Podcasts about qb3

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Best podcasts about qb3

Latest podcast episodes about qb3

3 y Fuera NFL
4-0 Eagles, Packers Sobrevive al Novato Bailey Zappe y Resultados NFL de Semana 4 | Ep. 739

3 y Fuera NFL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 35:44


Analizamos en vivo cada partido de semana 4, incluyendo el paso invicto de Eagles, el sufrimiento de Packers ante el QB3 novato de Patriots y la venganza de Chiefs ante Tom Brady y Buccaneers en Sunday Night Football. También respondemos preguntas del público. Conductor: Rudy Jacinto (https://twitter.com/paradojanfl (@paradojaNFL) / https://l.instagram.com/?u=https%3A%2F%2Flinktr.ee%2Fprecionfl&e=ATPyh17-lFzq32PMI6H7vacGwsBZwNIkQGo9C9pXFD4jR0czttKcXVmMy_2Zssjezt7ULS-ySmFWvOKCHhHtkzXrbUnldZ_Q&s=1 (@precionfl)) ________________ ¡La NFL no termina y nosotros tampoco! Sigue a Cuarta y Gol en:

Redshirt Heisman Podcast
Look out for Clemson ( Is DJ a draft steal?) | Redshirt Heisman Podcast

Redshirt Heisman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 29:06


How can you not be romantic about college football? There's not much like a good upset in CFB, and the TCU Horned Frogs gave us just that. A quick recap of the results of week 5 before jumping into the current Heisman Trophy race according to Vegas odds. CJ Stroud is the leader in that race, but he took a back seat to Miyan Williams' legendary performance in their routing of Rutgers. The matchup of the week was arguably Alabama vs Arkansas and sadly we didn't get a full game from Bryce Young  - so Jahmyr Gibbs decided to go OFF! A little late this week, ut we had to take a look at week 4's matchup between Tennessee and Florida to see how 2 interesting QBs got on. Last but not least: DJ Uiagelelei and Clemson. The number 5 team in the nation got ANOTHER win against a tough Devin Leary led Wolfpack, which did wonders for DJ's draft stock - is he QB3? Enjoy!(02/10/22)Music by: bensound.com

Seven Rounds in Heaven
2023 NFL Draft: Virginia isn't for lovers when Garrett Williams is playing, CJ Stroud Heisman numbers, and Jaelyn Duncan and Mazi Smith statement games

Seven Rounds in Heaven

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 64:22


After a not so exciting Week 3, Week 4 of CFB didn't disappoint as plenty of 2023 NFL Draft prospects made massive impacts. Rob Paul and AJ Marchese breakdown Garrett Williams big Friday night, CJ Stroud's continued dominance, Mazi Smith's breakout game, Hendon Hooker's bid for QB3, and much more! Then, they make their Week 5 picks ATS.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Locked On Steelers – Daily Podcast On The Pittsburgh Steelers
Steelers Right to Name Najee Harris/Mitch Trubisky as New Captains / Why Kenny Pickett Listed as QB3v

Locked On Steelers – Daily Podcast On The Pittsburgh Steelers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 36:29


Chris Carter of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, hosts the Locked on Steelers podcast, and is joined by Jeff Hathhorn of 93.7 The Fan. The Pittsburgh Steelers named Najee Harris and Mitch Trubisky as their new offensive captains along with T.J. Watt, Cam Heyward and Miles Killebrew for defense and special teams. But are Harris and Trubisky the right faces for the team? Chris Carter and Jeff Hathhorn think so, and that this could be the right tone Mike Tomlin wants to set for when Kenny Pickett may someday take over the for the offense and as a leader. But Pickett was listed as QB3 on the Steelers depth chart, behind both Trubisky and Mason Rudolph. That doesn't mean he lost out at training camp, but it does show a glimpse into how the Steelers want to handle the backup quarterbacks spot while Pickett continues to adjust to the NFL. Also, are the Steelers cornerbacks Ahkello Witherspoon, Cameron Sutton and Levi Wallace ready to take on Ja'Marr Chase, Tee Higgins, Tyler Boyd and the Cincinnati Bengals wide receivers? CALL INTO THE SHOW AT 412-223-6644 or if international, e-mail your audio message to LOSTEELERSTOPICBAG@GMAIL.COM Follow Chris Carter on Twitter: @CarterCritiques. Theme music is 'Soul Kick' by Ceddy P, and 'Too Easy' by Nerdboy. Both from their label Renaissance Music. Find more from their label here. This show is part of the Locked on Podcast Network. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Dave Download the Dave app from the App store right now for an Extra Cash account and get up to 500 dollars instantly. For terms and conditions go to dave.com/legal. Instant transfer fees apply. Banking provided by Evolve. Member FDIC. BetterHelp It's not a crisis line, it's not self-help, it's professional therapy done securely online, available to people worldwide. And they have a special offer for my listeners: get 10% off your first month at Betterhelp.com/LockedOn Elias NFL season is right around the corner, so don't wait! Find Elias Game Plan in the App Store or Play Store today! LinkedIn LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at LinkedIn.com/LOCKEDONNFL Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Athletic Greens To make it easy, Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/NFLNETWORK. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The PM Team w/Poni & Mueller
Puzzling move at QB, Depth chart reaction

The PM Team w/Poni & Mueller

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 20:20


Chris and Donny still in disbelief over Kenny Pickett at QB3.  More reaction to the Steelers week one depth chart with Kenny Pickett as QB3. Is Mike Tomlin throwing a bone to Mason Rudolph? The stunning move of the day is Rudolph over Pickett for the backup spot behind Mitch Trubisky. Chris is puzzled and said it doesn't make sense for Tomlin to go this route. A guy that was once pulled for Duck Hodges still finds his way as the backup QB. Chris said it makes more sense if the Steelers would have drafted Malik Willis or a more raw talent in the draft, not the most “pro-ready” rookie quarterback. What does this move accomplish? Chris said nothing. 

The Ramon Foster Steelers Show
The Ramon Foster Steelers Show - Ep. 151: Who are the kings of the North?

The Ramon Foster Steelers Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 31:54


On this episode, Ramon Foster and Eddie Provident discuss the power balance in the AFC North, the top tier quarterback play across the NFL, and today's 'HEY 'MON!' asks if $5M is too much for Mason Rudolph at QB3. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

DK Pittsburgh Sports Radio
The Ramon Foster Steelers Show - Ep. 151: Who are the kings of the North?

DK Pittsburgh Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 25:39


On this episode, Ramon Foster and Eddie Provident discuss the power balance in the AFC North, the top tier quarterback play across the NFL, and today's 'HEY 'MON!' asks if $5M is too much for Mason Rudolph at QB3. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Transfer Portal: A @nocontextcfb Podcast.
Week 1 Preview Pod with Eric Edholm

The Transfer Portal: A @nocontextcfb Podcast.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 68:37


Eric Edholm of NFL Media joins the guys to preview Week One and some NFL Draft talk! Can Oregon or Notre Dame do the unthinkable? Who is QB3? What upsets are going to take place? Make sure to like, comment, and SUBSCRIBE! We are now sponsored by the good people of Run Your Pool, join our weekly pick 'em pool for an opportunity to win great prizes, and to have bragging rights over our experts! Join here! https://www.runyourpool.com/auth/sign-in/?redirectTo=%2Fp%2Fj%2Fa03a852c7481416ca81553bc3f6d

Cool Your Jets
Chris Freakin' Streveler - Is He The NY Jets' QB3?

Cool Your Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 58:25


Ben Blessington and Michael Nania react to Jets-Giants and make their 53-man roster predictions. Will Denzel Mims be a Jet this year? Has Chris Streveler beaten out Mike White for QB3? Who could be a surprise cut? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Climbing The Pocket
Playing For Vikings Careers | Two Old Bloggers

Climbing The Pocket

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 71:10


The Minnesota Vikings are in Colorado preparing to play the Denver Broncos. The starters will again not play again in this preseason game as reported by the StarTribune, “Ten to 12 snaps here and there,” O'Connell said, “I don't know how much it does for some of the veteran players who have played a lot of snaps in this league when we're talking about a bigger picture.” So it will be down to everyone else playing for their Vikings careers, and maybe even bubble players on other teams. One of those players is Kellen Mond. He was selected by Rick Spielman in the third round of the draft last year. From that round, players like Chazz Surratt and Wyatt Davis appear to be in danger of losing their chances of playing for the Vikings. There are many who advocate keeping Mond as QB3. This is to see what one more year of development and cheap rookie cost can do. Hopefully, he can become a viable quarterback for this team, at least as a backup. Others advocate for more of a cut bait now approach, especially with the trade for Nick Mullens to back up Kirk Cousins. This will open his roster spot for a more productive and better potential player. Some suggest that Mond could be resigned to the practice squad. However, would he make it through waivers, especially with quarterback-starved teams that were high on him heading into the 2021 draft, or would he even want to? Kellen Mond can make this decision easy or difficult, depending on how he plays against the Broncos. Darren and Dave will each predict their final 53-man roster. There are plenty of bubble players in question like Kellen Mond above, offensive tackle Old Udoh, and wide receiver Jalen Nailor, to name a few. Let's see where Dave and Darren disagree and why. Do you agree or disagree and why? Then the guys look at the game. Besides the bubble players trying to make the team, look at the known backups. How will Austin Schlottmann look at center? Is Josh Sokol worth further development? Can Jalen Nailor continue to return punts? Now that Ryan Wright has seemed to win the punting job, are all his holds for Greg Joseph sound and true? Will T.Y. McGill continue to stand out on the defensive line? Can Nick Muse make a case for himself to be the fourth tight end? Then there is backup QB play and much more, so enjoy the game as you watch these young men living their dreams. Here are the themes for the show: Theme #1: Does Mond have a future with the #Viking? Theme #2: 53 man roster predictions Theme #3: Looking at the #Broncos game Darren Campbell and David Stefano are the Two Old Bloggers. Both started public commentary on the Vikings two decades ago on various blogs. They now do it via live streams on YouTube and Facebook. We appreciate your team fandom and your taking the time to enjoy it with us. Join us for your Minnesota Vikings talk amongst Two Old Bloggers and join the conversation! Fan with us!!! Come join the @Climb_ThePocket 's & @DailyNorseman's blogger show with Darren @KickassblogVike and Dave @Luft_Krigare, along with an occasional special guest appearance from Tyler Forness @TheRealForno. Plus, enjoy an OUTSTANDING brew from @LakeMonsterBrew. _____________________________________________________________________________________ Subscribe to us here! - https://www.youtube.com/climbingthepocket Watch the live show here: https://youtu.be/_lfnp_KmnrY At Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/climbingthepocket/ https://www.facebook.com/thedailynorseman/ Partners: Lake Monster Brewing - https://www.lakemonsterbrewing.com Eastside Jiu-Jitsu Club - https://martialartsorleans.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Behind the Steel Curtain: for Pittsburgh Steelers fans
Let's Ride: Making the case for Kenny Pickett being QB1

Behind the Steel Curtain: for Pittsburgh Steelers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 47:40


There are camps that feel that the Steelers will make Kenny Pickett the QB1 to begin the 2022 season, while others think he won't even get a hat on Sundays as QB3. Should KP8 be the guy? BTSC Senior Editor Jeff Hartman outlines why the Steelers should start the rookie on the latest episode of “Let's Ride”. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Chasing '69
23. Jets Training Camp Updates & Preseason Game Two Notes: Concerns Defensively, Garrett Wilson Impresses and Streveler vs. White

Chasing '69

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 56:21


Blake & Teddy run through all the news and notes from Jets training camp — including roster cuts, the starting kicker battle & Garrett Wilson's drops — before discussing all their takeaways from the Jets come-from-behind victory against the Atlanta Falcons: how concerning the defensive miscues are, the QB3 battle, rookie watch and Bryce Hall's slump.

The PM Team w/Poni & Mueller
Another odd cut, Batko w. takes

The PM Team w/Poni & Mueller

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 27:07


Another odd cut by the Steelers as they trim the roster from 85 to 80 was outside linebacker Genard Avery. Not that Avery is a key player, but the lack of depth at that spot makes this a puzzling move. On top of that, Alex Highsmith has been dinged up the duration of camp. The guys are concerned with what the Steelers have behind Highsmith and TJ Watt, leading basically no room for error.  Steelers insider Brian Batko from the Post-Gazette joined the show. Brian doesn't put much stock in the Mike Tomlin comment about the starting QB job being on the line Sunday against the Lions. He still thinks it's definitely Mitch Trubisky going forward for the Steelers. Brian also doesn't buy Tomlin's comments about why he took Kenny Pickett out of the game so early in Jacksonville. Brian thinks the left guard battle is still ongoing between Kendrick Green and Kevin Dotson, but thinks Dotson has the edge because of how bad Green has been. Brian thinks the move today means Mason Rudolph is safe as QB3 going into the season. Chris asked if Mark Robinson is making enough of an impact on this team to be at the heels of Devin Bush. Brian broke down the curious move of cutting Genard Avery earlier today. Brian said Hamilcar Rashed is a surprising player making a name for himself in camp. Brian doesn't expect to see Kevin Colbert much during the season even though it was portrayed that Colbert would stay heavily involved with the team. He doesn't rule out the team making a late move in camp to improve offensive line or outside linebacker. 

The PM Team w/Poni & Mueller
Still a battle at left guard in Pittsburgh

The PM Team w/Poni & Mueller

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 12:14


Steelers insider Brian Batko from the Post-Gazette joined the show. Brian doesn't put much stock in the Mike Tomlin comment about the starting QB job being on the line Sunday against the Lions. He still thinks it's definitely Mitch Trubisky going forward for the Steelers. Brian also doesn't buy Tomlin's comments about why he took Kenny Pickett out of the game so early in Jacksonville. Brian thinks the left guard battle is still ongoing between Kendrick Green and Kevin Dotson, but thinks Dotson has the edge because of how bad Green has been. Brian thinks the move today means Mason Rudolph is safe as QB3 going into the season. Chris asked if Mark Robinson is making enough of an impact on this team to be at the heels of Devin Bush. Brian broke down the curious move of cutting Genard Avery earlier today. Brian said Hamilcar Rashed is a surprising player making a name for himself in camp. Brian doesn't expect to see Kevin Colbert much during the season even though it was portrayed that Colbert would stay heavily involved with the team. He doesn't rule out the team making a late move in camp to improve offensive line or outside linebacker. 

Lab to Startup
Building the Bay Area Life Sciences Startup Ecosystem

Lab to Startup

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 73:48


Regis Kelly and Doug Crawford have been instrumental in building the Bay Area life sciences startup ecosystem over the past two decades. They continue to grow this ecosystem, making it easier for aspiring founders to translate their research to products at startups. In this episode of Lab to Startup, we talk about the story behind building QB3 that started over two decades ago; the challenges they had to overcome; the evolution of academia and biotech startups from 1970's to the current day; macroeconomic conditions that are shaping the funding and growth of this sector; government policies; lessons learnt from the Massachusetts biotech ecosystem; evolution of new research centers like the Arc Institute, Altos and others; and finally discuss ways to move more technologies out of academia to benefit the society. Shownotes: - Story of how Reg and Doug started working together - Story of how QB3 was built - Story of not believing in productizing university research to becoming champions of building startups - Concerns about curiosity driven research vs translational research - Herb Boyer and Bob Swanson founding Genentech - Changing markets and influence on biotech - Conversations around alternative research institutions like Altos Labs and Arcadia - Progress of academic entrepreneurship - You need public support to build startup ecosystems, especially in the biotech space - Credit card is a sufficient source of capital to start a biotech startup - Better interface between academia and business -  Ideas to getting technologies out of academic labs - Ways big pharma and biotech are working with startups - Need for looking beyond cancer - Workforce development to support biotech startup ecosystems - Lack of role models - Lessons learnt from Massachusetts biotech ecosystem - Addressing the lack of diversity in the botech space - Flexible space has been hugely beneficial in building biotech startups - Academic vs non-academic leaders leading startups ecosystems

The Next Pats Podcast - A Patriots Podcast
Mac Jones EXCLUSIVE: 'I made significant strides' this off-season

The Next Pats Podcast - A Patriots Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 13:41


Phil Perry catches up with Mac Jones for an exclusive 1-on-1 interview to discuss his new ‘Mac Attack' ice cream flavor, his improved diet and physique and how much ownership he feels he has over the Patriots offense entering year 2. 1:13- Phil catches up with Mac for an exclusive off-season interview2:24- Mac explains why making physical changes this off-season was important to his development as a QB3:55- Mac explains why he spent so much time working out with teammates in the off-season and how much ownership he feels he has over the offense right now5:25- Phil breaks down his main takeaways from the interviewWatch the full episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/1NOhEDWnSVoSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

LeatherBrainz Fantasy Football
42. Milf Hunters & Baker Mayfield to the Panthers

LeatherBrainz Fantasy Football

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 64:50


Coming from a return of absence, the boys discuss the trepidations of Zach Wilson, the Jimmy G dilemma, sick Scotty's Army on Slapdawg, and decide which quarterback they'd want as their QB3. Tune in!

Lab to Startup
Nodexus- Benchtop single cell sorting and dispensing

Lab to Startup

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 55:54


Karthik Balakrishnan (CEO) and Anand Kesavaraju (Chief Strategy Officer) are the co-founders of Nodexus, a Biotechnology startup that is developing scientific tools to accelerate biological workflows and make them universally accessible. Their first product is a single cell sorting and dispensing machine. In this episode of lab to startup, we talk about the problems around single cell sorting and the solution they have come up with; the evolution of technology, challenges and advantages of growing a lean operation; identifying markets, mentors, and investors; and some of the lessons learnt building a scientific tools company. Show notes: - https://nodexus.com - Biotechnology company that commercializes tools to accelerate biological workflows and make them universally accessible. - Benchtop single cell sorting and dispensing - People who built something previously are a good fit to recruit - Some of the programs that helped: Berkeley SkyDeck, StartX, QB3, NSF I-Corps - Targeting right partners, investors is super important - How to convince people to use innovative products - Feature based on customer feedback - Being a part of incubators/accelerators gives a network around you to share and learn from problems that others are going through - Careers: https://boards.greenhouse.io/nodexusinc

The PM Team w/Poni & Mueller
James Farrior shot at Kenny Pickett, John Canzano

The PM Team w/Poni & Mueller

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 28:47


More fallout from the Baker Mayfield trade. James Farrior took a shot at Kenny Pickett on Twitter in a conversation with Mark Kaboly in regards to Pickett being the third QB on the depth chart right now. The guys discussed how much should be read into Pickett as QB3.  College football insider John Canzano joined the show. Poni asked John what to make of a “loose partnership” possibly in the works between the ACC and Pac 12. He talked about what kind of expansion could be ahead in college football. John said the Big 10 will never want Pitt because the television revenue just isn't there with the program. John said there will eventually be three major entities in college football, led by the Big 10 and SEC then another conference full of outliers. He added that Pitt is “sitting pretty” in the ACC. 

GlobalSF : So Future
In Conversation with the Director of Bakar Bioenginuity Hub, QB3-Berkeley

GlobalSF : So Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 24:10


In today's episode, Darlene and Bruce talk with David Schaffer, the incoming Director of QB3 (the life science consortium of UC Berkeley, UCSF and UC Santa Cruz), on the origins of QB3, its role in generating research in some of the most challenging areas in biotech today, the challenges of making life sciences research available to companies and eventually to the public, and QB3's place at the center of the Bay Area's biotech ecosystem.

The PM Team w/Poni & Mueller
Steelers reporter surprised by Johnson, blown away by Harris

The PM Team w/Poni & Mueller

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 13:12


93.7 The Fan reporter Josh Rowntree joined the show. Josh said Diontae Johnson looked good and was surprised to see him this early after not attending OTAs last week. He discussed if he thinks the Steelers will shoot for an extension with the wide receiver. He again commented on how good Najee Harris looks, with the news that he weighs 244 pounds. He said he looks like a varsity player on the JV squad. He thinks Najee creates a lot of interesting personnel possibilities for the Steelers next season. He mentioned the QB depth chart right now, which has Kenny Pickett as QB3. Josh got into how Cam Heyward will lead this team to the future. 

The PM Team w/Poni & Mueller
Diontae in town, Josh Rowntree, Hot in Herre (the studio)

The PM Team w/Poni & Mueller

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 43:18


A big Steelers name has arrived at OTAs. That name is Diontae Johnson. Should the Steelers pay him? Chris and Donny debated what their price point would be for the Steelers wide receiver.  93.7 The Fan reporter Josh Rowntree joined the show. Josh said Diontae Johnson looked good and was surprised to see him this early after not attending OTAs last week. He discussed if he thinks the Steelers will shoot for an extension with the wide receiver. He again commented on how good Najee Harris looks, with the news that he weighs 244 pounds. He said he looks like a varsity player on the JV squad. He thinks Najee creates a lot of interesting personnel possibilities for the Steelers next season. He mentioned the QB depth chart right now, which has Kenny Pickett as QB3. Josh got into how Cam Heyward will lead this team to the future.  The AC unit was out in the studio, but Mullsy lucked out big time. 

The Say Chess Podcast
Chess Podcast Launched! The Match With Marshall, Ep. 1.

The Say Chess Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022


Hi! I have made a brand new chess podcast. You might ask how will this be different from the other chess podcasts? The Say Chess Podcast will be updating you on my chess projects, delivering blindfold chess puzzles, miniature games, and moments from chess history. It will challenge you to visualize the chessboard and practice blindfold chess. To ensure a good narration of the puzzles I have used an artificial voice, that I think does a better job than I would.In the first podcast episode, you will find a part of Capablanca's book ‘My Chess Career' that I'm covering in newsletter format. The game mentioned on the podcast can be found in this Lichess study or look below.Let me know what you think!THE MATCH WITH MARSHALL, CHAPTER IV, My Chess Career, part VII “The most surprising feature of all was the fact that I played without having ever opened a book to study the openings.” — CapablancaSubscribe for free to receive new posts and support my work.The Match with Marshall. No difficulty was experienced in arranging the match. Marshall was disposed to play in this case where he naturally discounted his victory. How far he was wrong the result proved. I beat him eight to one with fourteen draws thrown in between. I can safely say that no player ever performed such a feat, as it was my first encounter against a master, and such a master, one of the first ten in the whole world. The most surprising feature of all was the fact that I played without having ever opened a book to study the openings; in fact, had Marshall played such things as Danish Gambits, Vienna openings, or the like, the result might have been different. I certainly should have experienced more difficulty in obtaining such a result. I had only looked up an analysis of the Ruy Lopez by Lasker, on the f5-defence, but the analysis was wrong, as it did not give the strongest continuation for Black. This, and whatever I knew from experience or hearsay, was all my stock of knowledge for the match. My victory put me at once in the foremost rank among the great masters of the game. The play during the match showed that I was weak in the openings and just about strong enough in the simple play for position. My great strength lay in the end game, and I also excelled in combinations of the middle game. I had a fine judgment as to whether a given position was won or lost, and was able to defend a difficult position as few players could, as I repeatedly demonstrated during the course of the match, in repulsing Marshall's onslaughts. I may add that my style was not as yet either definite or complete, though it had a wide range, i.e. I could attack almost as well as I could defend, and could make combinations in the middle game nearly as well as play the endings where I felt more at home and was decidedly strongest. Here are some of the games with notes as I see them today. GAME No. 7.The Fifth Game of the Match.F. Marshall vs. J. R. Capablanca, 0-1Link to Lichess studyYear: 1909Opening: Queen's Gambit Declined (Lasker Defence)1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e3 Ne4 Today, when I have developed theories in accordance with my greater experience and knowledge, the chances are great against my making such a move, but then it was different, I did not know what to play, and when someone told me that Lasker had successfully played this move in his match with Marshall, I decided to adopt it. It was not till the end of the match, when I learned something else, that I changed my defence. 6. Bxe7 Qxe7 7. Bd3 The continuation adopted by Marshall in this game is in my opinion deficient. I believe that he played this variation best in the twenty-first game. Here, at any rate, I think it is better to play cxd5, followed by Qb3, after the Knights have been exchanged. 7... Nxc3 8. bxc3 8… Nd7 cxd5 at once is better. 9. Nf3 O-O 10. Qc2 h6 11. O-O He still had time to play cxd5, which was the correct continuation. 11... c5 With the idea of counterbalancing on the Queen's side the attack of White against the Black King. 12. Rfe1 dxc4 13. Bxc4 b6 14. Qe4I do not think well of this maneuver, as the attack is too slow to obtain any advantage, and on the other hand, it compels Black to post his pieces where he wanted, i.e. the Bishop at b7, the Knight at f6, and his two Rooks at c8 and the Queen-square respectively, thereby holding the open lines with the Rooks and ready at the same time to attack the enemy's center. 14... Rb8 15. Bd3 Nf6 16. Qf4 If Qh4, Nd5 would have been sufficient. 16... Bb7 17. e4 Rfd8 18. Rad1 Rbc8 Black has now the superior game, as there is no weak point in his position, and his Queen's side is much stronger than White's. Besides, the strategical position of Black's pieces is superior to that of White's. 19. Re3 Not good, as Black quickly demonstrates. Bb1 was the correct move. 19... cxd4 20. cxd4 Rc3 21. Bb1 An error, Qh4 was the only chance White had of holding the game. 21... g5 22. Nxg5 Qg3 would have lost a Pawn, but White sees chances of attack by sacrificing the Knight and consequently adopts this continuation in preference to the other, which he thought would also have lost the game with less chances of a possible mistake on Black's part. 22... Rxe3 23. Qxe3 Ng4 hxg5 would have avoided complications but would have left White with two Pawns for the Knight. 24. Qg3 Qxg5 25. h4 Had White played Qc7 at once, Black would have answered 25. Qc7 Rc8 26. Qxb7 Rc1 27. Qb8+ Kg7 28.Rf1 Qd2 winning outright. 25... Qg7 26. Qc7 Rxd4 Not the best, Qf6 was the right move. Incidentally, it would have saved me a great deal of trouble which I had to win the game. Here I will call attention to the poor notes sometimes written by analysts. Games are often annotated by unknown players who have not sufficient knowledge of the game. As a matter of fact, the games of the great masters, at least, can only be properly annotated by very few players. Of course, even the best are not exempt from mistakes, but while they make them few and far between the others do so continuously. I was highly praised by many because of the excellence of my play in this position, while in reality, I could have done better. They simply did not see that here Qf6 was better than the text move. 27. Qb8+ Kh7 28. e5+ Be4 29. Rxd4 Bxb1 30. Qxa7 Nxe5 31. Rf4 Be4 White should not have allowed this move. 32. g3 Nf3+ Very poor play, f5 at once was the right way. After the text move Black has a difficult game to win. 33. Kg2 f5 34. Qxb6 Nxh4+ 35. Kh2 If Kh3, then Qa8 would win at once.35... Nf3+ 36. Rxf3 Forced, as Black threatened Ng5+ followed by Qa8. 36... Bxf3 37. Qxe6 Be4 38. f3 Bd3 39. Qd5 Qb2+ 40. Kg1 Bb1It is from now on that it can be said that I played well. The ending is worth studying. 41. a4 Qa1 42. Qb7+ Kg6 43. Qb6+ Kh5 44. Kh2 Ba2 45. Qb5 Kg6 46. a5 Qd4 47. Qc6+ Qf6 48. Qe8+ Qf7 49. Qa4 Qe6 50. a6 Qe2+ 51. Kh3 Bd5 52. a7 52… Bxf3 Resigns.Stay tuned for more!Thanks for reading The Say Chess Newsletter! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support my work./Martin This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit saychess.substack.com

The Pylon Dons
ROOKIE QB + TE RANKINGS SHOW

The Pylon Dons

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 58:25


Ben wants another chance at Lock. Not Love, Lock. AJ summarizes this year;s TE1 eloquently. The Dons are in lockstep, except for the QB3. Wide Recievers next week. It's draft season baby.   IG: @thepylondons Twitter:@pylondons YT: https://youtu.be/1SvtvpiFSpA S/o Verse Gaming

MoneyBall Medicine
Fauna Bio Awakens Medicine to the Mysteries of Hibernation

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 53:51


Why is hibernation something that bears and squirrels do, but humans don't? Even more interesting, what's going on inside a hibernating animal, on a physiological and genetic level, that allows them to survive the winter in a near-comatose state without freezing to death and without ingesting any food or water? And what can we learn about that process that might inform human medicine?Those are the big questions being investigated right now by a four-year-old startup in California called Fauna Bio. And Harry's guests today are two of Fauna Bio's three founding scientists: Ashley Zehnder and Linda Goodman. They explain how they got interested in hibernation as a possible model for how humans could protect themselves from disease, and how progress in comparative genomics over the last few years has made it possible to start to answer that question at the level of gene and protein interactions. The work is shedding light on a previously neglected area of animal behavior that could yield new insights for treating everything from neurodegenerative diseases to cancer.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian, and this is The Harry Glorikian Show, where we explore how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.It's April and spring is well underway, even though it's been a pretty cold one so far here in New England.It's the kind of weather that makes you want to pull the covers over your head in the morning and just sleep in. Or maybe just hibernate like a bear until summer is really here.But when you think about it, what is hibernation? Why is it something that bears and squirrels do, but humans don't?Even more interesting, what's going on inside a hibernating animal, physiologically, that allows them to survive all winter without freezing to death and without ingesting any food or water?And what can we learn about that process that might inform human medicine?Those are the big questions being investigated right now by a four-year-old startup in California called Fauna BioAnd my guests today are two of Fauna Bio's three founding scientists: Ashley Zehnder and Linda Goodman. I asked them to explain how they got interested in hibernation as a possible model for how humans could protect themselves from disease.…And how progress in comparative genomics over the last few years has made it possible to start to answer that question at the level of gene and protein interactions.We've always looked to the natural world, especially the world of plants, for insights into biochemistry that could inspire new drugs. But what's exciting to me about Fauna Bio is that they're shining a light on a previously neglected area of animal behavior that could yield new insights for treating everything from neurodegenerative diseases to cancer.So, here's my conversation with Ashley Zehnder and Linda Goodman.Harry Glorikian: Ashley. Linda, welcome to the show.Ashley Zehnder: Thanks, Harry, we're excited to be here today. It's going to be fun.Linda Goodman: Yeah, thanks for having us.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, well, you guys are someplace sunny and warm, and I'm actually I shouldn't say that it's actually sunny right now on the East Coast. So I'm not I'm not.Linda Goodman: Don't jinx yourself.Harry Glorikian: But the temperature is going to drop. Like to I think they said 18. So everything will freeze tonight for sure. So it'll, you know, it's one of those days, but. I want to jump right into this because we've got a lot of ground to cover. Like there's so many questions that I have after sort of looking into the company and sort of digging in and, you know, but even before we jump into what you're working on. Right, I really want to talk about hibernation. Maybe because I'm jealous and I'd like to be able to hibernate. I have sleep apnea. So sleep is a problem. But humans don't hibernate. But there's a ton of other mammalian species that that do. And sometimes I do feel, though, that my teenager hibernates, but that's a different issue. So, but, what what is interesting to you about hibernation from a physiological point of view. What what goes on with metabolism or gene expression during hibernation, that's that's not found in humans, but that could be relevant to human health?Ashley Zehnder: Yeah, I think this is a great question, Harry, because I think both Linda and I came to fauna from different backgrounds. I came from veterinary science, Linda from comparative genomics. We can go into our details later, but neither of us really appreciated the amazing physiology of these species. There are some of the most extreme mammals on the planet, and there are hibernating bears and literally every group of mammals. Right. This is something Linda specializes in. But there are primates in Madagascar that hibernate very similar to the 39 ground squirrels that we tend to work with. So it's this really deeply conserved trait in mammals, including primates. And, you know, it kind of highlights for us what our genes can do when they're adapted for extreme environments. And so that's kind of the lens that we take when we look at hibernation. It's how do these species protect their own tissues from being nearly frozen for six, seven months out of the year, having to protect their brains, their hearts, all their vital organs? They're not eating, they're not drinking. They're not moving for these really deep bodied hibernaters. When you think of 100 kilogram animal that's not eating for seven months, how do they survive that? Right. And it has to do with metabolic rates that change 200- to 300-fold over the course of a couple of hours. It has to do with oxygenation changes and protection from oxidative stress and ischemia reperfusion. And so if you look at a tissue by tissue level, you can start to see how these animals are finally adapted to protecting themselves from from damage. And then we can start to say, well, this is similar damage to what we see in human diseases. And that's why this is such an interesting system, because it's so dynamic and because it happens across so many groups of mammals, it really lends itself to this comparative genomics approach that we take to drug discovery.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Because I was wondering sort of like what ways of healing from different sort of traumas and conditions do hibernating animals have that that humans don't, that we sort of maybe wish we did? It's sort of like, you know, almost Marvel or one of those things where you like go to sleep, you wake up, you've totally healed again, which kind of be kind of be cool. Yeah. So, you know. But when did scientists first begin to think about whether having a better understanding of hibernation might help us solve? Some of these riddles that we have in human health. I mean, it surely it can't be like a new concept. It has to go further back. I mean, what has changed recently to make it more actionable? I mean, is it, you know, omics, costs coming down that are making it easier, computational capabilities that are, you know, making all these come together? I mean, those. What do you guys. What's. What's the answer? You guys know the answer better than I do.Ashley Zehnder: I'll comment on a little bit on the physiology, and I will let Linda talk about the data revolution, because that's that's really what she knows very intimately. So from a physiology standpoint, these are species and not just hibernaters, but a lot of other species that we've been studying since the early 1900s, 1950s. I mean, these are some of our earliest biological experiments and our earliest understandings of biology. We're not necessarily done by studying humans. A lot of that was done by studying natural disease models, right? How did we figure out that genes cause cancer? So it's a little bit of a tangent, but bear with me, it was not by studying human cancer, it was by studying Rous Sarcoma Virus and how that virus picked up bird genes and then turn them on. Right and other in other individuals. So but then kind of this almost the same year in 1976 that we figured out that genes cause cancer by studying chickens. 1974 we figured out how to genetically modified mice. And we sort of figured out that like, okay, maybe we don't need to study natural biology anymore. And so I feel like we sort of lost a lot of those skills and figured out we had humans and we had model organisms and we were done. And I think now we're kind of in this renaissance where people are realizing that actually there's still a lot of natural biology that we can learn from. But it's being powered now by this data revolution and the decrease in cost and sequencing and availability of omics data like RNA. Seq and then I will pitch that over to Linda because that's really what she knows best.Linda Goodman: Yeah, yes, absolutely. You know, Ashley's right. And I think just to add on to that, that there was this issue in which there were a lot of field biologists out there working with these really fascinating hibernating animals. They knew a lot about what these animals could do, the extreme environments they were exposed to, that they could overcome, they could protect all of their tissues. And there was so there was a group of field biologists who knew all that information. And then on the other side, you have all of these geneticists who are studying the genomes of probably humans and mouse and rat. And they weren't really talking to each other for a long time. And I've been in the genomics field for at least a decade, and not until very recently did I even hear about all these amazing adaptations that these hibernating mammals have. So I think some of it was just a big communication gap. And now that the genomics field is starting to become a little more aware that all these exciting adaptations are out there that we can learn from, I think that's going to be huge. And yes, of course, it certainly does not hurt that there's been a dramatic drop in sequencing costs. We can now sequence a reference genome for around $10,000. That was unheard of years ago. And so a lot of these species that people would previously consider untouchables because they were not model organisms with a pristine reference genome, we can now start to approach these and thoroughly study their biology and genomics in a way that was not possible several years ago.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I was thinking I was, you know, I was laughing when you said $10,000, because I remember when we did the genome at Applied Biosystems and it was not $10,000.Ashley Zehnder: Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And it took I remember Celera, we had an entire floor of sequencers working 24/7 I mean, it was an amazing sight. And now we can do all that, you know, on a.Ashley Zehnder: Benchtop. Benchtop. Exactly. On a benchtop.Harry Glorikian: So. But, you know, it's interesting, like in a way, studying animals to learn more about disease mechanisms seems like a no brainer. I mean, we share a, what, about 99% of our DNA with chimpanzees. And for those listening. Yes, we do. You know, I'm sure there's people out there that, like, bristle when I say that. But what is it, 97.5% of our DNA with rats and mice. That's why we use all these things for sort of safety and effectiveness of drugs meant for humans. But. Still, I'm not used to drug hunters starting out by looking at animals, you know? Why do you think it's taken the drug industry, although I'm I say that very loosely, [so long] to wake up to that idea?Ashley Zehnder: Yeah. I think it's I think it's again, this almost reversal of the paradigm that exists today, which is let's take a human disease that we want to make a new drug for. Let's take a mouse and let's try to genetically manipulate that mouse to mimic as closely as possible what we see in the human disease. And those are always imperfect. I mean, I did a cancer biology PhD at Stanford, and there's that trope of like, Oh, if I had a dollar for every time you occurred mouse in a human right, it would need to work anymore. That's replicated across many fields, right? They're not good models. And so we're saying like obviously that doesn't really work for discovery. It's fine for preclinical and safety and you have to use those models. But for pure discovery, that's not where you want to be, right? Instead, you want to take the approach of saying, where has nature created a path for you? Where is it already solved this problem? And I think there are companies like Varian Bio who are doing this in human populations. We're saying, let's look at humans that have unique physiologies and a unique disease adaptations. And of course then you have to find those niche pockets of human populations.Ashley Zehnder: So that's not a not a simple problem either. But the approach is very analogous. What we're saying is we can use that rare disease discovery approach and just expand that scope of discovery. Look at highly conserved genes, look at how other species are using them to reverse how phosphorylation in the brain to repair their hearts after damage, to reverse insulin dependence. To heal, we'll heal their tissues or regenerate stem cells. Let's just see how nature did it right and just mimic that instead of trying to fix something that we artificially created. So it's literally reversing that paradigm of how we think about animals and drug discovery. But you have to know how to do that. You have to know which models are correct. You have to know how to analyze 415 genomes together in an alignment which is really complicated. Linda knows how to do that, so you have to know how to do it correctly, although you could screw it up very badly. So there's a lot of expertise that goes into these analyses and also again, the data availability, which wasn't there nearly a decade ago. So.Harry Glorikian: So I asked this question out of pure naivete, because I'm not sure that I could sort of draw a straight line. But, you know, which drugs were have been discovered through research on genetic mechanisms of disease in animals. Is there, are there?Ashley Zehnder: You know, I think directly it's a new field. Right. So I think, Linda, you and I have looked at some examples of looking at drugs for narcolepsy, looking at dog genetics and studies, looking at muscle disorders in certain species of cattle that have naturally beefed up muscles and translating those into therapies. I mean, there are examples of looking at animals for things like genotype, right, came from Gila monster venom, although that's not strictly a genetic program. Right? So I think this idea of looking at natural animal models is a source of innovation. It's just that, again, the data wasn't really available until fairly recently, but we know the strategy works by what's been done on things like PCSK9 inhibitors in humans, right? It's a very similar approach to that. It's just expanding that scope of discovery.Harry Glorikian: So because you guys raised money and you guys are moving this forward, sort of and I don't want you to tell me anything that's confidential, but. So what was the pitch when you when you put that in front of everybody?Ashley Zehnder: It was really that, look, drug discovery right now is really been hampered by a lack of innovation. And we're really stuck in looking at these very kind of currently limited data sources, which is humans and again, these handful of really imperfect animal models. But we can take what we've learned from working with human genomics and really greatly expand the opportunities for a number of diseases that still don't have good therapies. Right. We've had the human genome for really close to 20 years now. We spent a lot of money sequencing it. And still, if you go back and look at the FDA approvals in the last two years, which I did by hand a while ago, or more than three quarters of those are not new targets. They're new drugs for a new indication or new drugs, same drugs before a new indication or they're kind of meta pathway drugs or they're drugs for which we still don't know the mechanism. It's some small molecule. It's been around since fifties. And so like where is the innovation in the top ten diseases of people still have it changed? So like where I pulled these two headlines right not too long ago, one from 2003, which is like the era of the genomics revolution. Right? And then one from 2019, which was the genomics revolution question mark. Right. Like we're still sort of waiting for it. And so what is that missing piece of data that's really going to allow us to really leverage the power that's in the human genome? And to do that, we have to put our own genes in an evolutionary context to understand what's important. That's been that third dimension of genomics that's been missing. So it's really not necessarily about any particular species that we work on, all of which are amazing. It's really about using that data to shine a better light on what's important in our own genome. And so that's a lot of the pitches, like how are we going to use our own genome better and find better treatments?Harry Glorikian: Yep. Understood. So. You have a third founder, Katie Grabek. Right. So. Tell me about yourselves. I mean, did the three of you get interested in comparative genomics and hibernation? How did you come together? How did you decide like, oh, hey, let's do a startup and get this thing going in this area? So tell tell me the origin story.Ashley Zehnder: Linda, do you want to kick off?Linda Goodman: Sure. I think it all really started, Ashley and I initially started batting a few ideas around. We both had this understanding that that drug discovery today did not look outside of human mouse rat very much. And we both understood there was this wealth of animal data that's just waiting to be used and no one was doing it and we couldn't really figure out why. And we were having trouble figuring out exactly which animal we wanted to study and which diseases we wanted to study. And it just so happened that we lucked out. There was another woman in our lab at Stanford, Grabek, who had the perfect study system for what we were thinking about. She had these amazing hibernates our animals that have exquisite abilities in terms of disease, resistance and repair. And once she started talking about all the amazing phenotypes these animals have, we thought, wow, that would make a great study system to make the next human therapeutic. Yeah. And I think it's interesting that both Katie and Linda have human genetics PhDs. Right. So I think both of them and Linda can expound on this. But from Katie perspective. Right, she she went in to do a human genetics Ph.D. trying to understand how genes can be used to improve human health and shouldn't be rotating the lab of somebody who studied the 39 ground squirrel and said this physiology is way more extreme than anything we see in humans, but they're doing it using the same genes.Linda Goodman: What are those genes doing in these animals that we can adapt for human therapeutics? And so she brought that work with her to Stanford and was really one of the preeminent researchers studying the genetics and genomics of these species. My background is I'm of Marion, so my clinical training is in exotic species. So as a clinician, I treated birds, mammals, reptiles and saw that they all presented with different kinds of diseases or in some cases didn't present with diseases like cancer that were super interesting. And then coming to a place like Stanford to do a PhD, it was working with a bunch of human researchers, human focused researchers. They're all generally human researchers, but you know what I mean? It's a little bit tricky with the nomenclature. Generally, I have my doubts about, you know, maybe there's some chimpanzees doing research somewhere, people studying human diseases, right from a human lens who are completely ignorant of the fact that animals often also had these disease traits or in some cases were resistant to them. So there was this huge disconnect there of of biologists and veterinarians and physiologists who understood all these traits across different species and the people who knew the molecular mechanisms, even though a lot of those are shared.Linda Goodman: And so one of the things that I found really interesting just from a cancer perspective was that a lot of our major oncogenes are highly conserved because these are core biological genes that if you screw them up, will give you cancer. But there's an evolutionary pressure to maintain these genes. And so there's a reason why they're conservative, because they're really important biologically, and that's true across many other diseases as well. So from that perspective, I was really interested in this intersection of human and animal health. I always wanted to do more genomics myself and just never had had the training. Linda had always been interested in veterinary science, and so we kind of immediately started collaborating and saying, Look, look, there's a huge opportunity in this, again, third space, third dimension of genomics that people are not looking at. What do we do trying to start a comparative genomics company? I'm using air quotes here for the podcast listeners is a little bit broad. Where do you start? And I think Katie really gave us that start in saying, here's a model. We have a biobank of samples that are proprietary to fauna. We have an expert in this field. We have a model that's good for so many different diseases. Let's prove that the process works here and then we can expand into multiple disease areas.Harry Glorikian: You know, you got to love, people I think, underestimate that magic that happens when the right people get together and the spark happens, right? I mean, I'll take that. Any day. I mean, I love coming up with a plan and then, you know, working to the plan. But when it happens, when the right people in the room and they're all get excited, those are those are the most incredible start ups, in my opinion. Yeah. So you're starting off with targets in heart disease, stroke, Alzheimer's, diabetes, very different areas, right? Cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and metabolic. So. Why start with those areas in particular?Linda Goodman: So I think for us it was really again showing showing what we can translate from this model. So some of the phenotypes that we see, the traits that we see in the ground squirrel, which is predominantly one of the species we use for our work, is that they're exquisitely resistant to ischemia, reperfusion injury. So the kind of injury that gets, if you have a heart attack and you go and get the heart attack on block, you get this rush of warm, oxygenated blood back into your heart that can actually be damaging. And that's a lot of what causes damage after a heart attack, what these animals happen, they do this 25 times over the course of a 6 to 7 month hibernation cycle. And if you look at their hearts in the peak of one of these periods, there is an upregulation of collagen, which is cause of fibrosis. There's an upregulation, there's histologically, there's a little bit of damage. It's less than you would I would have, but there's a little bit there. But if you get to the end of that whole cycle and look at their hearts, they look normal and they do it again next year. Right. So you and I could not survive 25 of these attacks over six or seven month period, right? Obviously not. So let's pick the strongest phenotypes we have in these animals and let's show that we can use information from that and come up with genes and compounds that are protective in our more standard models of these diseases.Linda Goodman: And that's what we did really with the first round of data that we had is we generated four genetic targets and two compounds that came out of the heart data that we had from hibernating and that we tested them in human cardiomyocytes in a dish and said if we take oxygen and glucose away from these cells, they get really unhappy and die and we could double survival of human heart cells in a dish. And then we said, okay, great, let's actually move this into animals. And so we used AAV or some of these viral vectors to then knock down genes in vivo in hearts of rats. So we literally tied off a coronary artery and then let the blood come back in and saw that we could almost fully protect these hearts from damage by knocking down genes that we found in the hibernating data. So it was really closing that loop and saying, where are the strongest traits? Can we show that this works? And then it was really figuring out where are the really large areas of unmet need. And so in terms of metabolism, we end up connecting with Novo Nordisk, which is a publicly disclosed partnership. They are very focused on obesity. We have a model that increases this metabolism, 235 fold over an hour. Name another model that can do that, right?Harry Glorikian: I need that. I need that. I need like, because...Ashley Zehnder: We all need that!Harry Glorikian: I could get rid of a few pounds right around here.Linda Goodman: Exactly. So then it's really just figuring out where are the unmet needs, who is really interested in these areas we're looking at and do we have unique data that speaks to those models? And that's really we just try to be guided by the biology and saying, where do we have unique data sets that can answer high unmet needs?Harry Glorikian: Okay. Well, all I mean, all sounds super exciting if we can make the translation, you know, in the right way and find those targets. But. You guys have built up a significant biobank, right? I understand you have a huge database of genomic readout from various hibernating animals. Can you tell us a little more about the extent of that biobank? How did you collect the data and how unique is that database in the industry?Ashley Zehnder: Yeah. Linda, do you want to talk a little bit about the data sources that we're currently using at Fauna?Linda Goodman: Yeah. So maybe, you might be the best person to talk about the Biobank and then I can talk about all the other data sources layering on top of that.Ashley Zehnder: Yeah, I'll talk a little about the BiobanK. So we have yeah, we have a number of different data sources. The Biobank is one of them and probably one of the main ones that we use. So Katie, during her PhD, built a really unique biobank of very precisely time tissue samples from 39 ground squirrels across the whole hibernation cycle. And the reason why that timing is so important is because the cycle is so dynamic. If you don't have really precise sample timing, you end up with a big kind of smush of data that you can't tease apart by having really precisely timed data points, you can separate these genes into clusters and know exactly kind of where you are in time. And that timing relates to the physiological injuries that we study. So we know what time points their hearts are protected because those physiological studies have been done. We've looked at those time points very specifically. So we have that biobank of samples that we in licensed as founding IP at Fauna CANI literally drove it across the country in a U-Haul because we didn't trust anybody to move it. So that's that's now in our freezers and Emeryville with a cadre of backup batteries to protect it.Ashley Zehnder: So that's the founding data that we have. And that's been really crucial because I look at other companies trying to use data for drug discovery, particularly in the early stage. A lot of it is kind of publicly available data or cell lines or kind of shared data sources. And part of what is unique about font, as we literally have truly novel data sources that we're starting with that are wholly owned that we control and we know the quality of those. So that's really the Biobank that we have is and it's 22 different tissues. I mean, it's brain, it's kidney, it's lung, it's hard. It's liver or skeletal muscle. Right? Pretty much every kind of tissue you would want in that founding biobank. But then on top of that, I think what we've done with the other data is super important. Yeah. And so we layer on top of that all sorts of publicly available data and also data we've been able to source, such as human data from the UK Biobank. But I really want to hit on the point of, of why the model species hibernate or data is so different. All of the other data that most people work with is trying to compare animals that are healthy to animals that are diseased, or people that are healthy to people who are have disease. What's really unique about the model species that we're working with is we're trying to figure out why they have these superpowers in terms of disease, resistance and repair.Ashley Zehnder: So it's kind of the other end of the spectrum that we're making this comparison between a normal, normal hibernate or during, say, the summer months and then a hibernate or that has gene expression patterns that mean that it's resistant to many diseases and it can repair tissues when it gets damaged. So it's actually quite different from the normal types of comparisons that others would make. But yes, and then we integrate publicly available data from sources like Open Targets Reactance. And one of the other data sets that we work with that's that's valuable is that we go back through literature that is relevant to the disease, indications that we're going after. And we have a team of curators that mines these papers that where the biology is relevant and we integrate those transcriptomic studies generally into our database. And that that really helps with our comparisons. And I can kind of give you an example of the way that we would do this type of cross-species analysis compared to what other what others in the industry might do if they were just looking at humans or say, just looking at mouse and rat is that, you know, if you're if you're just looking at at a human study and you're trying to say, look, for what genes do we think are involved in heart failure? You would look at, say, transcriptomic, differences between healthy human hearts and failing human hearts.Ashley Zehnder: And then you would have some type of gene list where you'd see the genes that have differential regulation between those two groups. And it fa not we we look at that type of data and then we also look at hibernate or data and then we can compare that. And that's really where the magic happens because we can look at hibernate hours when their hearts are protected during the winter months. So we have an example of these are genes that are involved in protection and then compare that to the summer months where they're not protected. And then we can integrate both of those to analyses so we can say what's really different about a human heart when it is failing to a hibernating heart when it is protected. And we do very fancy types of network analyses and then we layer on all of these data from external sources and the really exciting moments where we see these networks light up with the exact regulation patterns we are expecting that is relevant to our biology. Those are really fun. And I would say the other data source, Linda, that would be good to touch on is the genomic data, right? I think the comparative genomics data. So maybe give a little context on that. I think that really broadens the the views point of what we work with.Linda Goodman: Yeah, absolutely. So that's another data source that we work with. We have a collaboration with the Broad Institute that is one of the leaders of the Zoonomia Project that has in the neighborhood of 250 mammals in a in a big alignment. So we can do comparative genomics across all of these animals. And what we like to look for are comparing the genomes of animals that have a specific phenotype to others that don't. So for example, what is different in the genomes of hibernaters compared to the mammals that cannot hibernate? And we typically do this with how fast or slow evolving genes are, right? So if a gene doesn't accumulate very many mutations in hibernate hours, then it's probably pretty important for hibernation because there's a lot of purifying selection on that versus say, in other mammals that are not hibernaters, like like a human or a rat. It got a lot of mutations in it because it didn't matter as much for those animals. So that's another way of pinpointing the genes that are really important to hibernation. And we know, of course, that some of those might relate to the overall hibernation trait, but many of them are going to be disease relevant because they've had to evolve these genes in a way to protect their hearts and their other organs from these extreme environments they're in during hibernation.Harry Glorikian: So that, if I'm not mistaken, so did the Zoonomia Consortium, there was a big white paper about comparative genomics published in Nature.Ashley Zehnder: Nature last year? Yep. Two years ago. Yeah. A little bit.Harry Glorikian: Yes. Time seems to blur under COVID.Ashley Zehnder: Yeah.Harry Glorikian: How long have I been in this room? Wait. No.Harry Glorikian: But. Can you guys I mean, because doing comparative genomics is not, you know. It's not new necessarily, but can you guys summarize sort of the. Arguments or the principles of that paper, you know, quickly. And then, you know, my next question is going to be like, do you feel that Fauna Bio is part of a larger movement in science and drug discovery that sort of gaining momentum? So I'll, I'll I'll let you guys riff on that launch.Ashley Zehnder: Linda, you're you're the best one to do a perspective on that paper for sure.Linda Goodman: Sure. Yeah. You know, I think this is really born out of the concept that in order to identify the most important genes in the human genome, we need to be looking at other animals and more precisely, other mammals to see their pattern of evolution. Because if you see a gene that looks nearly identical across all other mammals, that means that it's really important. It means that it has been evolving for somewhere in the neighborhood of 100 million years, not accumulating mutations, which really translates to if you got damaging mutations in that gene, you were a dead mammal. Those have been selected out. And that's really how you can tell these are the key genes that are important to to your physiology, the difference between life and death. And you can't understand those things as well by just looking within humans and human populations. We're all too similar to each other. But it's really when you get to these long time scales that the statistics work out where you can see, okay, this has been this mutation has not happened in 100 million years. We don't see it in anybody's genome. So that is obviously very important. And that's just this other way of looking at our own human genome that helps highlight the genes that are going to be important to diseases. And I think, you know, another side to this paper related to conservation and the fact that a lot of these animals with really exciting genomes, the ones that are exciting to people like us, are those that have these really long branch lengths where they're they're kind of an ancient lineage. And that's really where the gold is, because that helps us even more understand how quickly or slowly some of these genes are evolving, and it related to trying to conserve some of these species as well.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's leave a rating and a review for the show on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing a lot to help other listeners discover the show.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in print and ebook formats. Just go to Amazon or Barnes & Noble and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: I should say congratulations because you guys did raise a $9 million seed round last fall from a group of venture funds, some in life sciences, some more general. Right. What does that funding do? What is it? What does that unlock next?Ashley Zehnder: You. I will answer that question. I do want to jump back to your other question that was kind of is this part of a larger movement and comparative genomics? Right. I think that's an important question. I think you sort of hit the nail on the head there. We were invited to a symposium in August of 2019 called Perspective and Comparative Genomics that was held at NHGRI in Bethesda. And I think there's a recognition and actually some of our grant funding is also through NHGRI. And I think there's a recognition from the folks who sequenced the human genome, that they don't have all those answers. And so it's an interesting time where we realize that there is this kind of other data out there that can help us really understand that better. And it does feel a little bit like a rising tide. And so that's that's something that I think is important to recognize. But in terms of the seed round, really, that was meant to expand the platform and the pipeline that we built with our initial funding back from Laura Deming and Age One and True Ventures, who led around for us in early 2019. It's really saying like that initial $3 million or so is really to say like, does this work or is this crazy, right? Can we it's just a crazy idea.Ashley Zehnder: And that's what we really started to generate those first few animal studies that said, yes, actually we can find genes and compounds from this data that meaningfully affect not only human cells, but animal models of human disease. And now we're really expanding into new disease areas. We're looking at areas like fibrosis. We're looking at areas like pulmonary disease. We've got some really interesting data coming out of animal models of pulmonary hypertension with a compound that we found on our platform. We've got the collaboration with Novo Nordisk, which of the five genes that they tested in animals? We have one that has a significant obesity phenotype. So I mean, 20% hit rate on a novel target discovery in vivo is not bad, right? So we've gotten to the point now where repeatedly over multiple disease areas, we've seen that between 20 and 30% of our either compounds or genes are hits, which shows us that this is not only kind of a we got lucky in cardiac disease, but actually this is a process for enriching for important drug targets. And now it's a matter of really expanding the pipeline. We brought on a really experienced head of Therapeutics Discovery, Brian Burke, who spent 20 years at NIBR running very early discovery programs and then seeing programs go into the clinic.Ashley Zehnder: He worked on drugs like Entresto and then worked on a couple of startups after that. So he's kind of gotten both big pharma and startup experience, and his job at Fauna is to really look at the menu of things that we're presenting him from an early research and discovery phase and picking the winners and really figuring out how to take them forward and also killing the programs that are less exciting to him for a number of technical or practical reasons. So that's been really, really helpful to have someone come in truly from the outside and take a look at the science at Fauna and say this is as good or better as anything that I've worked on before. I'm really excited to work on this, and that's been kind of a nice external perspective on on the science and the pipeline at Fauna. So that's really what the $9 million is for. It's really expanding a lot of the computational expertise and and progress and Linda can talk a little bit about that, but also just expanding into new disease areas as well.Harry Glorikian: Understood. So, you know, on this show, like, I talk a lot about, you know, technology, data, and how it's all affecting health care, which this all fits into. But one of the things we talk about a lot is how crappy, terrible, I should use, you know, terrible, right, electronic health records are in the lack of interoperability between them. And Ashley, you actually wrote a paper.Ashley Zehnder: I did, yeah, veterinary medical records are just as bad, actually, veterinary medical records are probably a little bit worse, if it's possible.Harry Glorikian: And to be quite honest, I'm sorry, I just hadn't thought about Fifi or Rover and their...Ashley Zehnder: Their medical records.Harry Glorikian: EHR. Is like is the problem bigger, even, when it comes to functional genomics? I'm trying to think of like obtaining and storing and analyzing 'omics of different species. I mean, who's working on this? Is that part of the Zoonomia consortium? Right. I'm just trying to think it through, like, how do you get all this information and then look at it across all these different species. And at some point, you know, look looking at it against humans also.Ashley Zehnder: Yeah. I'll let Linda talk about the genomics side. I'll comment on sort of some of the validation, some of the externally curated data that Linda talked about. I think this is actually becoming a really important data set. It was a little bit of a slow burn to figure out how to get it and to curate it. But there are a lot of studies now coming out and not just your traditional model organisms, but naked mole rats and long lived rock fishes and primate studies and bats and all kinds of people looking at genomics and RNA seek metabolomics and proteomics across these species that have interesting phenotypes. The problem is, every one of those researchers really heads down on their own species of interest, right? Nobody's saying, oh, well, actually, we're seeing the same genetic signature in these bats that we're seeing in the naked mole rats that we're seeing in some of these long lived fish. Right. But that data is not in a very friendly format. So we were like originally we were like, okay, we're going to write some scripts, we're going to try to pull some of the stuff out of supplemental tables. It's going to be awesome. No, no, no. We have very highly trained curators who work on this data and bring it in. And we have a very standard pipeline and a process and a way to normalize the data across different studies and standard ontologies and ways to clean up this data in a way that it can be integrated with the genomics coming out of the platform. And that is a tedious and painful and ongoing effort to bring in all this data.Ashley Zehnder: Now, we have data from well over 330 individual studies, over 30 species. I think Linda, you told me it was like more than 800,000 gene entries at this point that's curated and that's kind of growing month over month. So now that's becoming part of our defensible moat, is that we've taken the last two or three years, again, slow burn, pulling all this data together in a way that it can be reused. And now we can turn a paper around and put it on a platform in a week or two. So we're kind of always scanning for these studies. But yeah, it's, it's, it's out there, but it's not always in a usable format without a lot of pain and effort. And so we've kind of put that pain and effort into getting that data in a place that we can use it. And then, of course, the comparative genomics is like a whole 'nother level of complexity.Linda Goodman: Yeah, so I can talk a little bit about how we do that within the comparative genomics community and how we've done that for Zoonomia. Because I referenced before that we like to do these sorts of studies to examine the genomes of hibernate ers and non hibernate and figure out what's different. And you'd think it would be a trivial question who is a hybrid nature amongst mammals? But it's actually not. And so along with our collaborators Alison Hindle and Cornelia Santer, as part of the Genome Project, Fauna tried to go through and categorize every every genome that was in Zoonomia. So we're talking about around 250 mammals for is it a hibernater, or is it not? And you'd be surprised how often it was digging through literature from the 1970s and someone would say, this animal is not often seen during the winter. So we think it hibernates and it's not always the most satisfying. And so it is an extremely tedious effort, but well worthwhile to go through and say this animal, I'm very sure, hibernates. This one, I'm very sure does not. And then there's this third category of animals that were unsure about we're going to remove those. And it's tedious, but you have to do that part, right? Because if you do the analysis with bad data, you're never going to find the genes that you want. And Linda, I remember you telling me when you were going through this very painful process, I think your threshold for being a perpetrator, quote unquote, was that you could drop your metabolism like 50%. Correct me if I'm wrong, and humans could go down to like 40 like in certain instances, like humans are almost there. You know, it's it's hard to know when there is only one paper about it, but certainly there are some really deep meditative states and humans and low oxygen environments where, you know, we're getting kind of close to the area where we might say that that's a hibernated, but certainly not the duration that you get out of hibernation. But it's it's it surprised me to see how close how much how much metabolic flexibility there really is when you start to look at it. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. We've got to go talk to the monks.Linda Goodman: Absolutely. Absolutely. You know, we have that in mind. It sounds like an interesting travel experience. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: So I want to jump back for a second because. You guys don't necessarily have from what I have pieced together, the normal sort of like startup story. Right. First of all, you're an all female founding team, right? Highly unusual, right? Not something I see every day. You guys started at an accelerator program in San Francisco called Age One.Ashley Zehnder: Age One.Harry Glorikian: And then you moved to QB3 and the East Bay Innovation Center.Ashley Zehnder: Yep.Harry Glorikian: And then I think they helped you with some paid interns.Ashley Zehnder: Well, we got some from Berkeley. Yep, we did.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And then you went through a SBIR grant.Ashley Zehnder: A couple of them.Harry Glorikian: From the Small Business Administration. And then a small business technology transfer grant from the Human Genome Research Initiative at NIH. Right.Ashley Zehnder: Yep.Harry Glorikian: I'm hopeful, hopefully my notes are all correct. Talk a little bit about the on ramp or infrastructure today for sort of seed stage startups like you. I mean, what were the most important resources?Ashley Zehnder: This is such an important conversation. I'm really glad you're asking this question. We had a call with a reporter from Business Insider yesterday who was talking to all three of us about this early founder ecosystems in biotech and sort of East Coast versus West Coast ways of starting biotechnology companies. Right. And that is a whole do a whole podcast on that, let me tell you. But I will say that there are a lot of resources for, let's call them founder led bio. Right. In the West Coast, which is kind of the buzzword these days, but people really supporting the scientists who originate the concepts and training them to be founders as opposed to assuming that you need to bring in an experienced CEO to run a company at this stage. Right. So I think we were very fortunate to meet Laura Deming at Stanford, who is one of the founding VCs. And longevity before that was a buzz word, right? She was one of the first longevity funds, literally Longevity Fund, and is really been a champion of founders, starting companies and really training founders to start companies who are deep science founders. So we started in age one. It was the first batch of age one. We're still very close to that cohort of companies doing interesting things from machine learning and image analysis through pure therapeutics development. And then Laura really helped us, her, her. We asked her later, like, why did you end up investing in us? She said, Well, the science was amazing.Ashley Zehnder: This is totally a field with so much promise. I just needed to teach you guys how to pitch. The science was there, right? So she helped me just how to pitch and how to use less science words in our pitches, which we're still working on to some extent. But then it was this balanced approach of taking in some venture money to really support the growth of the company, but balance with some of this non-dilutive funding for specific projects where it made sense and some of that was some of that in the early stage is validation, right? Having having funding through groups like NHGRI, having an early partnership with a company like Novo Nordisk, which provided also some non-dilutive funding for the company, really validated all of the science that we were doing because we were first time founders, because we're a little bit outside of the normal profile. For me, I don't feel weird being a female founder only because 80% of veterinarians are female. Like, I'm used to being in a room with all women. You go to a bio conference, it's not the same thing, right? So for us, we're just we are who we are. Right. But it's helpful, I think, to get some of that external validation and then really be able to use that to to start to build on programs and show progress.Ashley Zehnder: And then it becomes more about the data and the progress and what you can do with it. So that's a lot of how we started the company. There's I said there's a lot of support in the West Coast for this kind of thing. There's great programs like Berkeley Foreman Fund Talks, which I worked, which I was in as well, just about logistics around starting companies. There's a lot of good startup accelerators. I've got a really amazing all of us, how amazing a network of founders who we can reach out to on different. I got four or five different Slack channels of founders that I could reach out to for all kinds of advice. And usually it's always good to have a company that's one or two stages ahead of you, like talking to folks who IPO'd or something last year is is not as helpful as folks who recently raised a series B, right. And figuring out what those milestones look like and then particularly those that have taken mostly money from tech investors like we have all the lifeforce capital who led our last round is also has funded some very good therapeutics companies, Sonoma Therapeutics and Second Genome and other therapeutics companies as well. So I think it's it's helpful to see how people balance the needs of the companies at different stages in what you need.Harry Glorikian: But so do you guys think that you could have started Fauna ten years ago? I mean, did the support systems exist for starting a company like this?Ashley Zehnder: Well, no, for two reasons. We couldn't have started Fauna ten years ago. One is the data just simply wasn't in a place that the company was a tractable strategy. Everything was still too expensive and we had really shitty genomes for a few species at that point. And B, I think there really wasn't the kind of groundswell of support for deeply scientific technical founders to start their own companies and train them to be the kind of leaders they need to be to run those companies for a longer term. So I think it's a confluence of those things and being in an environment like Stanford that really encourages people to to try startups, it's not a crazy idea. Like people don't look at you like you're your heads backwards. If you start to start a company at Stanford, it's like, okay, cool. Like, when are you launching? You know.Harry Glorikian: I think it's the opposite.Ashley Zehnder: Yeah, exactly. Exactly. Like, why aren't you have a company yet? Whereas you know, a lot, many, many, many, many other places like that is seen as a very strange thing to do. So I think the environment plays a huge role. Yeah, for sure.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I think between East Coast and West Coast too, there's.Ashley Zehnder: That's a whole, we should have a whole 'nother podcast on that.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Well, I live here and I was I was born and raised on the West and I remember there and I came here and I was like, Oh, this is where you are not in Kansas anymore. Like, this place is different. So, I mean, I'm hoping that the East Coast is actually embracing risk a little bit more and sort of stepping out on the edge. But it's really slow. They don't call it New England for nothing. So. But, you know, it was great having you both on the show. I this was great. I we covered a lot of ground. I'm sure people's heads are spinning, thinking about, you know, you know, different animal species and how that's going to play into this. And I mean. It really does sound like I know we have to do the hard work, but there's a lot of computational effort that has to go on here to sort of. Make sense of this and bring it all together and align it so that you can be looking at it properly and make the right decisions going forward.Ashley Zehnder: Yep. Millions of data points coming together to find drug targets for sure.Harry Glorikian: So thanks for being on the show. And you know, I wish you guys incredible luck.Ashley Zehnder: Thanks, Harry, so much. This was fun.Linda Goodman: Thanks for having us.Harry Glorikian: Thanks.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find a full transcript of this episode as well as the full archive of episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at our website. Just go to glorikian.com and click on the tab Podcasts.I'd like to thank our listeners for boosting The Harry Glorikian Show into the top three percent of global podcasts.If you want to be sure to get every new episode of the show automatically, be sure to open Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast player and hit follow or subscribe. Don't forget to leave us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. And we always love to hear from listeners on Twitter, where you can find me at hglorikian.Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

The Rich Eisen Show
REShow: Scott Van Pelt- Hour 3 (3-29-2022)

The Rich Eisen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 49:39


Rich reacts to the New Orleans Saints signing Andy Dalton to backup Jameis Winston while Taysom Hill finds his new role as QB3 with a dash of TE thrown into the mix, and debate if the proposed new stadium for the Buffalo Bills should have a roof in it or not. ESPN SportsCenter Host Scott Van Pelt and Rich discuss how the late Stuart Scott, a devoted UNC alum, would have reacted to the epic North Carolina vs Duke Final Four showdown in the first-ever NCAA Tournament matchup between the two longtime arch-rivals, and if it's possible we'll see Tiger Woods tee it up at the Masters this year. Rich reacts to the NFL admitting they missed a number of taunting penalties last season including the blatant “peace sign/V” then-Chiefs WR Tyreek Hill threw at the Buffalo Bills in their playoff matchup. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Canadian Football Perspective
The Breakdown - Elks Issues & Evans Evaluation

Canadian Football Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 35:06


Derek Taylor (@DTonSC) and Marshall Ferguson (@TSN_Marsh) discuss the Elks inability to live up to their talent, Ottawa QB Caleb Evans chances of sustaining any success for the Redblacks, coaches going for two and why the QB3 debate is a waste of your valuable time and energy. Subscribe, download and tell a friend to help grow the CFP podcast!

evans evaluation cfp elks redblacks qb3 marshall ferguson tsn marsh
Translating Aging
Building networks and community around aging research (Leanne Jones and Saul Villeda of the Bakar Aging Research Institute)

Translating Aging

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 36:25


Earlier this year, the University of California San Francisco launched the Bakar Aging Research Institute (BARI), a scientific community that aims to translate breakthroughs in aging research across many disciplines into new approaches and treatments that help people remain healthy and vibrant in later life. Here to tell us about the Institute are Professor Leanne Jones, who moved from UCLA to UCSF to serve as Director of BARI, and Associate Professor and Associate Director of BARI, Saul Villeda. Today Dr. Jones and Dr. Villeda join host Chris Patil to discuss the mission and structure of the Institute, as well as their goal to bring people from different campuses together to push forward the field of aging research as a whole. Dr. Jones and Dr. Villeda talk about the collaborative culture at UCSF, lowering barriers to resources across disciplines, and what inspired the idea behind the Institute. They explain how they plan to foster communication between basic scientists, clinicians, and healthcare workers to enhance translational medicine, as well as the pathway to commercialization for BARI, and the value of building a community around improving human health together. Finally, Chris asks Dr. Jones and Dr. Villeda about the greatest challenges they've had to overcome in starting the Institute, their top priorities moving forward, and what they're most excited to achieve through BARI over the next five to ten years. Episode Highlights: Mission and structure of the https://bakarinstitute.ucsf.edu/ (Bakar Aging Research Institute) (BARI) Responsibilities and benefits of membership in the institute  Connecting researchers across campuses  Network creation and community creation Spirit of community will help attract other institutions to collaborate Providing central resources and lowering barriers to research What inspired the Institute and founding vision of Barbara Bakar How BARI will enhance and promote translational medicine, translational applications Improving communication amongst scientists, clinicians, and healthcare workers who are interested in treating problems related to aging https://qb3.org/ (QB3 )is a University of California hub for innovation and entrepreneurship in life science Path to commercialization for BARI Value of communicating with the community and including everyone in the conversation about improving human health Biggest challenges Dr. Jones and Dr. Villeda have had to overcome in getting BARI started Building a tangible community through a hybrid system of virtual/in-person interactions Top priorities moving forward and what they hope BARI will achieve in the next five to ten years Investing in the community and helping people jumpstart their research programs (e.g., https://fellows.ucsf.edu/ (Sandler Fellows Program)) Quotes: “Our mission is broad, and really focused on building networks and community around aging. And, as we've said, improving the outcomes for older adults.” “It's exciting to think that our original vision of bringing people together from across all of the campuses is really coming to fruition.” “The requirement is that you're a full-time faculty member or equivalent at UCSF, and membership brings an ability to have first priority for funding opportunities, as well as the core resources that we're building up currently.” “What we quickly realized is that there are a lot of existing resources that people just don't know about. There was no centralized place, where you could just send an email and say, Hey, is anyone in Geriatrics...collecting blood from aging people?” “That's really one of the main things I think that people will get out of this - it's sort of a central place where you can make connections to facilitate and push your research forward.” “We really took it on as our charge to provide all of these resources for the community at UCSF, so that there's really lowering of any barrier to do the type of...

Joe Kelley Radio
NYC Jazz Trio QB3 In-Studio Interview

Joe Kelley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 16:50


QB3 is Christopher “Root” Heinz (drums), Fred Gerantab (guitar) and Emek Rave (bass), 3 friends and like minds from Queens, New York. The trio's collective ability to mix solid grooves and melodies with masterful improvisation has gained quite a bit of attention just about everywhere they've set foot. Combining groove, funk, jazzy lines and and electronically influenced beats, the group nods to many different elements of their musical DNA from John Scofield to The Pixies, but it's indisputable that QB3 has honed their own niche in this heavily saturated musical capital of the world. Originally aired in 2003 www.joekelleyradio.com

Angelo Cataldi And The Morning Team
Ray Didinger: Minshew, Watson and more

Angelo Cataldi And The Morning Team

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 17:07


Hall of Famer Ray Didinger checks in with the morning show to discuss Gardner Minshew as QB3, DeShaun Watson no-trade clause to the Eagles and his feelings as Eagles preseason wraps up.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Boom or Bust: The Draft Show
Who's QB3 in 2022 Draft? Willis, Slovis, Corral and More! | Boom or Bust: The Draft Show

Boom or Bust: The Draft Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 23:11


After Spencer Rattler and Sam Howell, who's next? In this episode, your hosts Max Chadwick, Tate Sigworth and Nick Merriam break down nine candidates who can be QB3 (or higher!) in the 2022 NFL Draft. This episode is #sponsored by MANSCAPED™, who is the best in men's below-the-waist grooming. MANSCAPED offers precision-engineered tools for your family jewels. They obsess over their technology developments to provide you the best tools for your grooming experience. MANSCAPED is trusted by over 2 million men worldwide! Join the movement for all your below the waist grooming needs! Get 20% Off and Free Shipping with the code BOOMORBUST at https://www.manscaped.com/. That's 20% off with free shipping at https://www.manscaped.com/ and use code BOOMORBUST. Check out our new store on Teespring! Tweet us (@BoomOrBustDraft), follow us on Instagram (@BoomOrBustDraft), comment on YouTube (Boom or Bust: The Draft Show), TikTok (boomorbustdraft), or email us (boomorbustdraft@gmail.com)! Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts! Leave us a review and give us five stars! Intro Song: On & On Artists: Cartoon feat. Daniel Levi Video link: https://youtu.be/pGiKN9o8eNg

The Candlestick Kids Fantasy Podcast
Mock Draft: Super Flex / Redraft / PPR w/ Jordan DellaValle and Curly

The Candlestick Kids Fantasy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 64:33


On this episode brought to you by BetOnline, Sky Guasco is joined by Jordan DellaValle (@JDellaValle7) and former TCK co-host Curly (@Curly8812) to mock draft a Super Flex / Redraft / PPR league. Sky had the 5th pick. Jordan the 8th and Curly the 9th. Topics:Which early QB/WR stack do you prefer in SF?Are you taking a QB in Round 1?If you don't take a QB in Round one, are going RB or WR? Which RB/WR are you targeting in the 3rd to 5th Rounds with increased value as QBs go off the board so early in SF?Who is your favorite QB2, QB3 and QB4 to pile on in Super Flex?Follow the TCK Crew:Sky's Twitter: @SkyGuasco ( https://twitter.com/tck_pod )TCK Instagram: @fantasyfootball_tckpod ( https://www.instagram.com/fantasyfootball_tckpod/ )TCK TikTok: @tckpod ( https://www.tiktok.com/@tckpod? )Bobby's Twitter: @BobbyLaMarco ( https://twitter.com/BobbyLamarco )Fantasy Football XFactor Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/fantasyfootballxfactor/ )SPONSORSBetOnline -- You Online Sportsbook Experts: https://betonline.ag/Visit the website today or use your mobile device to join and receive your 50% Welcome Bonus on your first depositThe Jersey Jungle: https://www.instagram.com/thejerseyjungle/Promo Code "TCK" for 10-15% OFF authentic sports jerseysBombanana Hot Sauce: https://seekthespice.com/Promo Code "TCK" for 10% off orderRed Zone Draft Pack: https://draftwithredzone.com/products/the-draft-packPromo Code "TCK" for 10% off orderIntro/Outro Music: Shades of Green by Sol SeedPlease leave a 5 Star rating and review and subscribe on YouTube if we've brought you any value.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Fantasy Football Today Podcast
Top 5 QBs! Who is #2? Also, Best Movie Dads of All-Time! (06/21 Fantasy Football Podcast)

Fantasy Football Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 50:32


It's Patrick Mahomes at #1, but who are we ranking second? Let's start with some stats about the position (4:00) including a surprising stat about Lamar Jackson near the goal line (7:45). Within this discussion, we'll talk about how prolific 2020 was for QBs and what to expect in 2021 ... How confident are Dave and Jamey in putting Josh Allen as their QB2 (11:04)? Which non-Mahomes QB has the most upside (14:00)? Which Top 6 QB has the most downside (18:50)? Which quarterback drafted outside the Top 10 could finish as QB1 (19:30)? ... Now moving on to the rankings, we determine when Mahomes should be picked (20:30), debate Jackson vs. Kyler Murray as QB3 (22:22) and tell you why Dak Prescott is QB5 even though you shouldn't be surprised if he is much better than that (28:40). And let's reveal our Top 3 movie dads of all-time (39:00)! Why the hell is John McClane on the list? Can anybody beat Bryan Mills from "Taken"? ... Email us at fantasyfootball@cbsi.com Fantasy Football Today' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox, and wherever else you listen to podcasts. Follow our FFT team on Twitter: @FFToday, @AdamAizer, @JameyEisenberg, @daverichard, @heathcummingssr, @ctowerscbs, @BenSchragg Watch FFT on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/fantasyfootballtoday Join our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/FantasyFootballToday/ Sign up for the FFT newsletter https://www.cbssports.com/newsletter You can listen to Fantasy Football Today on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast." To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Colts - Daily Podcast On The Indianapolis Colts
Indianapolis Colts Positional Previews, Part I: Quarterback

Locked On Colts - Daily Podcast On The Indianapolis Colts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 35:17


On today's episode, Evan is joined by Stampede Blue's Stephen Reed to kick off our Indianapolis Colts positional previews. First up, we take a deep dive into the quarterbacks currently on the Colts' roster. Who wins the QB3 battle between Sam Ehlinger and Jalen Morton? Also, will we see Ehlinger eventually used in the same role we saw for Jacoby Brissett in 2020? Then, we analyze Jacob Eason. According to Colts OC Marcus Brady, Eason has taken a leap in the mental acumen department. If that's the case, could Eason be Indy's long-term answer behind Carson Wentz? Closing out the show, Evan and Stephen go over the situation Carson Wentz walks into with Indianapolis. Now, with Wentz having an elite offensive line, running game, while also being reunited with the coach he trusts most in Frank Reich, will Wentz return to top 10 form in Indy? Stay tuned throughout the next few weeks as we go over all the Colts' positions heading into training camp next month! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

GOAT District
GOAT District #154 (Part1) Pre-NFL Draft Dynasty Roster Tweaks & Rookie Tiers

GOAT District

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2021 73:47


Special Guest: Mike @FantasyStoner G-Units: Dan @OverhypedSleepr, Theo @TheOGfantasy, JD @GOATDistrict & surprise appearance by @JohnMcGlynn75 Topics: > PreNFL Draft dynasty roster tweaks > Rookie Tiers  > TE2? WR2? RB4? QB3? > 49ers upcoming draft & so MUCH MORE we had to cut this into TWO EPISODES! Make sure you download Part 2. AND make sure to go SUBSCRIBE to our YOUTUBE Channel so you don't miss another show.  

5 yard Rush Fantasy Football
Pro Day Rants, QBs 1-2-3, and Fantasy Mock Draft Data

5 yard Rush Fantasy Football

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 43:38


Murf is here flying solo to explain what is wrong with '40 times and Pro Days, who is going QB1, QB2 and QB3 in the 2021 NFL Draft and then talks through some Mock Draft data and the findings of that for rounds 1-6.Keep tuned in to 5 Yard Rush for more giveaways, more news on the Fantasy Football Playbook 2021 and all things Fantasy Football.

PFF NFL Daily
Ep 80 - Why is Justin Fields' draft stock falling?

PFF NFL Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 11:36


PFF analysts Steve Palazzolo and Sam Monson, just after Justin Fields' pro day, discuss why the QB3 on PFF's Big Board seems to be losing momentum leading up to the draft. Just a few months ago it seemed as though Fields was a lock to be the third QB off the board in the 2021 NFL Draft, but now some even put Mac Jones ahead of him. Why is Fields losing momentum, and does he deserve the criticism?

Fantasy Football Today Podcast
Buy or Sell Second Half Performances (02/09 Fantasy Football Podcast)

Fantasy Football Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2021 56:34


We saw great second half performances from Kirk Cousins, Jonathan Taylor and Marvin Jones among others, while Russell Wilson and the Rams passing game struggled down the stretch. What do we make of it? After Jamey and Heath give their thoughts on the Super Bowl, they'll tell you the second half performances they buy (8:33) and the ones they sell (12:45). And we'll spend some time on the Seahawks offense while we're at it (14:00) ... Cousins was QB3 in his last 9 games (22:55). Taylor and David Montgomery (27:30) were studs in the Fantasy playoffs. At WR (29:30), we discuss Robert Woods, Marvin Jones and a couple of Steelers ... Are Fantasy managers buying into what Logan Thomas did in his last 6 games (39:00)? He was really good! ... Your emails at fantasyfootball@cbsi.com Subscribe to the FFT in 5 podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, or wherever you listen to FFT. Follow our FFT team on Twitter: @FFToday, @AdamAizer, @JameyEisenberg, @daverichard, @heathcummingssr, @CTowersCBS, @BenSchragg Watch FFT on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCviK78rIWXhZdFzJ1Woi7Fg/videos Join our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/FantasyFootballToday/ Sign up for the FFT newsletter https://www.cbssports.com/newsletter You can listen to Fantasy Football Today on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast." To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Want winning picks each morning in under 10 minutes? Subscribe to 'The Early Edge: A Daily SportsLine Betting Podcast' on Apple, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever else you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rookie Big Board Fantasy Football Podcast
Small School, Big Potential: Ranking the Best Non-Power 5 Prospects in the 2021 NFL Draft Class

Rookie Big Board Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2021 40:27


In this episode, Matt breaks down nine of his favorite players from a Group of 5 or FCS school. Lost amongst the debates of WR1 vs WR2 is the hidden value of the NFL Draft Class. Fantasy Football players can win their rookie drafts by finding the underrated diamonds like Quintin Morris from Bowling Green State University, Cade Johnson from South Dakota State University, and Shane Buechele from SMU. The 2021 wide receiver class is strong, Matt lends insight on underrated players like Houston's Marquez Stevenson, Myron Mitchell from the University of Alabama-Birmingham, and D'Wayne Eskridge out of Western Michigan. He also lends insight on of his "his guys", Jaret Patterson from the University of Buffalo. Perhaps most excited about this Big Board is the debate between Zach Wilson and Trey Lance. They both have a good claim for being QB3 in the 2021 Draft Class but the decision is pretty simple for Matt. You can join the community via Patreon and get access to bonus episodes, Matt's Rookie Big Board, Devy and dynasty rankings, a vibrant slack channel, and personalized roster advice here: patreon.com/theffeducator

Dynasty Oasis
Week 15 & 2021 QB and RB Rookie Class Previews

Dynasty Oasis

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2020 59:44


@NastyNeutz and @DynastyOasis are back for another critical week of dynasty fantasy football. Join with us as we address the most pressing thing in every matchup from a dynasty perspective. Who is the starting RB in BUF in 2021? Would Carson Wentz make sense in IND? When is the optimal time to target selling Zeke Elliott shares? Neutz also makes a big prediction for the DET and TEN game. How will Taysom Hill perform in a high scoring matchup vs KC? Is the 2021 starting RB for the Pittsburg Steelers on the team currently? Then the guys will preview the 2021 Rookie Class, starting with the players who handle the ball the most, QB and RB. It's a strong QB class, and regardless of strength, RB depth is always at a premium. How do the guys feel about the likely landing spots for Lawrence and Fields? Who is their QB3? Beyond Najee Harris, is there anyone the guys see as a bell cow back? Thanks for listening, rating and subscribing!

The Goat House Podcast
NFL Teams That Will Be Better/Worse In Playoffs, And QBs That Need A New Team

The Goat House Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2020 52:53


-Teams that will be BETTER come playoff time & Teams that will be WORSE. -QBs that need a change of scenery the most and where they fit best. -Underdog most likely to pull off an upset in Wk13 -Who is the most embarrassed fan base of 2020 -Most underrated NFL players of 2020 -Favorite draft prospects/2021 QB3 after Lawrence & Fields --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Turn On The Jets: New York Jets
DRAFT SZN: Fields vs. Lawrence Comparison, Mock Drafts, Late 1st Round Targets

Turn On The Jets: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2020 41:37


James Kuntz, Joe Belic and Dalbin Osorio host our new Thursday show, Draft SZN, which will solely focus on topics around the 2021 NFL Draft. In this week's episode they cover the following: Comparing Trevor Lawrence & Justin Fields Players to target with the Seattle pick Who’s QB3? Mid-round “my guys” Dream Mock Draft Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Estadio Fantasy Podcast
Waiver Cinco Semana 12- EFP 243

Estadio Fantasy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2020 23:22


¡Taysom Hill termina como el QB3 en Fantasy la semana pasada! Atlanta fue una decepción total. ¿Qué pasa cuando estoy a nada de enviar el artículo de waivers y hay que agregar a un jugador de último minuto? Estas son las mejores opciones a reclamar esta semana.

Estadio Fantasy Podcast
Waiver Cinco Semana 12- EFP 243

Estadio Fantasy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2020 23:22


¡Taysom Hill termina como el QB3 en Fantasy la semana pasada! Atlanta fue una decepción total. ¿Qué pasa cuando estoy a nada de enviar el artículo de waivers y hay que agregar a un jugador de último minuto? Estas son las mejores opciones a reclamar esta semana.

American Football Community Belgium Podcast
Aflevering #21 XXL - Week 7 Review // Antonio Brown is BACK // Wat met de Cowboys? // Trade Talks

American Football Community Belgium Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2020 90:21


Week 7 aka 'het zottenkot'! Op papier leek deze speeldag weinig vuurwerk te bieden, maar de realiteit besliste daar anders over. Dirk, Laurens (deze keer mét elektriciteit) en Rein keuvelen na over het laatste NFL-nieuws en deze verrassende speeldag. Intro (00:00) Antonio Brown trekt naar Tampa Bay. Zit TB12 er voor iets tussen? (03:05) Andy Dalton afgevoerd met een hersenschudding. Wie is QB3 van de Cowboys Ben Dinucci? (13:40) Coronamiserie bij de Houston Texans. De facilities gaan dicht! (22:04) Review week 7 (25:25) Tradenieuws in de NFL! Wat denken onze luisteraars? (01:23:40) Preview week 8 (01:26:40) Enjoy! FACT CHECK: De match tussen de Giants en de Eagles speelde zich af in Philly. Daar zaten we dus fout. Maar het blijft een draak van een match en we blijven de stunt van Jones knullig vinden.

NFL Draft Punk Podcast
AFC 5th Year Option

NFL Draft Punk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2020 55:28


The Draft Punks commence Part 2 of the 5th year options available from the 2018 draft class and we're pretty down on Linebackers. We look at who's to blame for the Vikings woes, some of us stay emotion free!Talking points of Alabama V Georgia and @kevinsayer puts a new name in QB3 hat for 2021 draft01:57 - We discuss the Vikings woes13:48 - Alabama V Georgia - How good are ‘Bama receivers16:58 - @BarlowPeter gets excited about O Line17:38 - BYU QB Zach Wilson25:01 - AFC 5th Year OptionsThanks for listening look out for our FB College Previews and forthcoming player Evals, reach out to us on Twitter @UKDraftPunkNext week college uniforms!!!

Da realest sports show
Dewanye Haskins gets benched

Da realest sports show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2020 44:11


How do we go from QB1 to QB3 and more --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/marc-thevet-bethea/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/marc-thevet-bethea/support

Football und Weizen
NFL Football |S2 E45 | Weizenpreview Woche 5

Football und Weizen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2020 39:56


Privet Zusammen. In einer noch nie dagewesenen NFL season weiß man nie was passiert. Mehrere Starter sind raus und sogar schon der QB3 hat bei mehreren Teams das Feld betreten. Auch der Corona-Virus fässt langsam Fuß in der NFL. Trotz dieser ungewissenheit lassen wir es uns nicht nehmen unsere Picks zum besten zu geben. Also hör doch rein und sag uns wo wir vollkommen falsch liegen. Prost!

ATM: At The Minute Podcast
75. First Ever ATM Fantasy Football Mailbag + An NBA Playoffs Update

ATM: At The Minute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2020 53:32


Peter and Jackson are back with the first ever ATM mailbag! For 24 hours leading up to the episode, fans sent in fantasy football questions that ranged from "what will happen with Alvin Kamara and Leonard Fournette?" to "Who is QB3 behind Patrick Mahomes and Lamar Jackson". We've got your questions answered. After the fantasy mailbag, the guys finish with a quick NBA playoff update on the Houston-OKC, Denver-Utah, and Toronto-Boston matchups. Hosts: Jackson Stoever and Peter Mitchell Follow us on social media: Instagram - @fanfuelsports Twitter - @fanfuelsports Find our content at fanfuelsports.com and subscribe to our YouTube channel here.

Fantasy Six Pack: The Fantasy Six Pack Hour
2020 Fantasy Football Rankings & ADP w/John Hansen

Fantasy Six Pack: The Fantasy Six Pack Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2020 57:36


Welcome to The Fantasy Six Pack Hour Podcast. Joe Bond and A.J. Applegarth will be your hosts. This week the guys will be talking about 2020 Fantasy Football Rankings and ADP as the season approaches. To help them, they welcome John Hansen, Owner of Fantasy Points, Morning host on SiriusXM and much more to help cover the topic. If you don't already make sure you follow him on Twitter @Fantasy_Guru. Before they get started please show your support by following the YouTube Channel, rating/liking them on your favorite host via Anchor. You can also make a small donation at https://anchor.fm/fantasy-six-pack-hour/support to keep the sites/podcasts costs down.  Beers of the Week Joe and A.J. begin each show by letting you know what they are drinking. Feel free to share with them your favorites or your thoughts on our choices on Twitter @F6P_Joe and @AppleGarthAlgar. 2020 Fantasy Football Rankings and ADP The guys first start by asking John some questions about his new site Fantasy Points. Why did he decide to start it after his time ended with his original site? Also what to expect to find on Fantasy Points? Players Rising Up/Falling Down Rankings John shares the players at each position who are rising and falling down his rankings and why. He also goes in length about the following... - Talk that Josh Allen won't run as much, how does it affect his ranking? - Help rank the QB3 - 6, who are very different among analysts. - Rank the late first to end of second-round running backs - Rookies are rising up boards, what to make of them? - Allen Robinson has risen up ranks and ADP, should he be - Where do you rank inconsistent WR such as Marquise Brown, Will Fuller, Amari Cooper and A.J. Brown get ranked high, but should they be drafted where they are ranked? - Should you pay up for Travis Kelce or George Kittle - Hayden Hurst's ranking and ADP has risen the last month to TE8. Is he still worth it there? - Looking outside the top 100 ADP for a TE who is the favorite? Once John hops off, Joe and AJ answer a couple more questions - Are Melvin Gordon and Todd Gurley being disrespected in ranks and ADP? - Who is the guy to own in Washington? Be sure you follow both AJ and Joe on Twitter.  Joe: https://twitter.com/f6p_joe A.J.: https://twitter.com/AppleGarthAlgar Also, visit https://fantasysixpack.net for all your Fantasy advice. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fantasy-six-pack-hour/support

The Throwback: A show about fantasy football
Washington's Backfield and SuperFlex League Strategy

The Throwback: A show about fantasy football

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2020 46:14


We're approaching the beginning of the heart of draft season, and we've covered snake draft and auction strategy on The Athletic Fantasy Football Podcast. On this episode, we add SuperFlex league strategy to our plate. Michael Beller and Jake Ciely get into the intricacies of SuperFlex drafts, namely how your approach at the quarterback position must change. The guys also discuss Washington's backfield after the release of Derrius Guice.FLEX Leagues SuperFlex One Draft BoardFLEX Leagues SuperFlex Deux Draft BoardRundown1:07 Revisiting Washington's Backfield Without Derrius Guice3:18 Some Love for Bryce4:29 Putting a Draft-Day Price Tag on Adrian Peterson, Antonio Gibson and Love12:00 The top of the Quarterback Position in SuperFlex Leagues16:10 When to Dive in on the Position's Third Tier (Josh Allen, Matt Ryan, etc.)20:06 The Viability of Starting Your SuperFlex Draft with Two QBs26:36 The Danger of Waiting on QBs30:19 Targeting Two Top-16 Quarterbacks34:54 Picking Quarterbacks on the Turn40:15 The Necessity of a QB3 in SuperFlex LeaguesFollow Beller on Twitter: @MBellerFollow Jake on Twitter: @allinkid Get 40% off the first year of your subscription to The Athletic at theathletic.com/fantasyfootballpod Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fantasy Six Pack: The Fantasy Six Pack Hour

Welcome to The Fantasy Six Pack Hour Podcast. Joe Bond and A.J. Applegarth will be your hosts. This week the guys do their 2020 NFC East Preview. To help them, they welcome Rudy Gamble who runs the MLB/NFL/NBA projections for Razzball, to help cover the topic. If you don't already make sure you follow her on Twitter @rudygamble. Before they get started please show your support by following the YouTube Channel, rating/liking them on your favorite host via Anchor. You can also make a small donation at https://anchor.fm/fantasy-six-pack-hour/support to keep the sites/podcasts costs down.  Beers of the Week Joe and A.J. begin each show by letting you know what they are drinking. Feel free to share with them your favorites or your thoughts on our choices on Twitter @F6P_Joe and @AppleGarthAlgar. 2020 NFC East Preview They start with a hot topic regarding the division. Then they breakdown each position, first going through the ADP of the players and next asking some questions to dive further. Quarterbacks - Should Dak Prescott really be drafted as QB3? - Have we already seen the ceiling for Daniel Jones or can he get better? - Are we not giving enough credit to Carson Wentz after throwing for 4,000 yards and 27 TDs with a lack of weapons. - What is behind the chatter you hear about Dwayne Haskins taking a huge step this season? Running Backs - Who should be 2nd RB taken, Ezekiel Elliott or Saquon Barkley, why? Should either be considered at No.1? - Miles Sanders had a great end of 2019 as RB8 over the last six weeks, yet his ADP is 12, is he underrated? - Derrius Guice proved he is amazing when on the field. Is his ADP low enough to take the chance on? - Who is the best handcuff/later draft RB, Tony Pollard, Boston Scott, Adrian Peterson, other? Wide Receivers - Is an ADP of 9 for Amari Cooper right for Amari Cooper? Is Michael Gallup at 30 a much better value? - Terry McLaurin had a great rookie season despite poor QB play. What can we expect from him in his 2nd year? - Are there any Eagles WR that are worth owning? - Darius Slayton was the guy in 2019, can he be with Sterling Shepard and Evan Engram on the field more? Tight Ends - Is Zach Ertz still the man enough in Philly to warrant being drafted as TE4? - Should you take a chance at Evan Engram at his current price given his injury history? - Is the noise behind Blake Jarwin being a deep sleeper valid? Be sure you follow both AJ and Joe on Twitter.  Joe: https://twitter.com/f6p_joe A.J.: https://twitter.com/AppleGarthAlgar Also, visit https://fantasysixpack.net for all your Fantasy advice. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fantasy-six-pack-hour/support

Research for What?
From research lab in Australia to start-up in the US - with Maryam Parviz

Research for What?

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2020 35:57


In this episode of Research for What?, I speak with Maryam Parviz, Founder and CEO of SDIP-Innovations.Maryam studied engineering in Iran before working as an academic researcher in Australia. In 2018, she founded SDIP-Innovations, a start-up that develops new reservable implants. In April 2019, Maryam received a 2-year fellowship from NSW Health to relocate to the QB3 incubator at the University of California San Francisco and UCSF Rosenman Institute and advance the commercialisation of SDIP-Innovations implants. Here Maryam explains why and how she transitioned from an academic researcher to an entrepreneur. She discusses the pros and cons of moving to the US to build a new deep tech start-up in the bay area. She talks about the differences between Australia and the US (and Iran) including regulatory pathways, funding, ecosystem and culture. Maryam also discusses the differences between academic research and R&D in a start-up. She shares what it takes to learn business and its language, and to build a new company and network, with the goal to develop and launch new products for medical treatment. She talks about mental health, timelines and her team. Maryam says: ‘Having a good co-founder is the key. It's like a marriage: if you have a good marriage, it's great; if you have a bad one, it's really terrible!!' This is a fantastic episode with a very smart and hard-working research-entrepreneur who shares her journey to commercialisation!! Good luck to the team!Listen on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, Spotify and Google Podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Fantasy Football Today Podcast
Top 6 QB Debates! Can Watson Have His Best Season Yet? (06/22 Fantasy Football Podcast)

Fantasy Football Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2020 58:18


It's a big rankings week here on Fantasy Football Today as we look at the Top 5 at each position. With QB, you really have to discuss the Top 6. Let's take a look at early ADP (2:33) and see how far ahead of the pack Patrick Mahomes and Lamar Jackson are before we take a quick detour with some news and notes (8:00). Can Curtis Samuel be a sleeper this season? ... Jackson or Mahomes (12:00)? Let's pick these guys apart and figure out what separates one from the other. Then we'll move on to the next four (23:50). How do we rank Russell Wilson, Kyler Murray, Dak Prescott and Deshaun Watson? Why does Jamey have Watson as his QB3 even without DeAndre Hopkins? Why does Heath have Prescott in a tier ahead of the other three? Does Dave believe Murray has QB1 upside? ... We finish with some Fill in the Blank (41:30) to sum up our thoughts and to figure out which one of these six QBs we'd like to have lunch with. And what would we eat!? ... Your emails at fantasyfootball@cbsi.com 'Fantasy Football Today' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox, and wherever else you listen to podcasts. Follow the new FFT Twitch channel: https://www.twitch.tv/FFToday Follow our FFT team on Twitter: @FFToday, @AdamAizer, @JameyEisenberg, @daverichard, @heathcummingssr, @YardsPerGretch, @BenSchragg Watch FFT on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCviK78rIWXhZdFzJ1Woi7Fg/videos Join our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/FantasyFootballToday/ Sign up for the FFT newsletter https://www.cbssports.com/newsletter To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Non-Neutral Zone Podcast
3/15-3/21 CBA approved, Drops and Picks, XFL Canceled!

Non-Neutral Zone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2020 73:29


Week 3/15-3/21Check out the Mock Draft v1.0 Here.Visit us on: FacebookTwitterEmail us: nonneutralzone@gmail.comNewsThe players voted yes on the new CBA!! The final vote was 1019 yes to 959 no. 51.5 to 48.5. very tight vote.  We're going to have football for 10 more years on this new deal. Talking points:17 game season2 teams added to the playoffs.Michael Thomas crying on the socials about the extra game.Colts are extending Anthony Castonzo with a 2 year $33 million deal. The Jaguars are trading Calais Campbell to the Ravens in exchange for a 5th round pick. Campbell has had 31.5 sacks over the last 3 seasons. It's looking like he'll get a 2 year $27 million deal with 20 of that guaranteed. The Titans and QB Ryan Tannehill have reached agreement on a 4-year, $118M deal with $62M guaranteed, per Jeff Darlington.More good news for Tua Tagovailoa.  He has received clearance from doctors to resume training.According to Rick Stroud, who covers the Bucs, Tampa Bay is “going all in on Tom Brady”.Jordan Reed was in Seattle on Wednesday visiting with the Seahawks.Hunter Henry received the franchise tag from the Chargers on Friday.More Tight end news. According to NBC Sports Boston, the Patriots are planning to pursue Eric Ebron and other free agent tight ends heavily.The Titans cut Dion Lewis on Thursday.  The move saves Tennessee 5.1 million on the cap.Xavier Rhodes released by Minnesota. The Vikings save 8.1 million in cap space. Does Rhodes still have value somewhere? Twitter Pollshttps://twitter.com/nonneutralzone1/status/1238919839898624008?s=19https://twitter.com/nonneutralzone1/status/1237870386404102144?s=19https://twitter.com/nonneutralzone1/status/1237757695345807360?s=19Mail CallWe have a three part question from @gooner4136 on Twitter.  If Antonio Brown is reinstated pre fantasy draft, is he worth drafting?  If so, how early would you consider taking him? Is he worth a stash regardless?@Mcjammar on Twitter asks: There’s a consensus forming that CMC is the best player in the worst situation for fantasy purposes.  In dynasty do you trade him before his value possibly drops, and in seasonal is he still the undisputed 1:01? Could you offer trade scenarios?Steve, from Georgia wants to know: With the XFL officially announcing their season done for the year, do you consider the league a success?  Who are the players we should look for that might get a shot in the NFL?Lightning Round:All of these are assuming half point scoring.With Austin Ekeler’s new deal keeping him in LA for the foreseeable future, do you think he finishes as a top 5 back in 2020? He finished at number 5 in 2019.Kenyan Drake finished as the RB4 from week 9-16 after being traded to the Cardinals before the deadline.  Assuming he stays with the Cardinals, is he going to finish inside the top 10 this season?As a rookie, Kyler Murray passed for 3722 yards and 20 touchdowns while adding 544 and 4 on the ground. He finished as the QB7 in 2019.  Is he “this year’s Lamar Jackson”?Noah Fant and TJ Hockenson both showed flashes as rookies.  Do you think that either finishes inside the top 10 at the TE position this upcoming fantasy season?Dak Prescott was the QB3 last season.  Should he be the third QB taken this fantasy season?  

Dynasty Blueprint
Dynasty Blueprint 200 - Rookie Talk with Hayden Winks

Dynasty Blueprint

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2020 36:04


Matt Williamson (@WilliamsonNFL) and Ryan McDowell (@RyanMc23) welcome Hayden Winks (@HaydenWinks) of RotoWorld to discuss his recent work analyzing the 202 rookie class. Topics include a surprise QB3, how dynasty owners should value Henry Ruggs and ideal landing spots in Hayden’s first round mock.

Destination Devy Podcast
Destination Devy 32 - Superstar Ja'Marr || G.O.A.Tua

Destination Devy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2019 35:34


Episode 32 – Superstar Ja'Marr | G.O.A.Tua - There was a dark cloud that fell over college football as the greatest QB in Alabama history was lost for the season and possibly beyond. We are all wishing Tua a speedy recovery and hope to see him on the football field again. But there were some outstanding performances that @RayGQue dives into on this episode. 10:48 - The Case for Ja'Marr Chase as the WR1 in 202114:30 - Brock Purdy still lighting it up and locking up that QB3 spot in 202119:00 - Najee Harris deserves to be in the Top-5 for 2020 RBs28:20 - Buy Low on these guys32:50 - Jalen Hurts QB1 for someDestination Devy @DestinationDevy – one of many great podcasts from the Dynasty League Football (@DLFootball) Family of Podcasts – is hosted by Ray Garvin  featuring weekly dynasty football content focused on developmental prospects in the college football world. Special thanks Trivion McKenzie (@TTzMac702) for his song, “Attitudes,” and special thanks to the Dynasty League Football Family of Podcasts and the entire DLF staff for the ongoing support! Please leave a rating and review on iTunes. Follow the show and send questions to the podcast on Twitter, @DestinaitonDevy!