Podcasts about sahil kapur

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  • 23PODCASTS
  • 59EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about sahil kapur

Latest podcast episodes about sahil kapur

The News with Shepard Smith
Covid Boosters, Welfare Fraud and Brett Favre, Holiday Shopping Supply Chain

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 50:14


CNBC's Meg Tirrell updates on the FDA advisory panel's vote to recommend an extra half-dose for certain people who received Moderna's vaccine. NBC's Sahil Kapur reports on what's next for Steve Bannon after he defied the January 6th committee's subpoena. Senior Reporter for the Mississippi Free Press Ashton Pittman discusses the threat from Mississippi officials to sue Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre. NBA star Kyrie Irving opens up about his decision to remain unvaccinated. CNBC's Ylan Mui looks into the enormous decline of women in the workforce and what's keeping them on the sidelines. CNBC's Julia Boorstin reports on “self-preferencing” in big tech companies. CNBC's Perry Russom reports on the latest development in the saga of South Carolina lawyer Alex Murdaugh. Plus, CNBC's Andrea Day tracks down shoppers who are getting a head start on the holidays.

Deadline: White House
"A Friday that doesn't feel like a Friday at all"

Deadline: White House

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 96:52


Nicolle Wallace discusses Biden meeting with Democrats on Capitol Hill to find compromise on his infrastructure bills. Plus, the fight for women's reproductive rights continues, membership in a far-right militia group surges after January 6th, lawmakers address the mysterious illness known as the Havana Syndrome, and the Supreme Court denies a request from NYC teachers to block a vaccine mandate from taking effect. Joined by: Donna Edwards, Jonathan Lemire, Sahil Kapur, Garrett Haake, Claire McCaskill, Reverend Al Sharpton, Ali Vitali, Rep. Madeleine Dean, Fatima Goss Graves, Maya Wiley, Neal Katyal, Kristofer Goldsmith, Betsy Woodruff Swan, Julian Barnes, Aaron Blake, and Dr. Nahid Bhadelia

The Rachel Maddow Show
Red state's recount debunks pillow guy; Trump loses a few votes

The Rachel Maddow Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 45:45


Tonight's guests are Sahil Kapur, NBC News national political reporter; Rep. Jamie Raskin; and Rep. Barbara Lee.

All In with Chris Hayes
‘Failure is not an option': Hayes on why Dems must unify on Biden agenda

All In with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 44:44


Guests: Rep. Pramila Jayapal, Sahil Kapur, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, Barbara McQuade, Dr. Scott GottliebTonight: The all-out battle for the Biden agenda, the Republicans trying to kill the whole thing, and the Democrats holding one of the most popular parts hostage. Then, Trump's first FDA commissioner on what went so wrong on the Covid response—and how to get it right the next time. Plus, a new memo shows the Trump campaign knew the big lie was a lie.  

All In with Chris Hayes
GOP leaders undermine public health at home but fearmonger over ‘foreign threats'

All In with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 44:46


Tonight: As the pandemic spikes in states like South Dakota and Florida, the cruel irony of Republican leaders fear mongering over foreigners as coronavirus runs wild. Plus, Spencer Ackerman on Joe Biden actually ending America's forever war. Then, why today's big day for the Biden agenda in congress could be key for Democrats to hold power. And why this version of the California recall could be even worse than the last.Guests: Lucia Baez-Geller, Dr. Leslie Diaz, Spencer Ackerman, Sahil Kapur, Donna Edwards, David Plouffe

The News with Shepard Smith
Afghanistan Analysis, Hurricane Warnings, Sha'carri Richardson

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 49:16


Retired Army Brigadier General Mark Kimmitt reacts to President Biden's speech on Afghanistan and his pledge to get all Americans out of the country. NBC News Meteorologist Bill Karins tracks Henri, a tropical storm expected to strengthen into a category one status in the next 24 hours, and potentially become New England's first hurricane in 30 years. Senior Scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security Dr. Amesh Adajla delivers analysis on monoclonal antibody treatments and rapid Covid tests. NBC's Sahil Kapur gives the latest on where lawmakers stand on helping the Afghans who worked with Americans during the war. Plus, gold medalist Dawn Harper-Nelson reveals what she expects from Sha'carri Richardson at the Prefontaine Classic.

The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell
DOJ: Treasury Department must provide House cmte. With Trump's tax returns

The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021 43:38


Tonight on the Last Word: The Justice Department says the IRS must turn over Donald Trump's income tax returns to Congress. Also, handwritten notes show Trump pressured the Justice Dept. to declare the 2020 election “corrupt.” Plus, the CDC releases a study of the breakthrough outbreak that led to mask guidance for vaccinated people. Texas Republicans make concessions in the voter suppression bill. And the Senate moves ahead on the bipartisan infrastructure deal. Rep. Lloyd Doggett, David Cay Johnston, Matt Miller, Rep. Eric Swalwell, Joyce Vance, Dr. Uché Blackstock, TX Rep. Nicole Collier, TX Rep. Senfronia Thompson and Sahil Kapur join Jonathan Capehart.

Hardball with Chris Matthews
Top figures on the right ignore the gut-wrenching testimony of officers traumatized by Jan. 6

Hardball with Chris Matthews

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 43:43


We lead this episode with the appalling reactions from some on the right to the gut-wrenching testimony we heard yesterday from officers who were attacked while defending the Capitol on Jan. 6. Rep. Madeleine Dean joins The ReidOut to discuss. Also tonight, 17 Republicans joined all Senate Democrats in voting to move forward on a procedural motion to debate a bipartisan infrastructure bill. NBC News national political reporter Sahil Kapur joins us with his report. Plus, Beto O'Rourke and Rev. William Barber join on leading a four-day march for voting rights in Texas. Finally, Dr. Uche Blackstock discusses the backlash decorated gymnast Simone Biles is enduring after withdrawing from Olympic events, and the need to respect athletes' mental health needs. All this and more in this edition of The ReidOut on MSNBC.

The News with Shepard Smith
Covid Surge, Preventing Violence, Olympics Countdown

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 49:42


The dean of Brown University's School of Public Health Dr. Ashish Jha delivers his insights on what's next in the battle against the delta Covid variant. Aqeela Sherrills negotiated a truce between the Bloods and the Crips in the 90s, now he's helping communities across the nation find solutions to violence. Sherrills explains how communities can be harnessed to help decrease crime. NBC's Sahil Kapur explains whether or not House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is planning to appoint any additional Republicans to fill the January 6th committee. Plus, NBC Sports' Jimmy Roberts is live from Tokyo to deliver the latest details on the start of the Olympic games and how the Covid surge is impacting athletes.

All In with Chris Hayes
Chris Hayes: Climate change isn't a future threat—it's here

All In with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 44:43


As Republicans fight funding for climate mitigation dangerous smoky air blankets the Northeast as epic wildfires burn thousands of miles to the west. Then, House Republicans take their ball and go home over the January 6 investigation. Plus, the head of the National Institutes of Health on how to fight Covid misinformation. Then, the latest on the arrest of Trump's inaugural chairman—and what it can tell us about the ex-president's actions in the Middle East.Guests: Gov. Kate Brown, Naomi Klein, Sahil Kapur, Olivia Beavers, Matthew Cole, Dr. Francis Collins 

The News with Shepard Smith
Climate Crisis, Eric Adams and Handguns, Free Britney

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 49:28


Climate Scientist at Texas A&M University Andrew Dessler explains how much climate change is exacerbating the intensity of weather conditions around the globe. New York City's Democratic Nominee for Mayor Eric Adams discusses why dealing with the uptick in gun violence across the U.S. means addressing the nation's handgun crisis. NBC's Sahil Kapur delivers the latest on the January 6th Select Committee to investigate the Capitol insurrection. CNBC's Congressional Correspondent Ylan Mui explains what's going to happen after Senate Republicans blocked a vote to start debate on a massive infrastructure package. Plus, civil rights attorney David Henderson discusses the potential impact of the “Free Act” on Britney Spears' conservatorship case.

The News with Shepard Smith
Travel Troubles, Voting Rights & LGBTQ+ Business Owners

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 49:44


NBC's Steve Kornacki reports on the New York City mayoral primary, which put a spotlight on the ranked-choice voting process. Kornacki demonstrates how ranked-choice voting works. NBC's Sahil Kapur discusses Mitch McConnell and Senate Republicans blocking debate on the voting rights bill. Vice President Kamala Harris says the fight for voting rights is not over. CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin discusses airlines slashing flights and hiking prices as travel demand continues to surge. Meanwhile, CNBC's Phil LeBeau reports on the rise in unruly passengers engaging in physical assaults on flights and in airports. The Federal Aviation Administration is proposing $500,000 in fines for these passengers. Plus, CNBC's Kate Rogers reports on LGBTQ+ business owners and their experiences managing their respective businesses.

The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell
VP Harris meets Georgia leaders about voting rights

The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 42:50


Tonight on the Last Word: Beto O'Rourke and Stacey Abrams back Sen. Joe Manchin's voting rights compromise ahead of the Senate vote on Tuesday. Also, Republicans block efforts to hold Capitol rioters accountable. Plus, Betsey Stevenson discusses the latest on the recovery of the U.S. economy. Blue states put their focus on passing popular policies. And the Biden administration unveils a new online tool to help lower-income families access enhanced child tax credit payments. Aisha Yaqoob Mahmood, TX State Rep. Jessica González, Sahil Kapur, Xochitl Hinojosa, Rep. Peter Welch and Dr. Trevon Logan also join Ali Velshi.

The News with Shepard Smith
Reopening America, Russian Hack Attack & Neymar Nike Feud

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2021 49:19


Matthew Rojansky, director of the Wilson Center’s Kennan Institute, discusses U.S. and Russia tensions as Russian hackers launch a major cyberattack on U.S. agencies. This comes weeks before the Biden-Putin summit. NBC’s Sahil Kapur reports on GOP senators blocking the bill to create a January 6 commission to investigate the riot on Capitol Hill. Only six GOP senators voted to advance the commission. Dr. Esther Choo, an emergency physician and professor at Oregon Health & Science University, discusses Covid health and safety among children as the CDC says vaccinated kids don’t need to wear masks. NBC’s Kathy Park and Shaquille discusses Memorial Day and small businesses reopening for the weekend. Beaches and airports are preparing for an influx of travelers. Plus, Nike cuts ties with soccer player Neymar amid sexual assault allegations. Nike called the allegations “deeply disturbing.” Neymar denies such claims.

The News with Shepard Smith
San Jose VTA Shooting, Online Misinformation & Covid Origins

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 50:11


President Biden has ordered a closer intelligence review of what he said were two equally plausible scenarios of the origins of the Covid-19 pandemic. CNBC’s Meg Tirrell reports. CNBC’s Eamon Javers discusses how Russia and Iran spread misinformation during the Trump administration, according to a Facebook report. Arthur Caplan, director of medical ethics at NYU’s Grossman School Of Medicine, discusses privacy concerns regarding Google’s deal to develop healthcare algorithms. NBC’s Sahil Kapur reports on a potential bipartisan deal on gun reform. Senator John Cornyn (R-Texas) and Senator Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) are working to close the background check loophole. Plus, CNBC’s Scott Cohn reports on the San Jose VTA shooting. The bomb squad is searching the railyard after a gunman killed eight people. This marks 15 mass shootings in a little over two months.

Read By AI
McCarthy opposes bipartisan commission to investigate Jan. 6 Capitol attack

Read By AI

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 5:37


Hi! This is Lexie of Read by AI. I read human-curated content for you to listen to while working, exercising, commuting, or any other time. Without further ado: McCarthy opposes bipartisan commission to investigate January 6 Capitol attack by Rebecca Shabad, Sahil Kapur, Garrett Haake, and Frank Thorp with NBC News.

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press
Cheney is out from GOP leadership; Plus Millennials come into their own

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 61:50


Washington Post congressional reporter Paul Kane, and Sahil Kapur, National Political Reporter for NBC News discuss Rep. Liz Cheney's purge from House GOP leadership. Neil Howe talks about how millennials will change politics.

The News with Shepard Smith
Minneapolis Policing Practices, Climate Change & a Second Wave of Covid

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 49:45


The Department of Justice launched an investigation of the Minneapolis Police Department one day after former officer Derek Chauvin was convicted in the death of George Floyd. NBC’s Pete Williams reports the department will examine whether Minneapolis police have a pattern of using excessive force against protestors, how police treat people with behavioral problems, and how they enforce the law. NBC’s political reporter Sahil Kapur reports on where Congress is on police reform. Meanwhile, a 16-year-old girl was fatally shot by an officer outside her home. Bodycam footage seems to show the girl was threatening someone with a knife. India now has the second most Covid cases in the world, behind only the United States. And that’s putting a tremendous strain on the country’s health care system. Sky News’ Neville Lazarus reports from Mumbai. President Biden is serious about tackling climate change. He plans to get the U.S. to net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Plus, weddings are making a comeback as the Covid pandemic delayed many people’s plans last year.

The News with Shepard Smith
Awaiting Chauvin Verdict, Vaccine Hesitancy & Covid Hate Crimes Act

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 49:42


The city of Minneapolis is bracing for the verdict of Derek Chauvin’s murder trial. Civil rights lawyer David Henderson discusses the closing arguments. The head of the CDC warned against the steady climb of coronavirus cases in the U.S. Dr. Carlos Del Rio, professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine, discussed what needs to be done to combat vaccine hesitancy. The House passed two pieces of legislation to close loopholes in the background system, but neither of those bills have a simple majority in the Senate. NBC’s Sahil Kapur reports. Sen. Majority Leader Chuck Schumer introduced the Covid Hate Crimes Act, which would instruct people at the Department of Justice to track down and prosecute anti-Asian hate. The NYPD is also taking new steps to address hate crimes.

The News with Shepard Smith
Impeachment Timeline, Reopening Schools & Covid on the Decline

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2021 49:00


Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former FDA commissioner, says we are increasing the rate of vaccines around the country. But it’s important for people to get the vaccines so we can tackle Covid variants. CNBC’s Meg Tirrell also reports on the availability of vaccines and optimism surrounding the coronavirus pandemic. Neal Katyal, former acting U.S. Solicitor General, comments on the House impeachment managers’ case against former President Donald Trump. NBC’s news political reporter Sahil Kapur says Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell appears willing to let GOP senators vote how they please on the conviction of Trump. He says it’s unlikely Republicans will vote to convict. Plus, how to safely reopen the nation’s school and a deadly pile up in Texas.

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press
Where will the GOP be in a year?

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2021 53:47


Anna Palmer, co-founder of Punchbowl News and Sahil Kapur, national political reporter for NBC News join Chuck to talk about the future of the Republican Party.  Plus, Jeff Bezos is stepping down as the CEO of Amazon after 27 years. NBC News Senior Media Correspondent Dylan Byers shares the latest.

On Point
How Democrat Joe Manchin Might Sway The Power Of A Split Senate

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2021 47:03


The Senate is split 50-50. The power center of gravity? Democrat Joe Manchin. How will he wield his influence? Professor Robert Rupp, Belinda Biafore, Jack Beatty and Sahil Kapur join Meghna Chakrabarti.

The News with Shepard Smith
Biden’s Climate Agenda, GameStop’s Rally & Trump’s Impeachment

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 49:29


President Joe Biden’s climate plan includes banning oil and gas production on all federal land, a move that could threaten one million jobs. Republican lawmakers are voicing their opposition. Ylan Mui joins Shep Smith to discuss. CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin discusses the surge in GameStop shares and just who it is that could be hurt. There are no fundamentals behind what’s happening here, he says. Governor Jim Justice (R-W.Va.) discusses his state’s success at distributing the vaccine and getting it into the arms of its citizens. NBC News correspondent Sahil Kapur reports there’s growing pessimism among Democrats that they can convict Trump in the Senate. As a result, some senators are beginning to float the idea of censure. Plus, electric government vehicles and the return of ObamaCare.

The Takeaway
Politics with Amy Walter: How President Trump Attempted to Subvert Democracy

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2021 55:00


This week, a violent mob of President Trump’s supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol. The insurrectionists were seeking to overturn the results of the general election during a joint session of Congress as members tallied the Electoral College votes. President Trump has routinely and falsely claimed that the presidential election was rigged and encouraged his supporters to reject the result. As Donald Trump prepares to leave the White House, politicians that will remain in Washington will have to contend with the loyalty he’s fomented among his base and the anger that has been released. Jelani Cobb, staff writer at The New Yorker, and Adam Serwer, staff writer at The Atlantic, describe the consequences of failing to hold President Trump accountable for the violent attempt to subvert democracy. And, Grace Segers, political reporter for CBS News, provides a firsthand account of the attack on Capitol Hill.   Also, in the midst of the crisis in Washington this week, Democrats Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock won both Senate runoffs in Georgia. As a result, Democrats will have a slim majority in the House and Senate. Sahil Kapur, national political reporter for NBC News, describes how Democrats were able to run progressive candidates in a swing state and win.  Finally, President Trump’s norm-defying first term has drawn sharp criticism over the last four years, but the events of the week have drawn almost universal condemnation. Members of his own party have called on President Trump to resign and in less than two weeks, Joe Biden will be sworn in against a backdrop of unprecedented division. To understand how Joe Biden might attempt to navigate this moment in politics Amy Walter spoke with Brendan Buck, Republican strategist at Seven Letter and a former aide to John Boehner and Paul Ryan, and Joel Payne, Democratic strategist, former aide to Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign, and host of “Here comes the Payne.” 

Politics with Amy Walter
How President Trump Attempted to Subvert Democracy

Politics with Amy Walter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2021 55:00


This week, a violent mob of President Trump’s supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol. The insurrectionists were seeking to overturn the results of the general election during a joint session of Congress as members tallied the Electoral College votes. President Trump has routinely and falsely claimed that the presidential election was rigged and encouraged his supporters to reject the result. As Donald Trump prepares to leave the White House, politicians that will remain in Washington will have to contend with the loyalty he’s fomented among his base and the anger that has been released. Jelani Cobb, staff writer at The New Yorker, and Adam Serwer, staff writer at The Atlantic, describe the consequences of failing to hold President Trump accountable for the violent attempt to subvert democracy. And, Grace Segers, political reporter for CBS News, provides a firsthand account of the attack on Capitol Hill.   Also, in the midst of the crisis in Washington this week, Democrats Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock won both Senate runoffs in Georgia. As a result, Democrats will have a slim majority in the House and Senate. Sahil Kapur, national political reporter for NBC News, describes how Democrats were able to run progressive candidates in a swing state and win.  Finally, President Trump’s norm-defying first term has drawn sharp criticism over the last four years, but the events of the week have drawn almost universal condemnation. Members of his own party have called on President Trump to resign and in less than two weeks, Joe Biden will be sworn in against a backdrop of unprecedented division. To understand how Joe Biden might attempt to navigate this moment in politics Amy Walter spoke with Brendan Buck, Republican strategist at Seven Letter and a former aide to John Boehner and Paul Ryan, and Joel Payne, Democratic strategist, former aide to Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign, and host of “Here comes the Payne.” 

The Takeaway
Politics with Amy Walter: How President Trump Attempted to Subvert Democracy

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2021 55:00


This week, a violent mob of President Trump’s supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol. The insurrectionists were seeking to overturn the results of the general election during a joint session of Congress as members tallied the Electoral College votes. President Trump has routinely and falsely claimed that the presidential election was rigged and encouraged his supporters to reject the result. As Donald Trump prepares to leave the White House, politicians that will remain in Washington will have to contend with the loyalty he’s fomented among his base and the anger that has been released. Jelani Cobb, staff writer at The New Yorker, and Adam Serwer, staff writer at The Atlantic, describe the consequences of failing to hold President Trump accountable for the violent attempt to subvert democracy. And, Grace Segers, political reporter for CBS News, provides a firsthand account of the attack on Capitol Hill.   Also, in the midst of the crisis in Washington this week, Democrats Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock won both Senate runoffs in Georgia. As a result, Democrats will have a slim majority in the House and Senate. Sahil Kapur, national political reporter for NBC News, describes how Democrats were able to run progressive candidates in a swing state and win.  Finally, President Trump’s norm-defying first term has drawn sharp criticism over the last four years, but the events of the week have drawn almost universal condemnation. Members of his own party have called on President Trump to resign and in less than two weeks, Joe Biden will be sworn in against a backdrop of unprecedented division. To understand how Joe Biden might attempt to navigate this moment in politics Amy Walter spoke with Brendan Buck, Republican strategist at Seven Letter and a former aide to John Boehner and Paul Ryan, and Joel Payne, Democratic strategist, former aide to Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign, and host of “Here comes the Payne.” 

Politics with Amy Walter
The Next President of the United States

Politics with Amy Walter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2020 53:14


Not immediately knowing which candidate won the White House has long been a reality of a world changed by COVID-19. What campaigns, pundits, and pollsters failed to predict was the distance that would separate the results from the expectations. Tim Alberta, chief political correspondent at Politico, Sahil Kapur, national political reporter for NBC News, and Clare Malone, senior politics writer at FiveThirtyEight, analyze the incomplete election results and what Congress could look like when the dust settles.  President Trump has consistently and falsely asserted that losing reelection would mean that the White House was stolen from him. Meanwhile, election officials across the country have been working diligently to maintain free and fair elections. This year, their jobs include responding to a pandemic and refuting conspiracy theories. Election officials from across the country describe how Election Day 2020 went and how things could improve for future elections.  As Joe Biden gets closer to winning the electoral college, the Trump campaign is taking to the courts in an attempt to challenge the results. In the past few days, states like Michigan, Georgia, and Pennsylvania have all seen lawsuits calling into question their process of counting ballots, though there’s no evidence supporting the president’s claims of voter fraud. While some of the lawsuits have already been dismissed, others are still in play. Toluse Olorunnipa, a White House reporter for the Washington Post, breaks down the Trump campaign’s recent legal action. In the Trump era, political polarization has reached a level not seen since the Civil War. Though this polarization didn't start with President Trump's campaign and subsequent administration, it has brought the deepening divide to the surface--and to the ballot box--with voter turnout this week reaching record numbers. Lilliana Mason, professor of government and politics at the University of Maryland and author of "Uncivil Agreement: How Politics Became Our Identity," walks us through the widening political divide in the U.S. and what it means for how the country moves forward, regardless of who wins the 2020 election. Amy's closing thoughts: "The political profession. No other career as prosaic has been glamorized more. In movies and on TV, everyone who works for or as a politician is beautiful, smart, and ambitious. All are doing super important work that is changing the world. Even the interns are drafting amendments that protect our way of life. In real life, of course, politics is messy. And, more important, boring. For every election night balloon drop victory party, there are a million days filled with the crushingly tedious work of voter contact and fundraising and town hall meetings filled with cranky and angry constituents. But, as we learned this week, it is the people who do the non-glamorous work, those who spend almost every single day of their entire career in relative ambiguity, who help keep our democratic institutions steady. I’m talking about the elected officials, poll workers, and office staff, who ensured that this election - an election taking place in the middle of a health pandemic and with record turnout - was conducted as fairly, smoothly, and judiciously as possible. They are doing this work under great duress and stress. They continue to do their job even as the president of the United States - without any evidence - takes to the White House briefing room to question their integrity. When the election is over, these folks aren’t going to get a sweet cable TV gig or their own podcast. Instead, they are going to go back to their offices and prepare for the next election. For all of you who are cynical or anxious about the sturdiness of the guardrails protecting our democratic institutions, look no further than the local officials in charge of voting. They are not bowing to pressure from the president. They are not abandoning their posts for fear of political reprisal. They are doing their jobs. And, doing them well. At the end of the day, it is regular people who are responsible for our democracy. And, the regular people are saving it."

The Takeaway
Politics with Amy Walter: The Next President of the United States

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2020 53:14


Not immediately knowing which candidate won the White House has long been a reality of a world changed by COVID-19. What campaigns, pundits, and pollsters failed to predict was the distance that would separate the results from the expectations. Tim Alberta, chief political correspondent at Politico, Sahil Kapur, national political reporter for NBC News, and Clare Malone, senior politics writer at FiveThirtyEight, analyze the incomplete election results and what Congress could look like when the dust settles.  President Trump has consistently and falsely asserted that losing reelection would mean that the White House was stolen from him. Meanwhile, election officials across the country have been working diligently to maintain free and fair elections. This year, their jobs include responding to a pandemic and refuting conspiracy theories. Election officials from across the country describe how Election Day 2020 went and how things could improve for future elections.  As Joe Biden gets closer to winning the electoral college, the Trump campaign is taking to the courts in an attempt to challenge the results. In the past few days, states like Michigan, Georgia, and Pennsylvania have all seen lawsuits calling into question their process of counting ballots, though there’s no evidence supporting the president’s claims of voter fraud. While some of the lawsuits have already been dismissed, others are still in play. Toluse Olorunnipa, a White House reporter for the Washington Post, breaks down the Trump campaign’s recent legal action. In the Trump era, political polarization has reached a level not seen since the Civil War. Though this polarization didn't start with President Trump's campaign and subsequent administration, it has brought the deepening divide to the surface--and to the ballot box--with voter turnout this week reaching record numbers. Lilliana Mason, professor of government and politics at the University of Maryland and author of "Uncivil Agreement: How Politics Became Our Identity," walks us through the widening political divide in the U.S. and what it means for how the country moves forward, regardless of who wins the 2020 election. Amy's closing thoughts: "The political profession. No other career as prosaic has been glamorized more. In movies and on TV, everyone who works for or as a politician is beautiful, smart, and ambitious. All are doing super important work that is changing the world. Even the interns are drafting amendments that protect our way of life. In real life, of course, politics is messy. And, more important, boring. For every election night balloon drop victory party, there are a million days filled with the crushingly tedious work of voter contact and fundraising and town hall meetings filled with cranky and angry constituents. But, as we learned this week, it is the people who do the non-glamorous work, those who spend almost every single day of their entire career in relative ambiguity, who help keep our democratic institutions steady. I’m talking about the elected officials, poll workers, and office staff, who ensured that this election - an election taking place in the middle of a health pandemic and with record turnout - was conducted as fairly, smoothly, and judiciously as possible. They are doing this work under great duress and stress. They continue to do their job even as the president of the United States - without any evidence - takes to the White House briefing room to question their integrity. When the election is over, these folks aren’t going to get a sweet cable TV gig or their own podcast. Instead, they are going to go back to their offices and prepare for the next election. For all of you who are cynical or anxious about the sturdiness of the guardrails protecting our democratic institutions, look no further than the local officials in charge of voting. They are not bowing to pressure from the president. They are not abandoning their posts for fear of political reprisal. They are doing their jobs. And, doing them well.  At the end of the day, it is regular people who are responsible for our democracy. And, the regular people are saving it."

The Takeaway
Politics with Amy Walter: The Next President of the United States

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2020 53:14


Not immediately knowing which candidate won the White House has long been a reality of a world changed by COVID-19. What campaigns, pundits, and pollsters failed to predict was the distance that would separate the results from the expectations. Tim Alberta, chief political correspondent at Politico, Sahil Kapur, national political reporter for NBC News, and Clare Malone, senior politics writer at FiveThirtyEight, analyze the incomplete election results and what Congress could look like when the dust settles.  President Trump has consistently and falsely asserted that losing reelection would mean that the White House was stolen from him. Meanwhile, election officials across the country have been working diligently to maintain free and fair elections. This year, their jobs include responding to a pandemic and refuting conspiracy theories. Election officials from across the country describe how Election Day 2020 went and how things could improve for future elections.  As Joe Biden gets closer to winning the electoral college, the Trump campaign is taking to the courts in an attempt to challenge the results. In the past few days, states like Michigan, Georgia, and Pennsylvania have all seen lawsuits calling into question their process of counting ballots, though there’s no evidence supporting the president’s claims of voter fraud. While some of the lawsuits have already been dismissed, others are still in play. Toluse Olorunnipa, a White House reporter for the Washington Post, breaks down the Trump campaign’s recent legal action. In the Trump era, political polarization has reached a level not seen since the Civil War. Though this polarization didn't start with President Trump's campaign and subsequent administration, it has brought the deepening divide to the surface--and to the ballot box--with voter turnout this week reaching record numbers. Lilliana Mason, professor of government and politics at the University of Maryland and author of "Uncivil Agreement: How Politics Became Our Identity," walks us through the widening political divide in the U.S. and what it means for how the country moves forward, regardless of who wins the 2020 election. Amy's closing thoughts: "The political profession. No other career as prosaic has been glamorized more. In movies and on TV, everyone who works for or as a politician is beautiful, smart, and ambitious. All are doing super important work that is changing the world. Even the interns are drafting amendments that protect our way of life. In real life, of course, politics is messy. And, more important, boring. For every election night balloon drop victory party, there are a million days filled with the crushingly tedious work of voter contact and fundraising and town hall meetings filled with cranky and angry constituents. But, as we learned this week, it is the people who do the non-glamorous work, those who spend almost every single day of their entire career in relative ambiguity, who help keep our democratic institutions steady. I’m talking about the elected officials, poll workers, and office staff, who ensured that this election - an election taking place in the middle of a health pandemic and with record turnout - was conducted as fairly, smoothly, and judiciously as possible. They are doing this work under great duress and stress. They continue to do their job even as the president of the United States - without any evidence - takes to the White House briefing room to question their integrity. When the election is over, these folks aren’t going to get a sweet cable TV gig or their own podcast. Instead, they are going to go back to their offices and prepare for the next election. For all of you who are cynical or anxious about the sturdiness of the guardrails protecting our democratic institutions, look no further than the local officials in charge of voting. They are not bowing to pressure from the president. They are not abandoning their posts for fear of political reprisal. They are doing their jobs. And, doing them well.  At the end of the day, it is regular people who are responsible for our democracy. And, the regular people are saving it."

Politics with Amy Walter
Democrats Gain Edge in Quest to Overtake the Senate

Politics with Amy Walter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2020 60:32


After the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on September 18th and nomination of Amy Coney Barrett just a week later on September 26th, there’s been a lot of speculation about the political implications of a Supreme Court fight just days before Election Day. Democrats have seen a boon in fundraising with Jaime Harrison, the Democrat running against Republican Judiciary Chair Lindsey Graham, pulling in millions in the days after Ginsburg’s death. Graham himself, as well as several other vulnerable Republican senators, are hoping that the confirmation of a conservative to the court will help boost GOP enthusiasm and turnout. As the hearing wrapped up on Thursday, it was clear that Barrett had made it through the process unscathed. A vote is expected on October 22nd in the Judiciary Committee and by the full Senate at the end of the month. We spoke about this with Sahil Kapur, national political reporter for NBC News, and Jessica Taylor of The Cook Political Report.  Also on the show, a look at the political landscape in Texas going into the 2020 election. For years now, Democrats have been predicting they can turn this red state blue. But the last time a Democratic presidential candidate actually won the state was in 1976.  However, Texas is changing. A diverse electorate, combined with a backlash to Trump in traditionally Republican suburbs has given Democrats serious political traction. The latest polls show President Trump leading Joe Biden by an average of just two points. We got an overview of what’s happening in Texas from Abby Livingston, D.C. Bureau Chief at the Texas Tribune. There’s also a Senate race in the state this year. In 2018, a Texas Senate race was the center of the political universe. Then, Democratic Representative Beto O’Rourke raised millions of dollars and gained national attention for his race against Senator Ted Cruz. O’Rourke came up short, but his impressive showing gave him enough momentum and fame to mount a presidential run—albeit a short-lived run. Two years later, another Republican Senator, John Cornyn is up for re-election in Texas. We spoke to his opponent, MJ Hegar, the Democratic Senate candidate and U.S. Air Force veteran, about her race against the three-term incumbent. Her campaign brought in $13.5 million in the third quarter and she’s been outspending Cornyn in TV ads over the past few weeks. But even though the race is tightening, polls show Cornyn is still ahead by over seven percentage points.  We also took a look at the Latino vote in Texas with Jason Casellas, an associate professor of political science at the University of Houston. According to recent estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau, the Latino population in Texas grew by two million over the last decade, and it’s on track to become the state’s largest demographic group in 2021. 

The Takeaway
Politics with Amy Walter: Democrats Gain Edge in Quest to Overtake the Senate

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2020 60:32


After the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on September 18th and nomination of Amy Coney Barrett just a week later on September 26th, there’s been a lot of speculation about the political implications of a Supreme Court fight just days before Election Day. Democrats have seen a boon in fundraising with Jaime Harrison, the Democrat running against Republican Judiciary Chair Lindsey Graham, pulling in millions in the days after Ginsburg’s death. Graham himself, as well as several other vulnerable Republican senators, are hoping that the confirmation of a conservative to the court will help boost GOP enthusiasm and turnout. As the hearing wrapped up on Thursday, it was clear that Barrett had made it through the process unscathed. A vote is expected on October 22nd in the Judiciary Committee and by the full Senate at the end of the month. We spoke about this with Sahil Kapur, national political reporter for NBC News, and Jessica Taylor of The Cook Political Report.  Also on the show, a look at the political landscape in Texas going into the 2020 election. For years now, Democrats have been predicting they can turn this red state blue. But the last time a Democratic presidential candidate actually won the state was in 1976.  However, Texas is changing. A diverse electorate, combined with a backlash to Trump in traditionally Republican suburbs has given Democrats serious political traction. The latest polls show President Trump leading Joe Biden by an average of just two points. We got an overview of what’s happening in Texas from Abby Livingston, D.C. Bureau Chief at the Texas Tribune. There’s also a Senate race in the state this year. In 2018, a Texas Senate race was the center of the political universe. Then, Democratic Representative Beto O’Rourke raised millions of dollars and gained national attention for his race against Senator Ted Cruz. O’Rourke came up short, but his impressive showing gave him enough momentum and fame to mount a presidential run—albeit a short-lived run. Two years later, another Republican Senator, John Cornyn is up for re-election in Texas. We spoke to his opponent, MJ Hegar, the Democratic Senate candidate and U.S. Air Force veteran, about her race against the three-term incumbent. Her campaign brought in $13.5 million in the third quarter and she’s been outspending Cornyn in TV ads over the past few weeks. But even though the race is tightening, polls show Cornyn is still ahead by over seven percentage points.  We also took a look at the Latino vote in Texas with Jason Casellas, an associate professor of political science at the University of Houston. According to recent estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau, the Latino population in Texas grew by two million over the last decade, and it’s on track to become the state’s largest demographic group in 2021. 

The Takeaway
Politics with Amy Walter: Democrats Gain Edge in Quest to Overtake the Senate

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2020 60:32


After the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on September 18th and nomination of Amy Coney Barrett just a week later on September 26th, there’s been a lot of speculation about the political implications of a Supreme Court fight just days before Election Day. Democrats have seen a boon in fundraising with Jaime Harrison, the Democrat running against Republican Judiciary Chair Lindsey Graham, pulling in millions in the days after Ginsburg’s death. Graham himself, as well as several other vulnerable Republican senators, are hoping that the confirmation of a conservative to the court will help boost GOP enthusiasm and turnout. As the hearing wrapped up on Thursday, it was clear that Barrett had made it through the process unscathed. A vote is expected on October 22nd in the Judiciary Committee and by the full Senate at the end of the month. We spoke about this with Sahil Kapur, national political reporter for NBC News, and Jessica Taylor of The Cook Political Report.  Also on the show, a look at the political landscape in Texas going into the 2020 election. For years now, Democrats have been predicting they can turn this red state blue. But the last time a Democratic presidential candidate actually won the state was in 1976.  However, Texas is changing. A diverse electorate, combined with a backlash to Trump in traditionally Republican suburbs has given Democrats serious political traction. The latest polls show President Trump leading Joe Biden by an average of just two points. We got an overview of what’s happening in Texas from Abby Livingston, D.C. Bureau Chief at the Texas Tribune. There’s also a Senate race in the state this year. In 2018, a Texas Senate race was the center of the political universe. Then, Democratic Representative Beto O’Rourke raised millions of dollars and gained national attention for his race against Senator Ted Cruz. O’Rourke came up short, but his impressive showing gave him enough momentum and fame to mount a presidential run—albeit a short-lived run. Two years later, another Republican Senator, John Cornyn is up for re-election in Texas. We spoke to his opponent, MJ Hegar, the Democratic Senate candidate and U.S. Air Force veteran, about her race against the three-term incumbent. Her campaign brought in $13.5 million in the third quarter and she’s been outspending Cornyn in TV ads over the past few weeks. But even though the race is tightening, polls show Cornyn is still ahead by over seven percentage points.  We also took a look at the Latino vote in Texas with Jason Casellas, an associate professor of political science at the University of Houston. According to recent estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau, the Latino population in Texas grew by two million over the last decade, and it’s on track to become the state’s largest demographic group in 2021. 

The Takeaway
Politics with Amy Walter: How Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Death will Affect the Battle for the White House

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2020 25:14


After serving 27 years on the Supreme Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday from complications associated with metastatic pancreatic cancer. Justice Ginsburg was the second woman to be appointed to the highest court in the land. Early in her career as a lawyer, she was a champion for gender equality and in the time since has been elevated to a feminist icon. Clara Spera, Ginsburg's granddaughter said her grandmother dictated the following statement before her death: "My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed." While the race for the White House had already morphed into a turbulent, hyper-partisan event there's no doubt that Ginsburg's death underscores how consequential the November 3rd election will be.   In a statement issued on Friday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said President Trump's nominee "will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate.” That statement exists in direct opposition to his stance on Barack Obama's 2016 nomination of Merrick Garland.  Professor Barbara Perry, director of presidential studies at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center, and Sahil Kapur, national political reporter at NBC News, discuss Ginsburg's legacy and how her death could change the trajectory of the election cycle. 

The Takeaway
Politics with Amy Walter: How Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Death will Affect the Battle for the White House

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2020 25:14


After serving 27 years on the Supreme Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday from complications associated with metastatic pancreatic cancer. Justice Ginsburg was the second woman to be appointed to the highest court in the land. Early in her career as a lawyer, she was a champion for gender equality and in the time since has been elevated to a feminist icon. Clara Spera, Ginsburg's granddaughter said her grandmother dictated the following statement before her death: "My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed." While the race for the White House had already morphed into a turbulent, hyper-partisan event there's no doubt that Ginsburg's death underscores how consequential the November 3rd election will be.   In a statement issued on Friday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said President Trump's nominee "will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate.” That statement exists in direct opposition to his stance on Barack Obama's 2016 nomination of Merrick Garland.  Professor Barbara Perry, director of presidential studies at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center, and Sahil Kapur, national political reporter at NBC News, discuss Ginsburg's legacy and how her death could change the trajectory of the election cycle. 

Politics with Amy Walter
How Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Death will Affect the Battle for the White House

Politics with Amy Walter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2020 25:14


After serving 27 years on the Supreme Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday from complications associated with metastatic pancreatic cancer. Justice Ginsburg was the second woman to be appointed to the highest court in the land. Early in her career as a lawyer, she was a champion for gender equality and in the time since has been elevated to a feminist icon. Clara Spera, Ginsburg's granddaughter said her grandmother dictated the following statement before her death: "My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed." While the race for the White House had already morphed into a turbulent, hyper-partisan event there's no doubt that Ginsburg's death underscores how consequential the November 3rd election will be.   In a statement issued on Friday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said President Trump's nominee "will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate.” That statement exists in direct opposition to his stance on Barack Obama's 2016 nomination of Merrick Garland.  Professor Barbara Perry, director of presidential studies at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center, and Sahil Kapur, national political reporter at NBC News, discuss Ginsburg's legacy and how her death could change the trajectory of the election cycle. 

Vox's The Weeds
Coronavirus meets health reform

Vox's The Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2020 62:23


Ezra and Matt discuss Covid-19's impact on insurance premiums, the case for single-payer, and more. Resources: "Coronavirus May Add Billions to U.S. Health Care Bill" by Reed Abelson, NYTimes "The coronavirus crisis hasn't changed Joe Biden's mind on 'Medicare for All'" by Sahil Kapur, NBC News Briahna Joy Gray Tweet "Fighting coronavirus won’t help struggling Maine hospitals pay the bills" by Charles Eichacker, BDN "California’s rural hospitals can’t handle a coronavirus wave. ‘People will die,’ doctor warns" by Ryan Sabalow and Jason Pohl, The Sacramento Bee "Is U.S. Health Care Well-Equipped for the Coronavirus?" by Robert Orr, Niskanen Center "Trump rejects Obamacare special enrollment period amid pandemic" by Susannah Luthi, Politico Hosts: Matthew Yglesias (@mattyglesias), Senior correspondent, Vox Ezra Klein (@ezraklein), Editor-at-large, Vox Credits: Producer and edited by Jeff Geld More to explore: Subscribe to Impeachment, Explained on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Pocket Casts, or your favorite podcast app to get stay updated on this story every week. About Vox Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Follow Us: Vox.com Facebook group: The Weeds Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Inside Politics
Tuesday, January 14, 2020: Sanders-Warren Feud Escalates Before Tonight's CNN Debate

Inside Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2020 37:12


It is debate night for the six leading 2020 Democrats. There are new tensions between progressives Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, while Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar look to sell Iowa caucus voters on the idea a centrist has the best chance to beat President Trump. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi tells House Democrats they have to wait one more day to find out who she will tap to manage the Senate impeachment trial. And Majority Leader Mitch McConnell waits for the impeachment articles to arrive in the Senate, and watches a handful of Republicans who might vote to include witnesses in the trial. On today's panel: Julie Pace with Associated Press, CNN's MJ Lee, Sahil Kapur with Bloomberg, Jackie Kucinich with The Daily Beast, and Paul Kane with The Washington Post Also, on the program: Alex Thompson with POLITICO and CNN's Arlette Saenz, Manu Raju, and Lauren Fox

Inside Politics
Thursday, January 2, 2020: Julián Castro Ends His 2020 Presidential Bid

Inside Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2020 37:56


Calling it quits. Julian Castro tells his supporters to keep fighting, as he officially ends his bid to become president. And the proxy battle playing out between Washington and Tehran is far from over after a violent attack on the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad. Plus, Bernie Sanders is feeling flush after netting nearly $35 million in three months from grassroots donors. On today's panel: Margaret Talev with Axios, Olivier Knox with Sirius XM, Sahil Kapur with Bloomberg, and Rachael Bade with The Washington Post. Also on today's program: CNN's Ryan Nobles and Arwa Damon.

MOMocrats
We'd Rather Pay Tribute to Elijah Cummings

MOMocrats

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2019 61:00


The nation lost a great advocate of democracy yesterday, with the passing of Rep. Elijah Cummings, who was chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, currently part of the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump. MOMocrats Karoli, Aliza Worthington, and Donna Schwartz Mills believe that Cummings was the epitome of all that is good about our country, and they will talk about his legacy.  But his passing came during a week when the country was rocked by presidential actions that - in the wake of what's being uncovered in the congressional inquiry - were even more erratic than usual. Bloomberg journalist Sahil Kapur tweets out a list of all the bonkers news events that have occurred each day. Yesterday's tweet looked like this: Elijah Cummings deadSondland testifiesMulvaney briefingG7 at Trump DoralQuid pro quoImpeachment supportPence-ErdoganTurkey-Syria pauseZuckerberg speechBernie v. BidenPelosi presserSenate EPA rule voteRick Perry quitting People, that's just ONE DAY. And the pace is just accelerating as Trump's malfeasance begins to come into the light and he tries desperately to change the subject. The MOMocrats will do as they can to put all of this into context in this week's political podcast from the progressive point of view - part of the DemCast family of podcasts.

Inside Politics
Friday, September 27, 2019: Trump Demands Democrat House Intel Chair Schiff Resign

Inside Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2019 36:42


A whir of new developments connected to the whistleblower complaint that is now the lynchpin of the Democratic impeachment push. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi refusing today to put a specific timeline on the investigation, but the committee taking the lead told reporters to expect subpoenas for key witnesses and told its members to be ready to work during a planned two week recess. A big question today: Are House Democrats on their own, or will the Republican-led Senate look into the allegations raised in the explosive whistleblower complaint? Today's Panel: Julie Pace with the Associated Press, Sahil Kapur with Bloomberg, Julie Hirschfeld Davis with The New York Times, and CNN's Abby Phillip Also on the Program: CNN's Kaitlan Collins and Manu Raju

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press
The field of 2020 Democrats is about to winnow: Shawna Thomas, Sahil Kapur and Charlie Cook

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2019 67:07


Chuck Todd, moderator of "Meet the Press," sits down with Shawna Thomas, bureau chief at Vice News, and Sahil Kapur, national politics reporter at Bloomberg News, talk about the winnowing 2020 Democratic field. Plus, founder of Cook Political Report and co-author of the 2019 Almanac of American Politics Charlie Cook talks the latest version of the Almanac.  

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press
The field of 2020 Democrats is about to winnow: Shawna Thomas, Sahil Kapur and Charlie Cook

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2019 67:06


Chuck Todd, moderator of "Meet the Press," sits down with Shawna Thomas, bureau chief at Vice News, and Sahil Kapur, national politics reporter at Bloomberg News, talk about the winnowing 2020 Democratic field. Plus, founder of Cook Political Report and co-author of the 2019 Almanac of American Politics Charlie Cook talks the latest version of the Almanac.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Inside Politics
Sunday, August 11, 2019: Iowa, Iowa, Iowa

Inside Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2019 39:26


President Trump promises action on America's mass shooting epidemic - has Washington finally hit a tipping point, or will efforts fall short like they have in the past? Plus, tough new attacks on the president from the Democrats who want his job, as 2020 hopefuls descend on first-in-the-nation Iowa. And President Trump plays down the latest North Korean missile tests - siding with Kim Jong Un over America's allies and his own advisers. CNN's Phil Mattingly in the anchor chair. Today's Panel: Politico's Eliana Johnson, Sahil Kapur with Bloomberg News, Michael Bender of the Wall Street Journal, and Time's Molly Ball

Sound On
Debt Ceiling, Huawei & Iran

Sound On

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2019 36:11


Kevin Cirilli spoke with Dan Lippman, White House reporter at Politico, Sahil Kapur, Bloomberg News National Political Correspondent, and Lauren Zelt, Republican Strategist, Founder of Zelt Communications. They discussed President Donald Trump's meeting with Pakistan's Prime Minister, the debt ceiling, Huawei, Iran and Mueller.

Sound On
Debt Ceiling, Huawei & Iran

Sound On

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2019 36:11


Kevin Cirilli spoke with Dan Lippman, White House reporter at Politico, Sahil Kapur, Bloomberg News National Political Correspondent, and Lauren Zelt, Republican Strategist, Founder of Zelt Communications. They discussed President Donald Trump's meeting with Pakistan's Prime Minister, the debt ceiling, Huawei, Iran and Mueller.

Inside Politics
Thursday, July 11, 2019: Tensions Spill Over Between Pelosi, Liberal Wing of Caucus

Inside Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2019 37:38


And the speaker versus the squad. Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says speaker Pelosi is disrespecting the new liberal women of color in the democratic house. Just moments ago, the speaker defended her leadership -- but did not respond directly. President Trump's Rose Garden re-election strategy is on overdrive today. A news conference later to highlight his plan to force a citizenship question on the 2020 census. Before that, a so-called White House "Social Media Summit" whose guests list includes far right conspiracy theorists and smear artists. Plus, flip, flop, flip: Amy McGrath was against Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination, then for it, and now against him again. A very rough start for the Kentucky Democrat Party leaders in Washington say is the best challenger for majority leader Mitch McConnell. Today's Panel: Carl Hulse with The New York Times, Sahil Kapur with Bloomberg, Rachael Bade with The Washington Post, CNN's Kaitlan Collins Also, on the Program: CNN's MJ Lee and Manu Raju.

Bloomberg Law
Democrats Confront Trump's Success at Reshaping Courts

Bloomberg Law

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2019 8:30


Sahil Kapur, Bloomberg news National Political Correspondent, discusses how Democrats are attempting to turn the Supreme Court into a campaign issue, as they confront President Donald Trump's success at reshaping the federal judiciary. He speaks to Bloomberg's June Grasso. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Bloomberg Law
Democrats Confront Trump’s Success at Reshaping Courts

Bloomberg Law

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2019 8:30


Sahil Kapur, Bloomberg news National Political Correspondent, discusses how Democrats are attempting to turn the Supreme Court into a campaign issue, as they confront President Donald Trump’s success at reshaping the federal judiciary. He speaks to Bloomberg’s June Grasso.

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press
High crimes and misdemeanors: Eliana Johnson, Sahil Kapur talk Trump impeachment, Robert Caro explores LBJ's 1948 stolen election

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2019 70:24


Eliana Johnson, Sahil Kapur lay down some reality checks about Trump's financial prowess, the 2020 field and the Senate Republicans. Plus, Robert Caro sits down with Chuck in front of a live audience to discuss political power and  how he solved the crime of President Lyndon Johnson's stolen election.

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press
High crimes and misdemeanors: Eliana Johnson, Sahil Kapur talk Trump impeachment, Robert Caro explores LBJ's 1948 stolen election

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2019 70:23


Eliana Johnson, Sahil Kapur lay down some reality checks about Trump's financial prowess, the 2020 field and the Senate Republicans. Plus, Robert Caro sits down with Chuck in front of a live audience to discuss political power and  how he solved the crime of President Lyndon Johnson's stolen election. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sound On
New Nafta, 2020, Bernie Sanders Tax Returns

Sound On

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2019 34:27


Guests include: Capri Cafaro, Executive in Residence at American University and former Democratic Ohio Senate Minority Leader, Sahil Kapur, Bloomberg News National Political Correspondent and Josh Wingrove, Bloomberg News Canada reporter and White House reporter.

Sound On
New Nafta, 2020, Bernie Sanders Tax Returns

Sound On

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2019 34:27


Guests include: Capri Cafaro, Executive in Residence at American University and former Democratic Ohio Senate Minority Leader, Sahil Kapur, Bloomberg News National Political Correspondent and Josh Wingrove, Bloomberg News Canada reporter and White House reporter.

TicToc
Radical Road to 2020

TicToc

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2019 10:30


This year on the campaign trail, ideas once only talked about in the shadows of the Democratic Party are now taking the spotlight. Stump speeches are littered with radical proposals that would change the election process and upend D.C. David Meyers speaks to Sahil Kapur on how do we'll know if it's just talk or if true change is on the way. FOLLOW UP Sahil's latest report: Dump the Electoral College? Some 2020 Democrats Back Liberals’ Goals You can follow Sahil at: @sahilkapur ---- TicToc is a daily news podcast hosted by David Meyers (@davidfmeyers), produced at Bloomberg Worldwide HQ in New York City. You can follow up with us and watch our reporting @tictoc. If you like it, be sure to rate us on iTunes, and tell your friends!

TicToc
Shutdown 2.0?

TicToc

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2019 9:50


After a record-setting 35 day partial shutdown, the clock is once again ticking on Capitol Hill. Negotiations fell apart over the weekend and now leaders from the House and Senate are scrambling to salvage a deal. David Meyers speaks to Bloomberg's national political reporter Sahil Kapur on the issue holding up the negotiations: the number and purpose of immigration detention beds. FOLLOW UP Sahil's latest report: U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar Announces She's Running for President in 2020 You can follow Sahil at: @sahilkapur ---- TicToc is a daily news podcast hosted by David Meyers (@davidfmeyers), produced at Bloomberg Worldwide HQ in New York City. You can follow up with us and watch our reporting @tictoc. If you like it, be sure to rate us on iTunes, and tell your friends!

TicToc
New Year, Same Dysfunctional D.C.

TicToc

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2019 13:06


New year, same old Washington as the partial government shutdown has entered its 12th day. At the center of the standoff: President Trump's demand for $5 billion in funding for his border wall. David Meyers speaks to Bloomberg's national political correspondent Sahil Kapur on how the standoff and the government shutdown are likely to continue as Democrats are now set to take control of the House. FOLLOW UP Sahil's latest report: Ocasio-Cortez Breaks With Pelosi in Key Early Vote for Democrats You can follow Sahil at: @sahilkapur ---- TicToc is a daily news podcast hosted by David Meyers (@davidfmeyers), produced at Bloomberg Worldwide HQ in New York City. You can follow up with us and watch our reporting @tictoc. If you like it, be sure to rate us on iTunes, and tell your friends!

TicToc
Translating the Success of 2018 to 2020

TicToc

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2018 11:42


The 2018 midterms will no doubt go down as a success for Democrats. But what can the party learn from that success going into 2020? David Meyers speaks with Bloomberg's national political reporter Sahil Kapur on how the key is not allowing President Trump to control the narrative. FOLLOW UP Sahil's latest report: Democrats Learn a Big Lesson for 2020 Vote About Taking on Trump You can follow Sahil at: @sahilkapur ---- TicToc is a daily news podcast hosted by David Meyers (@davidfmeyers), produced at Bloomberg Worldwide HQ in New York City. You can follow up with us and watch our reporting @tictoc. If you like it, be sure to rate us on iTunes, and tell your friends!

P&L With Paul Sweeney and Lisa Abramowicz
Bloomberg's Porzecanski on Visium, Kapur on the RNC (Audio)

P&L With Paul Sweeney and Lisa Abramowicz

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2016 11:59


(Bloomberg) -- Taking Stock with Kathleen Hays and Pimm Fox. GUESTS: Katia Porzecanski, Hedge Fund reporter for Bloomberg News, on the red flags that presaged the downfall of $8 billion hedge fund Visium. Sahil Kapur, White House Correspondent for Bloomberg, in Cleveland with the the latest news from the RNC, including the fallout from Melania Trump's speech.

Biz Please
Trump vs. Hillary vs. the media

Biz Please

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2016 30:57


The general election looms, and that usually means candidates adapting their messages to the mainstream. Then again, there hasn't been much about this election that has been usual. Sahil Kapur, national political reporter for Bloomberg Politics, joins to talk about Trump's most recent tirade against the press, what Hillary Clinton is doing to compete with his media dominance, and the end of Barack Obama's presidency. Also, just a bit about Uber's massive funding round.

P&L With Paul Sweeney and Lisa Abramowicz
Bloomberg's Ubelhart on Deere, Kapur on Bernie Sanders (Audio)

P&L With Paul Sweeney and Lisa Abramowicz

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2016 12:00


(Bloomberg) -- Taking Stock with Kathleen Hays and Pimm Fox. GUESTS: Karen Ubelhart, Industrials analyst for Bloomberg Intelligence, on Deere earnings and the agricultural equipment space. Sahil Kapur, Bloomberg politics reporter and producer, on Sanders reassuring the Democratic party on unity.