Podcasts about Parsons

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  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Parsons

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Latest podcast episodes about Parsons

StarDate Podcast
The Leviathan

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 2:14


A beautiful spiral galaxy spins into view in the northeast this evening, near the tip of the Big Dipper's handle. It actually consists of two galaxies: a large one that's interacting with a smaller one, with a “bridge” of stars and gas between them. M51 is the first galaxy whose spiral nature was seen. It was revealed by the Leviathan of Parsonstown — the largest telescope in the world at the time. It entered service in 1847 — 175 years ago. The Leviathan was the invention of William Parsons, the Earl of Rosse, in Ireland. He owned and operated a large estate, but was also interested in astronomy. And he designed a telescope that far outclassed anything else of the time. Its main mirror spanned six feet — two feet wider than the second-largest. The metal mirror had to be taken out and polished every six months, so Parsons made two of them. The mirrors fit into a tube that was 58 feet long. It was suspended between two brick walls, and assistants used cables and pulleys to move it. Parsons did some of the observing himself, but he also hired a professional. Together, they studied the odd, fuzzy objects known as nebulae. Astronomers hadn't figured out what they were. The Leviathan revealed that some are clusters of stars. But more than a hundred were spirals. Decades later, astronomers showed that these objects are separate galaxies of stars — beautiful spirals first resolved with the Leviathan of Parsonstown.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Dallas Cowboys Podcasts
Mick Shots: No Bullying Around

Dallas Cowboys Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 48:00


Serious business these playoffs, Cowboys in pads, COVID care, Parsons the Lionbacker and his importance in this playoff game against The Bullies from the Bay. Of course, some “Catch” and the difference between the Cowboys and Niners offensive lines. And never fear, Will McClay ain't going anywhere.

Kulturnachrichten - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Parsons, Katharinawww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, KulturnachrichtenDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Kulturnachrichten - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Parsons, Katharinawww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, KulturnachrichtenDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Kulturnachrichten - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Parsons, Katharinawww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, KulturnachrichtenDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Simple Farmhouse Life
115. Where to Start with Natural Living, Cooking from Scratch, Holistic Health | Elizabeth Parsons of Purely Parsons

Simple Farmhouse Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 46:54


EPISODE SUMMARY It can be overwhelming to figure out where to start in your natural living journey. I get asked all the time, “Where should I start?” On today's episode, I am talking to Elizabeth Parsons of Purely Parsons about this exact question. We have both been living a natural lifestyle for over a decade, and if there is anything we have learned, it's that this is truly a process. It's unrealistic to overhaul our entire way of life overnight, but there are so many small changes we can make gradually over time that will add up to a new lifestyle. I'm so grateful Elizabeth joined me for this conversation. As a homeschooling, homesteading mama of five and pediatric nurse, she brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to this topic. Whether you are just getting started or have been living this way for many years, I hope some of the information shared in this episode serves as the catalyst for you to take the next step in your natural living journey. In this episode, we cover: - Starting small by making easy swaps in your home - What resources we used to start learning and researching - The importance of whole foods in natural living - How we handle criticism from others about this lifestyle - Success stories of healing our bodies naturally, apart from allopathic medicine - What foods you can start making today in your home - The most important items in Elizabeth's wellness toolbox RESOURCES MENTIONED Elizabeth's birth affirmations Lisa's sauerkraut blog post and video Lisa's bone broth blog post and video Lisa's milk kefir blog post Lisa's yogurt blog post and video doTERRA Essential Oils Elizabeth's DIY Elderberry Kits Earthley Wellness - Use code PURELY10 for 10% off Earthley Wellness Good Night Lotion (Magnesium Lotion) - Use code PURELY10 for 10% off Lisa's mayonnaise blog post and video Leefy Prana Turmeric Supplement - Use code PARSONS15 for 15% off Elizabeth's birth story on Happy Homebirth podcast: Apple or Spotify CONNECT Elizabeth Parsons of Purely Parsons | Website | Instagram

SkyWatchTV Podcast
Dr. Thomas Horn - Sex Magick and "The Hilarion" (Hillary Clinton)

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 41:00


NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory rocket scientist Jack Parsons and Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard came up with the infamous “Babalon Working” that allegedly opened a gate that fueled the modern UFO era and maybe played a role in the birth of Hillary Clinton. Both Parsons and Hubbard were disciples of Aliester Crowley and practiced his teaching called Thelema as a philosophy defined by the maxim, “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law.” It comes from Crowley's Book of the Law, which can be connected to the “Spirit Cooking” ceremonies of the Podestas and Abramovic, which was channeled by an incorporeal demonic intelligence named Aiwass. The ultimate goal of these operations, carried out during February and March 1946, was to give birth to the magical being, or “moonchild,” described in Crowley's works. Using the powerful energy of IX degree Sex Magick, the rites were intended to open a doorway through which the goddess Babalon herself might appear in human form. Accordingly, one would expect a female child was to be born around 1947, and, indeed, such an influential feminist was delivered that year who may offer the most promise for identifying the fruit of Parsons' infamous ritual. That would be none other than Hillary  Rodham Clinton. Intriguingly, Parsons later referred again to “Babalon the Scarlet Woman” and this time by a particular name in his Book of the Antichrist. On October 31, 1948, a full sixtynine years ago when the female child would have been only around one year of age, Parsons wrote that her spirit contacted him, calling itself “Hilarion,” who, he said, would become an international public figure dedicated to bringing the work of the Antichrist to fruition. Why is that important? Because the etymology of Hilarion is the arcane “Hillary.”

Live Your Best Life with Liz Wright
Engaging With God's Light with Mike Parsons (96)

Live Your Best Life with Liz Wright

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 28:25


In this episode, Liz interviews Mike Parsons, who shares his journey of learning about quantum physics and the heavenly realms. In this recurring theme, Liz and Mike dive deep into what it looks like to engage with the living light of God and how to be empowered with His divine reality in your everyday life. We are beings of the light, and when we reconnect with the light of the Father, we begin to co-reign with Him to pull heaven to earth. Receive His unconditional love, and embrace His presence face to face today. 

Party Like A Rockstar Podcast
Alex Markides, Ashton Parsons - From Steel Panther to Periphery!

Party Like A Rockstar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 62:08


Ashton Parsons is a sound guy.  He's toured with Fifth Harmony, Disturbed, Bush, Alice Cooper, Teddy Swims, Black Label Society, & Dashboard Confessional. Alex Markides is also a sound guy.  He currently works for Killswitch Engage, Periphery, & Steel Panther.  He's also done corporate sound for companies like LMG, JC Audio, Silo, Creative Video and Showtime Sound.

ESPN SA
The Blitz - 1/5/2022 - @JasonMinnix @JoeKENS5

ESPN SA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 135:03


- Parsons to miss final game with COVID - Where's the Cowboys run game? - Maddy Skye: Food and Culture Editor of the San Antonio Express-News - Getting to know Joe - Spurs lost 4 straight, Keldon struggling & more

Debate Amongst Friends With Doc & Prof
Duke BB, Mike Tomlin win%, Antonio Brown absent, Kyrie Returns, and NFL Draft order

Debate Amongst Friends With Doc & Prof

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 25:46


#Duke Men's basketball gets the win over #GT #MikeTomlin has 15 seasons over .500 #KyrieIrving returns to the #BrooklynNets and will be eligible for practice and road games #Cowboys rookie LB Micah Parsons may miss the final week after being placed on the #Covid/Reserved List, Parsons was shooting for the Rookie sack record held by "The Freak" Jevon Kearse #Bucs WR Antonio Brown has not returned to the team and has also not been cut from the team. Doc hopes that there can be some reconciliation between the two parties and Brown returns to the team and clears up the misunderstandings. #TerellOwens has reached out to the Bucs about joining the team for the playoffs. There are no rules in the NFL that states a HOFer can't join an active roster. NFL Draft Order (Top 10) as of week 17 #Jaguars #Lions #Texans #Jets 4&7 #Giants 5&8 #Panthers #WFT #Falcons --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/debateamongstfriends/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/debateamongstfriends/support

The Players Lounge
Player's Lounge: How Big Is The Loss of Parsons?

The Players Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 46:49


With Micah Parsons headed to the Reserve/COVID list, the guys debate how big the loss is for the defense this week, who steps up and more.

Dallas Cowboys Podcasts
Player's Lounge: How Big Is The Loss of Parsons?

Dallas Cowboys Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 46:49


With Micah Parsons headed to the Reserve/COVID list, the guys debate how big the loss is for the defense this week, who steps up and more.

Kids These Days Podcast
UNSCRIPTED: Welcome to Season Three, where the theme is "being comfortable with being uncomfortable".

Kids These Days Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 14:05


On today's UNSCRIPTED episode, we are kicking off Season Three!!! Get ready to dive deep and get comfortable with being uncomfortable!Plus - Ruddy gives us a tiny taste of her trip to Guatemala!! Learn more about Tejiendo Futuros, visit their website: https://tejiendofuturos.org/ Kids These Days is a co-production of the KCCTO-KITS Infant Toddler Specialist Network (ITSN) and KCCTO Workforce Development (WFD) programs. The KCCTO-KITS Infant-Toddler Specialist Network is a program of the Kansas Child Care Training Opportunities, Inc. (KCCTO) and the University of Kansas Life Span Institute at Parsons. The Workforce Development Project is a program of KCCTO.  Each program is supported through a grant from the Kansas Department For Children And Families' Child Care And Early Education Services. However, information or opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the agency and no official endorsement should be inferred.To learn more about the Infant Toddler Specialist Network, please visit: http://kskits.org/technical-assistance-0.   To learn more about KCCTO and Workforce Development, please visit: https://kccto.org/ Contact us via email at – kidsthesedayspod@gmail.com Follow and tag us on Instagram & Facebook @kidsthesedayspod & Twitter @ktdpod Cheery Monday by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3495-cheery-mondayLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

A Fashion Moment
Tanya Taylor

A Fashion Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 48:29


At 25, fashion designer Tanya Taylor launched her namesake brand in 2012, taking the New York fashion scene by storm. Equipped with academic training from McGill University, Central Saint Martins, and Parsons, in conjunction with her unwavering belief in her vision, Taylor transformed her clothing line into the successful multifaceted brand it is today. Tanya integrates her love of color into all of her collections, but her dedication to the arts, activism, and inclusivity are most prevalent throughout her work.  Whether it's getting people to register to vote, providing a range of sizes beyond the industry standard, or her ongoing collaboration with Memorial Sloane Kettering, Tanya uses her talents, connections, and love for fashion to make an impact. Host Kirsten Holtz Naim catches up with Tanya to talk about her career journey in the fashion industry, strategic decisions that helped her thrive as a brand during the pandemic, and of course, reflecting on one of her favorite fashion moments of all time. Enjoy the episode? Support the podcast by buying a cup of coffee! Learn more here: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/afashionmoment Connect with Us! Spotify | Apple Shop + Support Instagram: @afashionmoment Twitter: @A_FashionMoment Email: AFashionMomentPodcast@gmail.com Website: A Fashion Moment Show Notes: Shop Tanya Taylor's collections now at https://www.tanyataylor.com/ Follow Tanya Taylor on Instagram @tanyataylor and on Facebook @tanyataylornyc   Shop Tanya Taylor x Paintbox Nail Polish: https://gretta.co/products/tanya-taylor-x-paintbox-nail-polish  Follow Toronto Fashion Week on Instagram @tfw  Learn more about McGill University: https://www.mcgill.ca/  Vogue Business article covering Tanya's commitment to size inclusivity, “The payoffs of plus-size: https://www.voguebusiness.com/fashion/tanya-taylor-plus-size-inclusivity-profit  House Beautiful article, “Fashion Designer Tanya Taylor Launches Home Collection”: https://www.housebeautiful.com/shopping/best-stores/a36674977/fashion-designer-tanya-taylor-launches-spring-summer-home-decor/  Glamour article, “Designer Tanya Taylor Debuts Clever NYFW Film Series to Encourage Voting”:  https://www.glamour.com/story/tanya-taylor-nyfw-film-series-to-encourage-voting  Learn more about Tanya Taylor & Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center:  https://www.tanyataylor.com/pages/msk  Learn more about HENSE's mural work in Washington, D.C.: https://savingplaces.org/stories/slideshow-update-painted-dc-church-now-artistic-inside#.YdIl4mjMLIU  Learn more about the notes left at the White House during that infamous Obama farewell party: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9445203/Dave-Chappelle-says-celebrities-left-dirty-notes-White-House-Trump-Obama-party.html

Night Sky Tourist
#31 Discover Utah's Stargazing Secrets with Justina Parsons-Bernstien

Night Sky Tourist

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 33:33


Justina Parsons-Bernstein takes us into the world of dark skies across Utah's State Parks. In fact, she created the Utah State Parks Dark Sky Initiative in 2015. Find out some of the very best places in Utah to see a pristine dark sky and also where to go to find an ancient cultural astronomy site. LINKS: UTAH STATE PARKS STARRY NIGHTS INITIATIVE https://stateparks.utah.gov/activities/dark-sky/ UTAH STATE PARKS DARK SKY EVENTS https://stateparks.utah.gov/activities/dark-sky/dark-sky-events/ Utah.com Website Collection of Articles on International Dark Sky Places in Utah https://www.visitutah.com/places-to-go/dark-sky-parks Links to some Dark Sky educational courses that Justina developed in conjunction with Utah State University Extension: Dark Sky Observations Master Naturalist Course https://extensioncourses.usu.edu/product/dark-sky-observations/ 4-H Discover Dark Sky https://extension.usu.edu/utah4h/discover And don't forget to check out all the Facebook pages of Utah State Parks International Dark Sky Parks. They post lots of interesting dark sky-related information, photos, videos and events. Utah State Parks International Dark Sky Parks • Dead Horse Point State Park, 2016 • Goblin Valley State Park, 2016 • Antelope Island State Park, 2017 • Steinaker State Park, 2018 • East Canyon State Park, 2020 • Jordanelle State Park, 2021 • Kodachrome Basin State Park, 2021 • Rockport State Park, 2021 • Fremont Indian State Park, 2021 • Goosenecks State Park, 2021 Skywatcher by Jamie Hogan: https://www.jamiehogan.com Visit NightSkyTourist.com/31 for more information about this episode. SPREAD THE WORD Help us reach more people by subscribing to the podcast, leaving a review, and sharing it with others. GET TO KNOW US MORE Visit NightSkyTourist.com to read our great blog articles, check out our resource page, and sign up for our newsletters. Our monthly newsletter has content that is exclusive for subscribers. SHARE YOUR QUESTION We want to hear your questions. They could even become part of a future Q&A. Record your question in a voice memo on your smartphone and email it to us at Hello@NightSkyTourist.com. COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS Email us at Hello@NightSkyTourist.com.

Radio Duna - Visionarios
Visionarios: Henry Parsons Crowell

Radio Duna - Visionarios

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022


Esta semana, los inicios del fundador de Quaker.

Style Matters
Marian Parsons

Style Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 32:19


I'm very happy to have Marian Parsons open up this new season of Style Matters for us.  You may also know her as Miss Mustard Seed, which is what she called herself when she started a blog over 10 years ago.  From the blog came other business pursuits such as creating a line of milk paint, creating fabric and product designs, and selling her original artwork.  She's just come out with a new book, "Feels Like Home: Transforming your home from uninspiring to uniquely yours," and her approach to design completely aligns with what we believe here at Style Matters.  And that is that your story is your style.  Let's hear from Marian.  

Instagram for Business with The Social Focus
Throwback Episodes - Leveraging Pinterest with Emily Parsons

Instagram for Business with The Social Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 37:31


We're taking ten month of December off! But figured we' share some of our favourite interviews from this past year again!! We hope you enjoy this episode and don't forget to leave your rating and review for a chance to win FIVE MONTH'S ACCESS to our online course and community, Instagram for Business!Leave your review here for a chance to win!Wait, what? 

Murder Squared
The Murder of Kay Parsons

Murder Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 26:54


It's all in the neighborhood. Two houses are robbed and one woman is killed. Who would want the sweet woman from next door dead? Sources: https://www.google.com/amp/s/abcnews.go.com/amp/TheLaw/story%3fid=7588562&page=1 Forsake By Owner S4E10 Tangled Up In Red S1 E8 Unusual Suspects Dateline: Secrets on Hot Spring Dr. Patreon/other links: https://linktr.ee/Murdersquaredpodcast

Participation Trophy Podcast
Episode #52: Mutations Gone Wild (with Eric Parsons)

Participation Trophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 105:15


Homeroom:- Holiday shopping update- The Omicron takeover Instagram Grab Bag (Listener Submissions)

Empowerography
Katelyn Parsons Episode S01 EPS 268

Empowerography

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 59:42


In the latest episode of the Empowerography Podcast, my guest is Katelyn Parsons. Katelyn Parsons is a Certified Intuitive Eating + Body Image Coach, Speaker, and host of The Modern Girl Podcast. After years of struggling with bulimia and disordered eating, she not only found recovery but recognized a crucial missing link in the wellness industry- empowerment + individual sustainability around health. This inspired her entrepreneurial journey and life mission to shift the conversation toward healing our relationship with food and body. For the past 4 years, Katelyn has helped countless creative leaders transform their relationship with food and body image through an integrative, evidence-based process so that they can move through each day feeling more present, empowered, and comfortable in their skin, without worrying about what to eat. In this episode we discuss body image, binge eating, body acceptance, healing, the doing mentality vs the being mentality. Website - https://brainbehaviorbridge.com/ IG - http://www.instagram.com/dr.sarahlallen FB - https://www.facebook.com/Brainbehaviorbridge LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarah-levin-allen-phd/ "I wanted to create a safe space where the women that were in my community" - 00:07:50 "So much of this struggle that we find ourselves in around food and our bodies" - 00:20:28 "Women in particular, you know we've been taught for years and years and years"- 00:35:32 Empowerography would like to offer you a discount code to one of our exclusive partners, Quartz & Canary Jewelry & Wellness Co. Please use CODE EMPOWER15 to receive 15% off upon check out at www.quartzandcanary.com. Quartz & Canary is truly the place, where spirituality meets style.

The Behavioral Observations Podcast with Matt Cicoria
How to Manage Problem Behavior in Public School Settings: Session 173

The Behavioral Observations Podcast with Matt Cicoria

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 91:39


If you're like me, you are seeing more and more news articles about the challenges schools are facing with students engaging in problem behavior. For example, not too far from my home, a school district in Vermont recently proposed to shorten the school week in order to provide teachers with extra time to prepare for, and perhaps recover from, challenging behaviors in the classroom setting. As we've discussed many times before on this podcast, clearly there is a role for Behavior Analysis in these settings. And it is with that in mind that I was excited to chat with Dr. Paulie Gavoni, Anika Costa, and Andrew Houvouras about the book that they recently published with co-authors Frank Krukauskas and Eric Gormley. It's called "Quick Responses for Reducing Misbehavior and Suspensions: A behavioral toolbox for classroom and school leaders." In this episode, we spend a good chunk of time discussing the impact of the pandemic on student behavior, and why they felt this type of book was necessary to write. And while they provide an overview of the Quick Room process, I do think the book is worth getting for any school leader who is grappling with these increasingly common problems. For Patreon subscribers, we spent an additional 10-20 minutes talking about the book writing process more generally, along with what the authors learned after putting this incredible resource together. If you'd like to become a Patreon member to get commercial free access to the show, it's really easy to do so. Just go to Patreon.com/behavioralobservations to learn more. During our chat, we referenced a ton of resources, and I have done my best to catalog them below: The Quick Responses book The "Sprick Ratio" The 5:1 ratio in marriage "Human Competence," Thomas Gilbert Motivating Human Services Staff, Reed and Parsons (2006) School consultation pods (Session 74, Session 101, Session 78, etc...) Motivational Interviewing This podcast is brought to you by the following: Institutional Tier Patron Greenspace Behavioral Technology. Greenspace behavior offers cutting edge supervisor coaching, performance and competency-based trainings, and organizational supports for new BCBA and trainees. Find out how you can optimize your supervision practices, improve clinical outcomes, and increase employee satisfaction at Greenspacebehavior.com. Our very own BOP CEU offerings! Did you know we offer over 28 CEU events? To add to that, I'll have a few more that I'll be putting out there in early 2021, so if you'd like to learn about functional assessment, supervision, ethics, school consultation, along with the nerdy goodness of all the Inside JABA episodes, learn more at Behavioralobservations.com/Get-ceus! Lastly, if your 2022 plans include marketing your product, service, or agency to one of the largest and most engaged ABA audiences, consider advertising on Behavioral Observations.

GOLF SMARTER
After a Career in Manufacturing Jeff Perez Bought a Golf Course. Then Asked, Now What?

GOLF SMARTER

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 38:44


824: Jeff Perez lives in the small town in Parsons, Kansas. Ninety-five years ago, the MKT Railroad built a 9 hole course that is still around today. It's open mainly because after his career in manufacturing, Jeff quit his job and bought the course. He was in for a big surprise that just keeping the doors open was not enough to keep it running. In this episode we meet Jeff and hear what it takes to operate your own golf business when you know nothing about the business or the industry. WIN a box Golf Smarter golf balls and be part of the podcast! When you record our episode intro from your phone, you'll be eligible to win a box of golf balls with the Golf Smarter logo! Write to GolfSmarterPodcast@gmail.com and tell us that you want to play. We'll assign you an episode number and a script to record for the intro of the show. Every ten listeners who participate will be entered into a drawing for a box of balls with the Golf Smarter logo!Golf Smarter is your podcast forecaddie! We are an entertainment service that is focused on enhancing every round for you. Just like caddies, we accept tips for services rendered. Please click on the DONATE button at GolfSmarter.com to show your support so that we can continue to provide weekly, helpful, and entertaining content. Your donation can be as much, or as little as you'd like. It can be a one time offering or your can even do it recurring. Thank you very much.

Broncos Blitz
Rodgers or Wilson? Parsons or Surtain

Broncos Blitz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 33:43


Engineering Influence from ACEC
A Conversation with Carey Smith, CEO of Parsons Corporation

Engineering Influence from ACEC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 26:51


We were pleased to welcome Carey Smith, the President and CEO of Parsons Corporation onto the program for a conversation about leadership, diversity in the engineering industry and what Parsons is doing to help Build Back Smarter with the newly passed Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.  We were equally pleased to welcome our own CEO, Linda Bauer Darr to host the interview - chief executive to chief executive.   Transcript: Host: Welcome to Engineering Influence, a podcast from the American Council of Engineering Companies. ACEC's strength lies in its member firms and the diverse set of markets those firms operate in to serve the interests of their public and private sector clients. And it's always great to have the opportunity to bring on one of those firms to spotlight their work and really look at what they are doing to improve their communities and the world around them. And I'm pleased to bring one of those shows to you today. Host: I am pleased to welcome to the program Carey Smith, the President and CEO of Parsons. Parsons is a leading provider of technology-driven solutions, focused on the defense, intelligence and critical infrastructure markets. And they've been in operation for more than 75 years. Parsons provides technical design and engineering services and software products to address their customers' challenges, and they have capabilities in cyber security, intelligence, missile, space, connected communities, physical infrastructure, and mobility solutions. Host: Now Carey Smith joined Parsons in 2016 as President of the Federal Solutions business. She was promoted to Chief Operating Officer in 2018 and President and Chief Operating Officer in 2019. She was unanimously elected Chief Executive Officer of Parsons Corporation by the board of directors and appointed to the position in July, 2021. Now, prior to joining Parsons, Carey held a series of progressive leadership roles within the defense and aerospace industry. She holds an MS in electrical engineering from Syracuse University and a BS in electrical engineering from Ohio Northern University. In 2018, she received an honorary doctorate from Ohio Northern University for her outstanding contributions to the university and the field of engineering. Host: Now, interviewing a chief executive, sometimes it's best for me to take a step back and to allow a chief executive to interview a chief executive. So I'm also pleased to welcome our President and CEO Linda Bauer Darr to move us forward and take the mic. Linda, the floor is yours. Linda Bauer Darr: Great. Thank you, Jeff. I'm happy to be back on the podcast. I need to do this more often. You're doing a great job. So kudos to you, Jeff. Carey, we are so excited to have you in our offices. I think this is the second time in the short amount of time that you've been on board as the CEO of Parsons. It's been since July, I think now, right? Carey Smith: That's correct. Linda Bauer Darr: That you came on board and, it's a pleasure to be working with you. We're excited to have you here. So you're a CEO now - how did that come about? You know, you're an engineer, you're a CEO. What brought you into engineering? And, and tell me a little bit about how you made it all the way up to the top ranks of such a, such a significant company as Parsons. Carey Smith: Sure. Well, thanks first, Jeff and Linda, I'm pleased to be here and I appreciate you hosting me today. I'll start off. My dad kind of got me into engineering when I was really young. We had, I have one brother, one sister, he wanted all three of us to be engineers and one of us decided to be an engineer. So I went into engineering and one of my first experiences was working as an intern at LTB Steel in downtown Cleveland, really got hooked on the industry. Then when I graduated college start off, uh, with IBM, which subsequently became Lockheed Martin through acquisitions and had some great experiences. One of 'em I would highlight was being one of the first woman flight engineers to fly with special operations forces. So it's kind of in my blood, I would say. Um, and just an exciting field. It's an opportunity to make a difference. Linda Bauer Darr: Wow. That that's, um, there's so much there. I know we have a lot to talk about today in a short period of time, but I would love to just take a second to dive into that a little bit. So why was your dad so infatuated with engineering if he wanted all three of his kids to be engineer? So was he an engineer? Carey Smith: My dad was an engineer. Linda Bauer Darr: What kind of an engineer was he? Carey Smith: He was also an electrical engineer. So I followed in his footsteps. Linda Bauer Darr: Who did he work for? What kind of work? Carey Smith: He was with Morgan Engineering. So they built cranes for steel mills. Linda Bauer Darr: Out of Ohio, Carey Smith: Out of Alliance, Ohio. Linda Bauer Darr: Okay. And then you said that you were one of the first female flight engineers on a special operations mission. Carey Smith: Yes. Linda Bauer Darr: What what'd you do? Carey Smith: So at the time we were changing analog cockpits over to digital cockpits. So my job was basically to design the display formats. And then when the test engineers, when they were up flying, I was the flight test engineer. So I would sit between the pilot and the co-pilot and I would teach them how to use the new digital display systems. Linda Bauer Darr: Do you have your pilot's license as a result of that? Carey Smith: I do not, but I'll tell you, I've always thought about getting one. Linda Bauer Darr: Yeah. Something tells me that that's not beyond you and probably it's gonna be on your agenda for the future. Um, and then you went from IBM, which became Lockheed Martin. Obviously that's a thing in this business. I actually started out years ago in a company called EG&G that later was purchased by and you know, way down the road AECOM. So, you know, that's my only claim to the engineering profession before I came to ACEC and, um, man, you know, it's, uh, you never know where you're gonna be the next day. It seems Carey Smith: Like the that's absolutely true. It's spent a lot of consolidation in the industry. Linda Bauer Darr: It's really picking up. Um, that's another that's for another podcast though, Jeff, we'll try to stay disciplined. Um, so let's talk a little bit about diversity and inclusion. I know that that is a passion for you. It it's a passion for me. It is also a passion for ACEC and it's - we have five planks of our strategic plan, core strategic goals. And, and that is certainly one of them. Um, and you know, it's interesting trying to describe to people what ACEC sees kind of its unique lane in diversity and inclusion because we feel very strongly about STEM programs and bringing young people into this space. But, you know, traditionally ACEC has really been for the business of engineering and often focused on the leadership in engineering firms. You don't come in as a leader, you know, you don't come right outta college and become a leader. Linda Bauer Darr: It's something that evolves, but we feel really strongly about getting involved earlier on in the game for engineers that are on that track, right? That are on that path to become CEOs. So you are one of very few female CEOs of engineering firms, you an engineer, and that's not always the case. I mean, some of your colleagues are people that came into the profession as attorneys, or maybe they had a business development background. Um, so, you know, tell me a little bit about how you're taking kind of, you know, the, the perch of CEO of Parsons and moving the ball forward for people like you to come behind you and, and promoting that push for diversity and inclusion, which is so important to the future of this industry and this profession. Carey Smith: Yeah. So inclusion and diversity is one of Parsons', six core values. And it's obviously very important to me being a woman in, in the engineering field. So when I first joined the company, about five years ago, we stood up a diversity at the time it was called diversity and inclusion council. Today we call it diversity equity and inclusion council. Um, that has been one of the best initiatives in the company with many people, volunteering to participate. It's very active. We have ambassadors at each of our major locations across the company, and we also I will highlight, um, and promote it all the way up through our board. In fact, if you look at our board today, our board is about 40% diverse. So this is truly something that we take throughout the organization at all levels. We measure ourselves on diversity goals and we make sure that we're achieving the metrics. And the objective is really to try and make sure that every employee feels engaged at Parsons and is able to contribute fully. Linda Bauer Darr: Yeah, that is, um, that it, it sounds like, you know, it's, it was a, was a seed and it's grown and it's taking on more kind of speed and kind of heft as time goes along. And I met, you know, the way that you set it up, you described having an ambassador at each location, you know, with the company, the size of Parsons. It can't all come from you. I know you have pressure to be everywhere at once, right. At all these different locations, um, to try to kind of share your me message and your passion and your vision for Parsons. So how do you keep those ambassadors. kind of on message and how much do they have, um, kind of free reign to do their thing? How do, how do you package it all together with the company as large as yours with these ambassadors? Is it all these separate locations? Carey Smith: So we set up specific goals that we're gonna do as a, at the company level. So a goal might be one year we wanna improve mentoring across the company. A goal might be that we set up enterprise business resource groups. So they're basically affinity groups. And once we sort of have the corporate objectives, then we flow those down to each of the ambassadors. And the ambassadors do have the authority to do what makes sense in their local area, because each area, as you know, particularly in the engineering field is different. It's a lot different if I'm at a facility in Virginia versus a facility in California versus facility in Florida, right. So they can create events and activities that are meaningful to their particular location. Linda Bauer Darr: How do you choose who these ambassadors are gonna be? Do they have to represent a diverse constituency to begin with? Or how do you choose them? Carey Smith: We let them volunteer. Okay. Um, and we think that's the best way, because if you're selecting people, then they might not really be the right person for the job and might not put as much into it. So we really say, if we have a major site, let's say in New York city, and we have several hundred people working there, we'll have a volunteer on who wants to be the ambassador. Linda Bauer Darr: That's great. So we have at ACEC a Diversity Equity Inclusion and Belonging Committee. And I think it's like you, I mean, it started out the concept was inclusion and diversity, and it just continues to grow and obviously belonging and, and equity. Um, you know, with this new legislation, equity is much more important. But one of the things that has been interesting as this concept has grown and our involvement has deepened is how, how do you build the leadership of an effort like that? Because if it only people from, you know, diverse backgrounds, gender diversity, ethnic diversity, age, diversity, whatever, um, you might be missing out on the important buy-in that you need for, you know, that, that fever, if you will, the positive fever of really, you know, promot diversity and inclusion throughout the industry, uh, for that fever to grow. So, you know, we have had, we have, a couple of white men that are helping to lead this effort for us. Linda Bauer Darr: It so happens that they also happen to be CEOs of these, you know, some, some very significant firms that have taken this and really run with it. So, um, I would agree with you that, you know, it's the people that really have the most passion, but you need to make sure that it's people that have those experiences having been in the minority in some way, shape or form, but it's also the people that represent kind of, you know, the broader population of that particular industry or profession, because if they're not buying in, then not much is gonna change. So it really takes... Carey Smith: And ultimately to me, it comes down to diversity of thought and to get diversity of thought, you need engagement from everybody in your population, regardless of background. Linda Bauer Darr: And, and I think diversity of experience, you know, diverse experiences lead to that diverse thought. So we could go on about that forever, but we have something a little bit timely to talk about. And that's the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act that, you know, it really has got this whole industry buzzing. We're excited. This is a transformational piece of legislation. Um, I've never seen anything like this in my lifetime. I was born after the Interstate Highway System was, you know, conceived and built. So, um, this, but this is akin to that. It, it it's that big. I know that you all are really embracing the opportunities and you've got your own unique kind of spin on it, a campaign, um, that kind of plays off of the Build Back Better concept, but that is called Build Back Smarter. That's focused on tying traditional infrastructure with technology and innovation. It's great idea. I mean, in a nutshell, it's your grandfather's infrastructure, right? I mean, let's not do it the way that, you know, we've been doing it in the past because society and our planet and, you know, the way people, the digital world that we're in right now, people do things way differently. And so you need to, we need to adapt. And so engineers are leading the way on that. So tell me a little bit about how you all are doing. Carey Smith: So we're very, very excited about the infrastructure bill. It aligns extremely well with Parson's portfolio, whether it's transportation, including work that we do in rail and transit airports, ports, the water wastewater also ties into our portfolio - broadband, and even the utilities work we're involved in, utilities, um, work as well. So we're excited about the bill and what it means for our country. Also highlight too, that we're seeing a lot of growth in global infrastructure. So beyond the United States, there's a lot of spend that's being done in Canada, as well as the Middle East. So for pars, it's a really important time for the infrastructure portion of our business, because we're an advanced technology company. We have two pieces of the business. We have a group that is focused on federal government and really develops advanced technology like artificial intelligence, data analytics capabilities. Carey Smith: We have some unique uses of drones and we do a lot of work in cybersecurity. So we have the ability to build back smarter because we take our advanced technology capabilities. We apply those to the infrastructure side of the business. So if you think about some examples would be instead designing roads and highways for a 30 year lifespan or bridges tunnels, dams, how do you design them for a hundred year lifespan? You include sensors that can perform monitoring and basically give you better predictability. How do you use drones to be able to do inspection of bridges? How do you apply artificial intelligence to a system that does advanced traffic management to be able to get better predictability on accidents? When things would be cleared up, people moving around more safely, um, use of sensors for things like an intelligent intersection. You know, our intersections were kind of set and they basically didn't change for like three to five years now, post COVID we've got whole different traffic patterns. So how do we use the intelligent intersection so that they change dynamically and allow responders the ability to get through. So to encapsulate all that, it really means Build Back Smarter. Um, this is the opportunity to Build Back Smarter and really design for the future. Linda Bauer Darr: I love that. And, um, one of the reasons I love that so much is because it really showcases engineering, right? I mean, people talk about the Recovery Act, you know, during the Obama administration and shovel ready projects. And as you know, that, you know, that's a, that's a red flag for engineers when they hear shovel ready projects, because it means there's not gonna be a lot of thought going into, you know, laying down that asphalt and concrete, this is in a lot of people's views, you know, much better use of our funds because it does promote the sustainability. The long-term project development that you know, is, we're not gonna have to redo, you know, five years down the road. Carey Smith: Right. Linda Bauer Darr: You know, under having that predictability, having those sensors kind of accelerating our, um, you know, the, the way that we use the infrastructure to promote mobility and, you know, our economic backbone, um, it's exciting. And so you guys are right at the crossroads of that. Carey Smith: Yeah. It is really exciting, even, you know, a couple other examples. If you think about airports of the future, how those will be reinvented post COVID, you know, the whole way from the time you get outta your car, you go into the airport, you check in, you do your baggage, you know, you might have integrated health screening combined with ticketing, um, the way you drive up to park, that can all be different. It can all be used of sensors. So I mean, everything in our life really can be reimagined. We like to say at Parsons, we create the future, and this truly an opportunity to create the future of infrastructure. Linda Bauer Darr: Yeah. You know, it's you think about what the origin of the need for a lot of this is, and to some extent, I think we've all been spoiled by Amazon over the years. You know, and the easy button, you know, those concepts of, I don't wanna work too hard for it. And in this digital environment, I can just push a button and all this has been calculated. And that entry to the airport is a great example of that. You know, we're all in a hurry. We don't wanna expend a lot of effort getting all the checks, you know, done just for us to get on a flight, um, you know, for engineers to come in and figure out how to do it. That's a great example of problem solving that really is, you know, central to who our folks are as engineers. Linda Bauer Darr: So we are getting close to the end of our time here. I think I have a couple more points that I wanted to raise with you, and then, you know, Carey, anything you wanna raise this, uh, course, you know, I'd be, be happy to hear your views on what's going on and what you want us to know about what's happening at Parsons. But you know, you talked already a bit about cyber security and cyber protection of critical infrastructure assets. This is so important. It's important for our nation's safety. It's important for our economic safety. It's important for, you know, the privacy of consumers. You know, and we've, we've heard about so many engineering firms who have, suffered because of the bad guys that are out there. And, you know, they know that without our kind of hands in the middle of so many of these really critical projects that if we are vulnerable, they're gonna find a way in. And so you guys are really working big in that space. I'd like to hear a little bit more about, you know, how you think you all are gonna be able to kind of move the ball forward in that regard. Carey Smith: Yes. If you look at the Department of Homeland Security has defined 16 critical infrastructure sectors, and the way we approach it from Parsons is we look at areas that are highly regulated, that are high threat driven in areas that we have domain expertise, because the intersection of those three pillars is basically, um, we're differentiated in those markets. And those are the gonna be the ones that get the most funding as well, because they're gonna be the most under attack. So if you step back and look out at the 16 segments we play in transportation, we play in utilities, we play in facilities area and also in healthcare to just to name a few of the sectors. And what we can do that is unique is because we do have extensive cybersecurity capabilities. We understand, for example, how an airport operates. We understand how a port operates. We understand how a utility company operates. So we're best equipped to be able to provide that cybersecurity protection. And I would say it goes beyond cyber for information technology, because also have the operational technology component. So if you think about SCADA systems or industrial control systems, those were put into those sectors, basically without security in mind at the time that those were designed. So Parsons is able to come in and approach protecting different sectors, both from an IT perspective, as well as an OT perspective. Linda Bauer Darr: Right, so you know, it's, you said, those systems were put in place without kind of a consideration for security. They were put in place for efficiency. Right. And, you know, because we were on everything now we want it yesterday. Right. So now we're at a position we're in a position where we're really having to kind of go back and, and reinvent aren't we? Carey Smith: Yeah. Most definitely protect things, legacy systems that are out there. But most importantly, design with security in mind, as you put new systems, greenfield systems in place. Linda Bauer Darr: So, um, just take a minute, if you will, and tell me about some of the exciting projects you all are involved in right now, if you were gonna say, you know, here is the poster child of how Parsons is involved in innovative engineering solutions that, um, we want the world's policymakers to know about what kinds of things fall into that category for you? Carey Smith: Well, so I, I would say, um, starting with critical infrastructure sector, one of our biggest projects would be the LAX modernization program. That's an example of where we're a program, basically, an owner engineer, a program management office, providing support to what is probably the largest aviation infrastructure project that's underway. If I move around the world to the middle east, we're involved in some exciting programs, there, an example would be NEOM, which is a new city industrial city. That's gonna be built on the Red Sea. And NEOM is gonna be basically designed from the sand-up. So there's gonna be a new airport, for example, that's gonna be put into NEOM. We won a program management job there, and we're in the process of pursuing the airport opportunity. If I move around the world a little bit further up into Canada, we're involved in some of the major rail projects up in Canada - Edmonton Light Rail Transit would be a big one. And then on the federal side of our house, I mentioned cybersecurity's a big area for us, and that is to tied infrastructure, but we do a lot of work in the space area in terms of integrated launch, space, ground systems, and space, situational awareness. And then we're involved in some missile defense projects as well. Linda Bauer Darr: Wow. That really is a very diverse portfolio. That's gotta be a lot to keep up with it. One thing I'm noticing as you're talking about these projects, all are, you know, big and obviously impactful, hugely consequential, but if I am a 16 or 17 year old, and I'm thinking about going to college, and I'm thinking about changing the world, I wanna look at an engineering that is doing something that I know is gonna make the world safer or make the world ultimately healthier, you know, dealing with, for example, climate change, extreme weather issues. I think these are the kinds of motivating concepts where, you know, the people that are coming outta high school and college these days are saying, you know, how can I, how can I make a difference? You know, I don't wanna, I don't wanna just go to a nine to five job and, you know, sign a time sheet and push around a bunch of paper. I wanna make a difference. So what do you have at Parsons that's going on right now where you think the young people of today would be really inspired? Carey Smith: Yeah. So first our motto is we deliver a better world at Parsons. We deliver a world that is safer that is more efficient. And that's true whether it's the federal side of our business or the critical infrastructure side of the business. And what I would say to somebody at age is we're all about creating the future. I was asked recently, well, what company do you wanna emulate? And I said, we don't wanna emulate anybody. We're creating a company that is designing the future, whether it's future or transportation, or the future of defense or the future of cyber. That's what we're about. So I would say to a young person, if you wanna create the future, come join Parsons because that's what we're gonna be doing. Linda Bauer Darr: Right. That's and that's exciting who wouldn't wanna do that, right Jeff? Host: Absolutely. Linda Bauer Darr: That brings us to... Host: Well, um, right about right about time, actually, and that was a fantastic conversation. And I think it's a good example of the diversity of the work that, Parsons is engaged in and our, and our industry is engaged in, and for those listening who may not be completely familiar with engineering or, you know, it's that wide gamit of the services, the intellectual power of trying to solve complex challenges that make your lives better, uh, our lives better and also our nation more secure and productive. And, and I think from the conversation, it is, it's a good explanation that Parson is directly engaged in all of those fronts. And then of course it was a great opportunity to hear from two executives on, you know, really with this great opportunity with the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act and, and all of this potential that is there because now that the policy is done, we've moved to implementation and that's where it comes into our field to actually make policy translate into something tangible. Host: But this is, this has been great. And I do appreciate the time Carey that you've given us. And we look forward to working with Parsons as an active member of the ACEC community in the months and years ahead. And Linda, thank you very much for adding your expertise. And it's, it's always great to take a backseat to allow people who are actually doing things to talk about it. So thank you very much. And again, this has been Engineering Influence, a podcast from the American Council of Engineering Companies, and we'll see you again real soon.    

Kingdom Talks Media
Further Beyond Beyond" | Kingdom Talks – Guest Mike Parsons

Kingdom Talks Media

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 55:52


In this episode of the Kingdom Talks show, Next Age pioneer and author/teacher Mike Parsons meets up with our host Gil Hodges in a vibrant conversation guaranteed to get you thinking. From his teen years, Mike began to see through the fragility of Christian denominations, which had departed from biblical truth in demanding adherence to their human rules over and above maintaining the traditions of the Early Church. Never one to compromise, Mike made the decision to find the real truth . . . wherever his search might lead him. He wasn't disappointed in his quest to go Further Beyond Beyond, and he's now helping bring into the 21st century "beyond beyond" truths about the Truth, the God-Man, Jesus. Freedom Apostolic Ministries has a mandate to gather, connect, impart and release a worldwide Joshua Generation of forerunners who will mentor the next generation into the fullness of sonship. We look to fulfill that mandate by offering the Engaging God subscription program and various other resources to those who hear and respond to God's call to be part of that Joshua Generation. Learn more about FreedomARC at https://freedomarc.org/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kingdomtalksmedia/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kingdomtalksmedia/support

Mary English Astrologer Blog

This week I am covering the charts of a number of people who have Sun square Ascendant, or Ascendant square Sun and have committed a homicide/murder. As mentioned here is my interview with Emily Wyatt on her podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/gr/podcast/episode-12-astrology-with-mary-english/id1555955671?i=1000545371626 PLEASE NOTE this is NOT a signature of 'being a killer' What I found was these people had Ascendant = how-I-display-myself-to-others  ...in conflict with their: Sun = who-I-am.   Here are links to the actual chart mentioned https://www.astro.com/astro-databank/LaPlante,_Daniel https://www.astro.com/astro-databank/Baldwin,_Richard https://www.astro.com/astro-databank/McCra,_Gerald_Jr. https://www.astro.com/astro-databank/Rey,_Florence https://www.astro.com/astro-databank/Rooney,_Brian_L. https://www.astro.com/astro-databank/Rex,_John_Jr. https://www.astro.com/astro-databank/Parsons,_John https://www.astro.com/astro-databank/Maso,_Pietro

Black and White Sports Podcast
Kansas Police Officer's Dog Ranger BEHEADED! Parsons PD says this was TARGETED!

Black and White Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 7:57


Kansas Police Officer's Dog Ranger BEHEADED! Parsons PD says this was TARGETED! Website: www.blackandwhitenetwork.com Get your MERCH here: https://teespring.com/stores/blackandwhitesports Follow Black and White Network on Odysee: Black and White Sports: https://odysee.com/@blackandwhitesports Black and White News: https://odysee.com/@blackandwhitenews Black and White Entertainment: https://odysee.com/@blackandwhiteentertainment Follow us on Rumble: Black and White Sports: https://rumble.com/user/BlackandWhiteSports Black and White News: https://rumble.com/user/BlackandWhiteNews Email: blackandwhitesports2019@gmail.com Check out the podcast site here for all of the live streams: https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitesports Please support Black and White Sports for as low as .99 per month here: https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitesports/support Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/blackandwhitesports Join us and become a channel member today as we fight against Woke sports. Click the JOIN button or the link in the description and support us. Just starts at $4.99 per month and cancel anytime. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC73b_bf7j4fgTnBNRTqKKTA/join Check Out blackandwhitenetwork.com for More Exclusive Content from Us. Entertainment, Politics, Sports! 3 Membership levels Available As Well As Free Video Content & Articles!

Stroke Alert
Stroke Alert December 2021

Stroke Alert

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 42:09


On Episode 11 of the Stroke Alert Podcast, host Dr. Negar Asdaghi highlights two articles from the December 2021 issue of Stroke: “Baseline Cognitive Impairment in Patients With Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis in the CREST-2 Trial” and “Serious Adverse Events and Their Impact on Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke in the WAKE-UP Trial.” She also interviews Dr. Mark Parsons about his article “Stroke Patients With Faster Core Growth Have Greater Benefit From Endovascular Therapy.” Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         1) Can the presence of a high-grade asymptomatic carotid stenosis result in development of early dementia? 2) Have you ever wondered if a random poststroke urinary tract infection or hospital-acquired pneumonia can impact the 90-day poststroke outcome? 3) When it comes to the beneficial effect of endovascular thrombectomy, what is the concept of late window paradox, and why do we need to know about this and its relation with the speed of infarct growth? These are the questions that we will tackle in our December podcast. We're covering the best in Stroke. Stay with us. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Welcome back to the Stroke Alert Podcast. My name is Negar Asdaghi. I'm an Associate Professor of Neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and your host for the monthly Stroke Alert Podcast. For the December 2021 issue of Stroke, we have a large selection of topics, from whether adjusting antiplatelet therapies after stenting for intercranial aneurysms can potentially reduce ischemic events, to studying the outcomes of patients with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and analysis from a nationwide study in the United States, which I encourage you to review in addition to listening to our podcast today. Later in the podcast, I have the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Mark Parsons, from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, on his work suggesting that the beneficial effect of endovascular thrombectomy may be modified based on the speed of infarct growth, from the time of symptom onset to the time when the patient is being considered for reperfusion therapies. But first with these two articles. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         It has been suggested that the presence of chronic high-grade carotid stenosis can result in early cognitive decline, even in the absence of ischemic stroke secondary to the carotid disease. Multiple mechanisms for this decline have been proposed, including an alteration of cerebrovascular reactivity and ipsilateral hemispheric hypoperfusion. Now, if this is true, then asymptomatic patients harboring a high-grade carotid stenosis would have a lower cognitive status than their age and risk factor in matched counterparts. And this is the exact topic that Dr. Ronald Lazar from the Department of Neurology at the University of Alabama and colleagues studied in this issue of the journal, in their article titled “Baseline Cognitive Impairment in Patients With Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis in the CREST-2 Trial.” Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Now, a very quick recap of the CREST-2 Trial. You will recall that CREST-2 is an ongoing randomized trial of patients over 35 years of age with asymptomatic carotid disease of equal or greater than 70%. Asymptomatic is defined as absence of ipsilateral stroke or TIA symptoms within 180 days prior to randomization. Also, a reminder, that to be able to be enrolled in the CREST-2 Trial, patients had to be independent, with no diagnosis of dementia, and they were then randomized to either intensive medical management versus carotid artery stenting, or intensive medical management alone versus carotid endarterectomy. It's important to keep in mind that a secondary outcome of CREST-2 is to see whether carotid intervention over intensive medical management is better in reducing cognitive decline over time in this patient population. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Obviously, we'll have these results after the completion of the CREST-2 trial and its follow-up completion, but in the current study, the authors were interested to compare the baseline cognitive function of the CREST-2 candidates, and they were able to compare this baseline cognitive status to participants of the REGARDS population-based study. Now, the acronym for REGARDS stands for "Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke." This was a population-based study in the United States that included over 30,000 community-dwelling White and Black adults over the age of 45. So, think about the REGARDS cohort as the stroke-free participants without the high-grade carotid stenosis. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, to match the two populations, the authors included only CREST-2 participants that were older than 45 years of age and did not have any prior strokes. So, that gave them a sample size of 786 patients for the current analysis with a complete neurocognitive battery of four tests administered over the phone, in the same order in both studies. So, let's go over these cognitive tests. The test included the Word List Learning Sum, assessing the cognitive domain of learning; the Word List Recall, which is a test of memory; and the two tests for executive function, Word Fluency for animal names and fluency for the single letter 'F'; and a brief screen for depression. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, simply put, we have four cognitive tests assessing the three cognitive domains of learning, memory, and executive function. And depending on how the person did on each test, it gave the investigators Z scores for each participant in each category and then they compiled the Z scores in a percentile tabulation for the CREST-2 population and compared these percentiles to the normative data obtained for the REGARDS population. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, what they found was that, well, not surprisingly, the population of CREST-2 had a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, things like hypertension, elevated lipids, smoking and diabetes. Slightly more than half, exactly 52% of the CREST-2 patients, had a target carotid stenosis vessel on the right side. And then they did some complex statistical models, adjusting for age, race and educational level, and then further adjusting for some vascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and smoking, for each cognitive test, and they found that the overall Z score for patients in CREST-2 was significantly below expected for higher percentiles and marginally below expected for the 25th percentile for all four cognitive tests, as compared to the normative population. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         For example, if they were expecting that 90% of the CREST-2 population would score in the 75th percentile for a particular test, or at 95th percentile on a different test, these percentages were significantly lower in the CREST-2 candidates. The greatest cognitive differences were detected for Word List Delay, which is a test of memory, followed with the Word List Learning, which is a test for learning. And the results really did not change when they adjusted for the vascular risk factors, and importantly, unchanged when they adjusted for right- or left-sided stenosis of the carotid, which is important, as language plays an important role in assessment of memory function. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, what did we learn from this study? Well, number one, poor cognition is associated with harboring high-grade asymptomatic carotid occlusive disease, an effect that was only modestly attenuated by further adjustment for other risk factors. Number two, patients with high-grade carotid stenosis showed a significantly lower cognitive performance in the learning and memory domains. This profile of cognitive decline is different than what was typically expected to be seen in the case of vascular dementia, where abnormalities are predominately seen in the test of executive function. Number three, though we don't know the precise mechanism for cognitive impairment in the setting of carotid stenosis, cerebral hypoperfusion seemed to be the leading plausible cause as hippocampus and amygdala are known to be susceptible to hypoperfusion, and the findings of the current study show that the predominant impairment seen in patients with carotid disease seemed to be involving memory and learning. So, really important findings, and lots to still learn on this topic. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         The occurrence of adverse events during acute treatment and within the first few weeks of acute ischemic stroke are common and can negatively influence the course and clinical outcomes of stroke patients. Serious adverse events, or SAEs, are defined as life-threatening events resulting in death or requiring hospitalization, prolongation of hospitalization, or resulting in significant disability, and they can be either neurological, such as recurrent ischemic events, hemorrhagic complications, seizure disorders, but also can include a myriad of systemic complications, including, but not limited to, occurrence of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, cardiac arrhythmias, various infections, GI bleeds, to name a few. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         In a setting of a clinical trial, patients are regularly and systematically monitored for SAEs, and from these studies we know that, indeed, both adverse events, or AEs, and SAEs are quite common poststroke and are reported in up to 95% of participants of prior randomized trials. Intravenous thrombolysis increased the risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, but in general, the rate of SAEs are similar in thrombolyzed and non-thrombolyzed patients. Which clinical characteristics prone stroke patients to what type of side effects is, of course, an intriguing subject for a stroke neurologist. Similarly, it's important to know how, for example, a seemingly indirect complication of ischemic stroke, such as a hospital-acquired urinary tract infection, can potentially affect the stroke outcomes. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, in this issue of the journal, Dr. Iris Lettow from University Medical Center in Hamburg, Germany, and colleagues looked at the subject in the paper titled “Serious Adverse Events and Their Impact on Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke in the WAKE-UP Trial.” This was a post-hoc analysis of the WAKE-UP Trial, which was a multicenter randomized trial of MR-guided intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase in ischemic stroke patients with unknown time of onset. The WAKE-UP Trial included 503 patients, and they had 199 SAEs reported for 110 patients, meaning that one in five patients had at least one serious adverse event in the trial. Of those patients who did suffer an SAE, 20 patients, which was 10%, had a fatal outcome. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         The rate of SAEs were not different between thrombolyzed and non-thrombolyzed patients. But, when they categorized the patients based on who did and who did not experience an SAE, they found that those who experienced an SAE were older, presented with more severe strokes, and were more likely to have a large vessel occlusion. But only higher age and male sex were independent predictors of development of an SAE poststroke. So, let's pause and think about these findings. This was in contrast to the previous studies, where traditionally, the severity of stroke was a predictor of complications, and importantly, the first study to identify male sex as an independent predictor of SAE, whereas, traditionally, female sex had been identified as a risk factor for development of adverse events poststroke. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Perhaps what we're seeing with a paradigm shift in improvement in poststroke quality of care. Now, another important finding of this study was that the presence of any SAE, whether neurological or non-neurological, resulted in reduction of favorable outcome by half and almost quadrupled the odds of poor outcome, defined as modified Rankin Scale of four to six at 90 days, even after accounting for all the known confounders. Now, the authors also looked at some interesting details. The organ most effected by serious adverse events poststroke was indeed the nervous system. Almost 50% of all SAEs were neurological in nature. This was then followed by cardiac events. Some examples would include an acute coronary syndrome, MI, various arrhythmias. And the surgical and medical procedures were the third most common category of serious adverse events in this study. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         And what they found was that SAEs by organ of involvement had a significant association with 90-day outcomes, where any neurological serious adverse events significantly affected 90-day functional outcome poststroke. When adjusting and accounting for important variables, such as age, sex, LVO, this still remained true in terms of a predictor of outcome. In contrast, cardiac serious adverse events, infectious serious adverse events, did not have any effect on the 90-day functional outcome. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, what are the top takeaway messages from this study? Number one, SAEs occur commonly poststroke, and in this particular study, occurred in one in five ischemic stroke patients. Number two, 10% of those who suffer from an SAE had a fatal outcome. Number three, nervous system disorders and cardiac disorders were the most frequent classes of side effects poststroke. And finally, patients suffering from at least one serious adverse event had a lower odds of reaching favorable outcome at 90 days. These findings emphasize the importance of dedicated stroke care, neurointensive care units, and all poststroke efforts to reduce preventable adverse events poststroke. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Time is an exceedingly important concept in treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. As an example, in a typical stroke related to a proximal large vessel occlusion, the ischemic brain loses an average of two million neurons per minute. Now, endovascular therapy is the standard reperfusion treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke secondary to a large vessel occlusion. It is an effective treatment to restore blood flow and reperfusion to the brain and had been shown to improve outcomes in stroke patients. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Therefore, one would naturally anticipate that the benefits of endovascular therapy would be dramatically reduced with treatment so late. If this is true, then why is it that the beneficial treatment effect from endovascular therapy was even larger in patients treated in the late time window trials, and you will recall that these were patients included from 6 to 16 hours, or 6 to 24 hours, from their symptom onset time. This compared to treatment effects noted in patients enrolled in the early time window trials. This concept is known as the "late window paradox" and does not mean that we have to wait to provide reperfusion therapies to patients. It actually refers to those fortunate few that have robust collaterals and, as a result, have slow infarct growth, which will afford them that extra precious time to remain eligible to receive this life-saving treatment. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Joining me now on the podcast is Dr. Mark Parsons from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, to talk to us about the concept of infarct growth. Dr. Parsons is one of the senior authors of the study published in the current issue of the journal titled “Stroke Patients With Faster Core Growth Have Greater Benefit From Endovascular Therapy,” and will discuss how the beneficial effect of endovascular treatment may be modified by the speed of infarct growth in the early time window after symptom onset. As in every podcast, when I have the pleasure of interviewing a pioneer in the field of stroke, that my guest needs no introduction, but truly Dr. Parsons needs no introduction to our listeners. He's a Professor of Neurology at the University of New South Wales in southwestern Sydney. He's an internationally recognized leader in the field of stroke, stroke clinical trials, and brain imaging whose research has helped improve patient selection for acute stroke reperfusion therapies. It's truly an honor to have him on the podcast today. Welcome, Mark. Thank you so much for joining us all the way in Sydney on a Saturday morning. Dr. Mark Parsons:           Yes, thank you, Negar. It's OK, I have been up for a little while. So, yes, lovely to chat with you, and we haven't chatted in person for quite a long time, and I think I actually remember the last time was in Hamburg, in Germany, at a big stroke conference. I remember it quite well. We had a very pleasant evening with a group of Canadians and Australians, and I had to present a major tenecteplase study finding the next day, and I was a little bit off my game, some of my friends said, and I think that's probably your fault, Negar. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Mark, you did really great, and we really, truly, look forward to getting back to in-person meetings. So, let's start with the study here. Can you please tell us about the INSPIRE registry? Dr. Mark Parsons:           So, the INSPIRE registry, that's an acronym. So, it's best to spell out this acronym, so that stands for the "International Stroke Perfusion Imaging Registry." So, that was something we set up quite a while ago when perfusion CT was quite considered advanced or novel. We set that up, I think, in about 2010, and because that was obviously one of my areas of interest, perfusion imaging, we started collecting perfusion CT and CT angiography , and noncontract CT, for that matter, from our stroke patients from a number of centers in several countries. And over time, that built up to over 20 centers around the world, so predominantly Australia and China, because of the close connections that we've got there, but also one site in Canada, actually two sites now. We have so many sites that I sometimes overlook a few. Dr. Mark Parsons:           So, it is international. And what we do is, we collect prospective data from stroke patients, both clinical and their acute imaging, follow-up imaging, follow-up clinical information, and in the majority of patients, we also get three-month Rankin. So, there's now over 3,000 patients in that database with complete datasets from acute baseline imaging through to three months. And that was the dataset that we used for this current study. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, Mark, this is truly an impressive registry. It is not easy to do large-scale imaging-based registries, and this is really impressive to have so many centers involved. Can you tell us about the current study population? Who did you include in the current study paper? Dr. Mark Parsons:           Firstly, we specifically looked at patients that had a large vessel occlusion, or LVO. Of course, the definition of large vessel occlusion varies a bit from place to place, but essentially, that means a clot in a proximal artery to the brain that's potentially retrievable via endovascular thrombectomy. I guess the beauty of the INSPIRE registry is, we started collecting stroke patient data well before endovascular thrombectomy was a routine treatment. We had quite a large number of large vessel occlusion patients in this study who didn't receive endovascular thrombectomy because it simply wasn't available at the time. And then, of course, with all of those big trials that came out in 2015, as you know, and beyond, with thrombectomy becoming routine at all of our INSPIRE sites and many other places around the world, we then had a, I guess, a historical cohort comparison of large vessel occlusion patients that were not given EVT and then, more recently, a cohort of large vessel occlusion patients who were treated with thrombectomy. Dr. Mark Parsons:           The non-thrombectomy patients, in the vast majority, received intravenous thrombolysis because they were in the 4.5-hour time window. I guess the only other thing, the main other inclusion criteria, was we specified that patients in this particular study needed to have a relatively small infarct core, less than 70 mL, and we can talk more about that later, if you like, and a significant area of tissue that's potentially salvageable with reperfusion, the so-called penumbra. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Thank you. Just to recap for our listeners, so your current study population included patients presenting early on, within 4.5 hours from symptom onset, with a large vessel occlusion, and because, as you mentioned, the study had been ongoing even before endovascular therapy became a standard of care, you have a group of patients in whom endovascular therapy was offered and you have the comparison to this group to those patients who had an LVO, large vessel occlusion, but simply received intravenous thrombolysis only. Can you now tell us about these two groups, basically, IV thrombolysis versus endovascular therapy group. What were the differences between the two groups, and what were the main clinical outcomes in your study? Dr. Mark Parsons:           Yes. We had about 400 patients in each arm. And though reasonably well matched, I mean, of course, registry, it's not randomized, so you can't have perfectly matched groups, and indeed, in the more recent era where most patients with large vessel occlusion, particularly with this small core, big penumbra on imaging, would go to thrombectomy because they had the so-called ideal target population. So, in the modern era, if patients don't receive EVT, then there's probably a good reason for that. But, essentially, they are around 70 years of age. Their NIH Stroke score was around 15, or the median score, so that's reasonably consistent with large vessel occlusion. And then if you look at the perfusion imaging, so this was all with perfusion CT in our studies, so the core volume was quite small, 15 mL, but there was quite a large range. And the median penumbra volume was actually a bit bigger in the EVT group; it was 80 versus 65 in the penumbral group. Dr. Mark Parsons:           We probably don't need to go into the details of how those core penumbral volumes are calculated, but that might be a bit over-technical for our audience, but happy to elucidate further if you want. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Actually, I think it's important to, just briefly, talk about how those values were measured. Dr. Mark Parsons:           Yes, OK. The other thing I should say is that, interestingly enough, we specified the 4.5-hour time window, but in fact, the median time from stroke onset to imaging was just under two hours in both groups, which is quite short. Dr. Mark Parsons:           And indeed, some of the people that are less enthusiastic about perfusion CT than I am would say, "Well, maybe measures of core are not so reliable in that early time window with perfusion CT." I would probably debate that to some degree. But, if we talked to the technicalities, there's quite a lot of data to suggest that the cerebral blood flow threshold is probably the most robust for identifying core, or at least tissue that's destined to infarct. It may not actually be infarcted at the time we measure it, particularly at two hours, but there's quite a lot of data now showing that with perfusion CT with a cerebral blood flow threshold of 30%, depending on software variations, that's a pretty accurate estimate of the final infarct in people that have rapid reperfusion fairly quickly after the perfusion CT. Dr. Mark Parsons:           So, all of these figures that we use are based on, for example, the core threshold on perfusion CT relates to, we validate that from patients, particularly that have had thrombectomy, so we know when they've reperfused. And the theory should be that if the CT perfusion core is an accurate measure of the final infarct, that there should not be much change from the baseline CT perfusion core to the follow-up infarct because there's been reperfusion not long after the perfusion scan. Now, with the penumbral volume, we use software that measures a delay time. Other software, particularly in North America, you would use a Tmax, but they're both basically direct measures of collateral flow. Dr. Mark Parsons:           So, as you know, when you have a large vessel occlusion, say, of a middle cerebral artery and in one segment, the way that blood gets to the cortex, it's typically supplied from the middle cerebral, is via retrograde flow from the anterior cerebral and the posterior cerebral via leptomeningeal collateral, so you actually get blood coming back retrograde bypassing the occlusion. And these measures on perfusion CT delay time in Tmax, actually, give you a measurement in seconds of how long it takes the blood to travel to that part of the brain. And, obviously, the longer the delay in seconds means the poorer the collateral flow. And then, typically, that means the poorer the collaterals, the less time you've got to salvage the penumbra, and the quicker the infarct core will expand. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Right. So, in your study, using these perfusion parameters. First, before even we come to the perfusion parameters, you found that overall, when you adjusted for all confounders, endovascular-treated patients had a better, or higher, odds of achieving good 90-day outcomes. This was not a surprising finding when you compare this population of endovascularly-treated patients to those treated with intravenous thrombolysis alone. But what was interesting was, indeed, those analyses related to infarct growth rate. Can you tell us a little bit about this concept of infarct growth rate, and you already mentioned how you measured infarct growth by perfusion imaging. Dr. Mark Parsons:           Thanks, Negar. I guess that's the novel part in it. I guess it would have been quite surprising if we didn't show that EVT was superior to IVT in the early time window. So, that certainly wasn't unexpected, that finding. But I guess the novel part of this study is this relatively new concept of infarct core growth rate. I'm not saying we're the first that's described it because, as you know, there are a number of papers in the literature and talking about the concept of slow infarct core growers versus fast infarct core growers. And you mentioned the late time window thrombectomy studies, DAWN and DEFUSE 3, which actually showed a dramatic benefit in the later time window, up to 24 hours after stroke, in patients who had evidence of perfusion core mismatch. And the concept then was suggested that the reason that these people benefited so much in that late time window was that they had very slow infarct core growth because they had great collaterals. Dr. Mark Parsons:           The treatment effect was bigger in those late time window studies than it was in the early time window thrombectomy studies, which was hypothesized might have included a lot of patients with fast infarct core growth rate, which wasn't really measured in a number of the thrombectomy studies in the early time window. We wanted to look more at, does the rate of infarct core growth have an influence on the effective treatment, with both IV and endovascular treatment? Dr. Mark Parsons:           So, the way we measured infarct core growth was pretty simple, actually. It's basically, we excluded patients with uncertain time of stroke onset because we had more than double this total number of LVO stroke patients with target mismatch, but we had to exclude the patients with uncertain time of onset, which included wake-up stroke and others. So, in this group, where there was a defined time of onset, basically, the infarct core growth rate was simply measured from the volume of the infarct core measured on perfusion CT divided by the time from stroke onset. So, just simplistically, if you've got a core of 50 mL, and it's two hours after stroke onset, then the infarct core growth rate is 25 mL per hour. That's simple, but that obviously assumes a linear core growth rate. And we based that linear model on previous studies of repeated diffusion MR imaging, which is another measure of core, that showed that the core growth rate was linear. Dr. Mark Parsons:           Now, of course, you could criticize that because I suspect, in some patients, the core growth rate is not linear. This is an estimate of core growth rate. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Right. So, your study actually found something quite interesting, which I really want you to go over for us and for our listeners, and that's that the beneficial effect of endovascular therapy is superior in those with a fast infarct growth rate, and was not superior, in fact not any different, in those patients who had a slow infarct growth rate. Can you walk us through that, and also tell us how that does not contradict what we've found as part of DAWN and DEFUSE with the slow infarct growers? Dr. Mark Parsons:           Thanks, Negar. It is slightly complicated, so we'll go one step at a time. So, first of all, the core growth rate varied quite a bit in this population. A number of patients, and this is because you saw that the median core in this group was 15 mL, so there was quite a large population of patients that had a core growth rate of less than 15 mL per hour. So, they're your traditional slow growers, slow core growers, who have really great collateral flow. You probably have a number of hours to save the penumbra. Now, I'm not saying that you should waste time in this group of patients, but it might be particularly relevant, for example, if you're transferring from a primary stroke center to a comprehensive stroke center. You know that you're going to have time to save that penumbra because the infarct core is going to grow slowly. Dr. Mark Parsons:           In, for example, in Australia, at least half of our thrombectomy patients come from regional or out of metro centers, where there is a significant transfer time from the primary stroke center to the comprehensive center. So, that may be a particularly important finding to look at in the future for longer transfer times from primary to comprehensive stroke centers. So, then, at the other end of the scale, we had a proportion of patients who had what we call a fast core growth rate of more than 25 mL per hour. And then there were people in the middle between 15 and 25 who we called sort of moderate core growth. So greater than 25 mL per hour was a fast core growth. Dr. Mark Parsons:           We categorized it into those sort of three categories. Again, that's a bit arbitrary, but the reason we did that was that if you look at the IVT group alone, those who had slow core growth rate, less than 15 mL per hour, their rates of good outcome, so a Rankin 0 to 2, so getting back to close to normal function at three months, their rates of a good outcome were almost 60% in the slow core growth rate with IVT. Then, if you go to the other end of the scale with fast core growth with intravenous therapy, the rates of good outcome in that group were only 30%. So, there was a clear decline in terms of three-month good outcomes with intravenous thrombolysis versus core growth rate. So, as the core growth rate increased, the chances of good outcome with intravenous thrombolysis decreased. Dr. Mark Parsons:           Then, if you looked at the EVT group, it was quite interesting that this core growth rate effect had minimal impact on the outcome of the EVT patients. So, in the EVT patients with slow core growth rate, less than 15 mL, the rates of good outcome at three months were, again, close to 60% and identical to the IV therapy group. But, at the other end of the scale, with fast core growth rate above 25 mL with the EVT group, they had a much higher rate of good outcome compared to the IVT group. Their rates of good outcome were around 45%. So, they are a little bit lower than the slow core growers with EVT, but there wasn't much drop-off with core growth rate, and there was a significant increase in good outcomes in the EVT group who had fast core growth compared to the IVT group. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, I just want to summarize this so that I understand it and, of course, want to make sure that it's simplified also for our listeners. So, you found that those people, and it should be noted these are all within the first 4.5 hours. Dr. Mark Parsons:           Yes. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, we understood in that time frame. Those people who had a fast growth rate, they had the greatest benefit from endovascular therapy in this time frame. And those people who had the slow growth rate, that is defined in your study as less than 15 cc per hour, they actually had a similar benefit from endovascular therapy as they did with intravenous thrombolysis. Did I summarize that? Dr. Mark Parsons:           Yes. That's correct. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, Mark, how do you explain this from a pathophysiological standpoint? Dr. Mark Parsons:           Fortunately, there's a relatively simple explanation. So, because of the way that we set up INSPIRE, we collected follow-up infarct volumes as well. From the time window for follow-up infarct measurement was a little bit variable, but it was around 48 hours after stroke onset. In this group of patients, we actually were able to measure final infarct volume and essentially, in the slow core group, so less than 15 cc growth per hour, in that group, with both IVT and EVT, there was minimal infarct growth by the time we measured it at 48 hours. So, both therapies basically led to minimal infarct growth after the treatment, whereas in the fast core growth group, more than 25 cc per hour, the IVT group had much greater infarct growth by 48 hours, about 40 or 50 mL more, on average, than the EVT group. Dr. Mark Parsons:           I guess also, to explain that a touch more, if you look at the slow core growth EVT group versus the fast core growth EVT group, there was still more infarct growth in the fast core growth rate. And this is because you measure the core at a certain time on the CT or the MR. And then, even with the very best system, you're not going to get reperfusion with EVT for at least 30 minutes after that because you have got to get into the angio lab, you have to puncture the groin, and you have got to get up there, and you have got to pull the clot. So, even if you get complete perfect circumstances, it's still usually at least a 30- to 60-minute delay between the perfusion CT and when you're fully reperfused. Dr. Mark Parsons:           But the theory should be, if there's a minimal delay from the perfusion CT to reperfusion, the core at that time should be identical to the follow-up, final infarct volume. And that's what we actually found in the slow core group. It was almost the same. The interesting thing was, it was the same in both IVT and EVT, which basically, we don't know for sure, because we don't know exactly when the IVT group reperfused, but it probably means that because the core growth is so slow in this group, even if you reperfuse later with IV therapy, which we know is the case, often with IV thrombolysis the recanalization is a bit slower than with EVT, so even if you've got delayed reperfusion, if you've got slow core growth rate, you may not get much infarct expansion at all, whereas if you've got fast core growth rate, getting reperfusion as quickly as possible after your CT is crucial to limit subsequent infarct growth before reperfusion. And that's exactly what we found in the fast core growers, that EVT substantially limited that subsequent infarct growth and led to better clinical outcomes as well. Sorry, again, that was a long explanation. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Mark, but these are really important findings, and as you alluded to earlier, I believe that they have major implications in how the systems of care are organized and our transfers are going to be decided upon in the future. We have a few minutes before we end the podcast here, and I want to ask you, do you think it's fair to have a similar concept that's studying the infarct growth rate in the late time window, especially in the sort of past 12 hours time window in the future? Dr. Mark Parsons:           Yeah, it's a fascinating question, Negar. In fact, we do have a paper somewhere under review. I think Stroke might have knocked it back. Anyway, but it's actually looking exactly at this concept, but the fascinating thing is, in the late time window, you see very few true fast growers because they actually present early. This is what the paper under review is talking about. So, in fact, most people that you see with a favorable imaging pattern in the late time window, such as DAWN and DEFUSE 3, the core is relatively small. In patients with fast core growth, by the time you get to six hours, you've got a massive core and no penumbra, so they are typically not offered endovascular therapy because there's no salvageable tissue and there's already lots of damage, even on the non-con CT. Dr. Mark Parsons:           So, it would be actually really interesting to look just at the late time window, and I'm sure others are doing that, too, but I suspect what we'll find is that the distribution of core growth is pretty narrow. It's mostly the slower core growers, and it's very clear that most of the really fast, and we're actually looking at this now in people with large infarct core over 70 mL, in fact, they present, the ones that we've got at least, present very early. So, it'll be a fascinating area to look at, for sure. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Mark, it is definitely fascinating. We look forward to covering that paper, hopefully in our future podcast. But I want to leave you, reminding you that I'm a mild stroke person, so I am definitely interested in looking at these slow grow rate infarct patients because there are also, as you know, some studies suggesting that the slow growth infarct actually can happen sub-clinically on only a radiographic basis, and especially important in the mild group patients. But, we are out of time. Professor Mark Parsons, thank you so much for joining us all the way from Sydney, and it's been a pleasure interviewing you. Dr. Mark Parsons:           Thank you, Negar. Lovely to chat and hope to see you very soon in person. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Thank you. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         And with that, we end our podcast for the December 2021 issue and close the first year of the Stroke podcast. A year ago, Dr. Ralph Sacco, the Editor-in-Chief of Stroke, approached me to talk about the importance of starting a podcast for Stroke as an accessible means to highlight the great work published in the journal, and also introduce me to the amazing Stroke editorial staff. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         One year, hundreds of reviewed papers, and 11 podcasts later, from missed deadlines to late night emails, early morning texts, and weekend recordings, our podcast has become a bit more than just a quick review of the literature. It has truly become our podcast family. Overcoming the time differences and impossible schedules, you made time to interview with us, listen to us, and work with us as we reached out to researchers across the globe who contributed to this journal and to the podcast. Lots of laughter and a few tears. Like every family, ending the year reminds us of some good times and, of course, the difficult times. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, I want to end our final podcast of the year with a topic that we haven't really covered in our journal, but I think may sprinkle some magic on your holiday season, and that's the topic of quantum biology. Wrapped in mysticism with a pseudoscientific flavor, physicists, neurologists, anesthesiologists, and philosophers have been hard at work deciphering whether consciousness may have similar properties to quantum particles. From superposition to entanglement and coherence, is it possible that your mind may have something to do with the epigenetics, up and down regulation of genes and presentation treatment and, importantly, outcome of various medical or neurological disorders? Now, even if this was proved to have a low scientific validity, as a stroke scientist, isn't it amazing to be working in the one field that ensures the brain, which is the home of consciousness, remains healthy? So, let's think about the power of consciousness in altering the outcome of medical conditions with our ever-excitement to stay alert with Stroke Alert. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit AHAjournals.org.

Inside the Birds: A Philadelphia Eagles Podcast
Jason Kelce Appreciation | Antonio Gibson "Overrated?" | No Time To Cower | DeVonta Vs. Parsons | Q&A With Quintin Mikell, Jason Avant

Inside the Birds: A Philadelphia Eagles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 77:33


Jason Kelce Appreciation | Antonio Gibson "Overrated?" | No Time To Cower | DeVonta Vs. Parsons | Q&A With Quintin Mikell, Jason Avant #PhiladelphiaEagles #GardnerMinshew #JalenHurts #WashingtonFootballTeam #Eagles #PhiladelphiaEagles #JalenHurts #PhiladelphiaEagles #NFL A weekly digital show and podcast hosted by former #Eagles wide receiver Jason Avant and former Eagles safety Quintin Mikell. The former Birds break down the game, take you behind the scenes, and share some stories from their playing days. Follow the Hosts! ► Follow Jason Avant on Twitter: https://twitter.com/j_avant81 ► Follow Quintin Mikell on Twitter: https://twitter.com/QMikell27

Keyes Two The City
True or False: Parsons MVP? Judge's decision? Down to 5 for SBLVI?

Keyes Two The City

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 54:25


On today's episode we bring to our version of True or False! Are we down to 5 teams who can win #SBLVI? Should Parsons deserve #MVP consideration? Are Giants making the right decision bringing back #JoeJudge? #JustinHerbert has to outplay #PatrickMahomes for #Chargers to beat #Chiefs?

Real Estate Strategies with Ken McElroy
Real Estate Markets that will CRASH in 2022 (with RealPage's Jay Parsons)

Real Estate Strategies with Ken McElroy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 50:46


Gain access to weekly real estate updates, mini courses, sample forms, and more by signing up for Ken McElroy's FREE Membership: https://kenmcelroy.com/podcastWhat markets are going to be the hottest in the coming year? And which markets may start to see a decline? Join Ken McElroy, Danille, and RealPage's Chief Deputy Economist, Jay Parsons, in a discussion about all of the data that Realpage has to offer to predict the BIGGEST real estate markets of 2022.

Real Estate Strategies with Ken McElroy
The BEST Markets to Watch in 2022 (with RealPage's Jay Parsons)

Real Estate Strategies with Ken McElroy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 51:31


Gain access to weekly real estate updates, mini courses, sample forms, and more by signing up for Ken McElroy's FREE Membership: https://kenmcelroy.com/podcast What real estate markets are going to be the hottest in the coming year? And which markets may start to see a decline? Join Ken McElroy, Danille, and RealPage's Chief Deputy Economist, Jay Parsons, in a discussion about all of the data that Realpage has to offer to predict the BIGGEST real estate markets of 2022. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne
12/14/21 DPS Hour 1 Cris Collinsworth

The Dan Patrick Show on PodcastOne

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 53:07


Cris Collinsworth tells Dan that it is not a fair comaprison between Micah Parsons and Lawrence Taylor. Cris says the talent is there for Parsons but not yet on Taylor's level. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Field Tripping
Coming Home | Bob Parsons

Field Tripping

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 68:10


Bob Parsons, entrepreneur and psychedelic philanthropist best known for founding the domain registrar GoDaddy, joins Ronan to discuss his harrowing combat experience in Vietnam and the ensuing PTSD, his path to psychedelic therapy and healing, how to address the failed war on drugs, and more! After returning home from the Vietnam War, Bob realized he was not the same person as before, and eventually became aware of his PTSD after years of struggle. After reading Michael Pollan's book “How To Change Your Mind,” he immediately began exploring psychedelic therapy as an option to heal his trauma. Parsons is currently working with MAPS to help conduct clinical trials of MDMA-assisted therapy for FDA approval, and with Dr. Rachel Yehuda to help with PTSD research, and to train therapists to specialize in treating veterans and active-duty members with psychedelics.Feel free to leave Ronan a message with your comments, questions, or just to say hello! https://www.speakpipe.com/fieldtripping or write us an email at fieldtripping@kastmedia.com. And please check out our Field Tripping YouTube channel where you can watch the show!Follow us! Official Website: fieldtriphealth.comLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fieldtriphealth/Facebook: facebook.com/fieldtriphealthTwitter: twitter.com/fieldtriphealthInstagram: instagram.com/fieldtriphealthGuest Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drbobparsons/Download our app: tripapp.co

Sustaining Creativity Podcast

Creativity through the lens of an architect"Creativity is the development of novel and useful ideas for products, services and systems"Architect Donald M. Rattner helps people maximize their creativity by applying research in design psychology to the built environment. His most recent book is the award-winning My Creative Space: How to Design Your Home to Stimulate Ideas and Spark Innovation. Rattner has taught at the University of Illinois, New York University, and Parsons. Speaking venues include the Creative Problem Solving Institute, Creative Mornings, libraries, bookstores, conferences, and corporate events. His work has been featured in The New York Times, Architectural Digest, and on various podcasts. Rattner holds a Bachelor's from Columbia and a Masters from Princeton.LinksThe book "My Creative Space": https://amzn.to/3CXzY7yWebsite: https://donaldrattner.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/donaldrattnerarchitect/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/donaldrattneraia/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/donald-m-rattner-architect-b5472221/Mari's Awakening Creativity FREE Guide:https://courses.skillfulmeans.life/Awakening-CreativityMari's Awakening Creativity FREE 7 Day Challenge:https://courses.skillfulmeans.life/7-day-Awakening-Creativity

Dallas Cowboys Podcasts
Hangin' with the Boys: There Goes That Man

Dallas Cowboys Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 47:39


Nick and Kyle join the show to celebrate another Victory Monday! The boys discuss the return of Gregory and Gallimore, the other-worldly impact of Parsons and how the defense dominated in the win over rival Washington. But about that offense…

Hangin' With The 'Boys
Hangin' with the Boys: There Goes That Man

Hangin' With The 'Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 47:39


Nick and Kyle join the show to celebrate another Victory Monday! The boys discuss the return of Gregory and Gallimore, the other-worldly impact of Parsons and how the defense dominated in the win over rival Washington. But about that offense…

Kevin and Cory
Jerry Jones on Parsons and Pollards' injuries, WFT preview and more

Kevin and Cory

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 15:52


Jerry Jones joined the K&C Masterpiece to discuss Micah Parsons and Tony Pollard's injury statuses heading into Sunday's game vs. Washington.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dallas Cowboys: The Star Boyz Podcast
Week 14, Is This Defense for Real!? Can The Offense bounce back against The Washington No Names

Dallas Cowboys: The Star Boyz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 24:03


Tune in this week as we dive head first into the Week 14 Washington Football Team Matchup. We talk about Gregory and Gallimores Return, Who is your pick for Defensive Player of The Year, Parsons or Diggs? We also talk about Zekes injury and ask that the real Connor Please Stand Up. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thexxoshow/message

Fit For Golf
Episode #27 - Justin Parsons

Fit For Golf

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 64:45


In this episode of the Fit For Golf Podcast I am joined by Justin Parsons. Justin is a golf coach. His pupils include Louis Oosthuizen, Harris English, Brian Harmon, and Patton Kizzire. As you can probably guess, Justin is a great golf coach, and he is very interested in how humans can train to perform better. In this episode we dig into how Justin approaches golf improvement. He provides many valuable nuggets along the way. A quick reminder that Fit For Golf has its own App.It is currently being used by over 4000 golfers around the world, ranging all the way from PGA Tour winners, to high handicaps beginners, to juniors, and seniors. There are programs to suit everyone and the detailed video instruction makes it very simple to follow. You can get a 20% off a one year subscription by entering the code FFGPODYou will not find it in the app store, you must go to the website www.fitforgolf.blog/app

Moving Upstream Without a Paddle
From Prejudice to Philanthropy - Rich Parsons

Moving Upstream Without a Paddle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 48:23


Rich was a preacher's kid and grew up knowing the bible truths. But somewhere along the way, he was infected with a prejudicial mindset. He could be around other ethnicities but he came to the awareness that he didn't treat all people the same. After entering the military, he went to a bar-b-q that was predominantly black people who were making slurring remarks to him and that is when he became aware of how hurtful not treating people right could be. He knew he had to change that mindset. He deliberately started putting himself in situations where people of color and sexual preferences that he didn't agree with congregated. He learned that people are just people. You don't have to agree with them to treat them with care and respect. While in the military he coached and mentored people in the areas of leadership, communication, and human resource management. He thus became familiar with John Maxwell and determined that he wanted to take his certification course and do some type of mentoring and coaching for a post-military career. The pandemic spawned an “E” magazine to provide a platform for businesses to share their voice and market their businesses which has become well known. Currently, he is developing a mindset course and a transition course called Become an Interview Rockstar. (Hint: It's about beefing up your job interview skills.) With his experience, Rich can be of help in numerous areas of life. If you know you need help here's how you can reach him: Call: 719-896-118 Email: Rich@yoursuccess.biz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Talkin' Cowboys
Talkin' Cowboys: Parsons Comparison

Talkin' Cowboys

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 48:17


Micah Parsons' rookie season is drawing comparisons to NFL greats. Who does he remind you of most? The crew debates. Plus, fan phone calls.

Dallas Cowboys Podcasts
Talkin' Cowboys: Parsons Comparison

Dallas Cowboys Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 48:17


Micah Parsons' rookie season is drawing comparisons to NFL greats. Who does he remind you of most? The crew debates. Plus, fan phone calls.

Shan and RJ
Jerry Jones on Dak & Zeke's health, Parsons' fit with healthy D-Line, and more

Shan and RJ

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 19:23


Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones joined Shan and RJ for his weekly visit Tuesday morning on 105.3 The Fan. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mighty Mommy's Quick and Dirty Tips for Practical Parenting
How To Resolve Parenting Conflicts with Dr. Aleja Parsons

The Mighty Mommy's Quick and Dirty Tips for Practical Parenting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 35:39


It’s not easy when parents have very different ideas about raising the kids. Leaving these conflicts unresolved is a recipe for resentment and eroded relationships. Dr. Coor interviews Dr. Aleja Parsons to get some tips for improving communication with your co-parent. Read the companion article on Quick and Dirty Tips. Follow Dr. Aleja Parsons and sign up for her vulnerability masterclass. Check out all the Quick and Dirty Tips shows. Subscribe to the newsletter for more parenting tips. Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.  Links:  https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/ https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/podcasts https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/subscribe https://www.facebook.com/QDTProjectParenthood https://twitter.com/qdtparenthood  

PFF NFL Daily
Ep 211 - Is Cowboys LB Micah Parsons changing the game?

PFF NFL Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 11:34


PFF analysts Steve Palazzolo and Sam Monson react to Cowboys rookie LB-turned-pass-rusher Micah Parsons' dominant performance on Thursday night vs. the Saints by putting into perspective just how good Parsons' rookie season has been. Not only is Parsons the clear favorite for Defensive Rookie of the Year, he's also in the conversation for DPOY. Could his ability to play both linebacker and speed rusher off the edge completely change the way offenses have to gameplan?

START with Kristy Dickerson
EP076 | Feels Like Home with Marian Parsons

START with Kristy Dickerson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 33:48


​​Marian Parsons is the mother of two boys, a paint enthusiast, a lover of all things home and author of Feels Like Home. Join Kristy as she interviews Marian about home interiors and creating a space for productivity. While the focus of Marian's work has been on the home, the heart of her work has always been providing encouragement and inspiration to women in the areas of decorating, homemaking, and creative endeavors. Don't miss out on her tips! You can find Marian at https://missmustardseed.com/ and more START with Kristy here startplanner.com/pages/podcast.

Texas Wine and True Crime
The Murder of Marian Parsons.

Texas Wine and True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 34:06


This week we are discussing the murder of Marian Parsons out of Palmer, TX. Marian was giving and would help anyone, but someone wanted her money and lifestyle. We are sipping on a Dolcetto from our friends at Cascabel Ranch Winery! This dry red has hints of black cherry, plum and cocoa. Check out our friends at cascabelranchwinery.com.This week we want to encourage everyone to donate to the Salvation Army or grab an Angel from your local Angel tree! It's the season for giving!The cheeses we paired with the Dolcetto from Cascabel Ranch Winery were Gouda aged 50 months called Artikaas, Quadrello Di Bufala Casefico Quattro Portoni and MMolette Vielle Signy Ste Mere. Please visit us at Texas Wine and True Crime.