Podcasts about Howard University

Historically black university in Washington, D.C., US

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New Books in African American Studies
Above the Veil: Beyond Segregationism and Assimilationism

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2023 37:04


The work of Ibram X. Kendi distinguishes between two forms of racism: segregationism and assimilationism. Segregationists argue that some groups are inferior by nature; assimilationists, on the other hand, argue that some groups are inferior by 'nurture,' but can overcome this inferiority if they conform to another group's cultural standards -- in America, always a White cultural standard. Black leaders past and present have challenged these racist assumptions while revealing the liberatory potential of a cultural engagement based on equality and mutual exchange. Guests: Ibram X. Kendi, director of the Boston University Center for Antiracist Research, contributing writer to The Atlantic and author of "How To Be An Antiracist" and "Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America 1619-2019." Max Mueller, assistant professor in the Department of Classics and Religious Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and author of "Race and the Making of the Mormon People." Dr. Anika Prather, adjunct professor in the Classics Department at Howard University and author of "Living in the Constellation of the Canon: The Lived Experiences of African American Students Reading Great Books Literature." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

Yahoo Sports NFL Podcast
AFC & NFC Championship preview + Panthers hire Frank Reich & Jets hire Nathaniel Hackett

Yahoo Sports NFL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 74:08


Charles Robinson, Frank Schwab and Charles McDonald react to the Carolina Panthers hiring Frank Reich and the New York Jets Jets hiring Nathaniel Hackett as OC before previewing the AFC & NFC Championship games coming Sunday.The Panthers announced the hiring of former Indianapolis Colts head coach Frank Reich. It'll be interesting to see how he decides to handle the quarterback situation. Frank Schwab wishes the Panthers had just kept interim head coach and former defensive coordinator Steve Wilks, but everyone is convinced he will get another chance soon enough.The Jets hired former Denver Broncos head coach and Green Bay Packers offensive coordinator Nathaniel Hackett as their new OC. Is this a sign that the Jets could be looking to acquire Aaron Rodgers? Charles McDonald thinks the Jets might actually have a better offensive foundation in place than the Packers. Even if they don't end up acquiring the veteran Rodgers, Hackett should be able to contribute early to a team that, according to Charles Robinson, believes they are not far off from contending.While taping the podcast, the news dropped that Dallas Cowboys DC Dan Quinn will be staying in his role for another year. This is huge news for the Cowboys, who manage to hang onto Quinn through yet another head coach hiring cycle. It's concerning news for teams like the Broncos who have yet to hire their next coach, as the premiere options are starting to dwindle.Next the trio move on to the NFC championship game, where Brock Purdy will look to evade the nasty Philadelphia Eagles pass rush, and Jalen Hurts will attempt to crack a tough San Francisco 49ers defense. Charles McDonald believes Hurts may be able to throw it deep against San Francisco – the cornerbacks may be their one weakness.The AFC championship game between the Cincinnati Bengals and the Kansas City Chiefs hinges on the health of star quarterback Patrick Mahomes and whether or not he can overcome the ankle injury that affected his play last week. Mahomes was, shockingly, a full participant in practice on Wednesday and was seen jogging on the field. Regardless of Mahomes' status, Robinson believes the key to stopping the Chiefs will be slowing down tight end Travis Kelce, who is Mahomes' safety valve and tends to dominate in playoff games. Charles McDonald picks the Bengals; he thinks their streak of three straight victories against Kansas City will continue for at least one more game.00:25 - The Panthers hire Frank Reich to be their next head coach13:55 - The Jets hire Nathaniel Hackett to be their next offensive coordinator. Is Aaron Rodgers next?29:50 - Cowboys DC Dan Quinn announces he's staying in Dallas. What does this mean for teams without head coaches?37:15 - 49ers @ Eagles Preview: Which offense will crack first against elite defense? Purdy and the 49ers or Hurts and Eagles?50:00 - Bengals @ Chiefs Preview: Can the Bengals stop the Chiefs just short of the Super Bowl for the second straight year? Is Mahomes going to be more healthy than we all thought?Please support Terez Paylor's legacy:• Buy an All-Juice Team hoodie or tee from BreakingT.com/Terez. All profits directly fund the Terez A. Paylor scholarship at Howard University.• Donate directly at giving.howard.edu/givenow. Under “Tribute,” please note that your gift is made in memory of Terez A. Paylor. Under “Designation,” click on “Other” and write in “Terez A. Paylor Scholarship.”• Donate directly to the PowerMizzou Journalism Alumni Scholarship in memory of Terez PaylorSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Yahoo Sports NFL Podcast
Championship Week News Roundup: Tom Brady's Future, Daniel Jones' Contract, Sean Payton Update

Yahoo Sports NFL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 54:37


Charles Robinson is joined by Jori Epstein and Charles McDonald to discuss the hottest storylines around the NFL heading into conference championship weekend, including rumors surrounding Tom Brady's future, how the New York Giants plan to handle Daniel Jones and Saquon Barkley's contract negotiations and whether or not Sean Payton returns to the NFL as a head coach in 2023.Rumors are swirling around the league as Tom Brady erupted on his podcast when asked questions about his future, and was recently seen in Miami touring schools for his children. Will the 45-year old return to the NFL, possibly in a new uniform? Or will he hang up the cleats and begin his commentating career?New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick hired former Houston Texans head coach and longtime associate as offensive coordinator. What does this mean for Mac Jones and the struggling New England offense?Giants GM Joe Schoen seemed to indicate earlier this week that the Giants may favor Daniel Jones over star RB Saquon Barkley if a decision needed to be paid, but is that the right call? Charles Robinson reports that the Giants may need to give Jones $40M or more per year to retain him.We are in the midst of the head coach hiring cycle, but the news surrounding longtime New Orleans Saints coach Sean Payton returning to the NFL has slowed over the last few days. The trio dive into what could be causing this, and whether or not Payton is even interested in any of the coaching jobs available. In other head coaching news, Indianapolis Colts head coach Jeff Saturday looks like he's trending towards keeping the job in 2023. Charles McDonald wonders if it's even possible that Saturday could take a significant year two leap.00:20 - Will Tom Brady return to Tampa Bay in 2023? Or will he return at all?14:10 - New England Patriots hire Bill O'Brien as offensive coordinator20:35 - Giants contract updates: will they extend Daniel Jones, Saquon Barkley or both?39:10 - Sean Payton may not return to the NFL in 202346:30 - Jeff Saturday is currently on track to continue as the Colts head coach in 2023Please support Terez Paylor's legacy:• Buy an All-Juice Team hoodie or tee from BreakingT.com/Terez. All profits directly fund the Terez A. Paylor scholarship at Howard University.• Donate directly at giving.howard.edu/givenow. Under “Tribute,” please note that your gift is made in memory of Terez A. Paylor. Under “Designation,” click on “Other” and write in “Terez A. Paylor Scholarship.”• Donate directly to the PowerMizzou Journalism Alumni Scholarship in memory of Terez PaylorSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

I Am Refocused Podcast Show
Joe Morton and Tracey Moore of Crackle's Inside The Black Box, Season 2

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 9:43


ABOUT INSIDE THE BLACK BOX, SEASON 2 NOW STREAMING ON CRACKLEInside the Black Box, hosted by Emmy and NAACP Image Award winner Joe Morton and celebrity acting coach Tracey Moore, spotlights the greatest artists of color, from actors to producers to directors, writers and musicians, and allows them to reflect on how the color of their skin affected their journey to success. Season 2 continues the important conversations from last season with a new set of black artists, with some of the biggest names in the entertainment industry. Talent featured in the second season includes Debbie Allen (Grey's Anatomy, Fame), Keith David (Nope, Armageddon), Jeffrey Wright (The Batman, Westworld), Malik Yoba (First Wives Club, Designated Survivor), Wendell Pierce (Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan, The Wire), Ruben Santiago-Hudson (Billions, Castle), Rob Morgan (Stranger Things), and Naturi Naughton (Power, Queens).Here's the trailer:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbis3K1bbfsJOE MORTON BIOJOE MORTON is an Emmy® Award winner and recipient of multiple NAACP Image Awards for his role as Rowan/Eli Pope in Shonda Rhimes' critically acclaimed series SCANDAL. He was last seen in the FOX drama, OUR KIND OF PEOPLE, CBS's feel-good, Sunday night series, GOD FRIENDED ME, and Netflix's THE POLITICIAN. Morton recently expanded his TV presence as executive co-producer and co-host on INSIDE THE BLACK BOX, an interactive interview show, which explores the experiences of black artists within the world of entertainment, premiering its second season on CRACKLE, December 1st.In film, Morton is widely known as the mute alien in the title role of John Sayle's THE BROTHER FROM ANOTHER PLANET, and as the ill-fated scientist, Miles Dyson, in TERMINATOR 2: JUDGEMENT DAY. Other notable film credits include SPEED, OF MICE AND MEN, ALI, HBO's star-studded special BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME, and as Cyborg's dad, Dr. Silas Stone, in BATMAN VS. SUPERMAN and Zack Snyder's Cut of JUSTICE LEAGUE.Morton debuted on Broadway in HAIR, and received a Tony nomination and Theatre World Award for his portrayal of Walter Lee Younger in RAISIN. For his Off-Broadway portrayal of comedian/civil-rights activist, Dick Gregory, in TURN ME LOOSE, Morton received the Lucille Lortel Award, the Off-Broadway Alliance Award, and the AUDELCO for Outstanding Lead Actor in a play. Morton is also the recipient of an Audie, the Audible Award, for his reading of Ta-Nehisi Coates' THE WATER DANCER.Morton also directs for both stage and screen. Most currently, he directed a Zoom production of Cornelius Eady's BRUTAL IMAGINATION for the Vineyard Theatre, a play about Susan Smith, the woman who drowned her children and accused a non-existent black man of kidnapping them. His TV directing credits include episodes of SCANDAL, GOD FRIENDED ME, BULL, and OUR KIND OF PEOPLE.Additionally, Morton released WAKE UP AMERICA (https://smarturl.it/wakeupamerica) in 2020, a song and lyric video that promotes unity and hope in a time of deep political and racial tribalism. He's also written music for feature films LIFELINES and BADLAND, and for SYFY'S EUREKA, and most recently co-composed music for INSIDE THE BLACK BOX.TRACEY MOORE BIOTracey Moore arrived in New York City in 1983 with two hundred dollars, a one-way ticket and a trunk from San Francisco, California to pursue a directing career on Broadway. One of her first jobs she created was a practical joke company for hire called "The Joke's On You!". Tracey wrote, directed and cast her unemployed actor friends in customized joke scenarios. After 4 years of playing jokes, Tracey was asked by a director to cast a music video. Being in a position to help actors get jobs moved her away from "The Jokes's On You" into a successful casting career in television, film and commercials for over 30 years.One of Tracey's first casting job was a show at MTV. The search was for comedians and during Tracey's scouting at comedy clubs, she discovered Dave Chappell. She cast Jon Stewart's first MTV show "You Wrote It, You Watch It" and found Lisa Gay Hamilton and Donald Faison. Tracey has had her hands on a plethora of actors including Jamie Hector, Michael K. Williams, Kerry Washington, Jeffrey Wright, Mike Epps, Adam Rodriguez, Naturi Naughton and many, many more.Since then she has become a renowned casting director for feature films such as Miramax's awarding winning, Just Another Girl on the I.R.T., New Jersey Drive and A Brother's Kiss. As Extras Casting Director, Tracey cast for the popular FOX show New York Undercover and Spike Lee's "Girl 6". Her commercial credits include: Nike, Sprite, Coca-Cola, New York Times, Miller Lite, Pontiac, Taco Bell, Disney and PSA's Under the Influence.In her "spare" time, Tracey enjoys speaking to students at various colleges. She has lectured at Howard University, Long Island University, CW Post, Georgia State University and Loyola Marymount University. Tracey also teaches The Spirited Actor Workshop and she conducts private coaching sessions. Her clients are Cardi B, Busta Rhymes, Missy Elliot, Eve, Nelly, Q-Tip, Faith Evans, LaLa Anthony, Naturi Naughton, Olivia, Jennifer Williams, Drew Sidora, Russell Hornsby, Kellita Smith, Charlie Murphy, Chico DeBarge, Musiq Soulchild, Faith Evans, Common, Ludacris, Victoria Rowell, Mona Scott Young, Q- Tip, Darius Rucker (Hootie and the Blowfish) Lil' Wayne, Joumana Kidd, Salt N Pepa, Laura Izibor, Kenny Latimore, NBA's Ray Allen, Terrence and Rocsi of BET's 106th and Park, Fonsworth Bentley of BET's Lift Every Voice, Tiny, Estelle, Kem, NFL Thomas Q. Jones, Vanessa Simmons, Leslie Grace andThe Breakfast Club's Angela Yee.. In 2002, Tracey wrote her first book entitled "The Spirited Actor; Principles for a Successful Audition" to empower and encourage actors on their journey. Tracey made her music video directorial debut with an artist named Blac Dyemond, which featured a cameo of Samuel L. Jackson. She recently shot the music video "Heaven" for R & B singer/ Broadway star Badia Farha. Tracey directed interstitials for Nickelodeon's Black History Month, which won her the 2004 Parent Choice Silver Award. Tracey has directed the annual HBO / BET Screenplay Competition for the last twenty years for the Urbanworld Film Festival in New York City.Tracey has received accolades from NABEFEME Television and Film Executive of the Year (2004), Delta Nu Sigma Rho Sorority Hattie McDaniel's Award (2004), and Honorary Mention for Best Short Film The Interview for Chicks with Flicks Film Festival (2003) Tracey has worked with ABC's Sade Baderwa's program "Get Reel With Your Dreams" where she teaches acting workshops for high school students.Tracey produced four films with New York Times Bestselling Author, Carl Weber; "The Man in 3B", "The Preacher's Son", "The Choir Director" and "No More Mr. Nice Guy"https://www.crackle.com/

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I Am Refocused Podcast Show
Tulani - Performing Live Friday, January 27th at The Rock Box

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 26:57


Tulani will be performing live Friday, January 27 at The Rock Box @therockboxsatx Get your tickets now at tulanitix.eventbrite.comDoors open at 7pmTulani is a powerhouse R&B singer, songwriter and harpist whose music colors outside the lines. She can't be put in a box! A high energy and electric entertainer, Tulani, has toured internationally with Lady Gaga and has opened up for Chaka Khan, Andra Day, CeeLo Green, Bobby Caldwell, Eddie Levert, Estelle, Wyclef Jean, Jill Scott, Stokley, Musiq Soulchild, Gary Clark Jr, Erykah Badu, Anderson .Paak & The Free Nationals, as well as George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic to name a few. In addition to being a headline performer for major brands such as Toyota, Tulani has performed at arenas, theaters, clubs, festivals, weddings and events throughout the country. She was a resident artist at the Bethesda Blues and Jazz Supper Club and has performed at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, The Howard Theatre, Arena Stage, Lakewood Amphitheater, State Farm Arena, The Ice Palace, and The Tobin Center to name a few. A sought after performer, Tulani was handpicked by Cathy Hughes to perform a tribute for Cathy Hughes at the naming of the Cathy Hughes School of Communication at Howard University. She was also the ATL Live On The Park "Pepsi Artist of the Month, and she performed for the BET Music Matters Showcase at SOB's in NYC. On TV, Tulani has performed on ABC, and CBS and in print, she has been featured in Marie Claire Magazine, Sheen Magazine, Rolling Out Magazine and in numerous teen and women's magazines. Her radio coverage includes V103 fm, Sirius XM, and MAJIC 107.5fm.Tulani's new singles "Stuck In My Mind,” and “You Are,” are featured in a movie that is currently Top 5 on Amazon Prime Video.http://iamtulani.com/https://twitter.com/iamtulanihttps://www.facebook.com/iamtulani/

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
459: Adobe Express with Kasha Stewart

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 50:41


Kasha Stewart is the Director of Growth Engagement at Adobe Express. Victoria talks to Kasha about finding advocates that encourage her to chase problems, getting more women into product development and why it's essential to bring different perspectives into this area, and ways to bring connection between the end users and customers, engineering teams, and the rest of the organization to the business. Adobe Express (https://www.adobe.com/express/) Follow Adobe LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/adobe/) or Twitter (https://twitter.com/AdobeExpress). Follow Kasha Stewart on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/kashastewart/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: VICTORIA: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Victoria Guido and with us today is Kasha Stewart, Director of Growth Engagement at Adobe Express. Kasha, thank you for joining us. KASHA: Well, thank you for having me. VICTORIA: Well, I thought I'd start off by asking you to tell me a little bit more about your background and how you found your way to product from starting out in film and video production. KASHA: I originally started...I have a fine arts background and did a lot of digital story narrative, post-production. Back in the day (I'm going to date myself.), you had to do...it was a very manual process of chroma keying and removing backgrounds, or refining someone's skin, or some type of background. That was where I kind of...it was my bread and butter. I really loved it. It was creative. Then in 2008, 2009, the housing market crashed, and the recession happened. And I thought, you know, I'm not a homeowner. What does it have to do with me? I'm taking these freelance jobs. I had just finished my grad program. And then all the jobs kind of disappeared. And I was thinking; here I was; I had gone to grad school. I had a really specific skill set. And then everything just poofed overnight, disappeared. And I thought, okay, well, what's more stable? Like, what could I do to secure a little bit more stability in my job, career? So I started applying for jobs in all these very different tech, like, they wanted people to be what we used to call a preditor, like, a producer and editor, someone that knew how to do this but also knew how to like FTP massive asset files and also knew how to flag something for when things were going wrong. And so I thought, okay, well, let me just apply for one of these. I have some of the skills. I tick the box on some of the requirements. And there was a job...it was actually on Craigslist. I actually didn't even know if it was a real job or if it was a scam situation, but I applied. It had a very unusual title; I think it was content distribution editor. And I thought, okay, well, this is interesting. And it was for abc.com. And this is about 2010. I applied. They called me. I thought, okay, why is ABC on Craigslist? But never mind, it was a legitimate job. And I got into what we call content distribution, so understanding content management systems. And I would be the last person that would actually process the content that would then be delivered to Hulu platforms, abc.com, many different affiliates. There were also Verizon mobile deals at this time, where the cell phone carriers had their own television networks that they tried to stand up. In that process, I started to really learn about licensing, how content is distributed, meta-tagging, and then also the architecture of a CMS. And I just for the life of me couldn't understand why this was built this way. It was a very cumbersome tool. And like clockwork, around 11:00 p.m. at night, it would crash. And if you hadn't saved your metadata on a notepad or in a spreadsheet, you're basically starting over from scratch. And I remember asking all these questions, and they were like, "Well, it's proprietary software, and it was built in Seattle." And I was like, "Yeah, but did they ever talk to the, you know..." I didn't know the terminology like end user at the time. But they never talked to any of us that were part of this small team that had this really pivotal role of publishing the content. And I remember asking all these questions. I had a supervisor at the time. And he jokingly said, "Well, you should go into product management since you love to ask questions." I didn't even know what product management was. I was like, well, I'm on a producer's track; that's my goal. I have this film and narrative background. And a role came up internally, and it was for a product specialist. I would say I needed a little bit of convincing to apply. I had some advocates in HR that saw this role and thought I would be perfect for it. And I was like, I don't know, it has all this data analytics. And what does this have to do with people and storytelling? And they were like, "We think you should apply for it." And I made the transition, which is rare sometimes in corporate and internal transitions. But I did make the transition, and I became a product specialist. And I kind of dived deep in into understanding consumer products from a front-end experience. So before, it was more from a distribution and back end. And now it was really focusing on the UX flow, the UI. What are the targets? And how do we position the content? And then, what are our consumers saying about the content? So I did open up a whole new world for me. I went ahead, and I made plenty of mistakes. There were times that I was like, I don't know if I'm for this if this is right for me. And people definitely weren't shy then. They would tell me, "You don't look like a product manager." Or "You don't have that background of CS or data and analytics person." And I totally didn't, and I never sold myself as a false representation. But what I did have was I had this really strong inclination of really understanding from the consumer perspective. I always took it back to even in my own circle. And I think I'm an early adopter. I love technology. But I also have friends that are still using Yahoo or Hotmail. And I'd be like, "Oh no, you got to try Gmail, or what about Gchat? This thing came out. You have to check it out." And I would think...back when I was building out these products, and this was, to level set, this is around the time of Web 2.0. I would think, oh, well, how would my friend in New York use this? Or how would my mom find her content? Or, how would my brother... And I think sometimes we get very seduced when you're building something, especially as a product manager, that everything is from your lens and from your perspective. And the data and then also the feedback was telling us that we weren't really hitting it where consumers were. They weren't able to find the content as easily as we hoped. And from there, I jumped into kind of entertainment streaming platforms, building out architecture, CMS, and then eventually transitioning into growth-led roles and then leadership roles later in my career. And so I've had the pleasure of working for startups like Beachbody, which was a fitness company big in the fitness space but smaller on the digital perspective, all the way to going back to Disney leading a team at Movies Anywhere. And now, I'm leading a growth team at Adobe. VICTORIA: Wow, thank you so much. That's so interesting. And we have a couple of different tracks we could get into here. One thing I want to note that I thought was interesting is when you got into your new role, what really kind of presented itself to you is that you identified a problem in the UX. Like, you kind of lateral moved, and then you found this problem, then you had advocates who pushed you to go in that direction. And so, if you have advice for people who are looking to make that transition, how do you find those advocates that encourage you to chase the problems that you find? KASHA: Oh, that's a great question. People ask me this frequently because I think on paper, it is hard. And no one's going to find you in your cubicle...or now a lot of us are working remotely in our houses. So you have to be your best cheerleader and campaign manager. I also think, like, what is it that is on your top three lists? In product, we have nice-to-have, must-haves, and then we kind of prioritize or stack rank our work backwards from that. So I ask people, "What's the most important thing for your next role?" And then those are the things that you need to either lean in and start to amplify that you're already doing and how you would make a great candidate. I think internal candidates do have an advantage because they know the culture, or they may know the players, or they may see something from a different perspective, but they know what the company's challenges are. So I would start by first talking to your manager, and you can have a great manager or not-so-great manager, but start there. Show them that, you know, I'm on this track plan, but I really want to be here. Are there things that I can do in my current role that would support that transition? Are there people that you can recommend? And sometimes, you can get traction with your manager, but if you can't, then start to search within your network. And if there's a product manager who's maybe in your org or actually would be maybe at the same leveling or someone new, start to explain to them, "Hey, I would love to set up a coffee chat, a 15-minute informational just to hear how you did it or what's your perspective?" And constantly, as you're taking notes...people usually like it when they get an opportunity to share their story or talk about themselves. And as you take notes, "Ah, I am actually looking to transition to that. Do you have any advice for me? If you had something in an open role, what would you want from that candidate?" And so you're constantly planting those seeds of like, I am this candidate, here's why. And product managers and, I think, also hiring managers, we have a room full of distractions. But if something's laid out to me in concise language and it's showing results of like, oh, well, I did this on the content management side, and I think this would be transferable, and here's why. And you don't have to be long-winded. I'm not into people writing dissertations and producing 20-page decks. I don't always have the time to read that, as lovely as it sounds. Drive in on your skills. How are they relatable or transferable? And then, what are the goals that you've been able to achieve in your current role? And what are you looking to do in your next role? And I think if you start to place yourself there...and definitely get out and start talking to people in your employee resource groups. And then also, internally, there's always, at some companies, there are HR or employee resource groups that will have at least a blog post on how to transition within the company, and if they don't, search out those people. And it's not an overnight process. I've seen people where it's been a flip of the switch, and they're on a rocket. And I've seen other people where it's taken time, but they've built those rapports with people that started to get to know them outside of their current role. VICTORIA: That makes a lot of sense. And you're also involved in many professional networks. And so, do you also get a benefit for your career growth from that? KASHA: Yes. I feel like I never stop learning. As much as there's always something new coming out, I mean like now I'm into the chatbots and AI. And I'm like, okay, here's another thing I got to learn. Let me [laughs] add this to my to-do list. So I never want to take that for granted. So I feel like the communities kind of keep me, you know, it's a temperature check of what's going on, either from a challenge perspective or what type of new technologies people are integrating into their existing platforms, and how it's actually growing or benefiting them, whether it's from a machine learning and building out recommendation engines that have saved time, and then actually gets smarter. And we're building out algorithms all the way to, you know, what would it be like to have AI enhancements on an existing platform and still help drive that high-value consumer experience? So I don't take for granted. I also recommend people that, even if you're not in product to, join product communities so that you start to hear the language and you start to see how product managers think and how hiring and leadership think. And LinkedIn is a great resource. I belong to Women in Product, Black Product Managers. There's a slew of Tech Ladies. And I'm always kind of looking. There are newsletters that I love, Lenny's Newsletter. And I'm always like, oh, that's a nice one. Let me take that away for my team, or, oh, I didn't actually see that. I didn't think about that. I didn't see that playing out with NFTs in that way; hmm, really interesting. Or that TikTok is taking over search. And now I'm like, okay, how can my product that I'm growing from an engagement standpoint also have really strong representation on TikTok in a way that's authentic and users can find us, and we can continue to engage with users that way? Start small. Find the right community that works for you. There's also Product-Led Growth, Product Alliances. There are so many of them. And I think you just start to kind of join them if you can. Some of them are free, some of them have dues. And they're really worth it. It's a value add. And you never know who's going to be posting in these Slack community groups too. You might see something where they're okay with associate level or okay with someone transitioning, or looking to help someone transition. And I often mentor and direct some of my mentees in that direction so that they don't feel like they're in the passenger seat of their career and waiting for something to happen. You have to be active in this pursuit. And you also have to be a driver in it. VICTORIA: Right. I felt that myself in my career. I felt like my network was my number one source of learning like you said. And also, when you're considering a career change, sometimes you don't even know what else is out there or what other types of jobs are out there. [laughs] I love what you said about that. And you also mentioned Women in Product and Black Women in Product. How can we promote those groups more [laughs] as we get more women in product? And why is it important to bring a different perspective into product? KASHA: Yeah, that's a great question. I mean, I think podcasts like this, you know, letting people know. And then also, when I do a post on LinkedIn, I do the hashtags of all the groups that either I belong to, or I might tag them. One thing that I do when I do start to mentor someone I say "Be active in the community, share your voice. You're going to start to get comfortable." Product managers have it...it's not a career for the weak, I'll say that. [laughs] And you have to have an opinion, so start small and start promoting yourself in those groups or hearing what people are saying. And even if my company is hiring or someone else, another hiring manager, and it has a post, I'll say, "Oh, did you think about posting this or adding this hashtag to this? This would definitely help give you a different type of candidate and also get more traffic." And it's important to me because if I think about the world population and how we're changing, and who's showing up, you want that representation of the people that are working on it. They're going to be thinking about it from a different lens that I didn't even realize that that was an issue or oh, wow, we need to really tap into that. Or actually, we should promote this in a different way because we're going to cast a wider net, or we're going to cast a really specific net. With this demo, it can grow by 10x. Versus us thinking very generally and saying, "Well, we're happy with a 2x growth." So that's why it's important to me. I'm also always balancing, like, do I have enough representation of women? And do I have enough representation of men on the team too? I don't want to go one side too far and then I'm out of balance and I'm just hiring the same people that are like me. It is kind of challenging sometimes because I have to think about what does the team need? What is the team dynamics missing? And who is that person that can bring in or usher in that different perspective? And then also work cohesively with the existing team. And so that's a lot of balancing act that I do in my current role and really thinking about okay, well, we're serving small businesses. We're serving social entrepreneurs. Has anybody ever done that? We can be very kind of elitist in tech, especially in product of, like, well, I do it this way. I've [laughs] got Discord, and I have all the NFTs that I've ever wanted to collect. And I can hear and listen to all that, and I can geek out. But then I'm like, if I go back to my friends, they'll be, "Kasha, what are you talking about? Can you speak English to us?" [laughs] And they'll be like, "Can you please calm down?" And I'm like, "Oh, but there's this thing." And then I'm like, well, maybe I need to have someone who is not like me because they're going to be thinking of that person who really just has a simple task they're trying to solve for. They have a limited amount of time, and they also have limited patience. They're not in a place where they want to learn and go on YouTube and watch a tutorial. They're really just, you know, "Hey, I need to get this birthday card or this invitation out for my kids. And this was a free product that I saw from SEO results, and I'm here." And that's the value in finding that person and then carrying them through a journey. Me, I'm going to be picky. I'm going to probably research. I'm going to look at reviews. I'm going to look at two other competitors that I'm going to start to line up. [laughter] And then you've lost me by that point. You want to get that person, and you want to make it a frictionless experience. So I do encourage, when I'm building teams, to think about the dynamics, always going for people that are, you know, want to be there and that are really dedicated to the product but also bring a different perspective than I did. And I come from an untraditional background in tech, so I think that's probably why I'm so conscious of this and how we can make these changes. And I think, historically, or the data proves that diverse teams often excel faster and better than traditional teams. VICTORIA: Right. And teams that are diverse and are in an inclusive environment where they feel like they can bring their authentic selves. KASHA: Correct. Yeah, it's one thing to have diversity, but then it's also another, you know, the counterbalance of inclusion. And how do you set people up for success that have different backgrounds? And I have a great strong team of rock stars, as I say, but they all are different. They all need different things. They all have different kinds of needs from a coaching or leadership perspective. Some I'm more hands-on, others I'm hands-off. But as a leader, it's being perceptive of that and saying, okay, well, this person likes to run their own ship. I'm going to be here on the sidelines. And this person I'm going to be out front. I'm going to be walking with them side by side. I don't know why I have all these sports analogies because I was terrible at sports in junior high, in high school. But I always feel like I'm this coach out here with a whistle and a clipboard. And I'm telling them I'm like, okay, I'm going to set this person up. This person is going to happen here. And that's how I look at it from a growth perspective. When I'm really assessing the roadmap and the backlog and what's going to be our impact, I'm also thinking about, well, how is everybody working cohesively? And is there a way that we can have shared experiences so that that way, oh, we learned from such and such an experiment, and that's going to influence the other half of my team? Or, actually, I'm going to have them focus, or I know that we're going to have too many mobile tests at the end of Q2 because the monetization team is also trying to test something very similar. So it's a constant juggling act in my role. VICTORIA: Right. I very much relate to that. I was a competitive rock climbing coach a few years ago on top of my full-time job. KASHA: Oooh. VICTORIA: And my kids would ask me if I was also a motivational speaker [laughs] because I was always pumping people up while they're climbing. So yeah, I find it fascinating how you think about the needs of your team and your own growth from an individual contributor into a leader. And how do you coach people in your team along that path, like making that transition from being really strong in product to managing a team of product people? KASHA: Oh, that's a great question. And I love that you're like a rock climbing...I love that. I'm like, [laughs] what we call thumbs. I would just be looking; I mean, just thinking about rock climbing, my hands are probably getting sweaty right now. [laughs] And for my team, I do have people that they're getting to a senior PM level, and they're like, "What's next?" And I really like to do an assessment of, like, "Well, what do you think is next? And what is really going to help your career growth?" And some of them are like, "Well, I want to do leadership. I want to do this." And I ask, just like I ask in any product question, "What's the why behind that? Is it a financial contribution? Is it a recognition? Or is it that you are really invested in people development?" Because one thing I do like to preference, especially people that are in early or mid-level careers, is that managing a product versus managing people are two different skill sets. And I didn't even understand that when I started to get into management; I kind of fell into it. I had a leader that exited the company, and it was like, "Oh, gosh, what will we do next?" And I was just like, "I think we should still continue to pursue the roadmap [laughs] is what I would think to do first." So one of the things I do say is that your work is going to change. I don't PM, and I'm not regularly with the engineering team on a day-to-day basis. And so I will say to the team that first, at certain points, you can balance it. You'll have both where you might own still part of the portfolio, but then you have maybe one or two direct parts. But as you start to grow, you will start to transition out of the day-to-day or building individual features or initiatives. And I do ask my PMS, are they ready for that? And if they check all the boxes and say that they have a strong why, then I start off by, okay, well, let's see if our team is eligible for an internship. We're going to open up an internship this summer, and instead of this intern reporting to me, they're going to report to you. What's your onboarding plan? What's your growth strategy for this person? And then, what do you want this person to accomplish at the end of the internship? And it's a baby step for them to kind of get their feet wet on what is it like to lead someone? And then also, what are the challenges? There's always a perfect storm where things go great. But what about the times when things are not going great, and how do you communicate with that person? What are the nudges that they need to give for them to either redirect them, or what are the things that you need to do to kind of show them the happy path to success? So those are where I start. We have international teams and people onboarding. I work for a huge company, so there are more opportunities there. But then I will also say if someone wants to drive and be in a leadership role, what are the mentoring opportunities within the company? So, how would you mentor somebody? And what would be your advice? How do you set up a weekly cadence? What are your expectations of this? How should they measure success and goals? All these are things that are going to be transferable when that opportunity comes up. And then also, too, what is the right situation? Is it a mix of where I'm 50% IC and then I'm, you know, this other 40%-50% of people management? I encourage them to look at opportunities internally, even if I'm at the sacrifice of losing what I call one of my rock stars. I know that it's inevitable for people to grow. And I never want to be the person that held someone back out of jealousy, or fear, or my own insecurities. And I do have a strong network that when I post something, I get so many candidates. It's almost to the sense of like, wow, this person is greater. Wow, this person...wow, they went to Stanford, and they did this, and now they're transitioning. And I'm like, oh my gosh, they want to work with me. And so that's always very exciting. So I never want to get so trapped in the ideology that the team is only great with these people. I'm like; the team starts with me and my leadership. So I need to be able to build a team. I need to be able to grow a team. And sometimes, you might have a great talent pool, and other times you don't, and then what do you do in those? I mean, that's what leadership really is. It's not always when you have everybody applying for your job, and you have all this funding, and your P&Ls are going incredible. It's those times where they come back to you and say, "Yeah, we're not going to get that done this sprint, so you'll just have to figure it out." Or someone's resigning that you didn't see coming. And then you're like, okay, I might have to roll up my sleeves and take over their part of the roadmap just as a stopgap till I have someone. And that's the things that can make or break your leadership. VICTORIA: Yeah, it's easy when everything is going great. [laughter] KASHA: Yes. Don't we love that? [laughter] Mid-Roll Ad: As life moves online, bricks-and-mortar businesses are having to adapt to survive. With over 18 years of experience building reliable web products and services, thoughtbot is the technology partner you can trust. We provide the technical expertise to enable your business to adapt and thrive in a changing environment. We start by understanding what's important to your customers to help you transition to intuitive digital services your customers will trust. We take the time to understand what makes your business great and work fast yet thoroughly to build, test, and validate ideas, helping you discover new customers. Take your business online with design‑driven digital acceleration. Find out more at: url tbot.io/acceleration or click the link in the show notes for this episode. VICTORIA: You mentioned a few times, switching more into your approach to product management about the experiments that you run. Sometimes those go great, and sometimes they don't go so great. So can you tell me about a time you ran an experiment, and the results were really different than what you expected, and what did you do from that? KASHA: Oh gosh, yeah. There are so many. I'm trying to think of what's the best example. Gosh, I'm like, do I go for mobile? No, web. [laughs] Well, I think in growth, a part of your experiment should fail because if they're not failing, that also means to me you're not taking enough risk. And you're taking things that you already know, in some ways, are like low-hanging fruit, and you're very comfortable in it. And I do encourage my team to take a big risk of how do we start to find something? We recently had something to help users on the AI side. It was a really unique feature. A user uploads an image, and AI automatically spits out templates with this user-generated content. And we were so excited. We were watching the demos, I felt like on replay, you know, as we got out the meaning. It didn't necessarily do what we thought it would do. And so then we had to take a pause, like, what happened? And one of the things that we learned from the test is that people just didn't understand what they were supposed to do. They didn't understand the process of their workflow. And they also weren't engaged with what the results came back. So I think that's one thing that, you know, I know there's a lot of chatter in the space about AI taking over and where are we going to be. And I still think we need to have that human perspective, that person that is like, hey, these search results are really not what the consumer is looking for. And yes, it solved a requirement of picture upload output, but the output is not matching what the consumer's needs were. It didn't solve their problem. And we have to constantly continue to filter and refine the algorithm. So our first output back was not great. But what we learned is that we have to have more variety of the type of output of content and that we also have to do more hand-holding. As much as we think that people are going to dive right in because it's in the press, and it's in TechCrunch and on Verge, that is not our general population. I can talk to my girlfriend; she's a doctor. And she's like, "Hey, I'm just really trying to do this for my local women physicians network." All this other stuff, she's like, "It's kind of overwhelming to me." And I didn't even see that. I was just like, "Aren't you excited that you have five options? She's like, "No, I just kind of needed the one thing with the squiggly backgrounds [laughs] and the template that I could alter." She's like, "These don't actually really speak to me." And so we had to come back and re-define the algorithm and also think about less choices for people; as much as we were like, we can randomize it; we can output more types of templates. It's really about finding the cues that the user is giving us to find that right match, and it's not something that I think we're going to get...and knowing from the test, we're not going to get on the first try. We're going to continue to test this, and that's what's going to make it better because we stress-test it. I mean, in growth, sometimes, I tell my team, like, don't get our hopes up, our hearts set into it because we can spend a lot of time in crafting the experiment and doing the 50% and then the other 50% control and variants, and then when it comes back, they're just not excited, or the consumer just didn't really gravitate or attach to it. And so then we have to stop, and I think, okay, there's a lesson here. Is it the education? Is it the guidance? Isn't the language that we use? You'd be surprised how one word can throw off someone's context. And they're turned off, or they don't want to do it. Or they like, "Oh, this is kind of cool. Oh, I didn't realize that this was a free service." Or, "Oh, I didn't realize that I could save this, and it's removing the background for me. And then now I have all these options." Growth is a hard challenge. I mean, we move so fast, which is what I love, but then we're always kind of looking at the data and having to constantly pivot and transition based off of our previous tests. [laughs] Now I'm thinking about a time when I was at Beachbody, and I was so excited because I got to do native app development on mobile platforms, and I'd never done that before. We were all excited. We had an iOS product that was really strong. And, of course, many of the people that worked in the office were all iOS users. So they weren't even thinking about Android. And we had just missed the mark as a company not really focusing on building out a great Android native app experience. And we were just kind of relying on the mobile web experience. And I remember thinking like, oh, okay, well, you have something. And then I went into a Facebook community group, and I just saw all the complaints. I saw all the people's frustrations. I saw also all these user-generated hacks. People were sharing what to do when your video stops. And I just was like, oh my gosh, we need to get on this. And so from that experience, I was able to champion and be one of the people that was like, hey, we need to help drive this. On Android, we need to really, like, this is really a problem. We could set ourselves up for success. And then we can also grow in other markets outside of the U.S. And I remember looking at the first designs, and they were all done by our creators' team, which were iOS users. So even in that situation, I think of that as more of growth internally versus putting something out user-facing to the consumer. It still was a challenge. Like, how do I influence? How do I show that this is not the right path? How do I show that, hey, we're not using material design or best practices, and this is going to hurt us in the long run? Because people that are on these platforms on Android they're used to seeing things in this manner. And we're presenting it to them in another way, and then now we're wondering why they're confused. VICTORIA: Right, right. And you mentioned a couple of different tactics to connect to that consumer voice. What other ways do you try to bring that connection between the end user and the customer, to the engineering teams, to the rest of the organization, to the business? KASHA: I'm very privileged in my organization. We have a really strong user research team as well. As we're doing our experiments, depending on how large or how much time we'll invest into an experiment, we will do a prototype kind of test in a smaller pool, let's say, before we go out to A/B test or have a controlled and variant situation. And sometimes those are the little things that I can take back, a video, or likes, comments, and send it. I don't even need to wait for it to be polished into a presentation or to a Confluence page, or even in Jira. And I can say to my counterpart, "Hey, Ganesh, do you see this? This is what I'm trying to solve for." And then it's like that aha moment. And I can say, and, you know, and engineers are always delightful. And they'll say, "Well, that's only one data point." And I'm like, "Yes, but it is a significant point. And I think if we tested this more, we will see more people are struggling with this." And how can we change that? What are their solutions? And I'm really big on collaboration. Product owns kind of the deliverables and the path and is accountable for the results. But this is a joint effort between design, between data and analytics, and engineering. So early on, I present the problem. This is the why; here's kind of our best path. But what do you think? And that to me and my career has always yielded such a higher result instead of coming from an authoritative or dictatorship of, "Well, this is the way that I've envisioned it. Here's my mocks, here are my wires, and this is why," and then kind of leaving it out to pasture or throwing it over the fence and saying, "Okay, and I need it in a week and a half." And I've been on both sides of different product teams, and different engineering teams work differently. But I have found that when you get people to buy in, to care, and then also give them that consumer value of that person is frustrated; I mean, that's what was the trigger for me when I went into the Facebook groups. I really didn't have the biggest inclination that we were having such a problem on Android. I was an iOS user. I was happy with the product; I could get my workouts in, or I could find what I was looking for. And then, when I did that, I started screenshotting. And then, I started to share this out in the Slack channel. And then there are also ways...now we have so many things where you can have bots that will record the feedback if someone says something in the App Store. That's one way to kind of bring it up to people. And then, if you don't have the funding or have an in-house user research, there's always usertesting.com. That is one way that you can start. Even if you work with design, and you guys are a small team, "Hey, I am so committed to this working. But I really would love to run a test." And then also running a survey after people test or even in product, you know, what did they think about the experience? And if you can't even get that, you can always do thumbs up, thumbs down. [laughs] You can always do is this a four-star experience or a five-star? Would you like to tell us more? I would say that sometimes we have blindness to surveys and to people asking for our opinions because you just want to get to that thing. But that small sampling of people that do respond, I think, is a way for you to kind of, if you're not sure, think about this directionally. I was leaning more towards this, but, wow, this user research came back, and I think people are going to really appreciate having this extra step. Which is something like an oxymoron for me because I'm always thinking about, well, what's the easiest path? Or what's the least path of resistance to getting the user into the experience? And then sometimes you're dropping them into a whole new what we call canvas or experience, and they have no idea what to do. VICTORIA: I liked the way you described your approach or how not to do it was like, just throw things over a wall [laughs] and say, "This is the way." KASHA: [laughs] Yes. VICTORIA: One of my questions that I like to ask people who have design and product backgrounds is just what does product design have to do with DevOps? KASHA: Yeah, so everybody has to have a starting point. And a lot of times, I was definitely a product manager when I was more in the day-to-day, and I see where...in my mind, I like to figure things out on my own. And that way, I like to come with this pretty package of, like, I thought of all the different angles. I thought of the best use case and the worst use case. And as much as that was delightful for me, I noticed that the people in engineering would kind of check a box too, and they'd be like, okay, done. And then we might get to a certain point, and they would be like, "Oh, well..." one time when I was building something for Beachbody, and, again, it was on Android, and it was the search. And I didn't think anything of it. I was just like, oh yeah, top result, then stack rank alphabetically. And then I hadn't thought about new content. And I remember thinking, like, why didn't my engineer say this? Because this is something that we do on iOS. And they said, "Well, you never asked us." [laughs] And I was there, you know, "But you work on the product too." And they're like, "Oh yeah, but you run the show. So this is what you wanted, so this is what I coded." And I just remember feeling like I had egg on my face in a meeting because now we had all this new content coming out, and the search results weren't accommodating for new content. They were accommodating for the existing metadata. And I just remember thinking like, never again. And from a DevOps perspective, I think of there's a lot of change in the industry where we also have product ops people as well. And I think of it as additional layering; it can be good and bad. I think there are positives and advantages. I think there are always growing points. And I think you have to give what is the ultimate goal? Like, if you do have a DevOps team, are they also early in the iteration? Are they part of the brainstorms? That's how I run my small pod. We have design, analytics, and engineering part of our early brainstorms. So instead of us kind of holding our ideas in a huddle, we will kind of tee up, let's say, our top five and say, "Hey, directionally, this is the direction that we're going." And we're framing it to the problems that are most important for us to solve. So we don't turn it into a hackathon where people are trying to build a spaceship in a brainstorm. That's not the goal. The goal is that, hey, we have these particular problems. This is the direction that we want to go in, and this is how we carry it through. And then, what do you guys think? And then we're in a Miro board in real-time. And we put the timer on and then get everybody's opinions. And some product groups I've seen where product team doesn't actually talk to the engineering. They just talk to the technical PM, which then translates out what the actual specs and requirements are. I haven't been part of that type of org yet in my career. I have been traditionally where it's a one-to-one ratio where if there's a product manager, there's going to be a data and analytics analyst assigned to them. There's going to be an engineer assigned to them. There's also going to be a designer. And that's been my sweet spot. And I've had a lot of gains and tractions for that. In my mind, ideas can come from anywhere. It doesn't have to start with product, but product is going to be the leader. And I don't want to think of it as a gatekeeping situation. But we're the ones that are going to drive it through with our own cross-functional teams as a partnership. So I hope that answers the question about DevOps; I'm not sure. Sometimes I can get into a little bit of a tangent [laughs] and start talking about my own experience. VICTORIA: I love talking about it because some product, people will say nothing. [laughter] KASHA: Oh really? VICTORIA: And I'm like, no, you're supposed to talk to people. Bring everybody in, and that's the whole philosophy of it. And I like that you mentioned product ops and design ops as well, thinking about how you can automate the process of what you're doing or how the information flows across your team. I'm sure with your designs and end product, and everything is more on the product ops side. KASHA: And I think having an ops, you know, it does have like one central point of contact. So if you want to think about alleviating steps, or reducing the white noise, or the friction that you may have in the organization, you have one kind of point of contact. And that person will own it, and they'll almost become a mini pod and then distribute the information, which is definitely like a gain and a positive. I just wonder on the reverse side, though, how does that engineer or how does that designer then surface, "Hey, what about this?" Or "I think this is a better way," or "Actually, we tested this two years ago, and the results weren't great." And so that's the only thing where how does that two way-communication go back and forth when you have ops? I think ops definitely gives more structure. You're definitely in a high performance. Everybody knows what their marching orders are. We know who's on first. And we also know from an accountability and an escalation process where all these pieces are working together. So I can see the benefits to it. I'm not opposed to it. I just want to make sure that the people that are actually building the product also have time to have a say and have an opinion. And whether that helps change me, I want to at least hear the feedback first. And then as a product leader and as a product manager, it's up to that person to make the decision of, like, okay, you know what? I've thought about this looking at the data, or this person raised a really significant point that I hadn't considered. I do think that we need to think about this and focus. That's the advantage for me, I feel like, of having that bottoms-up approach to development and then running your teams. VICTORIA: I think that makes sense. And you're right; I think it can be successful. But I think there's a good warning there about...and people do this with DevOps teams as well where they create a DevOps team and then put them in a silo, right? [laughs] KASHA: Yeah. VICTORIA: And that's kind of missing the point about the whole thing. It's like we want to power these people. KASHA: Yeah, everything new is old again. I remember when I didn't even talk to an engineer. And I remember...and this was early in my product when I had the product specialist. I would be at my cube writing requirements. I thought they were great. And then we switched to an agile format, and I remember going into a meeting thinking, okay, we're just going to go over the stuff that's next. And they had all these questions for me, and it terrified me. [laughter] Because it made me think, like, maybe I don't know what I'm talking about or, yeah, I didn't think about the error messaging. Oh, okay, yeah, what happens if someone loses internet connection during that session and they've started the process? Oh, I don't know. What should happen? [laughs] And so there were all these kinds of questions. But before, I would just process my requirements, put it in a Jira ticket. And then you might get some Jira comments, but there wasn't this back-and-forth in real-time. And then, I had to really step up and write my requirements better. Because at that point, I had just had like, oh, this happens in check one. This happens at step two. And then step three, the end. That was my own kind of naive perspective at the time when I was writing requirements. And I didn't know that the engineers had all these questions because we had that layer of...they didn't call it a DevOps person. I think they called it, you know, an engineering lead where he would just take the tickets, and then they were doing their own sub tickets to make it make sense. And so then, when we started to transition into more of an agile and rating things and giving value to them, I really had to change. And it helped me grow. And it was definitely uncomfortable. But it definitely pushed me into thinking, okay, someone's reading this. They're an engineer. They're not thinking about this. How can I get as clear as possible but also still think about the consumer or the persona that I'm thinking about that is trying to solve this problem? VICTORIA: That makes sense. It reminds me of one of my first jobs actually was in Washington, D.C., which you went to undergrad there. I would actually pass by Howard University on the bus every day to work. [laughs] KASHA: Oh wow. [laughs] VICTORIA: I wonder, are you familiar with BisonHacks and their annual hackathon that they have there? I know you're from the film department. But the computer science does a hackathon there every year. KASHA: I am not familiar with that specific one. But I participated; I mean, we have some at Adobe. We have our regular hackathons internally. But I would love to hear more about the one that you're describing. It sounds pretty fascinating. Do they have an ultimate goal? Are they building from an existing product, or is this something new? VICTORIA: I think it's something new. So I believe that they come together to create solutions to help improve the livelihood of the DMV community. KASHA: Oh wow. VICTORIA: So I think every year they make it a different purpose. KASHA: Okay, I got it. VICTORIA: But they interact with students and do different projects. And it's a super fun organization. So, yeah, I'll send you a link. We'll share it in the show notes as well. [laughs] KASHA: Yeah. I love it. I love it. This podcast I'm already growing [laughter] in the short time we've talked, so I love that. VICTORIA: And we're coming to the end of our time here. I have one final question before I ask you if you have any other final takeaways. [laughs] But what are you most excited about on the roadmap for Adobe Express that you have coming? KASHA: Well, I'm excited...gosh, what can I share? [laughs] I'm like, I see legal tapping me on the shoulder. [laughs] I'm excited that we are making so many improvements to really simplify the experience and that we're also diversifying our use cases of the types of people that will be coming to the platform. So when I say that, let's say we've been focused on what we call the social creator, or the small business owner, or hustler, I really want to lean more into that and expand that. We also have more of what we call our pro users coming to Adobe Express. So if you think of someone that's a professional graphic designer that may need something where they need to have a collaborator, we're enhancing that process. And then also, I'm most excited coming into 2023 is that Adobe's Express is going to be what we think of as the doorway to all the Adobe ecosystem. So whether you start with Express on a small scale and building out a template, you can really grow with this product. And whether you use it for your everyday either social needs or even in your everyday work or marketing, you can start to have people come to the platform and collaborate on it. We have so many exciting things that it's interesting because my team is focused on activation and repeat engagement, and how do those two worlds kind of marry each other? Getting the user in from having them on a first great day one experience and then carrying them through for when they return. And one thing that I'm excited for is that we've had this recent pivot, and this came out of user research. We don't have to wait for the user to leave the platform to remind them of all the great things that we can do. And I'm really excited about having machine learning capabilities on the platform; where, if your next step is this, what's the next best available action? And then how does that help enhance not only your experience of the product but then also starting to plant those seeds of you can schedule this in advance or creating this type of content once a week will drive exponentially your growth on your platform? And that, to me, is making us stronger and really looking at it not only from I want the consumer to do these series of high-value actions, but I really want to see them grow on their own personal platform level. And here's a tool that can help you do everything that you need to. And whether you're someone that posts once a week, or whether you're someone in an office that is collaborating for a marketing meeting, or if you're a professional that has something that, you know, I just really want to use a template. I have an aesthetic. I know how to use Photoshop. I know how to use Illustrator. But let me put this in Express. I can send it to the client. They can make comments, and then they can also feel like they're part of the creative process. That makes me happy because I was this fine arts major. It feels like 100 years ago. [laughs] And I remember thinking like, oh wow, I love these products. They're expensive, or saving up for them. And then now there are so many different plans. There are so many different ways. And I would have loved an opportunity to have a free product that allowed me to just start to understand my own type of style and capabilities without having this feeling that I have to be a designer and that everything has to be perfect. So I'm excited for that. We have so much growth planned, new, exciting ways on the platform. And, also, you'll see some new looks. I can't share too much more than that. [laughter] So I hope the little bit of tidbit doesn't get me in trouble. But sometimes you got to break some rules. You got to break some eggs to make an omelet. [laughter] VICTORIA: Any other final thoughts for our listeners today? KASHA: I would love for, you know, to give me feedback. I always love doing these. I'm active on LinkedIn. You can find me at Kasha Stewart. Shoot me a note. I get a healthy amount of mail, but I promise I will reply back to you if you have questions and what your biggest challenges are. Check out Adobe Express. It's free, by the way. And continue to, you know; I just remember being this, like, early in my career and having these questions, and at different points, I was afraid to ask questions because I was like, I don't want to sound silly. Or maybe I'm not understanding that, or, you know, maybe I should have been a CS major. And I say to people now, like, you have to have a starting point. You never know what is next on the horizon. Or that everybody had been thinking about that and they were just waiting for the person to raise their hand. That's one of the things that I always want to encourage people and to check out these products, communities. And thank you to this podcast for allowing me to share my journey and my story. It's always a pleasure. I learned something, and I'm like, oh yeah, I did actually do that. But that was a while ago that; I might forget. So it's good. It's like having my own little mini retro. So I thank you for inviting me here and to, you know, share my journey. VICTORIA: Well, thank you. That's a very powerful message, and I appreciate you coming on today to share it with us. You can subscribe to the show and find notes along with a complete transcript for this episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. You can find me on Twitter @victori_ousg. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thank you for listening. We'll see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot, your expert strategy, design, development, and product management partner. We bring digital products from idea to success and teach you how because we care. Learn more at thoughtbot.com. Special Guest: Kasha Stewart.

Karen Hunter Show
Dr. Nneka Sederstrom - Founder & CEO of Uzobi

Karen Hunter Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 30:13


UzObi, Inc. is the first health technology company to specialize in providing ethically guided values-based health care decision-making tools to patients through their providers, insurers and hospital systems. UzObi empowers patients to have their identities and voices at the center of all health care decisions from routine, emergency to end of life medical decisions. Bio: Dr. Nneka Sederstrom received her BA in Philosophy from George Washington University in 2001. She began her career at the Center for Ethics at Medstar Washington Hospital Center in Washington DC the same year. She completed her Masters in Philosophy and Public Policy from Howard University in 2003 and proceeded to begin her PhD studies in Medical Sociology and Race, Class, and Gender Inequalities at the same university. After beginning her PhD studies, she was made Director of the Center for Ethics and Director of the Spiritual Care Department. She proceeded to hold these positions until she left to join Children's Minnesota in March 2016 where she served as the Director of the Clinical Ethics Department for almost 5 years. She has recently joined the executive leadership team at Hennepin Healthcare System as the new Chief Health Equity Officer where she will lead efforts in addressing health disparities, equity, and antiracism in the institution and community. Her PhD is in Sociology with concentrations in Medical Sociology and Race, Class, and Gender Inequality, MPH in Global Health Management, and MA in Philosophy. She is a member of several professional societies and holds a leadership position in CHEST Medicine and the Society of Critical Care Medicine. She is a Fellow of the American College of Chest Physicians and a Fellow of the American College of Critical Care Medicine. She is widely published in Equity and Clinical Ethics and speaks regularly at national and international meetings.  uzobiinc.com 

FriendsLikeUs
Professor Christina Greer and Erin Jackson Visit Friends

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 96:16


This week on friends Professor Christina Greer and Erin Jackson visit friends and talk on MLK's woke speech you don't hear, Mayor Adams, that corrupt republican party, and more!  Erin Jackson is one of the fastest-rising comedians in New York City. She works nightly in the city's top comedy clubs and most recently made her Netflix debut on Season 2 of Tiffany Haddish Presents: They Ready. She currently writes for the hit Netflix show, The Upshaws, and has appeared on Late Night with Seth Meyers, CONAN, The Ellen DeGeneres Show, This Week at the Comedy Cellar, and Last Comic Standing. Erin co-hosted three seasons of Exhale, a panel talk series on the ASPiRE television network, and has been a panelist on sports and pop-culture programs on MSNBC, NFL Network and VH-1. Her comedy album, Grudgery, was released in 2018 and debuted at No. 1 on the iTunes comedy charts. Erin is a proud alumna of Howard University and a die-hard fan of the Philadelphia Eagles. Christina Greer is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University - Lincoln Center (Manhattan) campus. Her research and teaching focus on American politics, Black ethnic politics, campaigns and elections, and public opinion. Prof. Greer's book Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream (Oxford University Press) investigates the increasingly ethnically diverse black populations in the US from Africa and the Caribbean. She finds that both ethnicity and a shared racial identity matter and also affect the policy choices and preferences for black groups. Professor Greer is currently working on a manuscript detailing the political contributions of Barbara Jordan, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Stacey Abrams. She recently co-edited Black Politics in Transition, which explores gentrification, suburbanization, and immigration of Blacks in America. She is a member of the board of The Tenement Museum in NYC,  The Mark Twain House in Hartford, CT, Community Change in Washington, DC, and serves on the Advisory Board at Tufts University. She is a frequent political commentator on several media outlets, primarily MSNBC, WNYC, and NY1, and is often quoted in media outlets such as the NYTimes, Wall Street Journal, and the AP. She is the co-host of the New York centered podcast FAQ-NYC, is a political analyst at thegrio.com and host of the podcast quiz show The Blackest Questions at thegrio.com, is a frequent author and narrator for the TedEd educational series, and also writes a weekly column for The Amsterdam News, one of the oldest black newspapers in the U.S. Prof. Greer received her BA from Tufts University and her MA, MPhil, and PhD in Political Science from Columbia University.   Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), TBS's The Last O.G, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf

Joe Madison the Black Eagle
Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin Integrates Power, Resources, And Responsibility

Joe Madison the Black Eagle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 20:38


Joe Madison celebrates how Lloyd Austin, the first Black U.S. Secretary of Defense, is dismantling racism with a newly-announced research center led by Howard University and other HBCUs.

For the Ages: A History Podcast
Lincoln and Emancipation

For the Ages: A History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 34:14


Edna Greene Medford, professor of history at Howard University, examines the ideas and events that shaped President Lincoln's responses to slavery, following the arc of his ideological development from the beginning of the Civil War, when he aimed to pursue a course of noninterference, to his championing of slavery's destruction before the conflict ended. Throughout this conversation, Medford juxtaposes the president's motivations for advocating freedom with the aspirations of African Americans themselves, restoring African Americans to the center of the story about the struggle for their own liberation. Recorded on December 9, 2022 

Yahoo Sports NFL Podcast
Divisional Round Monday Morning Freestyle: Bengals and Eagles look dominant, Chiefs and 49ers survive and advance

Yahoo Sports NFL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 66:29


Charles Robinson and Frank Schwab recap a weekend of NFL divisional round playoff games that saw the Cincinnati Bengals and Philadelphia Eagles steamroll the Buffalo Bills and New York Giants on their way to championship weekend as the Kansas City Chiefs and San Francisco 49ers earned hard-fought victories over the Jacksonville Jaguars and Dallas Cowboys.2:09 - The 49ers rolled to yet another consecutive victory, this time over the Cowboys. QB Brock Purdy showed he's able to improvise, and this team, led by Coach of the Year candidate Kyle Shanahan, is beginning to look unstoppable. Things are more complicated for the Cowboys, however, who have to navigate a murky offseason and try to accumulate more talent around Dak Prescott, specifically at the wide receiver position.18:25 - The Bengals looked dominant in their victory over the one-time Super Bowl favorite Buffalo Bills. The snow seemed to only affect the Bills as the Bengals run game got going despite a banged up offensive line. The Bills look to make another run next year despite QB Josh Allen's cap hit nearly doubling.32:30 - QB Jalen Hurts looked entirely recovered from his shoulder injury as the Eagles defeated the Giants. The Giants should feel great about the season they had and their future going forward under Head Coach Brian Daboll. The Eagles look like they're just getting started, as they have now won 15 of their 16 games with Hurts at quarterback this season.41:44 - QB Patrick Mahomes looks to have suffered a high ankle sprain as Kansas City defeated Jacksonville. Early indications are that he could play this weekend, but he will almost certainly be less than 100%. Jacksonville should be proud of the season they've had under Head Coach Doug Pederson, and can look forward to welcoming star WR Calvin Ridley next year.55:15 - Charles and Frank give their initial thoughts on the upcoming conference championship games this weekend: 49ers @ Eagles and Bengals @ Chiefs.Please support Terez Paylor's legacy:• Buy an All-Juice Team hoodie or tee from BreakingT.com/Terez. All profits directly fund the Terez A. Paylor scholarship at Howard University.• Donate directly at giving.howard.edu/givenow. Under “Tribute,” please note that your gift is made in memory of Terez A. Paylor. Under “Designation,” click on “Other” and write in “Terez A. Paylor Scholarship.”• Donate directly to the PowerMizzou Journalism Alumni Scholarship in memory of Terez PaylorSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

In All Things
Episode 61: Inclusive leadership with Kim Wells

In All Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 31:39


Dean Weaver, EPC Stated Clerk, welcomes Kim Wells, Executive Director of Executive Education and the Center for Career Excellence at Howard University in Washington, D.C. The two discuss how inclusive leadership does not necessarily mean racial diversity but is the discipline of seeking information from a variety of sources, listening, pausing, and then reflecting.

Public Health On Call
563 - Controversy over Deaths in Custody

Public Health On Call

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 17:06


Dr. Roger Mitchell, the former chief medical examiner of the District of Columbia, and current chief of pathology at Howard University speaks with Dr. Sharfstein about how deaths in custody are classified. Dr. Mitchell has observed that when it comes to understanding the reasons for these deaths, the usual rules of autopsies and death investigations don't always seem to apply. He's leading the charge to understand more about what's happening. 

Urban Sports Scene
Urban Sports Scene Episode 538: Starting Sam Howell, Whether the Wizards Should Trade Kuzma, and HBCU Corner with HU Women's Basketball Coach Ty Grace

Urban Sports Scene

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 60:32


Make sure you listen to our show live every Wednesday night at 8pm EST, Urban Sports Scene Live. Urban Sports Scene is a sports show based out of the DMV (DC, Maryland, Virginia). The sports show provides youthful and fresh insight into all sports. The show stars Wole, Ray and Will T. Show topic/agenda: Reports that the Washington Commanders will go into next season with Sam Howell as the starting QB, whether the Washington Wizards should trade forward Kyle Kuzma, and as part of our HBCU Corner segment we have an interview with Howard University women's basketball coach Ty Grace. Also, check out our Washington Commanders podcast "All Burgundy and Gold Errrything" on Fox Sports Radio 1340 AM and 96.9 FM Hopewell, VA. Check out the Football Garbage Time podcast for all kinds of NFL Football content. If you have any questions or comments email us at TheUrbanSportsScene@gmail.com. You can find all of our stuff below. Stay blessed: iTunes, Google Podcast, Spotify, iHeartRadio, Stitcher, TuneIn. Let's get Social: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Blogs.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dental Marketer
434: Dr. Nkemakonam Egolum | Bowie Oral Surgery

The Dental Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023


This Episode is Sponsored By:CARESTACK | Cloud-Based Dental SoftwareClick the link below and get 1 MONTH FOR FREE + 10% OFF your Annual Subscription + 50% OFF Your Set-up Fee!Check out CARESTACK now: https://lp.carestack.org/thedentalmarketer‍‍Guest: Nkemakonam EgolumPractice Name: Bowie Oral SurgeryCheck out Nkemakonam's Media:‍Instagram: @dr.egolumYouTube ChannelFacebook PageLinkedin Page‍Other Mentions and Links:EssentialismHoward UniversityHoward University HospitalBank of AmericaWells Fargo@thedentalmarketer‍Host: Michael Arias‍Website: The Dental Marketer Join my newsletter: https://thedentalmarketer.lpages.co/newsletter/‍Join this podcast's Facebook Group: The Dental Marketer Society‍‍My Key Takeaways:In the medical field, insurance tends to dictate how treatment is performed. Try not to be overly swayed by insurance in your practice!No matter how good you are at something, rushing procedures puts a strain on quality.Try being self-motivated! You do not need outside approval and affirmation for all of your practice decisions.Nothing beats a personal lunch or dinner with potential referring dentists.Many referring dentists would rather meet you as the Dr. rather than a sales person advocating for you.Permitting is highly time consuming with a practice buildout. Be sure to be proactive and speak with the permitting personnel often!‍Please don't forget to share with us on Instagram when you are listening to the podcast AND if you are really wanting to show us love, then please leave a 5 star review on iTunes! [Click here to leave a review on iTunes]‍

The End of Sport Podcast
Episode 105: Racial Capitalism and Football with Joshua Myers

The End of Sport Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 79:42


Nathan is joined by Joshua Myers, Associate Professor of Africana Studies at Howard University and author of Cedric Robinson: The Time of the Black Radical Tradition and  We Are Worth Fighting For: A History of the Howard University Student Protest of 1989, to talk about Cedric Robinson, racial capitalism, and how we cannot understand football without grappling with intertwined histories of racialization and capitalism.    The conversation explores Josh's brilliant essay in Catapult on his experiences in high school football as a prism for understanding how racial capitalism shapes and constrains those who participate in US football at the high school, college, and professional levels.   You can find Josh's essay in Catapult here.   For a transcription of this episode, please click here. (Updated semi-regularly Credit @punkademic) Research Assistance for The End of Sport provided by Abigail Bomba. __________________________________________________________________________ If you are interested, you can support the show via our Patreon! As always, please like, share, and rate us on your favorite podcast app, and give follow us on Twitter or Instagram. www.TheEndofSport.com    

Cool Soror with Rashan Ali
”Dressing The Part” with Raiyonda Vereen

Cool Soror with Rashan Ali

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 32:30


Costume Designer extraordinaire & Cool Soror of Alpha Kappa Alpha Raiyonda Vereen joins the show as our latest special guest. Tune in as she shares her beginnings in the fashion & entertainment industry to now working with some of the biggest stars. After graduating from Howard University and navigating her way through the fashion and entertainment industry, Raiyonda discovered an entry into the industry in 2002. In 2007, Raiyonda transitioned from styling into costuming & shopping for tv & film. Raiyonda worked as a Buyer and Set Costumer for TV shows & movies such as Single Ladies, Greenleaf, Sundays Best, Ride Along, Hunger Games II, The Bobby Brown Series, and Hidden Figures to name a few. She has been the Assistant Costume Designer for TV shows and movies such as Best Of Enemies, Nobodyʼs Fool, A Fall From Grace, Madeaʼs Family Funeral, The Have & Have Nots and the list goes on. From this experience, Raiyonda applied all that she learned, which eventually carried her into the position as a Costume Designer. Raiyonda is currently the head of the Costume Department for Tyler Perryʼs shows The Oval, Ruthless, Assisted Living and All The Queen's Men.   Follow Raiyonda on IG @raiyonda Stay connected at: www.CoolSoror.com Instagram, Facebook, Twitter @rashanali Instagram, Facebook, Twitter @coolsoror Watch on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLj_sI6lEq2DbgVUX2uR_Uk5reKu5o6Ccf

Yahoo Sports NFL Podcast
Divisional round preview, coaching carousel news + new Titans & Cardinals GM hires

Yahoo Sports NFL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 59:25


Charles Robinson is joined by Charles McDonald and Jori Epstein to recap the latest news around the NFL as the head coach and GM hiring cycle kicks into full gear and to preview the 2023 divisional round of the NFL playoffs.The trio start off by diving into some of the latest news around the NFL. Los Angeles Chargers OC Joe Lombardi was fired, but this might be a good thing for QB Justin Herbert, as he can have a fresh start with a new offense without losing the stability that comes with Head Coach Brandon Staley returning for the 2023 season. Detroit Lions OC Ben Johnson announced he's staying in Detroit for 2023, which is fantastic news for Lions fans. Michigan HC Jim Harbaugh has said he will not be returning to the NFL for the 2023 season, but his proven track record as an NFL head coach means fans and front offices alike will likely continue pursuing him in the coming years. The Tennessee Titans and Arizona Cardinals have their new general managers, as former San Francisco 49ers Director of Player Personnel Ran Carthon heads to Nashville and former Tennessee Titans Director of Player Personnel Monti Ossenfort heads to Glendale. Charles Robinson has heard great things about Carthon's leadership ability, but he's concerned about the future of Kyler Murray and the Cardinals given the turmoil within the organization over the past year.Charles, Jori and Charles move on to discuss an intriguing slate of matchups in the divisional round this Saturday and Sunday, as the group believes the Jacksonville Jaguars may have a shot against Patrick Mahomes and the dominant Kansas City Chiefs if Trevor Lawrence is at the top of his game. The New York Giants could keep their matchup close against the top-seed Philadelphia Eagles, but the Eagles roster looks better at nearly every position. The group is excited for the Cincinnati Bengals to take on the Buffalo Bills, but it'll be important to watch the injury report for the Bengals, as their depleted offensive line could get overwhelmed without the help of OT Jonah Williams. Finally, the Dallas Cowboys look to keep rolling against the San Francisco 49ers. The key to this game will be whether or not QB Dak Prescott can keep his stellar play from last week rolling against possibly the best defense in the NFL.00:30 - Latest coaching news: Chargers OC Joe Lombardi fired, Tampa Bay Buccaneers OC Byron Leftwich keeps his position for now, and Lions OC Ben Johnson & Michigan HC Jim Harbaugh decide to remain in their positions for next season22:08 - New GMs! Former 49ers Director of Player Personnel Ran Carthon hired as Titans general manager and Former Titans Director of Player Personnel Monti Ossenfort hired as Cardinals general manager36:14 - Divisional Round Preview37:43 - Jaguars at Chiefs: Does Trevor Lawrence and his offense have the firepower to keep up with Kansas City?42:53 - Giants at Eagles: Can Brian Daboll work his magic against a dominant Eagles roster?47:04 - Bengals at Bills: Can Joe Burrow overcome his offensive line injuries to outgun Josh Allen and the dangerous Bills offense?49:26 - Cowboys at 49ers: Can Dak Prescott carve up the best defense in the NFL?Please support Terez Paylor's legacy:• Buy an All-Juice Team hoodie or tee from BreakingT.com/Terez. All profits directly fund the Terez A. Paylor scholarship at Howard University.• Donate directly at giving.howard.edu/givenow. Under “Tribute,” please note that your gift is made in memory of Terez A. Paylor. Under “Designation,” click on “Other” and write in “Terez A. Paylor Scholarship.”• Donate directly to the PowerMizzou Journalism Alumni Scholarship in memory of Terez PaylorSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

This Academic Life
Ep.46 – Academic Service

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 17:44


Every academic has to do service at some point in their early career. We explain the inner workings of picking services that are both enjoyable and beneficial for you career as well as our experiences with service. Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on Facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newell (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Editing team: Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Edited by Angella Chen Edited by Jared Duffy Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Karen Hunter Show
Dr. Danielle Hairston - Psychiatry Residency Director at Howard University

Karen Hunter Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 43:24


Yahoo Sports NFL Podcast
Dak Prescott and Cowboys triumph, Brett Maher's kicking woes, Tom Brady's future

Yahoo Sports NFL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 37:38


Charles Robinson and Frank Schwab recap the Cowboys' triumphant defeat over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and look ahead to next week's divisional round games.The Dallas Cowboys rolled to a pretty smooth victory over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Monday Night despite four missed extra points by kicker Brett Maher. Charles and Frank discuss what this mean wins for head coach Mike McCarthy and the rest of the team as they take on the dominant San Francisco 49ers next weekend in the divisional round.The duo also discuss what may be next for Tom Brady, and whether or not Brady can expect to improve much over his situation next season.There are an exciting slate of divisional round games next weekend, and Charles and Frank give a quick preview of each, including their thoughts on whether or not the Jaguars can give the Chiefs a game, if the Giants can hang against the Eagles, what to expect in Bengals vs. Bills and more.00:30 - The Cowboys cruised to victory over the Buccaneers7:02 - Tom Brady's future: where will he end up next season?15:30 - The Cowboys: What happened with Kicker Brett Maher?23:55 - Quick Divisional Round Preview: Jaguars vs. Chiefs, Giants vs. Eagles, Cowboys vs. 49ers and Bills vs. BengalsPlease support Terez Paylor's legacy:• Buy an All-Juice Team hoodie or tee from BreakingT.com/Terez. All profits directly fund the Terez A. Paylor scholarship at Howard University.• Donate directly at giving.howard.edu/givenow. Under “Tribute,” please note that your gift is made in memory of Terez A. Paylor. Under “Designation,” click on “Other” and write in “Terez A. Paylor Scholarship.”• Donate directly to the PowerMizzou Journalism Alumni Scholarship in memory of Terez PaylorSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Latino USA
The Call Is Coming From Inside the House

Latino USA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 42:10


Last November, Maria Hinojosa visited Howard University in Washington, DC to celebrate its inaugural Democracy Summit. The Summit was organized by the Center for Journalism and Democracy, which was founded by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones. Maria sat down with journalist Jodi Rave Spotter Bear and historian Kathy Roberts Forde for a panel discussion about the history of journalistic blindspots and how the mainstream media often fails to see the dangers of white nationalism. It was one of many panel discussions that took place that day. We bring you an edited version of the conversation, moderated by Professor Dr. Jason Johnson.

The Eating Disorder Trap Podcast
#126: Difficult Conversations To Have with Dr. Charlynn Small & Dr. Mazella Fuller (part two)

The Eating Disorder Trap Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 21:02


Dr. Mazella Fuller is a clinical associate on staff at the Counseling and Psychological Services of Duke University. Dr. Fuller provides clinical services, consultation, and training for social work and psychology interns. She has worked in education for many years as a high school teacher, adjunct instructor, consultant, and clinician. Dr. Fuller is an integrative health coach, and graduate of Duke Integrative Medicine. She is a certified member and approved supervisor (CEDS-S) of the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals (iaedp™) and completed the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Program through the Duke Integrative Medicine/Duke University Medical Center. Her clinical focus areas are brief therapy and young adult development, couples, gender and social justice, equity and inclusion, and women's leadership development. Dr. Fuller received her MSW from Smith College for Social Work in Northampton, Massachusetts, Amherst. Dr. Fuller has served as a member of the advisory board for the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD). She is the Co-Editor of Treating Black Women with Eating Disorders: A Clinician Guide. She is also the Co-Founder and Principal of the Institute for Antiracism and Equity. Dr. Charlynn Small, PhD, LCP, CEDS-S is Assistant Director for Health Promotions at the University of Richmond's Counseling and Psychological Services in Virginia. She received her PhD from Howard University's School of Education. Dr. Small is a member of the Board of Directors of the International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals Foundation (iaedpTM) and is a certified member and Approved Supervisor (CEDS-S) of iaedpTM. She co-founded the Foundation's African-American Eating Disorders Professionals (AAEDP) Committee and has also served on the Advisory Board for the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD). She is a frequent speaker at national and international conferences on the treatment of eating disorders in college populations. Dr. Small is co-founder of the Institute for Antiracism and Equity and also is the co-editor of Treating Black Women with Eating Disorders: A Clinician's Guide, Routledge, Taylor & Francis (July, 2021). We discuss topics including: Understanding Cultural Humility The importance of having a sense of belonging Learning to be uncomfortable with having conversations that make you feel uncomfortable Doing your own work and not being judgmental Learn about your own culture, ethnicity and values SHOW NOTES: https://www.antiracismandequity.com/ (book) Treating Black Women with Eating Disorders: A Clinician Guide csmall@richmond.edu mazella.fuller@duke.edu www.membershare.iaedp.com (African-American Eating Disorders Professionals (AAEDP) Committee and People of Color  (POC-AAEDP) Subcommittee ____________________________________________ If you have any questions regarding the topics discussed on this podcast, please reach out to Robyn directly via email: rlgrd@askaboutfood.com You can also connect with Robyn on social media by following her on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn. If you enjoyed this podcast, please leave a review on iTunes and subscribe. Visit Robyn's private practice website where you can subscribe to her free monthly insight newsletter, and receive your FREE GUIDE “Maximizing Your Time with Those Struggling with an Eating Disorder”. Your Recovery Resource, Robyn's new online course for navigating your loved one's eating disorder, is available now! For more information on Robyn's book “The Eating Disorder Trap”, please visit the Official "The Eating Disorder Trap" Website. “The Eating Disorder Trap” is also available for purchase on Amazon.

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
David Schwartzman On War In Ukraine

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 9:52


David Schwartzman is an ecosocialist activist and Professor Emeritus at Howard University. For the weekly peace bucket at the Hudson Mohawk Magazine, he talks about the war in Ukraine with Mark Dunlea.

Yahoo Sports NFL Podcast
Wild Card Sunday Night Freestyle: Daniel Jones, Trevor Lawrence, Brock Purdy impress in first playoff action; Chargers & Ravens have unanswered questions

Yahoo Sports NFL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 62:35


Charles Robinson is joined by Frank Schwab to recap five of the six games from a surprisingly tight wild card weekend.Many of the young quarterbacks shined in their first playoff appearances, including Daniel Jones, Trevor Lawrence and Brock Purdy, who all led their teams to victories.Charles and Frank also address the latest news with Lamar Jackson's contract, what's next for Brandon Staley and the Chargers, whether or not there's cause for concern with Josh Allen and the Buffalo Bills and what kind of contract we can expect for Giants QB Daniel Jones and Seahawks QB Geno Smith.1:30 Baltimore Ravens fall to Cincinnati Bengals; what's the latest on Lamar Jackson's contract?15:20 New York Giants narrowly upset the Minnesota Vikings as Daniel Jones puts on a show27:10 Jacksonville Jaguars pulled off the third largest comeback in NFL playoff history to defeat Brandon Staley and the Los Angeles Chargers39:35 Buffalo Bills defeated the Miami Dolphins despite a heroic effort from Mike McDaniel and his third-string quarterback Skylar Thompson47:40 Brock Purdy and the San Francisco 49ers looked dominant in their victory over Geno Smith and the Seattle SeahawksPlease support Terez Paylor's legacy:• Buy an All-Juice Team hoodie or tee from BreakingT.com/Terez. All profits directly fund the Terez A. Paylor scholarship at Howard University.• Donate directly at giving.howard.edu/givenow. Under “Tribute,” please note that your gift is made in memory of Terez A. Paylor. Under “Designation,” click on “Other” and write in “Terez A. Paylor Scholarship.”• Donate directly to the PowerMizzou Journalism Alumni Scholarship in memory of Terez PaylorCheck out all the episodes of You Pod to Win the Game and the rest of the Yahoo Sports podcast family at https://apple.co/3zEuTQj or at Yahoo Sports PodcastsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The sistersovercomingandrising's Podcast
Ep 51: Seasonal Resets to Keep your Health on Track

The sistersovercomingandrising's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 55:01


As seasons change it is a great reminder for us to check in with our bodies. In the winter season, many of us slow down and go into hibernation mode. In this podcast episode, Dr. Stephanie and her guest Janice Saunders discuss how we can be very intentional about our health every time the seasons change. Janice Saunders is the creator of the Seasonal Healthy Habits Collective and she will engage us in a discussion around how to reset our health. Janice Saunders is an award-winning salesperson and creator of the Seasonal Healthy Habits Collective. In her 30 plus year career, Janice is known for her unparalleled enthusiasm for life, teaching people to motivate themselves from within and helping them to develop superior systems to live the life they desire. Janice, born and raised in the Bronx, was also an award-winning high school swimmer turned Howard University graduate who integrates her experiences as a collegiate athlete into the work that she does. As a big believer in personal and professional development, Janice earned both her MBA and Life Coaching certificate. Her thirty plus year career in the pharmaceutical industry has given her a birds eye view into how devastating illness can be on your life and career. Contact Janice ----more----Contact Dr. Stephanie

Weekend Roundup
Deadly Storms, Classified Documents, King Birthday Amid Turmoil

Weekend Roundup

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 39:59


On the "CBS News Weekend Roundup," host Allison Keyes gets the latest on the global weather forecast, and the deadly storms that have been roaring across the nation, from CBS News meteorologist David Parkinson. CBS's Steven Portnoy on President Biden's classified documents. In the Kaleidoscope, Allison speaks with Howard University professor Greg Carr about the meaning of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday this year, and whether the civil rights leader's narrative has been distorted.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talking Out Your Glass podcast
Between Seeing and Knowing: Collaborative Work by Anna Boothe and Nancy Cohen

Talking Out Your Glass podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 62:23


Comprised of hundreds of objects fabricated using multiple glass processes, Between Seeing and Knowing is a large-scale, site-specific installation by artists Anna Boothe and Nancy Cohen. The installation is on view now through February 5, 2023 at Bergstrom-Mahler Museum of Glass, Neenah, Wisconsin. Created as part of a collaborative residency that took place at the Studio of the Corning Museum of Glass (CMoG) in 2012, the artwork has been previously exhibited at Accola Griefen Gallery, New York, the Philadelphia Art Alliance, and Philadelphia's International Airport. At its core, Between Seeing and Knowing is the result of both artists' long-standing interest in and in-depth study of Tibetan Buddhist thangka paintings and the integration of their otherwise very separate studio practices. Thangkas are ordered cosmological paintings, often scrolls, created for the purpose of meditation and composed of numerous visual elements. This installation reinterprets the symbolism in the paintings to create new work that reflects the organizational structure and palette of the paintings, as well as the sense of expansiveness and lack of hard resolution characteristic of Buddhist ideology.  Boothe and Cohen state: “Overall, through this collaboration, its subject matter, and our chosen methodology, we seek to understand, both visually and viscerally, another cultural perspective or expression unlike our own, through our dissection and re-assemblage of elements unique to that culture. Just as collaboration brings forth the opportunity for a deep exchange of ideas and the development of sympathetic approaches to doing what one does, pragmatically and metaphorically, this is our attempt at bridging gaps between cultural approaches to explain the unexplainable.” With degrees in sculpture from Rhode Island School of Design and glass from Tyler School of Art/Temple University, Boothe has worked with glass since 1980. Included in the permanent collections of CMoG, Racine Art Museum and Tacoma Museum of Art, her cast glass work has been exhibited widely, including recently at the Albuquerque Art Museum, Fuller Craft Museum, Kemerer Museum of Decorative Arts and the Hotel Nani Mocenigo Palace in Venice, as well as at several villas in Italy's Veneto Region. Boothe taught in Tyler's glass program for 16 years, helped develop and chaired Salem Community College's glass art program and has exhibited and/or lectured internationally in Australia, Belgium, Israel, Italy, Japan, Switzerland, Taiwan and Turkey, as well as at numerous US universities and glass-focused schools. She served on the Board and as President of the Glass Art Society from 1998-2006 and is a former Director of Glass at Philadelphia's National Liberty Museum.     With an MFA in Sculpture from Columbia University and a BFA in Ceramics from Rochester Institute of Technology, Cohen has been working with glass (among other materials) since 1990. Her work examines resiliency in relation to the environment and the human body. Cohen's work has been widely exhibited throughout the United States and is represented in collections such as The Montclair Museum, The Weatherspoon Art Gallery, and The Zimmerli Museum. She has completed large-scale, site-specific projects for The Staten Island Botanical Garden, The Noyes Museum of Art, The Katonah Museum, Howard University, and others. Recent solo exhibitions include Walking a Line at Kathryn Markel Fine Arts in Chelsea, New York, and Nancy Cohen: Atlas of Impermanence at the Visual Arts Center in Summit, New Jersey. Group exhibitions include All We Can Save: Climate Conversations at the Nurture Nature Center in Easton, Pennsylvania, and ReVision and Respond at The Newark Museum. Cohen is a 2022 recipient of a Mid-Atlantic Fellowship from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. She currently teaches drawing and sculpture at Queens College. In a review of Boothe and Cohen's collaborative project, Elizabeth Crawford of N.Y Arts Magazine, wrote: : “Intuitively proximate to Buddhist philosophy, the piece is about the inter-relatedness of things. Each glass part appears sentient and in direct communication with the others. In a Thangka painting, none of the forms are meant to be isolated but work together to invite the viewer to take the painting in at once, as a whole. Similarly, all of the pieces in Boothe and Cohen's installation contribute to a sense of continuous breath or movement which is enhanced by light reflecting through the glass.” For this innovative work the artists used an astounding range of glass processes including kiln-casting, slumping, fusing, blowing, hot-sculpting and sand-casting.