Podcasts about Environmental justice

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Environmental justice

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Best podcasts about Environmental justice

Show all podcasts related to environmental justice

Latest podcast episodes about Environmental justice

Political Climate
How States Powered Climate Policy in 2021

Political Climate

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 39:54


2021 was a productive year for climate policy – particularly for U.S. states. Both red and blue states passed ambitious climate bills last year. Several of the new laws address emissions from multiple sectors of the economy, include strong labor provisions and center environmental justice in meaningful ways.In the first Political Climate episode of 2022, we look at some of the biggest political wins of 2021 that took place around the country. From Oregon and Illinois joining the party on 100% emissions-free electricity, to a wide-ranging cap-and-trade bill in Washington and a net zero goal in North Carolina, there was no shortage of action.Host Julia Pyper speaks with Canary Media's Jeff St. John about key elements of these new state policies, how they came to pass, and why they're so significant. Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:Canary Media: The top 6 ambitious state climate laws passed in 2021Political Climate: Winning political messages with David RobertsCanary Media: Washington state now has the nation's most ambitious climate policyCanary Media: Illinois' new climate bill is ambitious, justice-focused and a model for the nationPolitical Climate is brought to you by Fischtank PR. From PR and digital marketing to content writing, the team at FischTank helps you develop a strategy of bringing your work to not only wider audiences, but the right audience. To learn more about FischTank's approach to cleantech and services, visit fischtankpr.comPolitical Climate is also brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice the amount of renewable energy compared to the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it's the power of people over profit. Learn more at mceCleanEnergy.org

Creative + Cultural
Dr. William M. Tsutsui

Creative + Cultural

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 33:46


Dr. William M. Tsutsui is an award-winning historian and teacher, frequent public speaker and media commentator, and a seasoned academic administrator with a record of innovation.  Born in New York City and raised in Texas, he holds degrees from Harvard (A.B. 1985), Oxford (M.Litt. 1988), and Princeton (M.A. 1990, Ph.D. 1995) universities. He began his academic career at the University of Kansas, where over 17 years on the faculty he served as acting director of KU's Center for East Asian Studies, chair of the Department of History, founding executive director of the Confucius Institute at the University of Kansas, and associate dean for international studies in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences. From 2010 to 2014, he was dean of Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences and professor in the Clements Department of History at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.  In June 2014, he assumed the presidency of Hendrix College, a top-tier national liberal arts college founded in 1876 and located in Conway, Arkansas.  He is currently Professor Emeritus of History at Hendrix.  During the 2020 to 2021 academic year, he is the Edwin O. Reischauer Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies and the Department of East Asian Languages & Civilizations at Harvard University.Engaging the World: Leading the Conversation on Environmental Justice is a series of informed, sustained, and enriching dialogues looking at how environmental toxicity and risk disproportionately impact populations based on race, ethnicity, nationality, and social standing. Environmental Justice brings awareness to these disparities, fighting to ensure that every voice is heard, every challenge is addressed, and every community has a seat at the table for a greener future.Guest: Dr. William M. TsutsuiHost: Jon-Barrett IngelsProduced by Public Podcasting in partnership with Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at Chapman University.

The Kevin Jackson Show
Ep. 21-504 - Environmental Justice

The Kevin Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 38:40


In this episode, Harris pleads her case of justice for the trees. Tipping based on race and white population dwindling.

Creative + Cultural
Dr. Jason A. Douglas

Creative + Cultural

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 28:01


Dr. Jason A. Douglas is an assistant professor of public health in the Department of Health Sciences within Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences. Leveraging community-based participatory research frameworks, Douglas works with community-based organizations and residents in underserved Black and Latinx communities to investigate social and environmental determinants of public health disparities.His current research examines COVID-19-related health disparities, food and housing insecurity-related health disparities, the nexus of crime and violence and legal drug retail locations (e.g., tobacco shops, liquor stores), public park and physical activity disparities in underserved communities, and community organizing practices for advancing health and wellbeing. In his community-engaged research, Douglas has developed and adapted innovative participatory methods for public health, including structured observation and neighborhood mapping approaches for examining novel public health challenges.  Douglas completed his environmental psychology doctoral training at the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York, wherein he worked with children from underserved communities in New York City and forest-fringe community residents in Jamaica to examine social and environmental inequities that challenge community health and wellbeing. He then honed his participatory research practice through a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded postdoctoral research fellowship in the Psychology Applied Research Center at Loyola Marymount University, where he worked with a national cohort of community-based organizations to evaluate community organizing strategies and practices for addressing health, education, and built environment disparities in underserved communities. He extended these research practices as an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Studies at San José State University before joining Chapman University.Engaging the World: Leading the Conversation on Environmental Justice is a series of informed, sustained, and enriching dialogues looking at how environmental toxicity and risk disproportionately impact populations based on race, ethnicity, nationality, and social standing. Environmental Justice brings awareness to these disparities, fighting to ensure that every voice is heard, every challenge is addressed, and every community has a seat at the table for a greener future.Guest: Dr. Jason A. DouglasHost: Jon-Barrett IngelsProduced by Public Podcasting in partnership with Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at Chapman University.

Hujjat Podcast
The Breakdown - Ep.32: Cop26, Islam and Environmental Justice ft. Prof Iqbal Asaria

Hujjat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 38:55


Can we end the climate crisis? How effective are international conventions like COP26 in solving global problems? What is environmental justice? And do we have an Islamic responsibility to become more sustainable? In the midst of international momentum on tackling the climate and environmental crisis, we had a conversation with Professor Mohamed Iqbal Asaria on this highly relevant and critical issue. Through his experiences in international development, Prof Iqbal explains the main issues we face in achieving environmental justice and we discuss what impact our changes as a community and ummah can have in the bigger picture.

The Plantbased Business Hour
Professor Jason Scorse of the Middlebury International Environmental Policy Program

The Plantbased Business Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 61:40


Climate Change, Animal Agriculture and What The Heck? Middlebury Professor Jason Scorse is on The Plantbased Business Hour to discuss the Masters of Art in International Environmental Policy and Environmental Justice program, The Center for the Blue Economy and what you can do now to have a positive impact on climate change. Tune in. Things will get heated. We are talking Climate Change after all. Subscribe right now to never miss this podcast! For plant-based media/branding consulting and public speaking, reach out at elysabeth@elysabethalfano.com. For more information, visit ElysabethAlfano.com. Connect with Elysabeth on Linked in here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elysabeth-alfano-8b370b7/ For more PBH, visit ElysabethAlfano.com/Plantbased-Business-Hour

Emil Amok's Takeout from Emil Guillermo Media
Ep. 103: Environmental Justice Warriors: Little Manila Rising's Matt Holmes

Emil Amok's Takeout from Emil Guillermo Media

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 62:05


Little Manila Rising, a community non-profit in Stockton, Calif., is taking an aggressive stand to protect its Filipino American community from environmental racism. Matt Holmes heads up the environmental effort and talks about a new project with UC Merced to make sure the air in Stockton and the valley is monitored. He also talks about the ways the pollution from the freeways and port is being mitigated. The situation is dire, Stockton has one of the worst air pollution profiles in the state, and not coincidentally, the worst asthma rates in California, as well. This is Part 4 of an ongoing look at how Little Manila Rising is evolving to serve its community and to not give up on Stockton. This is the podcast of Emil Amok's Takeout. See the Daily Livestream at 2p Pacific on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter@emilamok. See replays at www.amok.com

Awesome Vegans with Elysabeth Alfano
Professor Jason Scorse of the Middlebury International Environmental Policy Program

Awesome Vegans with Elysabeth Alfano

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 61:40


Climate Change, Animal Agriculture and What The Heck? Middlebury Professor Jason Scorse is on The Plantbased Business Hour to discuss the Masters of Art in International Environmental Policy and Environmental Justice program, The Center for the Blue Economy and what you can do now to have a positive impact on climate change. Tune in. Things will get heated. We are talking Climate Change after all. Subscribe right now to never miss this podcast! For plant-based media/branding consulting and public speaking, reach out at elysabeth@elysabethalfano.com. For more information, visit ElysabethAlfano.com. Connect with Elysabeth on Linked in here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elysabeth-alfano-8b370b7/ For more PBH, visit ElysabethAlfano.com/Plantbased-Business-Hour

POLITICO Energy
Why rural communities, inner cities may struggle to receive Biden's climate cash

POLITICO Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 7:03


The Biden administration has secured billions of dollars in new federal funding to follow through on its climate and environmental justice promises, but some small and financially strapped communities may struggling to navigate the bureaucracy to get access to that funding. POLITICO's Zack Colman explains those challenges and how the White House is responding.    Annie Snider covers water issues for POLITICO Pro and is the host of POLITICO Energy.  Zack Colman covers climate change for POLITICO.  Nirmal Mulaikal is a POLITICO audio host-producer.  Raghu Manavalan is a senior editor for POLITICO audio. Jenny Ament is the interim executive producer of POLITICO's audio department.

CobCast
Arlington City Council Gives OK's New Gas Wells Near Daycare - CobCast Ep. 14

CobCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 17:34


Despite efforts by locals and environmental activists, the Arlington City Council this week gave the green light to three new gas wells near a daycare center.       The council approved a permit for the new wells, which will be operated by the French conglomerate Total Energies. The additional drilling near the Mother's Heart Learning Center is expected to start early next year. Liveable Arlington, an environmental advocacy group, was one of the driving forces behind the opposition ahead of a City Council vote on the permit Tuesday night.       “While this was not the result we were hoping for, we still have many to thank,” Liveable Arlington said in a Twitter post after the vote. “We will be reflecting and regrouping over the next few days, but you can expect to hear more from us in the future.”     Ahead of Tuesday's vote, parents and staff at the Mother's Heart Learning Center, along with other area residents, signed petitions and turned out to City Hall asking the Council to deny the permit. They cited studies suggesting drilling operations can exacerbate asthma symptoms and increase the risk of childhood leukemia. This episode is an audio adaptation of reporting I've done for the Dallas Observer. It is recorded and produced by me. 'French Energy Company Seeks Fracking Permit Near Arlington Daycare'https://www.dallasobserver.com/news/french-energy-company-seeks-fracking-permit-near-arlington-daycare-12918667 Despite Local Pushback, Arlington City Council Gives Go-Ahead for New Gas Wells Near Daycarehttps://www.dallasobserver.com/news/arlington-city-council-approves-new-gas-wells-near-daycare-12934815

Viewz with Dee De La Cruz
008: How Amazon & Others' Warehouse Booms Pollute the Inland Empire with Anthony Victoria

Viewz with Dee De La Cruz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 73:52


Anthony Victoria from People's Collective for Environmental Justice discuss how warehouses, which have proliferated in Southern California's Inland Empire, bring pollution that disproportionately affects people of color. 

People of Packaging Podcast
89 - Talking social and environmental justice with Khafre Jay from Hip Hop for Change

People of Packaging Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 23:11


If you want to get your own End White Supremacy shirt, sign up to be a monthly donor, or do both, go to https://www.hiphopforchange.org/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/peopleofpackaging/support

Creative + Cultural
Dr. Richelle Tanner

Creative + Cultural

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 26:07


Dr. Richelle Tanner is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Science and Policy Program, jointly appointed to the Schmid and Wilkinson Colleges. She is broadly interested in how climate change affects both ecological and human communities, and our mechanisms of resilience. She uses tools from ecology, physiology, genomics, and the social sciences to ask questions about how coastal ecosystems can rapidly adapt to warming temperatures and more unpredictable extreme weather events.Her current research projects include: 1) sea hare physiology and population dynamics for increasing eelgrass restoration efficacy under climate extremes, 2) socio-ecological best practices for collective action in Phragmites australis invasive species management, and 3) values-based communication strategies for science-informed policy across stakeholder groups in the California Delta.Dr. Tanner is also the Science Director at the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (www.nnocci.org) and the Reviews Editor at the Journal of Zoology. She received her PhD in Integrative Biology from UC Berkeley and two undergraduate degrees in Environmental Studies and Jazz Studies from the University of Southern California, and completed two postdoctoral positions at UC Davis and Washington State University. Her work has been supported by agencies including the National Science Foundation and the California Sea Grant, and she has published in journals including Marine Ecology Progress Series and Nature Ecology & Evolution.Engaging the World: Leading the Conversation on Environmental Justice is a series of informed, sustained, and enriching dialogues looking at how environmental toxicity and risk disproportionately impact populations based on race, ethnicity, nationality, and social standing. Environmental Justice brings awareness to these disparities, fighting to ensure that every voice is heard, every challenge is addressed, and every community has a seat at the table for a greener future.Guest: Dr. Richelle TannerHost: Jon-Barrett IngelsProduced by Public Podcasting in partnership with Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at Chapman University.

The Indisposable Podcast
The Power of Community and Coalitions

The Indisposable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 37:03


This week, for another special episode in our series on The Reusies™, host Brooking Gatewood sits down with members of Reusable LA – the 2021 Most Impactful Community Leadership award winner at the National Reuse Awards. Alison Waliszewski with 5 Gyres, Melissa Aguayo with Break Free From Plastic, and Emily Parker with Heal the Bay share the history and victories of this powerful and inclusive coalition helping to shift the state of plastic pollution in the city of Los Angeles. To keep up with Reusable LA's work and get involved in upcoming actions, visit www.reusablela.org and follow the coalition on social media: InstagramFacebookTwitterIf you're interested in joining an existing reuse coalition or starting a new one in your community, visit our Community Coalitions webpage to see how you can get involved. For more on grassroots and inclusive organizing, check out episodes 1: A giant leap toward throw-away-free living; 33: Racial Justice & Environmentalism: Together & Inseparable; and 45: Changing the narrative: Environmental justice and plastic production! 

The Ezra Klein Show
The father of environmental justice

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 50:51


Vox's Jamil Smith talks with Dr, Robert Bullard, a pioneer in the crusade for environmental justice, about his more than four decades in the fight. They discuss how the movement to recognize environmental civil rights began, overcame some of its early opposition, and the landmark legal case that established a constitutional protection against racist environmental policies and practices. Bullard, a member of the White House Environmental Justice Advisory Council, also discusses how the Biden administration plans to address disproportionately affected communities. Host: Jamil Smith (@JamilSmith), Senior Correspondent, Vox Guest: Robert Bullard (@DrBobBullard), co-chair, National Black Environmental Justice Network; professor, Texas Southern University References:  "Another Reason We Can't Breathe" by Jamil Smith (Rolling Stone; Oct. 27, 2020) The 17 Principles of Environmental Justice (adopted by the NBEJN on Oct. 27, 1991) "Environmental Racism: Recognition, Litigation, and Alleviation" by Pamela Duncan (Tulane Environmental Law Journal, vol. 6, no. 2; 1993) Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class, and Environmental Quality by Robert Bullard (Routledge; 1990) "One reason why coronavirus is hitting Black Americans the hardest" by Ranjani Chakraborty (Vox; May 22, 2020) "There's a clear fix to helping Black communities fight pollution" by Rachel Ramirez (Vox; Feb. 26) "The Path to Achieving Justice 40" by Shalanda Young, Brenda Mallory, and Gina McCarthy (White House; July 20) Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app. Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts This episode was made by:  Producer: Erikk Geannikis Editor: Amy Drozdowska Engineer: Paul Robert Mounsey Vox Audio Fellow: Victoria Dominguez Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

I’m Not Sure. But, It’s Okay.
Changing the Energy of Her Space and Our Climate | Audra Carson (Story 34/100)

I’m Not Sure. But, It’s Okay.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 102:12


Story 34/100: Audra's commitment to leaving people and places better than she found them shines through in every aspect of her being. Her love-in-action way of being is experienced through her work as Chief Beautification Strategist of Izzie, LLC, Environmental Justice and Sustainability Consultant, Tire Nerd, Mentor, hostess of the CommuniD podcast — and New Author. She's always on brand and operating in purpose. We went deep into her journey to living better, learning daily, and leading boldly — all while Glorifying God … in this season of life. Episode Highlights: 1. Meaningful spiritual, mentoring, and civic relationships 2. Origin story: family + legacy 3. Equitable development, Placemaking, Curriculum Development with Eastern Michigan University 4. Pingree Row Initiative in Detroit's Northend Community 5. The evolution of Izzie, LLC 6. Audra's new permeable rubberized turf product 7. Breath work, grief, forgiveness, humor — healing journey 8. New Book Release: Litter, Laughter, Lamenting 9. Inspirational tunes, CT (Cass Tech connections), and so much more. Connect with Audra Carson: IG | Facebook | LinkedIn Izzie LLC ( IzzieLLC.com ) CommuniD Podcast Thanks so much for considering this episode of I'm Not Sure. But, It's Okay. Tell us about your takeaways from the convo with Audra. Visit NotSureOkay.live to learn more about the I'm Not Sure. But, It's Okay. 100 Stories Project and Podcast, share your story and access resources about Living Better | Learning Daily | Leading Boldly. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

People Places Planet Podcast
Groundtruth: Environmental Justice in 2022—Perspectives From EPA

People Places Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 41:12


Interest and urgency in advancing environmental justice has gained new momentum. The Biden-Harris Administration has placed an unprecedented federal focus on environmental justice using a whole of government approach. Meanwhile, a growing list of states continue to develop, implement, and enforce EJ-focused legislation, accelerated by the intensity at the federal level. Will this momentum carry into the new year? In this episode, Stacey Halliday of Beveridge & Diamond talks to two EJ leaders at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Charles Lee, Senior Policy Advisor, and Matthew Tejada, the Director of the Office of Environmental Justice – to find out  what's in store for 2022. This episode is part of the Groundtruth series created in partnership with Beveridge & Diamond, one of the nation's leading environmental law firms. ★ Support this podcast ★

The Climate Pod
Centering Environmental Justice In Congress (w/ Rep. Donald McEachin)

The Climate Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 44:36


This week, we speak with US Representative Donald McEachin (D-VA) about the environmental justice measures contained within the Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill and the Build Back Better Act. Rep. McEachin, representing the 4th Congressional District of Virginia, co-founded the United for Climate and Environmental Justice Task Force in the House and has been instrumental in raising awareness for environmental justice in Congress. Co-hosts Ty and Brock Benefiel also discuss the prevalence of climate change in popular art, Elon Musk's recent comments about government subsidies, and who topped their Spotify Wrapped for 2021. Subscribe to our Substack newsletter "The Climate Weekly": https://theclimateweekly.substack.com/ As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our new YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group. Check out our updated website!

By Any Means Necessary
Joe Biden's Chances of Reelection Wane Amid Executive Power Struggles

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 114:04


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Reginald Black, Advocacy Director for the People for Fairness Coalition and the COVID-19 Outreach Initiative to discuss the clearing of homeless encampments in Washington, DC, the shortcomings of a pilot rehousing program that is geared more toward clearing communities rather than housing people, and the challenges that keep people unhoused in Washington, DC and in the country.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Anthony Rogers Wright, Director of Environmental Justice with New York Lawyers for the Public Interest to discuss climate resilience provisions in Biden's infrastructure law and the challenges that poor communities and communities of color may face in securing grants as part of those programs, the institutional hurdles that keep resources from the communities that need them, the neoliberalism inherent in grant programs, and history of racist exclusion from resources through qualification criteria.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by K.J. Noh, a geopolitical analyst, a member of Veterans for Peace, and senior correspondent with Flashpoints on KPFA to discuss the death and whitewashing of South Korean military dictator Chun Doo-Hwan and the US role in the Gwangju massacre, the US role in supporting military dictatorships in South Korea and the impact on the people of the Korean peninsula, and the lasting US domination for affairs on the Korean peninsula for the purpose of dominating Asia.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Ted Rall, award-winning editorial cartoonist and columnist, and author of the graphic novel, "The Stringer," to discuss the chances that Joe Biden runs for reelection in 2024 and who might take his place if he does not, the mismanagement of the COVID-19 pandemic, and how capitalism pushes out working and poor people from their communities and restricts the necessities of life.

By Any Means Necessary
How Climate Resilience Project Funding May Still Mostly Go To White Communities

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 15:33


In this segment of By Any Means Necessary, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Anthony Rogers Wright, Director of Environmental Justice with New York Lawyers for the Public Interest to discuss climate resilience provisions in Biden's infrastructure law and the challenges that poor communities and communities of color may face in securing grants as part of those programs, the institutional hurdles that keep resources from the communities that need them, the neoliberalism inherent in grant programs, and history of racist exclusion from resources through qualification criteria.

Sustain267 Podcast
#GSWF2021 Indigenous Women's Rights and Environmental Justice

Sustain267 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 53:27


This episode focuses on a human-rights-based approach to biodiversity and gender justice, converging around areas of synergy across various international biodiversity-related fora and national actions. It introduces and shares knowledge of Indigenous women in working collectively towards a transformative global agenda for women and girls and environmental justice. This episode is from the 2021 Global South Women's Forum on Sustainable Development hosted by International Women's Rights Action Watch Asia Pacific, a feminist organisation committed to the full realisation of women's human rights through the pursuit of equality. Speakers: Edna Kaptoyo, PAWANKA Fund, Kenya  Kanlaya Chularattakor, Indigenous Women Network in Thailand (IWNT), Thailand  Aydah Akao, Network of Indigenous Peoples in the Solomon Islands (NIPS), Solomon Islands  Sushila Kumari Thapa Magar, FIMI, Nepal Click to watch the  Thengapalli film Find Lulu Kitololo on her website or on her social media pages Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook Watch the episode with visuals here and watch all 23 sessions of the forum on the IWRAW youtube channel here

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Omicron, Senator Kyrsten Sinema stands for Fiscal Responsibility, and More

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice—God Bless America this is the Steve Gruber Show—FIERCE AND FEARLESS – in Pursuit of the truth—   Here are 3 big things you need to know right now—   ONE—  Omicron—run for your lives—its nothing but death and destruction—or its not—who do you trust? Damn—that's a tough question isn't it—   TWO—  So—Joe Biden was wheelin through this great country—riding the ribbons of highway behind the wheel of an 18 wheeler—before intervening in the 6 Day War in 1967—I mean Forrest Gump has nothing on this guy—   THREE— The biggest nightmare for the Democrats today is quite a shock actually—because it's a very progressive blonde—self professed bi-sexual from Arizona—   Better known as Senator Kyrsten Sinema—but despite her very open ideas on relationships—when it comes to fiscal responsibility—she can still do basic math—   And man does that light up those on the left like a Christmas Tree— I mean a non- denominational Christmas tree of course that is really more of a secular tree—don't want to unintentionally misappropriate someone's culture—I am so ashamed—   And of course it would be A Christmas Tree from a sustainable forest of course—I mean don't get too carried away— good Lord you gotta keep the Green Warriors and Environmental Justice warriors in mind— during this holiday season too—   Yes—   Those on the left have their hair on fire—and their anger is re-focusing on a new villain—   Switching from Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia—the Coal Meister—to the Sinister Sinema—who is making it clear again—she is not going to be intimidated by mathematically uppity former bar tenders or anti- semitic brother marrying America hating immigrants—   And she is not going to back down to some old school political hack— that was kicked out of communist training camp—because he was too lazy—before he sluffed off to Moscow for his honeymoon—before getting on the gummint check for the rest of his—honestly worthless commie life—   At any rate the Senator could send Dianne Feinstein and the rest of the old white loathing white octogenarians to their graves if she continues to stand in the gap of American destruction at the hands of socialist democrats—  

Sh!t Gets Weird
The Terrified Teens of TikTok

Sh!t Gets Weird

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 75:04


In this edition of the Workers Cauldron, we are headed over to the strange world of TikTok, where a new folklore is developing around creatures appropriated from indigenous American spiritualities.  These spirits, oddly euphemized as “Flesh Pedestrians” and “Windy Bois," are said to steal unwary hikers off trails and into the deep forests of North America. We break these stories down, and discuss how this form of appropriation sidesteps the very real history of colonialism, to the horrors of Canadian residential schools to Kit Carson's brutal attempt at ethnic cleansing in the American Southwest.Bonus Material: Deer that are not deer. They are #notdeerSources:Shawn Smallman, Dangerous Spirits: The Windigo in Myth and HistoryJack Forbes, Columbus and Other Cannibals: The Wetiko Disease of Exploitation, Imperialism, and TerrorismDina Gilio-Whitaker, As Long as Grass Grows: The Indigenous Fight for Environmental Justice, from Colonization to Standing RockCBS "We're not just relics of the past": How #NativeTikTok is preserving Indigenous cultures and inspiring a younger generationDazed Digital: Skinwalkers: the creepy creatures terrifying TikTokNoah Nez ,Native Skeptic, SkinwalkersAdrienne Keene, Native Appropriations, Magic in North America Part 1, ughLong Walk: Tears of the NavajoRobert Fletcher: Connection with nature is an oxymoron: A political ecology of “nature-deficit disorder”JD Sword, Not Deer,  or a Deer?SPECIAL SHOUT OUT TO WIDE ATLANTIC WEIRD AND The BEER LADIES PODCASTSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/theworkerscauldron)

World Changing Ideas
How We Can Tackle Climate Equity With the World's Oldest Tech: Trees

World Changing Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 25:32


Environmental Justice covers a lot of areas, including cultural, social, and economic elements. On this episode, we wanted to dive into how tree equity can help create more socioeconomic equity in urban landscapes. Talib chatted with Maisie Hughes, the senior director of urban forestry at American Forests about the wide-ranging benefits of planting and maintaining more trees in cities. For more information, check out: www.americanforests.org

Haymarket Books Live
Abolition Must Be Red: Ruth Wilson Gilmore & Stevie Wilson, Study and Struggle Critical Conversation

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 74:30


A conversation about centering anti-capitalism in the fight for abolition with Stevie Wilson and Ruth Wilson Gilmore. Study and Struggle organizes against criminalization and incarceration in Mississippi through mutual aid, political education, and community building. We provide a bilingual Spanish and English curriculum with discussion questions and reading materials, as well as financial support, to over 100 participants in radical study groups inside and outside prisons in Mississippi. These groups correspond with groups from across the country through our pen pal program. We regularly come together for online conversations hosted by Haymarket Books. The curriculum, built by a combination of currently- and formerly-incarcerated people, scholars, and community organizers, centers around the interrelationship between prison abolition and immigrant justice, with a particular attention to freedom struggles in Mississippi and the U.S. South. For our Fall 2021 four month curriculum, we have borrowed and augmented Ruth Wilson Gilmore's argument that “abolition is about presence, not absence. It has to be green, and in order to be green, it has to be red (anti-capitalist), and in order to be red, it has to be international," having added “intersectional” as a fourth analytical category that we hope moves us beyond “single-issue” organizing. Study and Struggle provides a bilingual curriculum to all our imprisoned comrades in Mississippi with the support of our friends at 1977 Books and makes it fully available online for other study groups to use as they see fit. Our Critical Conversations webinar series, hosted by Haymarket Books, will cover the themes for the upcoming month. Haymarket Books is an independent, radical, non-profit publisher. For more on Study and Struggle: https://www.studyandstruggle.com/ --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our third webinar theme is "Red" and will be a conversation about what it means for abolition to be anti-capitalist, centering questions of labor, time, and unfreedom. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of commissary and mutual aid for our incarcerated participants. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Ruth Wilson Gilmore is Professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences and Director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the City University of New York Graduate Center. Co-founder of many grassroots organizations including the California Prison Moratorium Project, Critical Resistance, and the Central California Environmental Justice Network, Gilmore is author of the prize-winning Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California (UC Press) and the forthcoming book Change Everything (Haymarket) . Recent honors include the SUNY-Purchase College Eugene V. Grant Distinguished Scholar Prize for Social and Environmental Justice (2015-16); the American Studies Association Richard A Yarborough Mentorship Award (2017); The Association of American Geographers Lifetime Achievement Award (2020); and election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2021). Stephen Wilson is a currently incarcerated, Black, queer writer, activist and student. He is a founding member of Dreaming Freedom Practicing Abolition, a network of self-organized prisoner study groups building abolitionist community behind and across prison walls. Follow him on Twitter @agitateorganize. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/E2OWObx5J9A Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Degrees: Real talk about planet-saving careers
Jason Swann's life turned upside down. Now, he's saving wild places

Degrees: Real talk about planet-saving careers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 29:40


Jason Swann's childhood in the rural south included living in “a small shanty in the middle of a cow pasture.” Sure, he played outdoors—but he wasn't exactly hiking in wild places. He grew up to become a financial analyst, but that career ended after an encounter with the police ruined his reputation. His life upended, he moved from Nebraska to Colorado. There, he tells host Yesh Pavlik Slenk, “I found respite in the melodic powers of the outdoors.”Inspired by his new connection with nature, Jason reinvented himself. He did what some career sustainability pros mistakenly think is impossible: He became a land policy analyst without first getting an advanced degree in environmental science or sustainability. Now, as an analyst with Western Resource Advocates and co-founder of Rising Routes, an environmental, social, and mental wellness advocacy business, he helps underserved communities gain access to the outdoors. He helped pass Colorado's Create Outdoor Equity Grant Program, ground-breaking legislation that allocates millions of dollars for outdoor activities and education to those in need. The Create Outdoor Equity Grant Program and similar national initiatives seek to address the historical exclusion of BIPOC communities from enjoying outdoor recreation in the U.S.Jason has little patience for sustainability career seekers who allow themselves to be stymied by a lack of an advanced degree. “For those who think you need to have a PhD or an environmental science degree or any of that, I say the hell with it…. Half of this job, if not 90% of it, is about relationships,” he tells Yesh. “You can learn technical things,” he says. “What you can't learn and you can't hide is your passion and love and appreciation for what you're doing.”Be bold, he urges. Speak your truth. “If you are being quiet, you don't have the power to shape the future of this work.”Resources mentioned in this episode:Colorado.gov: Create Outdoor Equity GrantOutdoor Afro: Outdoor AfroLatino Outdoors: Latino OutdoorsWestern Resource Advocates: Western Resource AdvocatesRising Routes: Rising RoutesAdditional resources:Outdoor F.U.T.U.R.E.: Outdoor Future Initiative This BIPOC-led group advocates for the National Outdoor Equity Initiative, which would allocate funds to make all U.S. public lands and parks financially accessible to underserved youth.American Trails: Historical Perspective on Racism in the OutdoorsFollow Jason Swann:Instagram: @jason_g_swannFacebook: Rising RoutesTwitter:@Jason_G_SwannRising Routes  Rising RoutesWestern Resource Advocates: Western Resource AdvocatesFollow EDF:Sign up for the Degrees newsletter!Twitter: EDF (@EnvDefenseFund)Facebook: Environmental Defense FundInstagram: environmental_defense_fundLinkedIn: Environmental Defense FundBe sure to explore the back catalog of Degrees. If you liked this episode, you'll love the conversation with environmental justice and green jobs advocate, Michelle Romero. If you're seeking a job tackling climate change, and I hope that you are, check out our "Land a Green Job 101 Bootcamp." 

Just Sustainability
Just Sustainability, Episode 12C: Cathy Jordan – Listening and rethinking the deficit-focused approach to environmental justice

Just Sustainability

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 26:21


In the final part of our conversation, Cathy Jordan and I talk about the emphasis on addressing disparities and harms within much of the literature about environmental justice. Cathy suggests […]

Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast
Rhonda V. Magee: Social and Environmental Justice (Part 4 of 4)

Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 53:37


Renowned professor of law and mindfulness teacher, Rhonda Magee, speaks to our task today to heal all separations. ‘The separation from our body to this planet, the separation from each other, elitism, borders, fascism, etc.'  We need to heal ourselves so that we can hold ourselves accountable. ‘The courts are not going to save us.' By bringing intentionality […]

Community Voz
CV S7 Ep 24: Crash the Cop pt 3

Community Voz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 52:07


In our final installment of Crash the Cop, Edgar and Jill talk about takeaways from COP26 and what could come next for climate justice organizing. Many thanks to Front and Centered for producing this podcast series with Jill and Edgar.Songs in this episode:Somos Sur by Ana TijouxSupport the show (https://foodjustice.ourpowerbase.net/civicrm/contribute/transact?reset=1&id=2)

Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast
Kritee Kanko: Social and Environmental Justice (Part 3 of 4)

Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 64:52


In this powerful talk, Sensei and Climate Scientist Kritee Kanko begins by underscoring the importance of addressing trauma for activism. To hear each other we need to be in our comfort zones. ‘Our communities need to have the skills to face and compost trauma… for communities of color, the climate crisis is another layer of […]

Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast
Dekila Chungyalpa: Social and Environmental Justice (Part 2 of 4)

Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 63:33


In the second talk of the morning session, Dekila Chungyalpa, Director of the Loka Initiative at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, differentiates between eco-anxiety, and solastalgia. She speaks about her work in the Loka Initiative, empowering faith leaders from around the world to take environmental action. She ends her talk by encouraging us to ‘…reclaim our relationship […]

Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast
Heather McTeer Toney: Social and Environmental Justice (Part 1 of 4)

Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 70:00


The first talk of the Social & Environmental Justice day long at Upaya, ‘recovering politician' Heather Mcteer Toney, points to the critical role of identity in climate solutions. Because of this nation's history, Communities' of Color's mistrust has left them out of participating in local and national climate solutions. In response, she recommends 3 points to regain community trust: 1) Deep […]

Mobile Suit Breakdown: the Gundam Anime Podcast

Show Notes With last week's general discussion of the plot of Char's Counterattack out of the way, it's time to start diving deep on specific aspects of the film. This week: environmental justice advocate Colin joins us to discuss the environment, and environmentalism, in Char's Counterattack. Plus in the research Thom explores what it might mean that the Federation is headquartered in Lhasa while Nina looks at how a 1988 audience might have responded to talk of 'nuclear winter'. From the Talkback In preparation for our conversation, Colin had us read "Principles of Environmental Justice" by the Delegates to the First National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit held on October 24-27, 1991, and "The Progressive Plantation" by Lorenzo Kom'boa Ervin. You can find Colin on Twitter at @padgettish and listen to them co-host for Wow! Cool Robot!!'s coverage of Zeta Gundam, or their own much less serious podcast about Medabots at Medawatch. They also recommended the Environmental Justice Network as a resource. Lhasa, Tibet Timeline of major events in Tibetan history from the BBC. Tibetan history via Britannica. Wikipedia pages for the history of Tibet, Lhasa, the 5th Dalai Lama, Tibet under Qing rule, and Mongol invasions of Tibet. General Tibetan history: “Tibetan Nation: A History Of Tibetan Nationalism And Sino-tibetan Relations,” by Warren Smith. Routledge. 1997. Tourist guide to the Potala Palace (which definitely appears in the movie) and the Jokhang Temple (which probably does). By She Jingwei for China Global Television Network, Mar. 26, 2019. Available at https://news.cgtn.com/news/3d3d514d30496a4e33457a6333566d54/index.html. Recent History: Tibet and China: “Tibet, China and the United States: Reflections on the Tibet Question.” By Melvyn C. Goldstein for The Atlantic Council of the United States. 1995. Available at https://web.archive.org/web/20061106021854/http://cc.purdue.edu/~wtv/tibet/article/art4.html. Topgyal, Tsering. “Identity Insecurity and the Tibetan Resistance Against China.” Pacific Affairs 86, no. 3 (2013): 515–38. http://www.jstor.org/stable/43590713. “The Monastery as a Medium of Tibetan Culture,” Donald S. Lopez, Jr. For Cultural Survival Quarterly Magazine. March 1988. Available at https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/monastery-medium-tibetan-culture. “Timeline of Destruction of Tibetan Buddhist Monasteries in China,” by Alexander Berzin. 1994. Available at https://studybuddhism.com/en/advanced-studies/history-culture/buddhism-in-east-asia/timeline-of-destruction-of-tibetan-buddhist-monasteries-in-china “Threat from Tibet? Systemic Repression of Tibetan Buddhism in China,” by Ryan Cimmino for Harvard International Review. Sept. 16, 2018. Available at https://hir.harvard.edu/repression-tibetan-buddhism-china/. “Genocide in Tibet,” by Maura Moynihan for the Washington Post, Jan. 25, 1998. Available at https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/1998/01/25/genocide-in-tibet/27c0891c-57f1-4a7c-b873-a1071d93cbfd “'Prosecute them with Awesome Power' - China's Crackdown on Tengdro Monastery and Restrictions on Communications in Tibet.” Human Rights Watch. July 6, 2021. Available at https://www.hrw.org/report/2021/07/06/prosecute-them-awesome-power/chinas-crackdown-tengdro-monastery-and-restrictions International Resolutions and Recognition on Tibet (1959 to 2004), assembled by Lobsang Nyandak Zayul for the Department of Information and International Relations, Central Tibetan Administration. Available at https://tibet.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/International-rsolutions-on-Tibet.pdf The Dalai Lama: “Chronology of Events [in the Dalai Lama's life].” From the Office of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Available at https://www.dalailama.com/the-dalai-lama/events-and-awards/chronology-of-events “14th Dalai Lama,” by Britannica. Available at https://www.britannica.com/biography/Dalai-Lama-14th/Life-in-exile “Dalai Lama caught in the middle as India and China reboot ties,” by Sugam Pokharel for CNN. March 30, 2018. Available at https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/30/asia/india-tibet-china-dalai-lama-intl/index.html “Dalai Lama opens exhibit of Tibetan art at Ueno,” by Ray Mahon for Stars and Stripes. Sept. 28, 1967. Available at https://www.stripes.com/news/dalai-lama-opens-exhibit-of-tibetan-art-at-ueno-1.18977. The 1980s Negotiations: Norbu, Dawa. “China's Dialogue With the Dalai Lama 1978-90: Prenegotiation Stage of Dead End?” Pacific Affairs 64, no. 3 (1991): 351–72. https://doi.org/10.2307/2759468. “Tibet 1985: The Last Fact-Finding Delegation - A Personal Account” by Tenzin Phuntsok Atisha.” 2020. Available at https://www.atc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/Tibet-1985-EBOOK.pdf. A report about the 1980s negotiations, based on declassified documents created by US officials at the time. “U.S. Officials Hoped Chinese Liberalization Program for Tibet in Early 1980s Would Bring Significant Improvements,” by Robert A. Wampler for National Security Archive. Feb. 28, 2013. Available at https://nsarchive2.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB414/. Press release: “Sino-Tibetan Contacts to Resume,” by Chhime R. Chhoekyapa from the Office of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, including an annexed timeline of negotiations between the Dalai Lama and Beijing. May 2, 2008. Available at https://www.c3sindia.org/geopolitics-strategy/sino-tibetan-contacts-to-resume/ Additional relevant Wikipedia entries on the "Great Game," the 1959 Tibetan uprising, Tibetan unrest 1987-1989, the Tibet Autonomous Region, Chushi Gangdruk, the Tibetan independence movement, the Convention of Lhasa, and the Seventeen Point Agreement. Japan, Chernobyl, & Nuclear Anxiety Wikipedia pages for the Chernobyl disaster, its effects, and its cultural impact, Page on the Chernobyl accident from the World Nuclear Association. About the "Red Forest." Page on the "Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident." Wikipedia pages for the band The Blue Hearts (ザ・ブルーハーツ), and for "On Your Mark," the Change and Aska song with the Ghibli/Miyazaki AMV (anime music video). Radiophobia. Specific pages on the nuclear-power debate, the anti-nuclear movement (in general and in Japan), and anti-nuclear organizations. Japanese-language page on the anti-nuclear movement. Website for the Citizens Nuclear Information Center (原子力資料情報室) (shortened to CNIC), a Japanese anti-nuclear organization (in Japanese), History and timeline for CNIC (in English). CNIC English-language newsletters, Oct. 1987, Dec.1987, and Jan-Feb 1988. Contemporary articles the Chernobyl disaster: Silk, L. (1986, May 02). Economic scene|: Chernobyl's world impact. New York Times (1923-) Retrieved from https://www.proquest.com/historical-newspapers/economic-scene/docview/110930284/se-2?accountid=35927 Hudson, Richard L., Terence Roth. "Chernobyl: Coping with Consequences --- Lingering Fallout: A Year Later, Mishap at Chernobyl Damps Atom-Power Industry --- Siemens Plant-Building Unit Battles Germany's Greens, Seeks to Reassure Public --- in Britain, Cuddly Reactors." Wall Street Journal Apr 23 1987, Eastern edition ed.: 1. ProQuest. 10 Nov. 2021. STUART D. "BIG AREA STRICKEN: SPREAD OF RADIOACTIVITY WAS FAR GREATER THAN INDICATED BEFORE FALLOUT FROM CHERNOBYL DISASTER AFFECTED LARGER AREA THAN FIRST REPORTED." New York Times (1923-) Aug 22 1986: 2. ProQuest. 10 Nov. 2021. Taylor, Robert E. "Scope of Chernobyl Accident is Unclear to West as Fallout Continues to Spread." Wall Street Journal May 05 1986, Eastern edition ed.: 1. ProQuest. 10 Nov. 2021. "Panel Says Japan should Boost Nuclear Power use." Wall Street Journal Jul 21 1986, Eastern edition ed.: 1. ProQuest. 10 Nov. 2021. WEINSTEIN, BERNARD L. and HAROLD T. GROSS. "Japan is Spending Heavily to Avoid Oil." New York Times (1923-), Mar 27, 1988, pp. 1. ProQuest, https://www.proquest.com/historical-newspapers/japan-is-spending-heavily-avoid-oil/docview/110543916/se-2?accountid=35927. ERIK E. "After Accident at the Soviet Station, Nuclear Power is Questioned again." New York Times (1923-), May 02, 1986, pp. 1. ProQuest, https://www.proquest.com/historical-newspapers/after-accident-at-soviet-station-nuclear-power-is/docview/110943137/se-2?accountid=35927. Other articles and papers: Zhukova, Ekatherina. “Foreign Aid and Identity after the Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster: How Belarus Shapes Relations with Germany, Europe, Russia, and Japan.” Cooperation and Conflict, vol. 52, no. 4, Sage Publications, Ltd., 2017, pp. 485–501, https://www.jstor.org/stable/48590276. Okabe, Aki. “Japan Reacts to Chernobyl.” Earth Island Journal, vol. 2, no. 2, Earth Island Institute, 1987, pp. 14–15, http://www.jstor.org/stable/43881866. Great book about film director and screenwriter Honda Ishiro (本多 猪四郎): Ryfle, Steve, et al. Ishiro Honda: A Life in Film, from Godzilla to Kurosawa. Wesleyan University Press, 2017. English and Japanese Wikipedia pages for the Kurosawa Akira (黒澤 明) film, 生きものの記録 or "I Live in Fear." About the Stanley Kubrick film "Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb." Not mentioned in the research but when I was editing and got to the part about Nazi scientists, I remember the existence of this satirical song, "Wernher Von Braun" by Thomas Andrew Lehrer (1965). Mobile Suit Breakdown is written, recorded, and produced within Lenapehoking, the ancestral and unceded homeland of the Lenape, or Delaware, people. Before European settlers forced them to move west, the Lenape lived in New York City, New Jersey, and portions of New York State, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Connecticut. Lenapehoking is still the homeland of the Lenape diaspora, which includes communities living in Oklahoma, Wisconsin, and Ontario. You can learn more about Lenapehoking, the Lenape people, and ongoing efforts to honor the relationship between the land and indigenous peoples by visiting the websites of the Delaware Tribe and the Manhattan-based Lenape Center. Listeners in the Americas and Oceania can learn more about the indigenous people of your area at https://native-land.ca/. We would like to thank The Lenape Center for guiding us in creating this living land acknowledgment. You can subscribe to Mobile Suit Breakdown for free! on fine Podcast services everywhere and on YouTube, visit our website GundamPodcast.com, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, or email your questions, comments, and complaints to gundampodcast@gmail.com. Mobile Suit Breakdown wouldn't exist without the support of our fans and Patrons! You can join our Patreon to support the podcast and enjoy bonus episodes, extra out-takes, behind-the-scenes photos and video, MSB gear, and much more! The intro music is WASP by Misha Dioxin, and the outro is Long Way Home by Spinning Ratio, both licensed under Creative Commons CC BY 4.0 licenses. All music used in the podcast has been edited to fit the text. Mobile Suit Breakdown provides critical commentary and is protected by the Fair Use clause of the United States Copyright law. Gundam content is copyright and/or trademark of Sunrise Inc., Bandai, Sotsu Agency, or its original creator. Mobile Suit Breakdown is in no way affiliated with or endorsed by Sunrise, Bandai, Sotsu, or any of their subsidiaries, employees, or associates and makes no claim to own Gundam or any of the copyrights or trademarks related to it. Copyrighted content used in Mobile Suit Breakdown is used in accordance with the Fair Use clause of the United States Copyright law. Any queries should be directed to gundampodcast@gmail.com

What A Day
Legislating Environmental Justice with EPA's Michael Regan

What A Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 26:35


House Democrats are on the verge of passing President Biden's Build Back Better bill, and once they do, it will head to the Senate. The $1.9 trillion social spending bill is a key part of Biden's agenda. Both that legislation and the recently passed infrastructure bill have provisions to address climate change. And all this week, EPA administrator Michael Regan has been touring the country to get a first-hand look at polluted communities fighting for environmental justice. Regan joins us to discuss how those bills could lead to better investments in these communities, climate change, and more.  And in headlines: Julius Jones's death sentence was commuted to life in prison, more than 400 Iraqis flew home after weeks of life-threatening conditions at the Belarus-Poland border, and two Iranian nationals were indicted for interfering in the 2020 U.S. presidential election. Show Notes: EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan to Embark on “Journey to Justice” Tour – https://bit.ly/3nsRBHs The Guardian: “Residents of Louisiana's Cancer Alley hopeful for action after EPA head's visit” – https://bit.ly/3CzHqVE For a transcript of this episode, please visit crooked.com/whataday Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Community Voz
CV S7 Ep 23: Crash the Cop pt 2

Community Voz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 38:45


Our second installment of Crash the Cop is a series of short podcast interviews produced by Front and Centered with Jill Mangaliman and Edgar Franks. Tune in to hear updates from Glasgow on inclusion, exclusion, gender equity, worker rights, haggis and who's showing up late at the hostel.You can see photos and videos from Edgar's trip on Front and Centered's landing page designed specifically for #CrashtheCop.Songs in this episode:Right On by the RootsAll the Good Girls Go to Hell by Billie EilishSupport the show (https://foodjustice.ourpowerbase.net/civicrm/contribute/transact?reset=1&id=2)

Locus Focus
Environmental Justice for Cully Neighborhood

Locus Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


Louisiana Considered Podcast
Louisiana Considered: What is “blue hydrogen?”

Louisiana Considered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 24:30


We speak with two environmental resource experts about an effort to produce green energy in Louisiana. Adam Voshosted this Thursday's episode of Louisiana Considered. The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources' Patrick Courregesexplains the process of “carbon sequestration,” or removing carbon during chemical processing and pumping it underground instead of releasing it into the atmosphere. In October, industrial gas supplier Air Products announced a $4.5 billion facility will be built in the state incorporating carbon sequestration technology. The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice's Monique Hardenexplains why Air Products' plant may not be able to fulfill the company's promises, and how its effects could harm Louisiana communities. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Allow Us to Rethriftrodeuce Ourselves
How I Thrift It: @CaliThriftQueen on Reselling, Fast Fashion, Environmental Justice

Allow Us to Rethriftrodeuce Ourselves

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 42:08


We interview Eidah @calithriftqueen, an LA-based fashion reseller and thrifter. The post How I Thrift It: @CaliThriftQueen on Reselling, Fast Fashion, Environmental Justice appeared first on Dina's Days.

The Capitol Pressroom
Environmental advocates urge state to prioritize all-electric homes

The Capitol Pressroom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 14:57


Nov. 9, 2021 - Environmentalists are calling on Gov. Kathy Hochul to transition 2 million homes to energy-efficient, all-electric residences by 2030, in order to make a dent in the state's greenhouse gas emissions, according to Lisa Marshall, of Mothers Out Front NY, and Sonal Jessel, of WE ACT for Environmental Justice.

Your Call
This year's American Indian Film Festival tackles addiction, environmental justice, and sovereignty

Your Call

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 52:29


Breaking Green Ceilings
EP 55: Running for Social and Environmental Justice

Breaking Green Ceilings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 63:26


Rocio Villalobos is from Austin, Texas. She's an avid trail runner who promotes mental health, having experienced her own challenges and finding a place to belong in nature. She runs to promote Indigenous values around running to heal the soul and healing one's relationship to the land and to raise awareness on the importance of increasing racial representation in the outdoors. She is also a mentor who helps connect young people to nature and themselves. In addition, she is also an environmental and social justice activist who is fighting to promote a healthy community in her East Austin neighborhood which is predominantly Latinx and a Black community and has experienced environmental injustices. Last but not least, she is currently working with the City of Austin's equity office as an immigrant affairs coordinator. Connect with Rocio IG: @thexicanaexplorer Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rociodelrosario Follow Breaking Green Ceilings IG - @breaking_green_ceilings Twitter - @breaking_green_ceilings

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Dr Aaron Carroll of Indiana University and Senator Jeff Merkley of Oregon Episode 464

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 99:38


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more 40 mins Dr Aaron Carroll is one of my closest friends and one of the finest people I know. He is one of the most reasonable and thoughtful guys as well. He is a professor of pediatrics and associate dean for research mentoring at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He is also vice president for faculty development at The Regenstrief Institute. And now Aaron is the Chief Health Officer at IU. Dr. Carroll's research focuses on the study of information technology to improve pediatric care and areas of health policy including cost-effectiveness of care and health care financing reform. He is the author of The Bad Food Bible and the co-author of three additional books on medical myths. Subscribe to his YouTube Channel Buy his books Read him at The NY Times   For decades, three distinct crises have been mounting in intensity and urgency. A democracy crisis: massive sums of dark money in politics, more and more obstacles to Americans exercising their freedom to vote, gerrymandering of districts, and the corruption of our government to benefit the most powerful and privileged among us. A climate crisis that threatens the well-being of our families and our businesses while costing lives around the world. And an opportunity crisis: rising costs and stagnating wages that keep countless families from the good paying jobs, affordable housing, quality education, and reliable health care that are the foundations for families to thrive. Every Oregonian, and every American—regardless of the color of their skin, their zip code, or their income—deserves the same opportunity to make a better life for themselves and their families. But for years, the powerful and the privileged have been calling the shots, playing on fears and resentments to divide us from each other, and stacking the deck in their own favor. Jeff is fighting to take on the powerful and put power back in the hands of the people. He's taking on the stagnant wages and the lack of affordable housing in America, leading the fight to get dark money out of politics, and fighting against efforts that rob millions of Americans of their freedom to vote. In the face of the greatest existential crisis of our lifetimes, Jeff has stood up for bold climate action. He's fought to protect Oregon's coastal and agricultural economies from the effects of climate chaos, and has brought labor unions and environmental leaders together to craft bold new legislation to curb emissions and strengthen protections for America's workers. His innovative proposals have earned the support of union leaders and climate advocates alike, helping to build a climate strategy that not only safeguards the planet but will build a stronger future for America's working families. And in the face of the privileged and powerful trying to stack the decks against working Americans, Jeff has taken on David vs. Goliath fights to ensure that today's kids have the same opportunities he did as the son of a blue collar family. That means he has drafted innovative affordable housing reforms, stood up for student borrowers, cracked down on predatory colleges, and has fought to expand access to affordable, high-quality health care and bring down drug prices—because no hardworking Oregonian should be homeless or crushed by a burden of medical or student loan debt. In some of the world's darkest moments in recent history, Jeff has emerged as a leading voice for protecting human rights—from advocating for solutions to our broken immigration and asylum process, to condemning the internment and torture of over one million Uyghurs and other predominantly Muslim minorities by the Chinese government. In June 2018, Jeff sparked a national outcry when he went to the border to investigate the Trump administration's child separation policy and was turned away from a child detention center. Jeff has remained a champion for human rights and has continued to bring scrutiny and public pressure to push back on the cruel treatment of children seeking asylum. Jeff is a member of the Appropriations Committee, where he Chairs the Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies; the Environment and Public Works Committee, where he Chairs the Subcommittee on Chemical Safety, Waste Management, Environmental Justice, and Regulatory Oversight; the Budget Committee; the Rules Committee; and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. He is also the Chair of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China. He and his wife Mary Sorteberg, a nurse, have been married for more than twenty years and have two children, Brynne and Jonathan. Senator Jeff Merkley comes from a family of fighters. According to family lore, his grandmother lived for a time in a boxcar during the Great Depression. Jeff's mother stretched a dollar as far as anyone possibly could, and his father overcame a serious illness and went on to work in a lumber mill and become a union machinist. Life wasn't glamorous, but together, Jeff's parents saved enough to buy a modest home, take their children on annual camping vacations, and retire comfortably after a lifetime of contributing to their community. Jeff learned to take that same determination his father took with him to the lumber mill into the classroom—and with the help of his public school teachers, Jeff went on to be the first in his family to graduate from college. He returned to the same blue collar community in Oregon where he grew up, and led non-profits to help Oregonians put roofs over their heads. When he was elected to the Oregon House, he hit the ground running for working families, creating the state's first-ever rainy day fund, expanding access to affordable prescription drugs, protecting LGBTQ Oregonians from discrimination, and throwing predatory payday lenders out of the state for good. And now, as a U.S. Senator for Oregon, Jeff has continued to be a champion for everyday people—at a time when the people need a champion more than ever. For decades, three distinct crises have been mounting in intensity and urgency. A democracy crisis: massive sums of dark money in politics, more and more obstacles to Americans exercising their freedom to vote, gerrymandering of districts, and the corruption of our government to benefit the most powerful and privileged among us. A climate crisis that threatens the well-being of our families and our businesses while costing lives around the world. And an opportunity crisis: rising costs and stagnating wages that keep countless families from the good paying jobs, affordable housing, quality education, and reliable health care that are the foundations for families to thrive. Every Oregonian, and every American—regardless of the color of their skin, their zip code, or their income—deserves the same opportunity to make a better life for themselves and their families. But for years, the powerful and the privileged have been calling the shots, playing on fears and resentments to divide us from each other, and stacking the deck in their own favor. Jeff is fighting to take on the powerful and put power back in the hands of the people. He's taking on the stagnant wages and the lack of affordable housing in America, leading the fight to get dark money out of politics, and fighting against efforts that rob millions of Americans of their freedom to vote. In the face of the greatest existential crisis of our lifetimes, Jeff has stood up for bold climate action. He's fought to protect Oregon's coastal and agricultural economies from the effects of climate chaos, and has brought labor unions and environmental leaders together to craft bold new legislation to curb emissions and strengthen protections for America's workers. His innovative proposals have earned the support of union leaders and climate advocates alike, helping to build a climate strategy that not only safeguards the planet but will build a stronger future for America's working families. And in the face of the privileged and powerful trying to stack the decks against working Americans, Jeff has taken on David vs. Goliath fights to ensure that today's kids have the same opportunities he did as the son of a blue collar family. That means he has drafted innovative affordable housing reforms, stood up for student borrowers, cracked down on predatory colleges, and has fought to expand access to affordable, high-quality health care and bring down drug prices—because no hardworking Oregonian should be homeless or crushed by a burden of medical or student loan debt. In some of the world's darkest moments in recent history, Jeff has emerged as a leading voice for protecting human rights—from advocating for solutions to our broken immigration and asylum process, to condemning the internment and torture of over one million Uyghurs and other predominantly Muslim minorities by the Chinese government. In June 2018, Jeff sparked a national outcry when he went to the border to investigate the Trump administration's child separation policy and was turned away from a child detention center. Jeff has remained a champion for human rights and has continued to bring scrutiny and public pressure to push back on the cruel treatment of children seeking asylum. Jeff is a member of the Appropriations Committee, where he Chairs the Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies; the Environment and Public Works Committee, where he Chairs the Subcommittee on Chemical Safety, Waste Management, Environmental Justice, and Regulatory Oversight; the Budget Committee; the Rules Committee; and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. He is also the Chair of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China. He and his wife Mary Sorteberg, a nurse, have been married for more than twenty years and have two children, Brynne and Jonathan. Sen Jeff Merkley Social media  Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page  

Unlikely Stories Podcast
The Queen in All of Us | Wyn Wiley/Pattie Gonia Part II

Unlikely Stories Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 25:30


With an Instagram following of more than 360k, you might have heard of Pattie Gonia. But she is more than just an Instagram influencer posting elaborate photos in five-inch heels and full-blown makeup in the wilderness. This drag queen is building a community for queer people, allies, and our planet. Today we talk with Wyn Wiley, also known as Pattie Gonia, to learn what it means to be an environmentalist drag queen, how a photographer from Nebraska found himself wearing knee-high boots and false lashes in the forest, and what choosing yourself can look like. Topics covered in this episode: · Her, him & they. · Choosing oneself. · Wyn shares his thoughts on environmental care. · The most important question: Who does Pattie's makeup? To learn more about Wyn Wiley and Pattie Gonia, follow them on Instagram at @pattiegonia. This episode is supported by Kula Cloth, the antimicrobial pee cloth for anyone who squats when they pee. Learn more at www.kulacloth.com & Instagram @kulacloth. We hope you enjoyed this episode. Come check us out at www.UnlikelyStoriesPodcast.com & Instagram @UnlikelyStoriesPodcast.

Unladylike
Environmental Justice League

Unladylike

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 39:12


How do you solve a problem like environmental injustice? Meet two forces of nature and intergenerational allies — trailblazer Vernice Miller-Travis and Intersectional Environmentalist founder Leah Thomas — on a mission to connect the dots between environmentalism, anti-racism and feminism. Unladylike: A Field Guide to Smashing the Patriarchy and Claiming Your Space is available now, wherever books and audiobooks are sold. Signed copies are available at podswag.com/unladylike. Follow Unladylike on social @unladylikemedia. Subscribe to our newsletter at unladylike.co/newsletter.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Earthkeepers: A Circlewood Podcast on Creation Care and Spirituality
Katharine Hayhoe on Her Book, "Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World"

Earthkeepers: A Circlewood Podcast on Creation Care and Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 34:41


In this episode we talk with Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, author of the new book Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World. Katharine offers encouraging, practical advice about how to engage in conversations about earthcare and climate change with the people in our lives, finding common ground and avoiding politicized terms that can derail conversations. This interview was conducted before a live online audience, and was cosponsored by Village Books and the North Cascades Institute. Guest: Dr. Katharine Hayhoe - climate scientist Dr. Hayhoe's book: Saving Us - A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World Dr. Hayhoe's website: KatharineHayhoe.com Dr. Hayhoe's Tiktok account  Mentions: 2/3 of major cities within a few feet of sea level - UN Fact sheet (see page 6) 86% of people not talking about climate change - Yale Climate Opinions Map (scroll to bottom) Washington State Ferry Electrification Plan Washington state governor Jay Inslee Carbon emissions from ferry systemAP article on the effect of warming stream temperatures on salmon Yale Program on Climate Change Communication Yale study on dismissive, alarmed, concerned, cautious, disengaged and doubtful populations Science Moms website Survey on young people's anxiety about climate change Greta Thunberg - School Strike for Climate Infrastructure bill in US Congress - current status (10/19/2021); Congress.gov's status tracker for H.R. 3684 The Nature Conservancy The Nature Conservancy's link to tell your congresspeople to support the Infrastructure bill Original interview sponsored by: Village Books in Bellingham, WA and The North Cascades Institute Keywords: electric ferry, carbon emissions, orca, salmon, Cascade Mountains, Olympic Mountains, climate deniers, climate change, global warming, ecodespair, community development, environmental jus

The Laura Flanders Show
Community Safety in a Time of Insurrection

The Laura Flanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 29:46


Join us live Sunday October 24th 7pm ET for a online screening & discussion of this week's episode, Register, for more Info and full episode notes goto=>  Patreon.com/theLFShowThe last US soldier to leave Afghanistan returned home this August, but private security personnel long outnumbered US troops in that war, and the for-profit business of training guns-for-hire is booming -- literally -- in the backyards of many rural Americans. In this special episode, The Laura Flanders Show travels to the tiny town of Hoffman in Richmond County, NC, where residents live next to a loud private training ground.They have real concerns about who is receiving training there and why, especially after the January 6th Insurrection at the Capitol. Laura interviews Hoffman's Mayors and one of the County Commissioners who approved the permit for Oak Grove Technologies' tactical training site. They regret that approval now. And we travel to nearby Hoke County, where a diverse coalition of local stakeholders — and an all-POC County Commission — were able to stop the expansion of Reservoir International, another training outfit seeking to expand its footprint near the county seat of Raeford. “The latter is an example of the power of community organizing,” says Serena Sebring of Blueprint NC. Blueprint is partnering with a statewide network of veteran ant-racist, anti-militia organizers to pool information and lift up local strategies for making communities safer.  “I don't think it's worthwhile for the county period. And it's really not good for the town of Hoffman. [We need to tell these private paramilitary training groups that]. We don't need you anymore…  Go back to the military, go back to camp McCall, go back to Fort Bragg... Don't let the civilians takeover military. We don't need it. “ Don BryantGuestsDonald Bryant, Richmond County CommissionerTommy Hart, Mayor Hoffman, NCDaniel Kelly, Mayor Pro Tempore, Hoffman, NCDanielle Purifoy, Assistant Professor, Dept of Geography, UNC Chapel HillHarry Southerland, Chairman, Hoke County Board of CommissionersChristina Davis McCoy, Former Executive Director, North Carolinians Against Racist and Religious ViolenceJim Davis, Former Sheriff, Hoke County, NCSerena Sebring, Executive Director, BluePrint NC 

Planet Reimagined with Adam Met
2.6 Environmental Justice, Green Jobs, and Politics - EPA Administrator Michael Regan

Planet Reimagined with Adam Met

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 19:47


Today's episode is with Michael Regan, the Administrator of the EPA. Earlier this year, after working with North Carolina's Department of Environmental Quality and the Environmental Defense Fund, Regan was sworn in as Administrator, becoming the first black man to hold the position. Under President Biden, Regan and his team have placed environmental justice at the forefront of all of their initiatives—from cleaning legacy pollutants to rezoning urban development. We talk about the EPA's role in the current administration, how individuals can participate in policy making, and greening the economy. Reminder that we plant a tree for every subscriber, so go ahead and hit that button! Executive Produced by Sustainable Partners, Inc. Edited/Produced by Shelby Kaufman Associate Produced and Engineered by Sophie Ewh Music by Ryan and Jack Met of AJR All Rights Reserved, Sustainable Partners, Inc.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2696 - #NoDAPL: One Of The Most Crucial Human Rights Actions Of Our Time w/ Katherine Todrys

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 65:27


Emma hosts human rights lawyer Katherine Todrys to discuss her recent book Black Snake: Standing Rock, the Dakota Access Pipeline, and Environmental Justice, on how far the fight against DAPL has come even as it's faded into the background of the media cycles. Todrys first discusses how she first came to human rights, environmental issues, and working with Indigenous communities, before jumping back to 2016 when this 3.8 Billion Dollar project was first announced as a plan to carry hundreds of thousands of barrels of crude oil each day along the Missouri River and through sacred and occupied lands of the Standing Rock Sioux reservation. After a small discussion on the dependence created by pipelines, they get into the birth of this mass water protection effort, with young folks from the Cheyenne River reservation coming off of the Keystone XL Pipeline protection effort working with the Standing Rock community to fight back. Next, Katherine takes us into the history of the land and the US' occupation of it, with no official agreements since treaties in the mid 19th Century, looking and how this specific land was claimed by the US Army Corps of Engineers as a part of the Pick-Sloan Act's dam creation, flooding and devastating certain areas of the region. She and Emma also dive into the importance of LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, a Standing Rock Sioux member that hosted the camps, which reached 10k people, on her land and gave everything to the fight, before also touching on the Sioux peoples' “prophetical” view of the fight. Looking at 2016, as the camps were growing, they discuss labor day as the marker of when the battle changed, with private security bringing in dogs and taking much more violent tactics, building up to the North Dakota Police Department using “non-lethal” violence. They look at the incredible trauma from psychological and physical abuses, and the incredible resilience from the water protectors, seen in the Tiger Swan intercept leak, and discuss the developments since Obama's “goodbye” attempt at interference, including the 2020 federal judicial declaration of the permit's invalidity, before they discuss what the Biden administration could do, and what activists are doing for it. Emma wraps up the free half with another update on the wave of labor organizing we're seeing across the country, and the importance of remembering the fights against the filibuster and for the PRO Act. And in the Fun Half: Emma, Brandon, and Matt(s) watch Alex Berenson and Joe Rogan chat about the spectrum of politicians that appear on Tucker Carlson, from the far right Bret Weinstein to Islamophobic imperialist Tulsi Gabbard, Chuck from Alabama talks convos with coworkers, and Warren from Toronto takes up Brandon's ear regarding lifting on the Left. Michael Schermer defends Thomas Jefferson by reminding us of the recency bias when it comes to condemning pedophilia and master-slave relationships, Kyrie continues to Kyrie, and Daves, from Jamaica and Evanston, respectively, call in with their own stories on vaccine hesitancy, plus, your calls and IMs! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: BetterHelp gives you access to your own fully licensed and accredited therapist via phone, chat, or video. A lot of therapists elsewhere have long waitlists and it can take weeks or months before they can see you… But when you sign up with BetterHelp, they match you with a therapist based on your specific needs, and you'll be communicating with them in less than 24 hours. BetterHelp is giving our audience 10% off their first month when you go to https://betterhelp.com/majorityreport Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Donate to the Indigenous Environmental Network here. Donate to Earthjustice here.

Blunt Force Truth
The Woke Mob & The Elitist Left an interview with Derrick Hollie

Blunt Force Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 68:52


Today's show rundown: Chuck warns that Government is NOT REASON, government is not eloquence, government is force. How is it that parents are getting treated like domestic terrorists when they want the Critical Race Theory instruction to STOP. The Government is saying that the FBI, DOJ is going to be coming into your schools and meetings and such to suppress your voice. Merrick Garland is at war with the American family. The Federal Government has NO business in a school board meeting. This week's "One Corrupt Politician" - Merrick Garlands son in law Xan Tanner, Co-Founded the company Panorama. This is the company that sells the curriculum of CRT to schools. This company sells millions of dollars to school boards, also keep in mind they sell a program called SEL which is about dismantling White Supremacy. This company circulates data and booklets instructing school administrators how to get around parents, and how to continue on teaching critical race theory. We get to our guest Derrick Hollie - Mark and him talk a little about the Ad Business. Derrick explains why he decided to step into the limelight in a public forum. Derrick talks about his work with the Census, how he was tasked to find enumerators, and what types of voters they were going after / targeting. What Project 21 really is focusing on now is energy poverty, families that can not afford basic heating, lights etc. He has been fortunate enough to have gone before congress 5 times to talk about this very topic. But under the guise of Environmental Justice, the Left is trying to shut down the oil and gas companies. Project 21 member Derrick Hollie is the president of Reaching America, a non-profit group he founded that addresses issues affecting the black community such as criminal justice reform, occupational licensing, energy poverty and free speech. He is a host of the weekly “Reaching America On Demand” podcast.Derrick became engaged in public policy after an extensive career in advertising and marketing. He previously served as executive director of the marketing firm Fresh Solutions Now and president of Global Advertising 1st. He was also the national sales manager for the black-focused Radio One media network (now called Urban One). He is a graduate of East Tennessee State University, where he earned a bachelor of arts degree in broadcast management and communications. A recipient of the ETSU Alumni Award of Honor, he attended the school on a football scholarship and was a member of the Omega Psi Phi fraternity. https://worldmission.cc/donate-humanitarianoutreach/ Give H2Max a try and let us know what you think: buyh2max.com Help us bring you the best content possible. Due to the left's boycotts of those who advertise with Conservatives, we have had a number of advertisers back-out to avoid possible backlash. Support the show and gain access to even more content at https://www.patreon.com/bftpodcast Don't forget to leave us a voicemail for the chance to have it played on a future episode. You can do so by clicking the link. https://bluntforcetruth.com/voicemail/ Also, check out the store on our website to get your own Blunt Force Truth gear. https://store.bluntforcetruth.com/

By Any Means Necessary
The Symbolic Presence of the Black Misleadership Class Only Benefits White Supremacy

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 112:21


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Anthony Rogers Wright, Director of Environmental Justice with New York Lawyers for the Public Interest to discuss a new report detailing the impacts of climate change already being felt by most of the world's population, how climate change connects to white supremacy and settler-colonialism, how the victims of those systems are the same groups that have to face some of the worst effects of climate change, and the anglo-centrism of the climate provisions in the reconciliation bills.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Patricio Zamorano, political analyst and co-Director of the Council on Hemispheric Affairs, COHA to discuss what's at stake in the upcoming elections in Chile, the political landscape and the state of progressive forces in the country, and the longstanding issues that must be addressed by the new administration.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Tings Chak, researcher and lead designer for the Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research to discuss China's campaign to eradicate extreme poverty and the role women played in that campaign, the offline and online organizing carried out by the All-China Women's Federation, a mass women's organization led by the Communist Party, the media silence about this campaign and other achievements in China, and the lessons that can be taken from the targeted aspect of this program.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Dr. Jared Ball, a father, husband, Professor of Africana and Communication Studies at Morgan State University at Morgan State University in Baltimore, MD, the curator of imixwhatilike.org and author of the book, “The Myth and Propaganda of Black Buying Power” to discuss racist, homophobic, and misogynist tirades of Las Vegas Raiders coach Jon Gruden and Stephen A. Smith's flip flopping on his condemnation of Gruden, the trend of wealthy Black people buying up property and how it fits into the myth of Black buying power, and Barack Obama's lasting almost-holy status and its indictment of the Black misleadership class.