wade-in.“Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle schoolers calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.“Wade in the Water” (arrangement) – used most recently in Episode 616, 2-14-22.  FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth.4.7 – The ocean environment.Grades K-5: Earth Resources 1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; human actions can affect the availability of natural resources; and reducing, reusing, and recycling are ways to conserve natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.6 – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.8 – Change occurs in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time.LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity.LS.11 – Populations of organisms can change over time. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.7 – Populations change through time.BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms.2.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents.3.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents. Grades K-3 Economics Theme2.8 – Natural, human, and capital resources.3.8 – Understanding of cultures and of how natural, human, and capital resources are used for goods and services. Grades K-3 Civics Theme3.12 – Importance of government in community, Virginia, and the United States. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history. United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics CourseCE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.8 – Government at the local level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it.WG.3 – How regional landscapes reflect the physical environment and the cultural characteristics of their inhabitants.WG.4 – Types and significance of natural, human, and capital resources. Government CourseGOVT.7 – National government organization and powers.GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.GOVT.15 – Role of government in Va. and U.S. economies, including examining environmental issues and property rights.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade. Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade. Episode 606, 12-6-21 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.

All Around Science
Quantum Particles and the LHC

All Around Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 69:06


On today's episode: Light pollution isn't just hiding stars, it's making plants bloom sooner. Why do people live so very long? Let's shrink down to the quantum realm and talk about particle physics. All that and more today on All Around Science. LINKS: [ARTICLE] Light pollution is disrupting the seasonal rhythms of plants and trees, lengthening pollen season in US cities [ARTICLE] The Importance of Elders | The UCSB Current [ARTICLE] Cern Large Hadron Collider scientists observe three 'exotic' particles for first time | NBC THEME MUSIC by Andrew Allen https://twitter.com/KEYSwithSOUL http://andrewallenmusic.com

Principled
S7E19 | What is the role of trust in stakeholder capitalism?

Principled

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 34:24


What you'll learn in this podcast episode Is trust the ultimate currency of stakeholder capitalism? If so, how can corporate leaders create a culture of trust inside and outside of their organizations? In the final episode of season 7 on the Principled Podcast, host Jen Uner talks about the role of values in building organizational trust—and frameworks to help you get there—with LRN Director of Advisory Services Emily Miner. You can listen to the other season 7 episodes mentioned in this discussion here: How values inform decisions: Unpacking the role of the CECO Trust is at stake, and other insights from Edelman's 2022 Trust Barometer You can access other materials mentioned in the discussion here: Aspen Ideas Fest panel discussion with Ellen McGirt Corteva case study LRN Benchmark of Ethical Culture   Featured guest: Emily Miner Emily Miner is the Director of Advisory Services at LRN's Ethics & Compliance Advisory practice. She counsels executive leadership teams on how to actively shape and manage their ethical culture through deep quantitative and qualitative understanding and engagement. A skilled facilitator, Emily emphasizes co-creative, bottom-up, and data-driven approaches to foster ethical behavior and inform program strategy. Emily has led engagements with organizations in the healthcare, technology, manufacturing, energy, professional services, and education industries. Emily co-leads LRN's ongoing flagship research on E&C program effectiveness and is a thought leader in the areas of organizational culture, leadership, and E&C program impact. Prior to joining LRN, Emily applied her behavioral science expertise in the environmental sustainability sector, working with non-profits and several New England municipalities; facilitated earth science research in academia; and contributed to drafting and advancing international climate policy goals. Emily has a Master of Public Administration in Environmental Science and Policy from Columbia University and graduated summa cum laude from the University of Florida with a degree in Anthropology.   Featured Host: Jen Üner Jen Uner is the Strategic Communications Director for LRN, where she captains programs for both internal and external audiences. She has an insatiable curiosity and an overdeveloped sense of right and wrong which she challenges each day through her study of ethics, compliance, and the value of values-based behavior in corporate governance. Prior to joining LRN, Jen led marketing communications for innovative technology companies operating in Europe and the US, and for media and marketplaces in California. She has won recognition for her work in brand development and experiential design, earned placements in leading news publications, and hosted a closing bell ceremony of the NASDAQ in honor of the California fashion industry as founder of the LA Fashion Awards. Jen holds a B.A. degree from Claremont McKenna College.      Principled Podcast Transcript Intro: Welcome to the Principled Podcast, brought to you by LRN. The Principled Podcast brings together the collective wisdom on ethics, business and compliance, transformative stories of leadership, and inspiring workplace culture. Listen in to discover valuable strategies from our community of business leaders and workplace change makers. Jen Uner: Is trust the ultimate currency of stakeholder capitalism. If so, how can corporate leaders create a culture of trust inside and outside of their organizations? Hello, and welcome to another episode of LRN's Principled Podcast. I'm your host, Jen Uner, strategic communications director at LRN, and today, I'm joined by my colleague, Emily Miner, director of advisory services. We're going to be talking about the role of values in building organizational trust and frameworks to help you get there. Emily, thanks for joining me today on the Principled Podcast, by the way, our final episode of this season seven. Emily Miner: Yeah, thanks for having me, Jen. I'm happy to be here and honored to be rounding out an incredible season on the Principled Podcast. Jen Uner: It has been a great season, and I think we're going to have an opportunity to touch on some of the folks that we've had on the podcast. To get us started though, recently at Aspen Ideas Fest, Fortune senior editor, Ellen McGirt, asked a great question of her panel. She said, "Is trust the ultimate currency of stakeholder capitalism?" It's how we started our conversation today. I of course will say yes, but recently, you spoke with David Bersoff, head of Global Thought Leadership Research at Edelman, and he worked on the Edelman Trust Barometer. You had a chance to speak with him earlier this season, and I'd love for you to recap for us some of the insights that stood out to you. Emily Miner: Yeah. I think based on the 2022 Edelman Trust Barometer, which is a fantastic annual look at levels of trust in key societal institutions, business, government, media, I think that the 2022 Trust Barometer report would say that the answer to your question and to Ellen's question is yes, trust is the ultimate currency of stakeholder capitalism. In fact, what Edelman found in their research is that business is the only institution in our society that is trusted, and that's actually a first in the 20 plus years that they have been running this type of study. Actually, for the second year in a row is business the most trusted institution. That was one of the takeaways from the Edelman Trust Barometer, and that David helped unpack when we spoke earlier this podcast season. Given that, if business is the only trusted institution for the second year running, it really underlines the question, what does this mean for leaders? How can they ensure that business remains trusted? People are looking more and more to business to help solve or address the problems of the world because we don't trust government, because we don't trust media, because we don't trust NGOs. With that mantle of being the only trusted institution, a lot more is falling on business and specifically business leaders and the expectations for them are a lot higher. I think that that really ... That was a current through the Aspen Ideas Institute that you mentioned through the conversation that took place there. Jen Uner: It really does put a lot of pressure on CEOs and leaders then. One of the stats that I thought was so interesting was how I think it was 60% of employees, they're basing their employment decisions now on the values of the companies that they're looking at and the positions that companies take around social issues, and of course they expect the company to have a position on a social issue, which I thinks it's a rather new thing. Would you say? Emily Miner: Yeah. I don't know if it's new in the past few years because I do feel like this has been a trend that I've observed in the research maybe up to the past decade or a little bit less, but it certainly every year seems to get to ... It grows. I think, first, it was a healthy minority of the global workforce or of the workforce in the United States, and now it's tipping to be a majority of the workforce. You see some of this in demographic changes as millennials grow in the size of our workforce and now Gen Zers as they're entering the workforce and the expectations that those two generations have for their employers. But it's certainly not a concept that millennials invented, but it does seem to be growing. Something that's interesting to me now where despite ... We're potentially heading toward a recession in the United States, and despite that, it's still very much an employee market out there. We're still in the midst of a great resignation, which is now really being more called a great reshuffling because it's not that people are dropping out of the workforce so much as they're leaving their jobs to find better jobs. What some research has shown is that it's not so much that I can find another job that pays me better, but it's that people are no longer satisfied with the status quo and they're looking for opportunities where they can feel more values alignment, where there's more culture of inclusion and equity in the workplace, where they feel that their company is doing something that's contributing positively to the world. Those are strong drivers of why people are jumping ship and looking elsewhere. It'll be interesting to see how that shapes the narrative and the importance of values and multi-stakeholder capitalism more generally as we continue to hopefully be coming out of the COVID pandemic and this great reshuffling in spite of some of the more negative trend lines with respect to our economy. Jen Uner: Yeah. I was just going to bring that up. When you have a business environment that's marred by an economic downturn, that puts a lot of pressure. There's then the business financial pressure on decision-making and performance for the company. Then you layer on top of that some of the social and political challenges that are happening and this need to have a position, and can you have a position on everything? Which are the things that you need to prioritize? I think often corporate leaders in ethics and compliance, our field, chief ethics and compliance officers, for example, the people listening here, they find themselves in a role of counselor to the C-suite as the company and as leaders are facing these kinds of tough decisions. One of the things that really struck me at that Aspen Ideas Institute conversation was Allstate's CEO, Tom Wilson, was one of the panelists and he spoke about a societal engagement framework. I know you had a chance to listen to his presentation. Can you tell me about their approach to decision-making and how they engage on hot button issues? Emily Miner: Yeah, absolutely. I am so inspired by this framework, and beyond that, there's so much common sense in it, and Tom Wilson talked about this societal engagement framework as something that Allstate developed a little over a year ago in response tom, he didn't use this word, but a deluge of social issues that were coming their way and that the company was being asked to take a stand on or take a position on, sign a letter that's going to be on the front page of the New York Times or what have you. It got to this point where they said, "We've got to pause and really think about how we're making these decisions." They developed what they call a societal engagement framework that they run all of these issues or questions through. The way that it starts is, first, as an added outset, how does this issue stack up against our values and the way that we do business? There needs to be a level of values alignment before they'll even entertain going further. But assuming that the issue does, they have four filters, as Tom called it, or you could also think of it as just four questions to ask. The first is, does this issue or does our taking action on this issue help us better serve our customers? The second is, do we, Allstate, have any institutional knowledge about this issue? Third is, can we affect change on this issue? What is our agency here? Then the fourth is, what impact does this issue have on our employees and our reputation? If issue A passes through all four of those filters, then Allstate will come out and they'll take a public stand, and more than just take a public stand, as in the CEO pens a letter that gets published somewhere, they'll actually come out and lead on the issue, engage on it. An example of an issue that passes this values track and the four filters is climate change. Allstate, obviously, an insurance company, and we know from science that the rate of forest fires in the west of the United States, for example, in the intensity of forest fires is ... The climate change plays a role in that. Forest fires are burning down Allstate customers homes. Does taking a stand and working to address climate change help them better serve their customers? Well, absolutely. That's an easy one. Do they have any institutional knowledge about the issue of climate change? Yeah, there's a lot of math and science that goes into determining what policy plans and rates are and the risk of different issues to someone's particular home. They have a lot of institutional knowledge about that. Can they affect change on the issue as a large insurer of homes as well as, of course, other things? Their voice carries some weight. They've worked with the government in the State of California to help shape and advance legislation and regulation, as well as perhaps other jurisdictions at the state level, or nationally as well. Then finally, what impact does this have on their employees and their reputations? Well, they know that climate change is an issue that their employees care about, and so it passes that filter. One distinction that Tom made that I thought was really helpful was that if an issue doesn't pass through the filters, it doesn't mean that they're not going to do anything with it. One of the examples that he gave was the Supreme Court recent ruling that overturns [inaudible 00:12:54]. Allstate's healthcare plan has always covered abortion care, and given the impact that the Supreme Court decision might have on some of their employees that are located in states where abortion care is no longer an option, Allstate has said, "We'll reimburse the travel, et cetera, for our employees in order to access that care." They're responding to that issue, but they're not coming out and taking a public stand on it. They're not taking a lead on reversing the reversal, shall we say, because does it help them better serve their customers? Well, they're not a healthcare insurer. Do they have any institutional knowledge about abortion care and the impacts of abortion or access or lack thereof? No. Et cetera. It doesn't pass the filters, but that doesn't mean that they're not doing anything about that particular issue. Having this societal engagement framework is a way for them to bring some discipline and structure and consistency into how they engage on the increasing number of social challenges, political challenges, climatic challenges that we as a global society and as businesses are faced with. It also tells everybody else, all of their stakeholders, their employees, their investors, their customers, it tells everybody, "This is how we do things. This is our process, and we go through this process." At the end of the day, depending on how you feel about the outcome, at least you know what that process was. I just think it's such a brilliant example of bringing that level of clarity into how they're operating in this multidimensional world and connecting it back to the Edelman Trust Barometer that we were talking about into the role of them as business leaders in fostering trust. Jen Uner: I think this clarity of where you stand and on which issues is an interesting one, because you can't necessarily stand for everything, right? You need to decide where is it your business, really? I think it's interesting how Allstate has chosen to filter a topic and arrive at a conclusion on it. This whole thing about how do you filter and how do you decide, I just find so fascinating. We had Scott Sullivan, he's the current chief integrity and compliance officer for Newmont Mining. We had him on the podcast with Joe Henry, former US compliance officer for Braskem, and they were talking to Susan Divers on our team. They were on a recent podcast and they were talking about some of the challenges they've both faced in decision-making, and one of the things that stood out for me was how they both used values to guide their decision-making and to guide their counseling of their colleagues in the C-suite, because they were both leaning into values and those corporate values might be stated differently or might be prioritized differently between the two organizations, they would arrive at different outcomes. Right? One of them would say, "Well, our policy around vaccines and masking is that you've got to do it, and no one's allowed back to the office without it." Then another organization might prioritize something else that says, "Well, it's up to you. You get to make that decision. You can work from home forever if you need to." I think it's really interesting that values plays a really important part and has a real impact on how corporate policy and ultimately behavior, how that comes to be. I don't know if you could talk to me a little bit about that, because obviously you spend a lot of time consulting on values with companies. Tell me about how that shapes company policy and behavior. Emily Miner:   Yeah. An interesting byproduct of the COVID pandemic I think has been that ... I perceive that the role of values has grown in prominence in terms of the discourse about the role of values in companies has increased. I think it's because the decisions around COVID are so hard. How do we ... Do people come in? Do they not come in? We're risking lives in making this decision. How do we keep, but we can't employ people if we don't have the money to pay the salaries? We have to keep on producing whatever it is that we produce in some level, but how do we do that? These are incredibly complex decisions. When you're in a situation where you have to make these really challenging decisions and there isn't necessarily a playbook for it. The last global health pandemic was over 100 years ago. I think a lot of companies have come out and said, "We didn't have a plan in place," because this wasn't something that was anticipated. When you don't have a playbook, or to use terminology that's common in our industry, ethics and compliance, rules or regulations about something, values help to fill that void and they guide us on what we should or shouldn't do as opposed to a playbook or a rule, which says what you can and can't do. Of course, we need rules, we need regulations, we need to know what we can and can't do and where the lines are. But there are always going to be these unforeseen situations, the variant on the scenario that we didn't anticipate when we wrote the rule, and that's where values come in. I think a lot of leaders, a lot of business leaders turned to their company's values, as well as I'm sure their own personal values, to help them navigate the incredibly complex decisions companies had to make surrounding COVID. I've read a number of accounts from business leaders that have talked about how helpful that was, and they're talking about values more internally and externally. I hope that that's a lens that business leaders will continue to use as strongly coming out of COVID, and that's at the company level, but it trickles down to the individual employee level too, because most companies offer some type of training or onboarding, or you have a code of conduct or you have policies. We have all of these resources that should tell us, again, the cans and can'ts, as well as the shoulds and shouldn'ts. But I think it's something like humans can only keep three or five things in their mind at once. We can only remember so much. Having the presence of really strong values where the values actually mean something, they're not just a nice recruitment tool on your website, but they really mean something, that's going to be infinitely more helpful guiding behavior on a daily basis across a global workforce and all the variation that comes with that. I've really been encouraged by how values have become a more dominant part of the conversation in the business community. You're right, depending on what your values are, you might have completely different outcomes. But again, it comes back to that transparency of the process and the fact that there is a process, the structure of the process that, at the end of the day, most of us can get on board and accept what it is because we understand how we got there. That's what I think is so key. It's just that transparency on how we got there. It's not so much about the end as the journey, so to speak. Jen Uner: Yeah. That makes total sense. I know in our code work, in the consulting work that you do with our clients, speaking of employee level work, we often include frameworks for decision-making, right? That work at the employee level. What are some examples of these tools that can help not just leadership, like we were just talking about a societal bigger picture one, but on the individual level? How does that play out? Emily Miner: Yeah. Actually, after watching Tom Wilson talk about Allstate's societal engagement framework, I actually went online and just Googled Allstate's code because I was curious, how do they ... do they have something similar, a similar framework that they share that they've developed for their employees? In fact, yes. In their code, they have a whole section on ethical decision-making that lists nine questions that employees should ask themselves when they're faced with a decision or a situation where the decision or the course of action is unclear. Is it legal? Okay. Yeah, that's an obvious one, but does it conflict with our values? What are the consequences of this? How would your family and friends perceive this decision or course of action that you take? These are some of the questions that Allstate included in their code that I think we ... The majority of us could probably take any number of tough, sticky, gray area situations and go through it, and is it legal? Okay, well, maybe I'm ... I don't know the law, but how would I feel if my mom knew? How would I feel if this was on the homepage of CNN? We all know how we would feel about that, and that's such a helpful ... It connects to our humanity, the human heart level. It's just really helpful framing that Allstate's providing to their employees. We help a lot of companies write their codes of conduct. Ethical decision-making models or a code in and of itself is a guide for behavior and breaking out different risk topics into what are the behavioral expectations, et cetera. But having a decision-making framework or a list of questions or whatever it is that ... It's issue agnostic, it's situation agnostic, it's just something that anybody can pick up and use. That continuity of Allstate at their company level, as well as how they translate that down to employees, it is just something that I wanted to note. But it's something that we include in most of our codes that we create for our clients. Some of my favorite examples, one of them is John Deere. Their code is beautiful, and it's who they are. It's their culture written down, which is what we always strive for. They include a decision-making framework as well and it include ... There's a series of questions and it's an interactive. You ask yourself this question and then you click yes or no, and it reveals guidance for what your next step is. But also, it starts out with is it consistent with our values? Centering the values first and then going into consistency with rules. They also ask, "Would this build trust with employees, customers, shareholders, or communities, or would it harm trust?" That is how we started at the outset of this conversation around the importance of trust in the business context. Similarly, how would I feel if my actions became public? Et cetera. They have their own framework that's speaks to their culture and to their values. Another example is Corteva, which is an agriscience company, and they also have a framework. Theirs is a little bit different. It asks a series of questions, and then depending on how you answer those questions, they give guidance on who you can consult for advice, and it's going to be different depending on the situation. That's also nice that you're not on your own, right? There are others in our organization that are here to help and can help, and if it's this situation, contact this group, and if it's this other situation, contact this other group. I also thought that's something that they did a little bit differently. They're all different. You talked about the conversation in the earlier podcast, but the goal is the same, which is to provide guidance for behavior that is reflective and supportive of who we are as an organization, what we stand for and what we value. Jen Uner: It's really, really important. One of the things that we know from our Benchmark of Ethical Culture, which is a report that you were very involved in, and it certainly steers a lot of my thinking these days. We know from the Benchmark of Ethical Culture that the companies with the strongest ethical cultures are going to outperform their peers by up to 40% in key business metrics, the standard things that you would want to have as a business like employee loyalty, innovation, adaptability, customer satisfaction, and growth. I think that taking code of conduct seriously, taking value seriously and taking culture building seriously is probably one of the most important things that a company could be doing right now, especially when you look at the Edelman Trust Barometer and the role companies have to take right now in society. Trust becomes super foundational to that. I know you've got some insights that you can share around trust building and how foundational that is for ethical culture. Emily Miner: Yeah. When we conducted our research into ethical culture globally in a business context, we looked at ... I want to say 10 different dimensions of culture and how people and organizations behave and operate, and we did some fancy statistical modeling to look at are there some aspects of culture that are more important than others? How do they relate to each other? What drives what? And all of that. What we found was that there were some dimensions that rose to the top in terms of influencing other elements of culture, as well as those business outcomes that you talked about, and trust was one of them. We found that trust had an outsized impact on whether or not people behaved ethically in an organization, and particularly when they were under pressure. I think that that's such an important idea because if you look at any number of corporate scandals, so often, not in every case certainly, but in many cases, the pressure to perform that was set out or pushed by the organization, by leaders in an organization, is part of why people did what they did. This idea that trust is one of the strongest drivers of whether people behave ethically, especially when under pressure, I think is a big one that certainly makes me sit up a little taller and take notice, because it's something that any chief ethics and compliance officer would say that they're looking for and is a goal of their program. Another area where trust really stood out as a driver of employee loyalty, we were talking earlier about the great shuffling, but I think that also makes it stand out even more for me, just in our current context. People are more likely to stay in your company, you're more likely to retain great talent if they trust you as leaders, as an organization, their peers, and if they feel trusted themselves. Jen Uner: I think one of the things that was evident too in the research is the value of transparency and building trust. Emily Miner:   To wrap up a lot of the threads that we've talked about and as it relates to transparency, one of the findings that was so compelling to me from the Edelman Trust Barometer was that the majority of people are expecting CEOs, specifically CEOs, to take a public stand on any number of social issues of our times. But at the same time, at least in the United States, these issues have become so politicized and polarizing. That's a tough bar to set for CEOs. How do they thread that needle? It's why I think that Allstate's societal engagement framework is just so brilliant, because it helps them figure out how are we going to address these issues? Responding to that majority of the population as Edelman, found they're looking for Allstate CEO and for any number of other companies' CEOs to take a stand. It's a way to respond to that call without politicizing or polarizing or without politicizing the issue, because that's not what it's about. It's not about is this a liberal cause or a conservative cause? Is it a Democratic cause or is it a Republican cause? It's four questions. Does this help our customers, do we know something about it, do we have agency over it, and what impact does it have on our employees? It really takes all of that noise out of the decision-making. I just think it's such a great example of how leaders in general can take up that mantle of society's expectations of business to help solve and address our social issues without having that response fall into any political trap that's going to alienate you or with your employees or with customers. It's such a great example and one that I hope other business leaders take inspiration from. Jen Uner: Well, I think it just really speaks to how important it is to set up those frameworks in advance so that you're not caught in panic mode or in defensive mode when it's not even necessary to be that way. Right? If you've set up those mechanisms in advance, you're going to probably come out ahead because you will have already created a framework that's going to prioritize the human response. Emily Miner: Absolutely. Absolutely. Because what's the next COVID? What's the next unexpected thing? To already have that framework in place is going to be so helpful. Jen Uner: That's why we say rules are good, values are better. Emily Miner: Exactly. Jen Uner: Goes back to that. Emily, thank you so much for joining me on the Principled Podcast today. It's our final episode of season seven, as we take a summer break and we'll resume with season eight in September. In the interim, we'll share encores of our favorite episodes from this season. To close out. My name is Jen Uner, and I want to thank you all for listening to the Principled Podcast by LRN. Outro: We hope you enjoyed this episode. The Principled Podcast is brought to you by LRN. At LRN, our mission is to inspire principled performance in global organizations by helping them foster winning ethical cultures rooted in sustainable values. Please visit us at lrn.com to learn more. If you enjoyed this episode, subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever you listen, and don't forget to leave us a review.

TNT Radio
Dr Karen Benn on Joseph Arthur & his Technicolor Dreamcast - 15 July 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 55:40


GUEST OVERVIEW: Dr Karen Benn has a Bachelor's and a Master's degree, and PhD in Environmental Science and a double major in Biology. She has worked for a Green NGO (Greening Australia VIC), several State Gov Departments including Melbourne Water and EPA. She also worked for the Murray Darling Basin Authority and Wet Tropics Management Authority. She has lectured at James Cook University and University of Queensland.

Nature Works
Episode 9- Mike Allen on Seagrass: A New Set of Lungs

Nature Works

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 88:08


Professor Mike Allen is an Associate Professor of Single Cell Genomics in the College of Life and Environmental Sciences at University of Exeter. His interests are varied and encompass both blue skies and applied research topics. Blue skies research focuses mainly on understanding the role of viruses in the ocean using genomic, proteomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches. Applied research focuses on biocatalysis, bioremediation, biotransformation, bioprocessing and technology development.Mike's current academic research projects include co-evolution of coccolithophores and coccolithoviruses, sphingolipid biosynthesis, novel protein characterisation, lytic and latent phytoplankton viruses, phytoplankton and virus isolation. Applied projects include biofuel production and processing, bioremediation, water sanitation, high throughput liquid processing and the development of novel photobioreactor technologies for promoting microalgal growth. Current and recent funding sources include The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, The Roddenberry Foundation, BBSRC and Innovate UK.For more information on Mike, follow him @Mike_J_Allen on twitter, check out his website www.bluemicrobe.co.uk, or one of his project pages at www.phycomex.uk .

EWN - Engineering With Nature
Coming Soon—Two Inspirational Conversations about Leadership and EWN

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 3:22


We're really excited about our upcoming episodes 6 and 7.  Tune in July 20th as we discuss leadership and Engineering With Nature with two inspirational USACE Division leaders – Colonel (P) Antoinette Gant, Commander, and Division Engineer of the South Pacific Division (SPD), and Brigadier General Jason Kelly, Commander of the South Atlantic Division (SAD).   Leadership and vision are essential to successfully incorporating Engineering With Nature and nature-based approaches into climate preparedness and resilience solutions to address landscape-scale challenges. In Episodes 6 & 7, Host Sarah Thorne and Todd Bridges, Senior Research Scientist for Environmental Science with the US Army Corps of Engineers and the National Lead of the Engineering With Nature® Program talk with COL Gant and BG Kelly about the some of the challenges facing their Divisions, how Engineering With Nature approaches are a key part of the solutions, and about the leadership needed to address landscape-scale challenges in innovative ways.   Stimulating, thought-provoking and truly inspiring!! The future of EWN is bright.