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Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 21, 2022: Stribling Avenue resident sues city seeking overturning of recent rezoning; Albemarle growth management survey closes Sunday night

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 13:38


This 141st day of 2022 also has the distinction of being National Waitstaff Day, and in this time of college and university graduations, my thoughts are with those people who bring food and drink to celebrations all over the globe. For most of my career in journalism, I supplemented that work by being attentive, detail-oriented, and as accurate as possible as I served customers and clients. That experience really wasn’t that much different from any of the work that goes into every single installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement, and I’m your host, Sean Tubbs. This is episode 383, and to help us all eventually get to episode 838, consider becoming a paying subscriber! On today’s program:Time is running out to tell Albemarle County your thoughts on the growth management policy that some would say has limited sprawl, and others would say has limited development Another land use lawsuit has been filed against the city of CharlottesvilleCharlottesville seeks a firm to help hire a new police chief And the spring COVID-19 surge continues with cases rising in Virginia and beyond Shout-out to Town Crier ProductionsIn today’s writer-and-publisher supported shout-out, Town Crier Productions, is the umbrella organization responsible for this Charlottesville Community Engagement newsletter. I founded the company two years ago to support my interest in bringing the community as much information as possible about local government, land use, the environment, economic development, and so much more. The company is still just getting started, and if you’d like to help, consider a subscription through Substsck, or support Town Crier Productions through Patreon. There are also other sponsorship opportunities available as the number of offerings increases. To learn more, visit the Information Charlottesville archive and click on the Support the Info button. My sincere thank you to the hundreds of subscribers who have signed on so far! COVID-19 updateOn Friday, the Virginia Department of Health reported another 3,847 cases bringing the seven-day average of new cases to 3,157. The seven-day percent positivity increased to 15.6 percent, up from 9.1 percent three weeks ago. Nationwide, the trend is toward more cases and more hospitalizations according to the Centers for Disease Control’s COVID dashboard. That tool also shows a trend toward fewer deaths per day with 242 a day reported on Thursday night. That could change as death is a lagging indicator as explained by Dr. Costi Sifri, the director of hospital epidemiology at the University of Virginia Health System. “As we see the summer surge start to move out of the northeast which is a highly vaccinated and COVID-experienced population to other parts of the country, we have concerns in the public health community that maybe what we’ve seen so far may not hold as true as the surge moves to the southeast,” Dr. Sifri said. This week, the Blue Ridge Health District discontinued its local dashboard for COVID data from within its boundaries. This follows the Virginia Department of Heath’s retirement of four dashboards. “The CDC dashboard is considered the standard when it comes to cases by vaccination status, as the definition of vaccination status is rapidly changing nationwide,” reads a newsletter from the Blue Ridge Health District. You can find local data on the VDH dashboard by selecting the appropriate geographic region on the cases tab. Children between the age of 5 and 11 are now eligible for boosters of the Pfizer vaccine. Appointments in the Blue Ridge Health District can be made online. Read the release on the Centers for Disease Control website for more information. There will be a community remembrance on Tuesday, May 24, at 7 p.m. at the outdoor ampitheater at Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital for those who died from COVID-19 hosted by area health care providers. (Facebook event page)Charlottesville opening up search for new police chiefNearly ten months since former Charlottesville police chief RaShall Brackney was fired by former City Manager Chip Boyles, the city is seeking a permanent replacement. On Friday, the city issued a request for proposals for a firm to conduct an executive search. “The City is seeking a consultant to assist the City Manager through the process of hiring a new Chief of Police who embodies the principles of 21st Century Policing and has an anti-racist focus,” reads the request for proposals. As part of the work, the selected firm will also seek community input on what the “desired characteristics and qualifications” for such a person would be. The solicitation states this will include a survey and in-person meetings. The firm will also be responsible for conducting background checks on all of the finalists. “The Chief of Police is hired by and reports to the City Manager, but upon hire will be officially confirmed by the City Council,” the request continues. The department is currently being led by Acting Police Chief Latroy Durette.The city is being run by interim City Manager Michael C. Rogers.  The closing date for the executive search firm is June 15. Lawsuit filed against City of Charlottesville for rezoning of 240 Stribling A person who lives on property on Stribling Avenue has filed suit against the Charlottesville City Council seeking declaratory judgment that the rezoning of 240 Stribling Avenue in April was illegal. (read the complaint)“During the Planning Commission and Council meetings, the large amount of tax revenue to be gained from increasing the density was discussed as the primary reason for backing this ordinance,” reads paragraph eight of the suit, which was filed on May 18 and served to the city a day later. Charlottesville City Council approved the rezoning on April 18, which will allow up to 170 units on about 12 acres in the Fry’s Spring neighborhood. (read a story)The plaintiff is Cabell Marshall, who is representing herself in the matter. The suit states that Marshall “occupies a house” across from 240 Stribling, but does not specify which one until the signature at the end of the document. Much of the complaint repeats testimony made by opponents of the project, such as increased exhaust fumes and additional traffic. The suit filed on May 18 also argues that an agreement between the city and Southern Development to pay for the upfront costs of upgrading Stribling Avenue is also invalid. “Many neighbors on Stribling Avenue felt overwhelmed by [Charlie Armstrong]’s seemingly unfair advantage in getting advance encouragement directly from the city,” reads paragraph 13. “Virginia Code Section 2.3-3103 prohibits a city employee or someone in an advisory agency from using for his own benefit or that another party confidential information that he has acquired by reason of his public position and which is not available to the public.” The complaint also argues that the public hearing was invalid because it was held while Council meetings were still remote. There’s also an argument the city has not done enough to upgrade city streets, such as the intersection of Stribling Avenue and Jefferson Park Avenue.One of the first legal questions will be whether Marshall has legal standing to bring the suit forward. The owner of the house where she lives is John C. Marshall, who is not named as a part in the suit. He owns two other properties on Stribling Avenue as well as three other throughout city limits. In today’s other two shout-outs Code for Charlottesville is seeking volunteers with tech, data, design, and research skills to work on community service projects. Founded in September 2019, Code for Charlottesville has worked on projects with the Legal Aid Justice Center, the Charlottesville Fire Department, and the Charlottesville Office of Human Rights. Visit codeforcville.org to learn about those projects. The final comes from another Patreon supporter who wants you to go out and read a local news story written by a local journalist. Whether it be the Daily Progress, Charlottesville Tomorrow, C-Ville Weekly, NBC29, CBS19, WINA, Charlottesville Inclusive Media, or some other place I’ve not mentioned - the community depends on a network of people writing about the community. Go learn about this place today!Albemarle closing survey on growth management policy Like many localities across Virginia’s Fifth District including Nelson County and Danville, Albemarle County is currently reviewing its Comprehensive Plan. State law requires localities to prepare such plans and update them on a periodic basis. Albemarle is reviewing its plan in a four-phase process and the first phase will take a look at the county’s growth management policy. A survey for input closes on Sunday at midnight. “The current Comp Plan directs new residential, commercial, retail, office, and industrial development into the Development Areas,” reads the first part of a StoryMap that seeks to explain the history of the growth management policy. “The Rural Area is intended to be used for agriculture, natural resource protection, and some residential homes.”That’s roughly five percent of the county’s 726 square miles. Albemarle’s first Comprehensive Plan in 1971, and originally envisioned a much larger development area.  This was at a time when Charlottesville still had the ability to annex county land if it could prove to a judge that the city would be able to provide urban services more efficiently. However, subsequent plans reduced that area due to concerns such as siltation at the South Fork Rivanna Reservoir, which opened in 1967 and soon began to fill in. Another issue was the high cost to build water and sewer infrastructure to remote areas. Several villages have been removed since, such as the ones in Earlysville, Ivy, North Garden, and Stony Point. In the early 90’s, four areas were added including the Village of Rivanna, the North Fork Research Park, and what is now being developed as North Pointe. For the full history, read part two of the StoryMap. It’s well worth a read as the county considers changes. “With an evaluation of the County’s Growth Management Policy, perhaps one of the most important factors to consider is how the policy is impacting the well-being of County residents and whether the policy is leading to equitable outcomes across different geographies within the County, such as residents in the Rural Area compared to residents in Development Area, or across different demographic groups such as age and race,” reads another portion of part 2.The survey closes Sunday night. (fill out the survey)Help Ting help support Town Crier productions!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 20, 2022: Charlottesville City Council presented with information on who is renting from the city and how much they are paying

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 16:51


There are 32 days left until the summer solstice which will mark the longest time this year that the rays of our star will soak our area of the planet with light and other forms of radiation. However, this is the first day of the year when temperature gauges on the Fahrenheit scale will come very close to triple digits. What will Charlottesville Community Engagement say about the matter in this May 20, 2022 edition of the program? Very little, but the host, Sean Tubbs, is sincere in wishing everyone well in the heat to come. On today’s program:A historical marker is unveiled at the Central Library in downtown Charlottesville to honor the legal battle to admit a Black man to the University of Virginia Law School Charlottesville City Council is briefed on efforts to get a handle on what property the city leases out and whether all of the tenants are paying their fair shareFifth District Republicans will meet tomorrow to select a nominee for the U.S. House of Representatives And work on a Regional Transit Vision will culminate next week in a long presentation to regional officials about what could happen if the area found a new mechanism for more funding for expanded transit Shout-out for an ACHS program on the Fields of Honor This year, the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society has been working with a group called the Fields of Honor to identify soldiers who were killed in action in the Second World War. Since February, ACHS researchers have helped locate several photographs of the fallen, including that of Private Clarence Edward McCauley who was tracked down through high school records. There are 18 remaining photographs to be found, and on Thursday, May 26 at 7 p.m. the ACHS will host Debbie Holloman and Sebastian Vonk of the Fields of Honor Foundation to talk about how you can take part in their volunteer efforts honoring the service and sacrifice of US WWII service members buried or memorialized at US war cemeteries in Europe. That’s Thursday, May 26, at 7 p.m. via Zoom or Facebook Live.Historical Marker unveiled at Central Library for crucial desegregation caseA crowd assembled yesterday afternoon at the intersection of East Market Street and 3rd Street NW in downtown Charlottesville to watch the unveiling of a historic marker to commemorate an important moment in the desegregation of education in Virginia. In 1950, Gregory Swanson applied to attend the University of Virginia School of Law, but he was denied a space because he was Black. He sued in federal court citing 14th Amendment rights to equal protection, and a three-panel judge heard arguments on September 5 that year. David Plunkett is the director of the Jefferson Madison Regional Library, and he noted the historic nature of the building that is the library system’s headquarters.“This building is formerly a federal building and home to the courtroom where Gregory Swanson won his legal petition for entry into the University of Virginia law school,” Plunkett said.     Plunkett said Swanson’s case was part of the NAACP’s legal strategy to challenge the system of desegregation. “While the law school had admitted Mr. Swanson on his merit, with the support of staff including Mortimer Caplin, the Board of University Board of Visitors subsequently denied his admittance based on his skin color,” Plunkett said. “The case tried here overturned that ruling and helped lead to the desegregation of higher education in the South.”Risa Goluboff is the current Dean of the UVA Law School, and she said the marker celebrates Swanson’s bravery and persistence. “He did all this for a belief, for a legal and constitutional principle, for his own growth as a lawyer and a person, for his race, and for the nation as a whole,” Goluboff said. Swanson was represented by the law firm of Hill, Martin, & Robinson, with future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall serving as his legal counsel. Goluboff said the denial back in 1950 must be remembered, as well as the University’s condoning of slavery and the continuance of Jim Crow era laws. She said Swanson’s case should be celebrated.“And when he succeeded, he became the first Black student not only at the University of Virginia Law School, not only at the University of Virginia writ large, but at any state in the former Confederacy,” Goluboff said. “Telling his story both forces and enables us to remember those aspects of our history of exclusion and segregation that we must know in order to repudiate them.” Also on hand at the ceremony was M. Rick Turner, a former president of the Albemarle-Charlottesville NAACP. He said Black students at UVA have always challenged the status quo of an institution founded to perpetuate racial and class inequalities. “It is worth remembering that the [admittance] of Black students at UVA years ago was not a benevolent gesture on the part of the UVA administrators and state officials, but rather the presence of Gregory Swanson paved the way,” Turner said. To hear the event in full, visit the Charlottesville Podcasting Network where the full audio is posted and is available.Fifth District Republican convention tomorrowRepublicans across Virginia’s new Fifth Congressional District will gather tomorrow at Hampden-Sydney College in Prince Edward County to select a candidate for the November 8 election. Over 2,000 attendees are pre-filed for the event, according to the draft program. Incumbent Bob Good of Campbell County faces challenger Dan Moy in the race, and the program states that each will give a speech before the votes are taken. There will also be remarks from outgoing Chair William Pace and incoming Chair Rick Buchannan. The program contains multiple endorsements for Good from Republican leaders across the United States, as well as several Delegates and Senators of the General Assembly. Moy’s sole endorsement is from the group Chasing Freedom Virginia.There are a total of 24 Republican committees in the fifth District. The convention will be called to order at 10 a.m. and will use a weighted voting system. The winner will face Democrat Joshua Throneburg in the November election. Regional Transit Vision updateConsultants hired by the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission to craft a vision for how public transportation might work better in the Charlottesville area will present more details next Thursday. The firm AECOM is the lead consultant with Jarrett Walker and Associates serving as a subcontractor. The study may recommend the eventualtransition to a unified regional transit authority. (meeting info)“There will be a 90 minute presentation from the consultants to go over what we’ve done so far, survey the results of the first round of public engagement, and then also what they found for the vision for the community,” said Lucinda Shannon, a transportation planner for the TJPDC. Shannon told a technical committee of the Metropolitan Planning Organization that a three-day workshop was held with the transit providers to imagine new bus routes under a new scenario where there is $30 million in annual funding from a new transportation authority. The consultants modeled that scenario after a new authority in the Richmond area that was created in 2020. “We looked at the Central Virginia [Transportation] Authority’s model of how they collect revenue to kind of calculate how much we could collect if we formed an authority to pay for the vision,” Shannon said.Shannon said that for now, the JWA’s work is more about what the vision will be.  A second round of public engagement will take place soon after next week’s partnership meeting. Shannon said the firm AECOM may also be hired to conduct a governance study to recommend how to actually come up with that hypothetical $30 million. That work is contingent on approval by the Commonwealth Transportation Board at their meeting in June. Shannon said this study will be more about the funding than changing the structure of area transit. “So it’s not going to be looking at how [Charlottesville Area Transit] or any of the service providers are governed or run or anything like that,” Shannon said. “It’s just bringing in money and putting it out for transit.” Funding for these studies come from Albemarle County, Charlottesville, and the Department of Rail and Public Transportation. The budget for the vision plan is $350,000 and the budget for the governance plan is $150,000. See also: Regional Transit Partnership briefed on Regional Transit Vision, looming Charlottesville Area Transit route changes, April 1, 2021Regional Transit Vision may suggest resumption of Regional Transit Authority foundation, December 14, 2021Shout-out to Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards In today’s subscriber-supported Public Service Announcement, the Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards continues to offer classes this spring and summer to increase your awareness of our wooden neighbors and to prepare for the future. Coming up on June 7 is a tree identification course taught on Zoom by tree steward Elizabeth Ferguson followed by a separate hike on June 11 at the Department of Forestry’s headquarters near the Fontaine Research Park. That’s followed by a tree identification walk at the University of Virginia on June 12 for the public. On June 14, Rachel Keen will give a lecture on Zoom on the Social Life of Trees. Do trees really communicate with one another? What is a 'mother tree'? Can a tree do anything to repel a pest? Learn more at charlottesvilleareatreestewards.org.City seeking to know more about what property it rents The City of Charlottesville could be pulling in more revenue from tenants who may be leasing city property at rates well below the market rate. That’s one of the takeaways from a report given to Council at their meeting on May 16. As the City of Charlottesville government seeks to rebuild after a recent era of frequent leadership transitions, the current management is looking at aspects of the city administration that have gone unnoticed or unchecked. Until now, there has not been one central source in city government that controls all of the various leases the city has for its properties as well as service agreements. That makes it hard to track who is responsible or where the public can get information.“So what we’re trying to do at this moment is compile that but one of the first things we had to do was identify an individual who would have that as their job,” said Sam Sanders, the Deputy City Manager for operations. That person will be Brenda Kelley, who has been the redevelopment manager for the city for the past several years. Her position has been elevated to the Office of Community Solutions, and she’ll be presenting a full report to Council this summer. In the meantime, she prepared a briefing for Council for their May 16 meeting which began with a basic definition of what she’ll cover. “Leases or agreement-type leases where either the city is a party,” Kelley said. “This is where the city owns the property or the city is a tenant of a property owned by someone else.” The city has about 155,000 square feet of building spaces that bring in about $580,000 a year in revenue for the city. That doesn’t include about 50 acres under ground lease. The oldest lease dates back to 1922 and allows the city’s utilities office to use space at a pump station at the University of Virginia. One of the biggest amounts of space the city leases is at the Water Street Parking Garage. “The city doesn’t own the Water Street Parking Garage but we lease parking spaces,” Kelley said. The city does own the Market Street Parking Garage, as well as the buildings on East Market Street that are currently occupied by the Lucky 7 and a Guadalajara restaurant. The City Council of January 2017 paid $2.85 million for an eventual parking garage at the location, but the City Council of March 2021 opted to go in a different direction. For now, the city gets rent from those businesses. “The Lucky 7 and the Guadalajara and all of the Market Street Parking Garage retail spaces, those rent funds go into the Parking Enterprise Fund,” Kelley said. Revenues from the Charlottesville Pavilion and the building where S&P Global operates go into the Charlottesville Economic Development Authority fund. Kelley said further research needs to be done into intergovernmental leases with the courts, libraries, and other entities. She said that systems need to be in place to track the leases and make sure that any rent increases due to the city are at least known about for Council’s consideration. Councilor Sena Magill said she appreciated being able to see a more complete picture of the city’s property portfolio, and the potential to get more out of its investment. “When we look at a lot of these rents on a lot of these buildings, they are at about half of market rate,” Magill said. Magill said if the city is charging below market, it should be as a way of helping small businesses who are just getting started. She wanted to see a presentation from the Charlottesville Economic Development Authority on the leases they currently manage. Mayor Lloyd Snook said he wanted any lessees to know that the preliminary report is not intended to raise rates, but just to provide information. “Until this report and this information is gathered, we on Council had no idea who we were subsidizing and we have no idea why we’re subsidizing them in some cases and we may want to make some conscious decisions to continue to subsidize in the form of the rent or we may not but at least we will be doing so from the basis of actual knowledge,” Snook said. More to come as the summer heats up. Help Ting help support Town Crier productions!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051922 @107wchv 'Miss-Informed' quits and @JoeThomasWCHV has had enough"

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 39:39


Nina Jankowicz quits after DHS Chief Mayorkas puts her board on hold and Joe has decided that he needs to do more for the Convention of States and has president Mark Meckler back on to tell him directly. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051822 @107wchv #education "Riley V #K12Albemarle" w/ @Gundisalvus

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 23:36


Best selling author ("BLM" and "The Plot to Change America") Mike Gonzalez is on to take a look into the case we've been following from street-level. Followed by a call asking about school choice. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051822 @107wchv #Podcast Latest from #Ukraine w/Tom @GarrettinEXILE

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 14:34


Documentary filmmaker (and former Congressman) Tom Garrett is back on with a look into some of the pro-Russian stories that have resurfaced, See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 19, 2022: New Jaunt CEO reintroduces agency to Charlottesville City Council; Albemarle preparing for affordable dwelling unit ordinance

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 19:13


The heat is on, on the street, and this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement is ready to get inside your head, on every beat. With apologies to Glenn Frey, this is not an 80’s music nostalgia newsletter and podcast, but the idea is to look back at some of what’s happened recently while anticipating the changes that will come this summer. It’s May 19, 2022, and I’m your host, Sean Tubbs. Sign up today to not miss a beat! On today’s show:The annual median income in the Charlottesville area has increased 19 percent over last yearAlbemarle Supervisors further discusses ways to incentivize developers to build housing for those with lower than that median incomeThe new CEO of Jaunt explains that a new page is turning toward cooperation with Charlottesville Area TransitA Pittsylvania County group seeks a second referendum on sales tax increase for education Shout-out: RCA seeks input on the restoration of Riverview ParkThe first Patreon-fueled shout-out today is for the Rivanna Conservation Alliance and their work with the City of Charlottesville on the restoration of Riverview Park. The RCA aims to restore a 600-foot section of the Rivanna riverbank in an area that’s designated for public access to the waterway as well as a 200-foot section of a dangerously eroding stormwater channel nearby. Another community meeting will be held in the near future to get your feedback on the work should be prioritized. Visit rivannariver.org to learn more about the project, which seeks to help Riverview Park continue to be a welcoming place to exercise, cool off, paddle, fish, play, explore, observe nature, and escape from the day-to-day stresses of life. Spring COVID-19 surge continuesTo begin today, a quick look at the latest COVID numbers from the Virginia Department of Health. Today the VDH reports another 3,836 positive COVID tests done through the PCR method, and a number that does not count at-home tests. The seven-day positivity rate for tests has increased to 15.2 percent. The seven-day average for new cases is now at 3,078. This surge of cases has so far not resulted in fatalities anywhere near what was seen in previous ones before vaccines were easily available. The seven-day average for new daily deaths is at three per day. According to the Virginia Healthcare and Hospital Association, there are 60 COVID patients in intensive care in Virginia, with 23 of them on ventilators. Pittsylvania County group wants to try again on sales tax referendum Last November, voters in Pittsylvania County on the south side of Virginia’s Fifth Congressional District had on their ballot a referendum on whether or not to approve a one percent sales tax increase to fund school improvement projects. The measure failed on a 23-vote margin according to election night results from the State Board of Elections. This Tuesday, the seven-member Board of Supervisors got an update on a campaign to try hold the referendum again this year, based on enabling authority that passed the General Assembly in 2020. Martha Walker is the chair of Pittsylvanians for a Brighter Future, an advocacy group that seeks passage this time around.“One cent, one penny, will generate $3.8 million each year for the 19 years that we will be allowed to have that one cent sales tax added,” Walker said. Under the same enabling authority, Danville voters voted in favor of the referendum and the sales tax increase has gone into effect. Speaking directly to the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, Walker said her organization will be seeking to educate the public on what improvements would be funded. “You know that ten elementary schools will be focused on safety and getting rid of those trailers by building those new classrooms,” Walker said. Charlottesville asked the General Assembly to be allowed to hold a referendum for its school system. Legislation passed the Democrat-controlled Senate, but failed to get out of a committee in the Republican-controlled House of Delegates. There is still no state budget, an issue of increasing concern to school systems throughout the Commonwealth. Jaunt CEO talks transit with Charlottesville City CouncilThe relatively new CEO of the transit agency Jaunt introduced himself to the Charlottesville City Council Monday and also had the chance to re-introduce a public service organization plagued by recent controversy. Ted Rieck started with fundamentals. “Our basic goal is to enable people to live their lives independently and with dignity and we’ve been doing this for about 42 years,” Rieck said. (view his presentation)Jaunt serves the six localities of the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission as well as Buckingham County. The Americans with Disabilities Act requires equivalent service to fixed route transit for disabled individuals, and Rieck said Jaunt performs this role for CAT for those who live within three-fourths of a mile of a bus stop. “We also provide in some of the outlying counties circulator or intra-county service,” Rieck said. “We also provide links from the counties to Charlottesville and then we also provide commuter services into Charlottesville and [the University of Virginia].”Rieck was hired last October by Jaunt. The agency’s Board of Directors asked the previous CEO to resign after irregular transactions were reported. That continues to have an impact on Jaunt’s budget. “We had our CEO make some judgment errors in terms of spending money,” Rieck said. “That triggered an audit and that discovered some issues that Jaunt wasn’t doing very well.” Rieck said Jaunt was making progress in correcting the errors pointed out in the audit, including misapplication of funds intended for rural use for urban purposes. There were also questions about administrative costs. “We overstated some of our statistics which allowed us to get more state funding and federal funding that we were entitled to,” Rieck said. “This was an error that the prior CEO basically hoarded the data and did not share that with anybody.”Rieck said Jaunt had to pay Virginia back a over a million dollars and that has happened. Record-keeping has now been improved. The previous CEO was Brad Sheffield, who also served one term on the Albemarle Board of Supervisors. During that time, he was hired on as Jaunt’s director. Rieck said other anomalies have been discovered and Jaunt is cooperating with the ongoing investigation. He said Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation officials will visit Jaunt’s headquarters next week for further discussions. Better cooperation?Rieck said as the legacy of the Sheffield era continues to play out, he wants to build a partnership with Charlottesville Area Transit, and he’s in close contact with CAT Director Garland Williams.“We are working together,” Rieck said. “I don’t believe Jaunt and CAT have played very well together in the past. We are turning a new page on that I believe.” That includes more frequent meetings to discuss common issues, such as driver shortages. Another issue is how to transition to a fleet that doesn’t run on fossil fuels to meet the community’s expectations on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Jaunt is also seeking members to join an Alternative Fuel Advisory Committee to oversee a study for which Kimley Horn has been hired to run. Applications are due May 27, and the process will build off of a study that Charlottesville Area Transit is also running for their fleet. (apply)They are also building off of conversations that have been taking place at the Jefferson Area Regional Transit Partnership. In April, that group heard from transit officials in Burlington, Vermont about how fixed-route transit can carry students to public schools. Those conversations are now occurring here, according to Rieck. “Today we discussed opportunities where we could see CAT bus routes overlapping areas where Albemarle County students live,” Rieck said. “Many of these people could conceivably take a bus to the high school, other schools as well. If that works out, we could save five or six bus operators for the school district. Doesn’t sound like much, but it’s really huge.”Other avenues of regional exploration include the creation of a Regional Transit Authority and development of an app to help people navigate public transportation. Rieck said Jaunt could also play a role in addressing the need for service to Crescent Halls, a Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority property whose residents have demanded door-to-door service be restored when the building reopens. He said the current service by Route 6 sees a large bus trying to navigate a small access road for which it was not designed. “And my understanding is that’s an awkward movement for a larger vehicle to do so the thought would be to have Jaunt provide that service instead of the main route,” Rieck said. Details to come in the future as Rieck said detailed conversations had not yet occurred. Council pressed Rieck on whether Jaunt’s troubles with the Virginia Department and Rail and Public Transportation were over. “First of all, are there any more shoes about to drop, and second, do you have a sense of when you will be past the shoe-dropping phase?” asked Charlottesville Mayor Lloyd Snook. Rieck said the long-standing issue is a pattern of mixing rural and urban funds that dates further back into Jaunt’s recent history. He said he’s being transparent with city, county, and state officials, as well as his board of directors. “So I don’t think that there’s any more shoes to drop and if there is, that’s the one,” Rieck said. Second shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign It’s springtime, and one Patreon subscriber wants you to know the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign is a grassroots initiative of motivated citizens, volunteers, partner organizations, and local governments who want to promote the use of native plants. This spring the group is working with retailers across the region to encourage purchase of plants that belong here and are part of an ecosystem that depends on pollination. There are plenty of resources on the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page, so sign up to be notified of lectures, plant sales, and more!Albemarle Supervisors discuss incentives for housing planThe Albemarle County Board of Supervisors continued a conversation earlier this month about how to incentivize developers to build units to be sold below market value. The six-member Board last discussed the matter in February and pushed back on the idea of creating an overlay district in the county’s zoning ordinance. (previous coverage)“The main question today that we would like some feedback on after listening to the information that’s provided is [whether] an affordable dwelling unit program something the Board would be interested in and staff reviewing?” asked Stacy Pethia, the county’s Housing Policy Manager. (view her presentation)The General Assembly has already granted Albemarle enabling authority to pursue such a program, which would allow the county to require a certain percentage of units be rented or sold at affordable prices to households at 80 percent or lower than the median income. This requirement would be triggered by a rezoning or a special use permit. Supervisors adopted the Housing Albemarle plan last July but delayed much of the implementation until these details could be worked out. Before they got too deep into the conversation, Pethia said the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has now released updated calculations for area median income for 2022. “That is now $111,200 annually and to put that into perspective, that is a 19 percent increase over last year’s area median income increase,” Pethia said. The median income for the Washington metropolitan area is $142,300 and the median income for the Lynchburg metro is $78,900.  We’ll come back to this in future stories about housing. (find the calculations for your favorite metro area)Pethia said after the work session in February, staff opted to come forward with the affordable dwelling unit program that is authorized under state code. “And the enabling legislation really doesn’t place many restrictions on what the county can do and what that program looks like,” Pethia said. “It does require we provide density bonuses but beyond that we are pretty open in the percentage of the affordable unit set-asides that we may require, the depth of that unit affordability, the length of the affordability for those units, and we also have the opportunity to include additional incentives within that ordinance above and beyond the density increases.”Pethia said there are about 500 such programs across the United States. Commonalities between them include: An identification of how many units the locality needs to be affordable standardized amount per unit for developers to pay into a fund rather than build units The right for the locality or its designee to purchase or rent affordable units that are actually constructed. Several localities in Virginia have such a program, such as Loudoun County. “They adopted their ordinance in 1999 and do require 6.25 to 12.5 percent of the units in projects to be affordable housing,” Pethis said. “Those units need to be affordable for 15 to 20 years depending on whether they are for sale or rent.” Pethia said around 2,500 units have been created under this policy in Loudoun. Fairfax County has a similar ordinance and has created nearly 3,000 units. For Albemarle, Pethia said county staff are recommending density bonuses, requiring 20 percent of total new units to be affordable as per Housing Albemarle, allowing non-profits to purchase “affordable” units for which the developer can’t find a qualified buyer, and a cash-in-lieu fee is a developer doesn’t want to build the units. Such a program is not yet ready and Pethia wanted feedback on whether they should proceed. Supervisor Ann Mallek had this question. “Is there a way that we can put a hold on new applications until we get this process adopted?” Mallek said. “I’m very concerned that another 5,000 units will come in in application that we will somehow be forced to accept the applications and then we will lose the opportunity to get a much better result.” Supervisor Bea LaPisto-Kirtley said she supported the idea of the creation of a waiting list of people and families who are eligible to rent or purchase affordable units due to their income level. “The waiting list would be extremely important to have a waiting list otherwise I can see this whole project failing if we don’t have a waiting list of qualified income buyers,” LaPisto-Kirtley said. Supervisor Ned Gallaway said that he did not want to see a list of stiffly-written incentives that might preclude flexibility. “I hope we don’t get caught in the trap of saying that even if we put an example of incentives our, or encouraged incentives, or whatever the wording is, that we’re saying that that’s it, and that we have a process in place that allows for consideration of other incentives,” Gallaway said. “Each project will be different. Each spreadsheet is different.” Gallaway also supported the cash-in-lieu program in order to be able to pay more funds into the county’s affordable housing trust rather than rely on surpluses. A more detailed plan will come before the Board of Supervisors for a work session in August followed by a public hearing in September. Help Ting help support Town Crier productions!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051822 @107wchv #Gastax & #Crime w/ @GovernorVA @GlennYoungkin

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 16:04


Virginia's Governor joins Joe to discuss the Crime Commission he and Attorney General Miyares have started the budget stalemate, cutting the gas tax and the baby formula shortage. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051822 @107wchv #podcast "Buffalo Bull"

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 43:57


The echo chamber is in overdrive to, like with the rioters in Charlottesville in 2017, cast the murderer in Buffalo as a right-winger, radicalized by Tucker Carlson and shows like Joe'. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Names on Taps
Random Row Brewing

Names on Taps

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 39:49


William and Jeff talk with Founder & Head Brewer, Kevin McElroy at Random Row Brewing in Charlottesville, Virginia.  Kevin explains how his medical background, surfing days and even his three children have influenced the beer names at Random Row.  Kevin is truly a beer expert which is evident by the beer "clones" he describes making during our chat.  Not only are the names great and the beers tasty, but Random Row is big in giving back to the local community.  Listen to find out just how much.@namesontaps@randomrowbrewing

News Beat
Radical Caucasian Extremism [2022]

News Beat

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 20:59


In 2017, shortly after the deadly "Unite The Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, we released an episode titled ‘Misunderstanding Terrorism: Exposing Radical Caucasian Extremism' calling out what the vast majority of mainstream news outlets and then-President Trump wouldn't, yet what study after study had been warning about for quite some time: It wasn't foreign Muslims posing the biggest threat to America's safety—but white, far-right extremists. Tragically, this ideology's death toll continues to climb.   We re-released this episode in the wake of the January 6 insurrection on the Capitol to shine extra light on this brutal trend, and we're sadly doing so again now, following the racially motivated mass murder of 10 people at a supermarket in Buffalo, NY. News Beat is a multi-award-winning podcast brought to you by Morey Creative Studios and Manny Faces Media. Audio Editor/Sound Designer/Producer/Host:Manny Faces Editor-In-Chief/Producer: Chris Twarowski Managing Editor/Producer: Rashed Mian Episode Art: Jeff Main Executive Producer: Jed Morey Support the show: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?token=EYkdQRkbZ6vNTGfNSGWZjx7_15orqqDl8vkmrAg3TkxLprft1OguFwxlheC3tAkNd-KVPG&country.x=US&locale.x=US See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 17, 2022: Crozet panel learns about Albemarle's climate action planning; Developer seeks 130 units in "downtown" Belmont

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 17:38


On this day in 1890, Idaho became the 43rd member of the United States of America, a fact that may not have resonance but could be the important piece of information you hear today. This is doubtful, but we are only at the very beginning of this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement, a program that contains between two and two-hundred-and two facts per newsletters or podcast. Actual amounts may vary by consumer. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs. Sign up for free to get all of the information!On today’s program:A site plan will be held tomorrow for a large condominium complex on land in Belmont that’s been used for automotive repair It’s the 68th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education ruling, and the R.R. Moton School in Farmville is now an officially designated historic site Albemarle County’s Climate Action Coordinator talks Climate Action with the Crozet Community Advisory CommitteeAlbemarle Supervisors to vote on resolution to allow reintroduction of a freshwater mollusk to area rivers Time is running out to inform surveys for climate action planning in Charlottesville First shout-out: Charlottesville Jazz Society spotlighting benefit show for UkraineIn today’s first subscriber supported shout-out. The Charlottesville Jazz Society is spotlighting a benefit event to support the people of Ukraine at the Whiskey Jar this Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Young jazz students near the besieged city of Mariupol sent guitarist Royce Campbell a plea to help, and several area musicians have jumped into action. Vocalist Monica Worth has organized the event, and Campbell will play for Ukraine with bassist Andre La Vell and drummer Jim Howe. Many of Charlottesville’s best jazz musicians will sit in. Donations will be collected and sent to Global Giving’s Ukraine Crisis Relief Fund, and you can also go ahead and support this effort with a payment online. That’s We Play for Ukraine at the Whiskey Jar this Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. City climate actions surveys closing this FridayThe city of Charlottesville is working on a Climate Action Plan to guide decisions on funding and resources for efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the community. Charlottesville and Albemarle County both have agreed to meet certain reduction targets by 2030 and to be carbon-free by 2050. A pair of surveys has been live since April 20, but the deadline to participate is coming up this Friday. The first seeks input on how you think greenhouse gas emissions should be reduced and there have been over 160 responses so far. (survey #1)The second wants your thoughts on what issues are faced by vulnerable populations when it comes to the top three climate hazards identified by staff. They are extreme heat, increased intensity of precipitation and flooding, and changing season conditions. This survey is five pages long. (survey #2)To learn more, there are five Climate Action Fact Sheets on the city’s website.Site plan review meeting for Belmont infill residential scheduled for tomorrowAs Charlottesville continues to change under the impact of a new Comprehensive Plan that encourages more residential density, there are still some examples of projects that could build to higher density under existing zoning.One such example comes up tomorrow at a site plan review conference that will be held virtually at 10 a.m. by the city’s Neighborhood Development Services Department. (meeting info)An entity with the name Belmont & Carlton Holdings LLC owns 16 parcels in the area, with one of them being a 2.58 acre parcel purchased in February 2006 upon which an automotive repair use has been on the property for many years. All of the land is zoned Neighborhood Commercial Center, which is the reason there are commercial uses in what some refer to as downtown Belmont. Now, that entity seeks to develop a portion of nearly 6.2 acres of their property and they need a critical slopes waiver to do it. “The applicant is looking to construct 118 multi-family condominiums and 12 single-family attached townhouses,” reads a supplement for the site plan review related to the critical slopes waiver. “The site includes existing city right of way that will be improved with the project for the development of the street grid and proposed neighborhood.”As part of the development, the applicant is seeking to designate eight of the units as affordable and argue that is why the slopes waiver should be granted. Of the total site, 14.31 percent are defined as critical slopes. To mitigate the impact, the applicant will build a stormwater management facility to reduce the impact to the watershed. In addition to the site plan review meeting, the critical slopes waiver will need to come through the Planning Commission and the City Council. Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education ruling todayToday marks the 68th anniversary of the ruling in the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court case which struck down the legal doctrine of “separate but equal” that sanctioned and required schools to be segregated. This anniversary marks the first time the U.S. Park Service has extended official recognition to other sites in other communities across the country that played a role in the Brown v. Board ruling. One of them is Farmville, where students at the R.R. Moton High School walked out on April 23, 1951 to protest inferior conditions and a pattern of being denied funds for improvements. A month later a lawsuit was filed by NAACP lawyers Spottswood Robinson and Oliver Hill and the case Davis v. County School Board was consolidated with four other cases on appeal to the Supreme Court. To learn more about the ruling and about how the ruling eventually led to the five-year closing of all public schools in Prince Edward County, visit the R.R. Moton Museum’s website or its Facebook page. Last week, President Joe Biden signed into law the Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Park Expansion and Redesignation Act which officially designates the R.R. Moton Museum as a National Historic Site. Learn more in a press release on the R.R. Moton website. Second shout-out goes to Camp AlbemarleToday’s second subscriber-supported public service announcement goes out to Camp Albemarle, which has for sixty years been a “wholesome rural, rustic and restful site for youth activities, church groups, civic events and occasional private programs.”Located on 14 acres on the banks of the Moorman’s River near Free Union, Camp Albemarle continues as a legacy of being a Civilian Conservation Corps project that sought to promote the importance of rural activities. Camp Albemarle seeks support for a plan to winterize the Hamner Lodge, a structure built in 1941 by the CCC and used by every 4th and 5th grade student in Charlottesville and Albemarle for the study of ecology for over 20 years. If this campaign is successful, Camp Albemarle could operate year-round. Consider your support by visiting campalbemarleva.org/donate. Albemarle Supervisors to be asked to support reintroduction of James Spineymussel The Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources is working on a plan to restore an endangered freshwater mollusk back into the James River watershed from which it has perished. On Wednesday, the Albemarle Board of Supervisors will vote on a resolution giving their support to efforts to introduce the James Spineymussel into the Rivanna River as well as the James River. “Existing JSM populations have been augmented in six streams in Amherst, Bath, Buckingham, Botetourt, and Nelson Counties, but to truly recover this endangered species, the mussel also needs to be reintroduced to waterbodies from which it has been lost,” reads the staff report.According to a staff report, there are over 300 species of freshwater mussels and many of them are located in the southeastern United States. They provide filtering of water with each individual able to process as many as 12 gallons a day in a single day. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service and the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources have been working on a recovery plan for decades and have raised James Spineymussel at the Virginia Fisheries and Aquatic Wildlife Center at the Harrison Lake National Hatchery. The species has been on the federal endangered list since July 22, 1988. The sighting of James Spineymussel has been enough to stop infrastructure projects in the past. At one point, the Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority was considering a reservoir in northwestern Albemarle County, but the potential presence of the James Spineymussel eliminated that from further consideration. Albemarle CACs are being briefed on county’s climate action implementationThe Albemarle Board of Supervisors adopted a Climate Action Plan in October 2020 to help guide the county’s efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 45 percent of a baseline by the year 2030. That’s the first step before a second goal to be carbon neutral by 2050 and the baseline is derived from the year 2008. Albemarle Climate Program Coordinator Gabe Dayley began his journey through the county advisory panels by asking the Crozet Community Advisory Committee what their first thoughts are when thinking about climate action and what he might have as an update. (review Dayley’s presentation)“I’ll jump in because I hope that I will hear some real substantive things that we’re going to do and not just talk about them,” said Supervisor Ann Mallek. Another CAC member said he’s noticed temperature changed over the decades. Kostas Alibertis has been in Crozet since the 1980’s. “Truly in the winter time we used to be a lot cooler than Charlottesville and now our temperature seems to be more comparable to Charlottesville,” Alibertis said. “I think that some of the growth has taken away some of the coverage, the greenery and the grass, and that’s led to the community being a little warmer. Maybe I’m completely wrong about that, but how do we address what we’ve lost?” There are some new members of the Crozet CAC and this was the first for Mallory DeCoster.“I feel excited that this is a topic because this is my first meeting and I joined this group because I care about the environmental issues particularly in this county,” DeCoster said. Another new member is local Realtor Jim Duncan, who said more needs to be done about getting infrastructure built to get people out of their cars. “Climate change is a real legitimate thing but I don’t know what the viable action items are that the CAC can voice our opinion on,” Duncan said. The Climate Action Plan was adopted prior to the review of the Albemarle Comprehensive Plan which is currently underway. Dayley said the overarching Comprehensive Plan that will be adopted will be influenced by the climate plan as well as efforts to include equity as a major consideration in future county decisions.  He also said there’s a lot of work to be done.“Climate change is big and can feel overwhelming and I think sometimes in professional spaces, policy spaces, local government, and science we can shy away from that side of things,” Dayley said. “But the number two point is that there is research showing that actually kind of like acknowledging our reaction whatever it might be to climate change might move us to effective actions.”Dayley said everyone can take actions to be part of the solutions to meet community targets. Dayley said CACs can play a role in communicating back to the public what the county and its partners are doing.There are four themes to Albemarle’s Climate Action Plan that mirror the county’s adopted missions and values. “Through our efforts to address global climate change we also want to attend to our local health of people and place here, benefiting the local economy through our climate action,” Dayley said. “Also the local environment and thinking about some of our intersecting county priorities like clean water and biodiversity and then making sure the work that we do and the services we offer to folks are equitable and inclusive in how they involve people in the community and bring benefits.”The plan itself has 135 action areas to reduce emissions for each of the sources including transportation, land use, building energy use, sustainable materials, renewable energy sources, agricultural and natural resources and more. The most recent inventory of greenhouse gas emissions dates back to 2018 and another one is underway now that will give a glimpse into 2020. In September, the Board of Supervisors was told more work needs to be done to meet the 2030 targets. (read previous coverage)Dayley said for the county, climate action means things like transitioning to an electric fleet and continuing to make county buildings more efficient. “We’re also looking at how the county manages landscapes it owns and that includes things like parks and natural areas as well as school grounds,” Dayley said. “We’re soon going to be looking at also our procurement and the sustainability of the materials that we procure like plastics and paper and things like that.”A second phase for the climate action plan will be on adaptation and mitigation and to prepare for impacts. The results of a climate vulnerability and risk assessment will be available for review in the coming months. As Albemarle reviews its Comprehensive Plan and the growth management policy, Dayley said one idea is to continue to build places to live that are more dense to support public transit. Study and analysis by county staff demonstrates the role that conservation of existing ecological resources can play.“They found that our forests are helping us quite a lot,” Dayley said. “They are sequestering and drawing down carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, almost a million carbon dioxide metric tons a year.”I’ll have from other CAC presentations in future installments of Charlottesville Community Engagement. At publication time, there are 12 views of this meeting on YouTube. Can we make that 24 in 24 hours time?Help Ting help support Town Crier productions!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051322 @107wchv #Congress @RepBobGood on #Ukraine Aid and More

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 15:16


Virginia's 5th District Congressman makes his weekly visit with radio constituents to talk about the $40B spending bill he voted against and more... See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051322 @107wchv #podcast "Yes, that's @David_Gergen"

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 13:14


Former Comms Dir for Reagan and adviser to Clinton is on with Joe regarding his new book; "Hearts Touched by Fire" and talks about the protests at SCOTUS homes, that Baby Boomers need to turn over the reigns and more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mark Moses Show
Mark meets Ralph Sampson & The Suns get Destroyed!

The Mark Moses Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 17:56


The Mark Moses Show kicks off a Monday with Mark recapping his weekend in Charlottesville and how he met Basketball Legend Ralph Sampson. Mark also recaps how the Phoenix Suns got destroyed at home from the Mavericks on Sunday to end their season.  The Mark Moses Show weekday afternoons from 3-6 pm on Sports Radio 1560 The Fan & Sportsradio1560.com. You can also listen to Mark Mid days on 95.9 The Rocket. Follow him on social media @markmosesshow

The Mark Moses Show
Risty Interview (5/16/22)

The Mark Moses Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 18:07


The Mark Moses Show is broadcasting live from his old studios in Charlottesville, Virginia and is joined by his good friend Risty from the Cavalier Diner to talk about her love for all things Dallas Cowboys, how she has been friends with Mark for over a decade and her future plans for the Cavalier Diner moving forward.  The Mark Moses Show weekday afternoons from 3-6 pm on Sports Radio 1560 The Fan & Sportsradio1560.com. You can also listen to Mark Mid days on 95.9 The Rocket. Follow him on social media @markmosesshow

The Mark Moses Show
Jacquie Franciulli-Wahoos 24/7 Interview (5/16/22)

The Mark Moses Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 16:43


The Mark Moses Show is broadcasting live from his old studios in Charlottesville, Virginia and is joined by his good friend Jacquie Franciulli of Wahoos 24/7 to talk about how she used to cover the Gators, where she sees NIL going moving forward in college athletics and what has it been like moving back to Charlottesville in the last year.  The Mark Moses Show weekday afternoons from 3-6 pm on Sports Radio 1560 The Fan & Sportsradio1560.com. You can also listen to Mark Mid days on 95.9 The Rocket. Follow him on social media @markmosesshow

The Mark Moses Show
Kerry James Interview (5/13/22)

The Mark Moses Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 78:47


The Mark Moses Show is broadcasting live from his old studios in Charlottesville, Virginia and is joined by his good friend Kerry James to talk about his great career in radio, how he has known Mark for over a decade and how his Dallas Cowboys will do in 2022.  The Mark Moses Show weekday afternoons from 3-6 pm on Sports Radio 1560 The Fan & Sportsradio1560.com. You can also listen to Mark Mid days on 95.9 The Rocket. Follow him on social media @markmosesshow

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 16, 2022: Divided Charlottesville Planning Commission recommends permit for 390-room, seven-story building on JPA

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 23:32


There is a month and a week left until the summer solstice, and the time when the days begin growing shorter. Until then, there are now over 14 hours of sunlight in the section of the Earth on the day when the May 16 edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement is produced. That’s enough time to ensure that this newsletter and podcast at least tries to bring as much information as possible. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs. On today’s program:Charlottesville Planning Commission recommends a seven-story building on Jefferson Park AvenueA fatal crash on U.S. 29 near Greenbrier Road has claimed the life of a Charlottesville manAn Augusta County elections official is the latest appointee to the State Board of ElectionsA quick update on COVID-19 from the UnivToday’s first shout-out goes to LEAPWe’re now well into spring, and many of us may have already turned on our air conditioning units for the first in months. To see what you can do to get the most out of your home, contact LEAP, your local energy nonprofit, to schedule a home energy assessment this month - just $45 for City and County residents. LEAP also offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents. If someone in your household is age 60 or older, or you have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!COVID cases still increasing; UVA Health urges renewed maskingAs the week begins, the Virginia Department of Health this morning reports a seven-day average for new COVID-19 cases at 2,750 a day and the seven-day percent positivity has increased to 14.6 percent. The actual amount of spread is likely higher due to the number of home tests that have become common as a first diagnosis for many people. “There are many people calling saying they’re COVID positive and importantly and interestingly, a fair number of those people have been vaccinated,” said Dr. Costi Sifri, the director of hospital epidemiology for the University of Virginia Health System. With more cases in the community, UVA officials say its time to take precautions again.“Personally I’m masking back up and I think a lot of people are making the decision,” said Wendy Horton, the CEO of the UVA Health System. “It’s people that have been really careful, been vaccinated, and I think we’re just in this interesting time where we’re really tired of masking but I think it’s alive and well. We know it. We see it in our workforce. We see it in our patients.” The latest COVID model from the UVA Biocomplexity Institute was released on Friday. “Models forecast a significant surge of cases in the coming weeks,” reads the model. “Case rates are not expected to reach levels seen during the January wave. But they will likely exceed those seen in pre-Omicron waves.” Dr. Sifri said ebbs and flows are likely to continue as COVID-19 continues to transition from pandemic to endemic. He said the same public health advice exists. “In a period of time like now where we’re starting to see a surge in cases, this is the time to say okay, in this time and place right now, wearing a mask is helpful to prevent transmission,” Dr. Sifri said. “It’s also important because with COVID it still remains the case that probably half or more than half of cases are in people who are asymptomatic or have such mild symptoms that they don’t recognize that they’re sick.” This week the Virginia Department of Health is retiring several dashboards and ways of reporting COVID. People who seek to know cases by vaccination status will need to go to the Centers for Disease Control website. Cases and Deaths by Date Reported will also be phased out. The changes will take place on May 19. The VDH already has stopped reporting cases by locality on its website. Learn more about the changes on their website.Fatal crash on Seminole TrailAlbemarle County police are investigating the cause of a fatal crash last night in the 1200 block of U.S. 29 near Greenbrier Drive. Thirty-six-year old Justin Michael Tilghman of Charlottesville died at the scene of the crash which happened at 9:21 p.m. last night. The driver of a second vehicle was taken to the University of Virginia hospital. The Albemarle County Police Department’s Fatal Crash Reconstruction Team is leading the investigation. This is the fourth fatality on Albemarle County roads so far in 2022. Augusta County official named to State Board of ElectionsGovernor Glenn Youngkin has named a member of the Augusta County Board of Elections to serve on the Virginia State Board of Elections. Youngkin named Georgia K. Alvis-Long to the position. A press release identifies her occupation as a registered nurse instructor. Under Virginia law, the State Board of Elections is a five-member body that will have three members from the political party that won the Governor’s mansion in the last election. “Each political party entitled to an appointment may make and file recommendations with the Governor for the appointment,” reads Section 24.2-102 of Virginia Code.Alvis-Long fills a position left by the resignation of Jamilah D. LeCruise. For more recent appointments, take a look at the full release. Second shout-out: Charlottesville Jazz Society spotlighting benefit show for UkraineIn today’s second subscriber supported shout-out. The Charlottesville Jazz Society is spotlighting a benefit event to support the people of Ukraine at the Whiskey Jar this Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Young jazz students near the besieged city of Mariupol sent guitarist Royce Campbell a plea to help, and several area musicians have jumped into help. Vocalist Monica Worth has organized the event, and Campbell will play for Ukraine with bassist Andre La Vell and drummer Jim Howe. Many of Charlottesville’s best jazz musicians will sit in. Donations will be collected and sent to Global Giving’s Ukraine Crisis Relief Fund, and you can also go ahead and support this effort with a payment online. That’s We Play for Ukraine at the Whiskey Jar this Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Divided Planning Commission approves seven-story building on Jefferson Park Avenue A divided Charlottesville Planning Commission voted 4-3 on May 10 to recommend that City Council approve a special use permit for additional height and density for a seven-story U-shaped building at 2005 Jefferson Park Avenue.  They’ve also recommended reducing parking requirements by 22 percent over what would otherwise be required.“The [special use permit] is required to accommodate a development being proposed for 119-units of multifamily dwellings within one building with underground parking,” said city planner Matt Alfele. This project was filed after the city adopted a new Comprehensive Plan and Future Land Use Map created as part of the Charlottesville Plans Together initiative, which is still underway. There are currently 17 units across multiple structures across the property. “The Future Plan Use Map, the Comprehensive Plan that we went through, is increasing density and increasing density in certain areas of the city, and this area of the city is one that is looking to increase density and to increase density at especially this scale is going to create a big building,” Alfele said. The developer would pay $500,000 into the city’s affordable housing fund rather than provide required affordable units on-site or at another location nearby. They’ll build 125 parking spaces in an underground garage with access on Washington Avenue. Residents would not be eligible to park on that street or Observatory due to restricted parking. The building would be seven stories taller from JPA and would be five stories tall at the back. “The biggest concern I think staff had was the rear elevation, the five story building going down into the mainly single-family, two-family neighborhood,” Allele said. This request comes after City Council adopted a new Comprehensive Plan with a Future Land Use Map that encourages more residential density, but before the new zoning rules have been written. “Do you happen to know and can you remind me what in our Future Land Use map, what this area is designated as, and what the by-right height would be in that corridor?” asked City Councilor Michael Payne. “This is Urban Mixed Use Corridor and the height is five stories or up to eight at key intersections,” Alfele said. “This is one of the areas where our Comprehensive Plan land use conflicts with our current zoning because our Comprehensive land use map is anticipating our zoning changing. The Future Land Use Map measures in stories and not feet.” Under the existing zoning, the structure could be 35 feet tall without a permit. This is one of the areas that will be clarified in the zoning rewrite. The term “key intersection” is also currently not defined. Payne pointed out the Comprehensive Plan seeks to encourage more units that would be rented to people below market. “The framework that we’ve adopted for that is that if we’re going above the by-right height, the reason we’re doing that is to have an inclusionary zoning program that’s going to required affordable housing as part of that,” Payne said. Payne also suggested $500,000 as an affordable housing contribution would not go far. “I know it’s their choice and we don’t have any control over it but I would just note for the record that we got an affordable housing report that included data on the total subsidy needed to construct a new affordable unit, and I can’t remember the exact number but I know in Virginia that total subsidy to build one new unit could be around $300,000,” Payne said. Charlottesville Mayor Lloyd Snook noted that there had been a lot of concerns during the Future Land Use Map from other neighborhoods such as North Downtown, but he had not heard much from the JPA neighborhood at that time.“The one area where it seemed clear that everyone was willing to agree we should have increased density was along JPA yet there was no basically no public discussion of that fact,” Snook said. Until the rezoning is finalized, individual applications like this are the forum for how the city will look in the future. The project will need a certificate of appropriateness from the Entrance Corridor Review Board, which is also the Planning Commission. They’ll get to influence the design. The developer said the area was already predominantly occupied by renters, and that this level of density is served by transit. “We are one block away in each direction from the trolley stops,” said Erin Hannegan with Mitchell + Matthews Architects and Planners. Hannegan acknowledged the Future Land Use Map designation of Urban Mixed Use Corridor and said this project meets the goals of the Comprehensive Plan.“The further definition is ‘higher intensity mixed-use development’ for this area and that’s exactly what we’re trying to do,” Hannegan said. “A higher intensity development. Mixed use is not allowed under the R-3 mixed-use currently designated.” Hannegan acknowledged that the new building would be out of scale with what is currently there, but anticipated the future conditions of JPA.“This building might be taller than its current neighbors but it won’t be out of character with the future implementation of the Comprehensive Plan and the implementation of the vision that’s been in the works for over 20 years for this particular neighborhood,” Hannegan said. At the public hearing, Nina Barnes of the Jefferson Park Avenue Neighborhood Association said the Comprehensive Plan compels Council and the Planning Commission to take adverse effects into account when considering a special use permit. “Adverse impacts may include traffic or parking congestion, undue density and population, and massing and scale,” Barnes said. “This project has adverse effects in all of these ways.”Barnes said the seven-story building would block the sun from existing one and two story buildings.Ellen Contini-Morava said the staff reports seemed to be in favor of the developer, and noted the gap between an adopted Comprehensive Plan and older zoning. She said this undermines the spirit of the Cville Plans Together Initiative. “This application treats the rezoning that’s proposed in the Future Land Use Map as if it were already in place,” Contini-Morava said. “This application not only aims to short-circuit the rezoning process but even requests a height that is two stories higher than the five stories suggested in the Future Land Use Map for the JPA corridor.” Fifeville resident Matthew Gillikin spoke for the group Livable Cville, which is not a registered entity with the State Corporation Commission but is active in promoting higher density in the community. Gillikin said the answer to affordability in Charlottesville is more housing. “And the developer is planning to contribute nearly $500,000 to the Charlottesville affordable housing fund as a condition to build,” Gillikin said. “This will fund groups like [Charlottesvile Redevelopment and Housing Authority], LEAP, [Albemarle Housing Improvement Program], [Piedmont Housing Alliance], and Habitat for Humanity in the work to address local housing issues.” Gillikin said approval of this project would prevent students from moving into local neighborhoods such as Tenth and Page and Fifeville. These units would have no affordability provisions. For comparisons let’s look at the Standard, another building designed by Mitchell + Matthews Architects. According to their website, the lowest rent for a room in a four-bedroom unit goes for $1,029 a month. Double occupancy in a single bedroom in a three bedroom unit can go for $845 a month. One and two bedroom units in the Standard are sold out. Pricing is not available online for the Flats at West Village. The Lark on Main has a one bedroom unit with a study for $1,879 a month. A room in a four bedroom, four bathroom costs $955 a month. Garage parking is an extra $100. Commission discussionAfter the public hearing, Commissioner Hosea Mitchell said he supported the project, but did want the massing to be a little more consistent with the rest of the neighborhoods. “We do need more housing in Charlottesville and we do a bit of relief valve,” Mitchell said. “We need housing in Charlottesville that is closer to UVA so that the housing that is further away from UVA can be used by the rest of our citizenry,” Mitchell said. Commissioner Taneia Dowell said if the developer is going to additional density based on the future zoning for the property, the spirit of the Affordable Housing Plan must also be honored. “That’s where I’m really having some heartburn,” Dowell said. “If we’re going to go off future endeavors for this project and this special use permit, then we need to go off future endeavors for everything related to this.” Commissioner Jody Lahendro said he could not support this level of density in the area and especially with a building with that much massing. He said the Comprehensive Plan also calls for development on Entrance Corridors to be compatible with existing neighborhoods. “I am not in favor of sacrificing a long term neighborhood for providing student housing for the University,” Lahendro said. “I think the people who have lived here and the single-family homes in this neighborhood deserve… we can’t just pretend that they’re not there.” Commissioner Rory Stolzenberg said he was reviewing the permit request under existing rules and not looking ahead to the new zoning. Quoting the standards of review, he noted that the Commission must review whether a proposal would be “harmonious with existing patterns of use and development in the neighborhood.”“But it will shock you guys to learn that harmonious is not actually defined in the code so the question I think before us is whether a five-story building can co-exist near or next to even smaller buildings including detached houses,” Stolzenberg said. “I’d note there’s already a four and a half story building at the head of the street.” Bill Palmer is with the Office of the Architect at the University of Virginia and sits as a non-voting member of the Planning Commission. He said UVA is not in an era where they are being required by the Commonwealth of Virginia to increase enrollment. According to the UVA office of Institutional Research and Analytics, there was an on-Grounds enrollment in Fall 2021 of 16,793 undergraduates and 6,928 graduate students. (enrollment data)“If you look at our official projects, they are flat,” Palmer said. Palmer said UVA is building additional housing on Grounds, including a second new structure in the Brandon Avenue Corridor. He also said the UVA initiative to build up to 1,500 new affordable units in the community includes a site further down from 2005 JPA in Albemarle County at the Piedmont housing site. “In terms of having affordable housing close in the future, that will be a place where the University is trying to provide something,” Palmer said. Council thoughtsCouncil will have the final decision, but did not vote during what is their first reading.Councilor Payne said he was frustrated that the affordability rules of the future are not yet in place. “This happened with another [special use permit] a few weeks ago where we’re in this strange situation where we’re sort of evaluating the Future Land Use Map and zoning map rewrite in mind, but if we’re using that in our evaluation, that will include our framework of inclusionary zoning and affordable housing overlays which are critical to the success of that plan for affordable housing,” Payne said. Councilor Brian Pinkston said he is learning toward support because it did provide more housing close to the University of Virginia. “I’m not able to fully articulate how we square that with point number one which is whether it is harmonious,” Pinkston said. “To some degree I think harmoniousness might be in the eye of the beholder. I will say that in terms of how the design was laid out and that you have seven stories in the front and five stories in the back, I thought there was some care and attention to trying to integrate into the neighborhood.” Snook also said he had issues with the word “harmonious” and said the traditional form of land use control known as “Euclidean zoning” is not good at dealing with change. “It doesn’t allow for us to grow gradually from a little bit of density to a little bit more density,” Snook said. “It allows us to say okay, we’re going to rezone the entire block of the entire neighborhood but it doesn’t let us go bit by bit.” As the Entrance Corridor Review Board, the Planning Commission voted unanimously on a motion to acknowledge there would be an adverse impact, but those impacts can be mitigated through the design process. As the Planning Commission, they consider a motion made by Stolzenberg to recommend approval. The was 4-3 with Stolzenberg, Mitchell, Habbab, and Commission Chair Lyle Solla-Yates voting in favor. Lahendro joined Dowell and Commissioner Liz Russell in voting no.  Help Ting help support Town Crier productions!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Rising
Buffalo Shooter: What We Know, SCOTUS Issues Opinions On Immigration, Silent on Abortion, Sweden & Finland Look To Join NATO, And More: Rising 5.16.22

Rising

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 81:04


Today on Rising, Buffalo shooter targeted Black people, killed 10 while livestreaming massacre: Authorities (00:00)Netflix FIGHTS BACK against censorship, tells woke employees to QUIT if offended: Robby Soave (14:08)Fauci says NO to serving under Trump again, would rather LEAVE White House (23:07)Elon Musk Twitter deal ON HOLD, Musk accused of VIOLATING NDAREPLACING HIM (30:51)FDA BEHIND the curve on formula shortage, FAMILIES now paying the price: Fmr official (41:18)Jeff Bezos CLAPS BACK at Biden for saying inflation is corporations' fault (49:17)NATO expansion on Russia's BORDER? Sweden & Finland to make alliance bids, cite Ukraine invasion (58:01)NEW: SCOTUS releases immigration, Ted Cruz V FEC opinions. SILENT on abortion decision (01:07:18)Where to tune in and follow: https://linktr.ee/risingthehillMore about Rising:Rising is a weekday morning show hosted by Ryan Grim, Kim Iversen, and Robby Soave. It breaks the mold of morning TV by taking viewers inside the halls of Washington power like never before, providing outside-of-the-beltway perspectives. The show leans into the day's political cycle with cutting edge analysis from DC insiders and outsiders alike to provide coverage not provided on cable news. It also sets the day's political agenda by breaking exclusive news with a team of scoop-driven reporters and demanding answers during interviews with the country's most important political newsmakers.

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051222 @107wchv #SCOTUS "There Oughtta be a Law" w/ @KenCuccinelli

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 29:46


Former Virginia Attorney General and DHS Secretary Ken Cuccinelli gets into the rioters illegal protests outside Supreme Court justices homes here in Virginia and what could (and SHOULD) be done about this adult-pattern-bullying. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051222 @107wchv #SCOTUS "The (p)Roe-Tests" Grow" w/ @ckchumley

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 28:51


The rioters continue to flaunt the law and challenge officials to dare to be seen enforcing anti-bullying statutes in front of Supreme Court justices homes. With special guest investigative journalist Cheryl Chumley. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051322 @107wchv #podcast "Voluntary Community vs Forced Collective"

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 61:54


It is one of the cornerstones of Conservatism as Russell Kirk lays it out but now we watch the Albemarle County School Division face unionist protests all while 'we, the people' receive outrageous increases in our (oxymoronically named) "Personal Property" taxes! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051122 @107wchv #podcast "How Much is the Bagel in the Window?"

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 42:35


Employees at the Bodo's Bagels on the UVA 'Corner' want to unionize... So how long before people decide that the bagel's aren't worth paying 3x the price? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series
Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: ASCO Guideline Endorsement of ASTRO Guideline

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 13:51


An interview with Dr. David Schiff from the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville, VA, Dr. Michael Vogelbaum from Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, FL, and Dr. Vinai Gondi from Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center Warrenville and Proton Center in Warrenville, IL, authors on "Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: American Society of Clinical Oncology Guideline Endorsement of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Guideline." An ASCO endorsement panel endorsed the "Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: an ASTRO Clinical Practice Guideline," and the authors review the endorsement process and key points in this episode. Read the full guideline endorsement at www.asco.org/neurooncology-guidelines.   TRANSCRIPT Brittany Harvey: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, a collection of nine programs covering a range of educational and scientific content and offering enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all the shows including this one at asco.org/podcasts. My name is Brittany Harvey, and today I'm interviewing Dr. David Schiff, from the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville, Virginia, Dr. Michael Vogelbaum from Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, and Dr. Vinai Gondi from Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center Warrenville and Proton Center in Warrenville, Illinois, authors on 'Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: American Society of Clinical Oncology Guideline Endorsement of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Guideline'. Thank you for being here, Dr. Schiff, Dr. Vogelbaum, and Dr. Gondi. Drs. Schiff, Vogelbaum, and Gondi: Our pleasure. Brittany Harvey: First, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guideline products and ensures that the ASCO conflict of interest policy is followed for each guideline product. The full conflict of interest information for this guideline endorsement panel is available online with the publication in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Schiff, do you have any relevant disclosures that are directly related to this topic? Dr. David Schiff: No relevant disclosures, Brittany. Brittany Harvey: Thank you. And Dr. Vogelbaum, do you have any relevant disclosures that are related to this topic? Dr. Michael Vogelbaum: I have no relevant disclosures. Brittany Harvey: Thank you. And Dr. Gondi, do you have any relevant disclosures that are related to this topic? Dr. Vinai Gondi: Brittany, my only relevant disclosure is that I served as vice-chair of the guidelines that we're discussing today, but otherwise, no relevant disclosures. Brittany Harvey: Excellent! Thank you all. So, then starting us off, Dr. Schiff, what is the scope of this guideline endorsement? And how does it intersect with the recently published 'Treatment for Brain Metastases: ASCO-SNO-ASTRO Guideline'? Dr. David Schiff: Sure. A little bit of background, from the start of the joint ASCO and SNO guideline effort, we had the participation of radiation oncologists, in addition to neurosurgeons, medical oncologists, and neuro-oncologists. As we were getting underway, ASTRO reached out asking to participate formally as well. They had been planning to update their brain metastasis guidelines but were a year or two away from getting started. And they recognized it would be redundant for them to create comprehensive guidelines that covered chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and surgery as our guidelines were poised to do. By participating with ASCO and SNO, they were able to have their task force focus specifically on key questions related to radiation oncology practices. In particular, the ASTRO project went into considerable depth on issues of radiation and radiosurgery dose, fractionation schemes, and the risk of radiation complications. These were areas that our guidelines didn't address. Several members of the ASTRO task force including their chair, Paul Brown, and co-chair Dr. Gondi were members of our committee, and we added Dr. Brown as a co-chair to our committee when ASTRO came on board. The overlap between our two groups helped ensure that our recommendations were in harmony. Brittany Harvey: So, then, Dr. Vogelbaum, can you provide us with an overview of how the ASCO guideline endorsement process works? Dr. Michael Vogelbaum: Sure, Brittany. So, as Dr. Schiff mentioned, ASCO had convened a guidelines panel to develop the new 'Treatment for Brain Metastasis: ASCO-SNO-ASTRO Guideline'. And this was a multidisciplinary panel that he and I co-chaired and was anchored by a guideline specialist from ASCO, Hans Messersmith, and the process was that we had evaluated recent literature pertaining to the treatment of the brain metastases, and so, we had a very good understanding of what was supported by high-quality evidence and what was not there yet, as a group. So, when ASTRO came to ASCO and asked whether or not we would be interested in endorsing their guidelines, we were already prepared with all the evidence. And so, the same panel got together again, to evaluate the ASTRO guidelines. And we did this, again, in a very structured manner. We reviewed the guideline questions and recommendations, compared them to the evidence, and went through the same type of review and polling process that we had when we had developed our own original guidelines. In the end, we had a conversation with the ASTRO guidelines leadership about some of the points that we raised questions about, and we were able to reach an accommodation that allowed us to fully endorse the ASTRO guidelines. Brittany Harvey: Thank you, Dr. Vogelbaum for that overview of the endorsement process. So, then, Dr. Gondi, what are the key recommendations of the ASTRO guideline? Dr. Vinai Gondi: Thank you, Brittany. As Dr. Schiff and Dr. Vogelbaum outlined, ASTRO commissioned a list of key questions that they sought to address specifically to inform the radiotherapeutic management of brain metastases. And to address these questions, ASTRO not only convened a panel of expert radiation oncologists across the country but also engaged with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to create a comparative effectiveness evidence review, in addition to our own high-level evidence review to address these questions. The four key questions that were addressed in the ASTRO guidelines are: Number one: What are the indications for stereotactic radiosurgery alone for patients with intact brain metastases? Number two: What are the indications for observation, preoperative radiosurgery or post-operative radiosurgery, or whole-brain radiotherapy in patients with resected brain metastases? Number three: What are the indications for whole-brain radiotherapy for patients with intact brain metastases? Number four: What are the risks of symptomatic radionecrosis with whole-brain radiotherapy and/or stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with brain metastases? The recommendations that were made are based on a high-level review of a considerable amount of literature over the past several years that addressed these specific questions. I would encourage the listeners to this podcast to read through the guidelines to understand the specific nuances of each of those recommendations. Brittany Harvey: Excellent! Thank you for that overview. Then, in addition to what Dr. Gondi just said, Dr. Vogelbaum, were there any additional points of discussion raised by the ASCO endorsement panel? Dr. Michael Vogelbaum: Brittany, yes, there was an area of discussion where we needed to interact with the ASTRO guidelines leadership, as I mentioned earlier, and it really related to that key question one that Dr. Gondi described, which is what are the indications for SRS alone for patients with intact brain metastasis. The approach that had been strongly endorsed by ASCO was that there would be a multidisciplinary approach to decision making. And really the benefit of that, the value of that radiosurgery really comes in the form of the interaction between the radiation oncologist and the neurosurgeon. The way that the original proposal had been formulated, there was a size cut-off that was higher than we thought was appropriate for really endorsing that kind of conversation between the radiation oncologist and the neurosurgeon. And so really, we proposed that we bring that cut-off down further, there actually was another subpart to the guideline that had looked at a lower cut-off, but did not specifically call out that interaction between the neurosurgeon and the radiation oncologist. And we felt it would be more appropriate to insert that at that cut-off rather than the larger lesion cut-off. And after a conversation, there was agreement, that was really the only guideline or subpart of the guidelines where there was any real debate or discussion. For the rest of it, the comments that came up from the panel were easily addressed and it really just came down to this one modification. And fortunately, ASTRO agreed, and we were able to go ahead and complete the endorsement. Brittany Harvey: Great! It's great that this was able to be a complete endorsement of that guideline. So, then, Dr. Gondi, in your view, what is the importance of this guideline endorsement? And how will it affect ASCO members? Dr. Vinai Gondi: Thank you, Brittany. A number of responses to that. Number one is, as Dr. Vogelbaum, outlined the purpose of these guidelines was meant to be patient-centric and patient-focused, that we had patient champions who had navigated, who are part of the guideline development team, but also to be multidisciplinary. And so, the type of input and feedback we received from the ASCO team was super valued and valuable, as we were formulating these guidelines and Dr. Vogelbaum outlined a good example. Number two, it had been almost a decade since the last guidelines had come out from ASTRO related to brain metastases management. And much has happened in our field over the past several years that has been practice-changing. We have several novel and innovative radiotherapy technologies and techniques, such as the emergence of radiosurgery, the use of novel radioprotectants, such as hippocampal avoidance, and memantine, but also the emergence of innovative and novel neurosurgical interventions and CNS active systemic therapies. So, the modern management of brain metastases has really undergone quite a revolution over just the past few years, and it is important that these guidelines be updated to reflect those changes, but also to inform radiation oncologists on the contemporary management of brain metastases and in evidence-based care. So, we believe that these guidelines will significantly impact ASCO members. Certainly, those who are radiation oncologists, as brain metastases are some of the most common patients that radiation oncologists manage in the community and in academic centers, but also for other members of ASCO medical oncologists, surgeons to understand sort of the nuances of radiotherapy management that is evidence-based, so they can have a patient-centered, patient-focused, multidisciplinary discussion with their radiation oncologist as well. Brittany Harvey: Those are excellent points for clinicians on the management for brain metastases. So, then finally, Dr. Schiff, Dr. Gondi just mentioned how these guidelines are patient-centric. So, how will these guideline recommendations impact patients with brain metastases? Dr. David Schiff: Yeah, well, I think what I'm about to say is really going to echo what Dr. Gondi just said. You know, 20 years ago, patients diagnosed with brain metastases were typically immediately referred to a radiation oncologist, they almost always got whole-brain radiation therapy, the median survival was about four months, and many, if not most patients, died from their brain metastases. The situation has really changed recently. With the rapid advances in management from new therapies, and well-designed clinical trials in recent years, outcomes have markedly improved, it's probably less than a quarter of patients now who succumb to their intracranial disease. But at the same time, decision-making for patients has become much more complicated. Nowadays, medical oncologists may reach out initially to neurosurgeons for consideration of radiosurgery or surgical resection, or in some circumstances utilize systemic therapy as a first step. Conversely, a patient might see a neurosurgeon first, who may or may not be aware that there's appropriate immunotherapy or targeted agent that might make sense prior to going on to radiosurgery. It's obviously a challenge for sub-specialists to keep up with all the emerging clinical trial data and new drugs. Our two sets of guidelines provide a roadmap for physicians of different expertise to help determine what types of therapies or referral should be considered when brain metastases are found. The end result of all this is improved control of intracranial disease and improved quality of life for the patients. Brittany Harvey: Absolutely. Those are key points. It's excellent to see these guidelines, and the overarching 'Treatment for Brain Metastases: ASCO-ASTRO-SNO Guideline' be published. So, I want to thank you all for your time today, Dr. Schiff, Dr. Vogelbaum, and Dr. Gondi. Thank you for all of your work on these guidelines. Dr. Michael Vogelbaum: My pleasure. Dr. Vinai Gondi: Thank you for having us. Dr. David Schiff: Thank you, Brittany. It was great to participate in this important project. Brittany Harvey: And thank you to all of our listeners for tuning in to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series. To read the full guideline endorsement go to www.asco.org/neurooncology-guidelines. You can also find many of our guidelines and interactive resources in the free ASCO Guidelines app available in iTunes or the Google Play Store. If you have enjoyed what you've heard today, please rate and review the podcast and be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode.   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.

Midday
Historian Kathleen Belew on 'A Field Guide to White Supremacy'

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 48:31


(This conversation first aired on December 8, 2021) The House Select Committee investigating the insurrection at the US Capitol on January 6, 2021 has interviewed hundreds of witnesses and made several criminal referrals to the US Justice Department for witnesses who have refused to appear before the Committee. Meanwhile, hundreds of rioters have been indicted and many imprisoned for their role in the attempt to subvert democracy. A federal jury in Charlottesville, Virginia, found 12 individuals and five organizations liable for $26 million in damages stemming from the Unite the Right Rally in 2017. Did the mob that stormed the US Capitol simply coalesce around the fantasy that the election was stolen from Donald Trump? What effect do monetary verdicts and criminal penalties have on the neo Nazi and White supremacist organizations that are behind this tragic deadly violence? Can the roots of the violence be traced back to rage about government that began in the 1970s? Today, we'll listen back to a conversation Tom had back in December, 2021, with Dr. Kathleen Belew. She's an assistant professor of history at the University of Chicago, where she is also the faculty affiliate at the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture. She is the author of Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America. And along with Ramón Gutiérrez, she is the editor of, and contributor to, a new collection of essays called A Field Guide to White Supremacy, in which she and other leading scholars explore how different forms of White supremacy and hatred manifest in events like those that took place on January 6th, and extend to domestic partner violence, homophobia, transphobia, Islamophobia, anti-immigration, and anti-Semitism. The authors chronicle how hate groups have moved from the fringe to the mainstream in America, and they send a clear warning that the violence we've seen in recent years may well be repeated. Kathleen Belew joined us on our digital line from Chicago. (Because this conversation is recorded, we can't take any call or comments today.) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 13, 2022: Several vacancies coming up on Charlottesville Planning Commission as city prepares to rewrite zoning code; One million Americans have died of COVID

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 15:22


Welcome to the only Friday the 13th of all of 2022! Many consider the day to be unlucky, a tradition that goes back many centuries. Rather than go through all of that, I’m more curious to know what you think of this day. Do you take precautions? Did you even notice? Do other days in a Friday the 13th’d month also have powers? In any case, those questions aren’t the purpose of Charlottesville Community Engagement, a podcast and newsletter whose host still wonders why. Charlottesville Community Engagement is mostly free but your financial support will help it growing! On today’s program:Governor Youngkin orders flags at half-mast to commemorate one million Americans who have died from COVIDThere are five vacancies on the Charlottesville Planning Commission, and the city is seeking applicantsAn update on the city’s zoning process as well as an update a lawsuit claiming the Comprehensive Plan is invalid under state lawAnd a quick preview of a conversation between the Reverend Alex Joyner and the author of a book on Virginia’s eugenics movement Shout-out to Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards In today’s subscriber-supported Public Service Announcement, the Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards continues to offer classes this spring and summer to increase your awareness of our wooden neighbors and to prepare for the future. Coming up on June 7 is a tree identification course taught on Zoom by tree steward Elizabeth Ferguson followed by a separate hike on June 11 at the Department of Forestry’s headquarters near the Fontaine Research Park. That’s followed by a tree identification walk at the University of Virginia on June 12 for the public. On June 14, Rachel Keen will give a lecture on Zoom on the Social Life of Trees. Do trees really communicate with one another? What is a 'mother tree'? Can a tree do anything to repel a pest? Learn more at charlottesvilleareatreestewards.org.One million Americans have died of COVID since pandemic beganGovernor Glenn Youngkin has followed the direction of President Joe Biden and has ordered that the United States and Virginia flags be flown at half-mast until Monday to commemorate the milestone of a million Americans who have now died of COVID in the past 26 months. I’ll have more on the pandemic tomorrow.On Thursday, the Virginia Department of Health reported another 3,144 new cases, and the seven-day average for new cases is 2,441. The seven-day percentage for PCR tests is 13.7 percent, up from 11 percent on May 6 and 9.1 percent on April 29. None of those numbers include tests taken at home. This morning the Virginia Healthcare and Hospital Association reports 325 people in hospitals are currently COVID positive, but many of those patients may have been admitted for other reasons. Forty-five COVID patients are currently hospitalized in intensive care units and 20 of those are on ventilators. Nationwide, the trend is toward more cases with 84,778 new cases reported through PCR tests according to data collected by the Centers for Disease Control. Hospitalizations are also trending upward across the country with a seven-day average of 2,603 new admissions a day. It’s important to remember that the number of COVID fatalities continues to trend downward with a current seven-day average of 272 deaths. The highest seven-day average during the pandemic was 3,420 in mid January of 2021 and 2,709 in early February of this year. Charlottesville hires two department headsThe City of Charlottesville has promoted two employees to take over their departments, and has also filled the position of Human Resources Director. Mary Ann Hardie will move to Charlottesville from Washington state to take the human resources position, which has been vacant since November 2020 when Michelle Vineyard left after just over a year of service. Hardie has served for the past three years as human resources director in Lacey, Washington. That’s a suburb of state capital Olympia that grew from 42,393 people to 53,526 from 2010 to 2020 according to the U.S. Census.Hardie starts work on May 16.Misty Graves has been with the city of Charlottesville’s Human Services Department for 16 years and has been the interim director since Kaki Dimock left the city to work for Albemarle County. “I am humbled by the opportunity to build on the existing work of the Department," is quoted in a press release. "Our Department is comprised of dedicated staff that are committed to creating a more equitable and just community so all of our residents may thrive, and it’s my honor to work alongside them.”David Dillehunt has been the interim deputy director of the Office of Communications and Public Engagement since soon after former director Brian Wheeler stepped down late last year. Deputy Director Joe Rice left soon afterwards. Dillehunt began working for Charlottesville in 2005 as a consultant has won two Regional Emmy Awards for work he’s produced for the city. In 2004, Dillehunt also produced a documentary on the children’s program You Can’t Do That On Television. (play the trailer) The city is still looking to fill the director’s position for the Office of Communications and Public Engagement. The position closes May 18 if you want to throw your hat in the ring. (see the vacancy)Vacancies opening up on Charlottesville Planning CommissionIf you have an interest in advising Charlottesville City Council on land use decisions, and have time to devote to the effort, you may get your chance. “There are spots on the Planning Commission that are coming open this summer,” said Missy Creasy, the Deputy Director of the city’s Department of Neighborhood Development Services. “And right now we are in the window for applications.” There are five terms ending this summer, and at least two current members cannot reapply. They are Jody Lahendro and Taneia Dowell. Commissioner Karim Habbab is filling an unexpired term which runs out on August 31. The terms of Hosea Mitchell and Rory Stolzenberg are both running out on that day. Stolzenberg is also filling out the unexpired term vacated when Hunter Smith resigned in 2018 after a handful of months in the position. Apply for the position here.Charlottesville zoning info slightly delayed Work on the next phase of the rewriting of Charlottesville’s zoning ordinance continues, but it’s slightly delayed. Neighborhood Development Services Director James Freas told the Planning Commission Tuesday that a “diagnostic and approach” report was not ready in time for their May meeting, but he hopes it will be out by the end of this month. (previous coverage)“As this point we are anticipating that the joint meeting between the Council and the Planning Commission to eventually make a decision on moving forward with that report, we’re projecting that happening in September at this point in time,” Freas said. Freas is now referring to this report as a conceptual plan for the new zoning ordinance. “It’s going to lay out what the approach is towards bringing our zoning into consistency with our Comprehensive Plan and its meant to include within it both modeling of potential building outcomes, so what type of buildings might be buildable under the policies articulated in the Comprehensive Plan, and how the market might respond to this new zoning,” Freas said. Freas said a public meeting will be held two weeks after the report with other community engagement events happening over the summer. The new Comprehensive Plan was adopted in November 2021. Consult Information Charlottesville for a series of property transactions in city limits since then. That joint City Council and Planning Commission meeting in September will be after a pair of judicial proceedings related to a lawsuit filed by anonymous Charlottesville property owners challenging the validity of the Comprehensive Plan. A hearing on the initial motion will be held in Charlottesville Circuit Court on July 15 with Judge Richard E. Moore presiding. A hearing on a city-filed demurrer to require the plaintiffs to identify themselves will be held on August 26. Alderman Library construction reaches milestoneThe tallest portions of the new Alderman Library have been installed, and the University of Virginia marked the occasion with a “topping out” ceremony. UVA Today reports that over a hundred workers were on hand to witness the placement of two steel beams that had been signed by UVA officials and more. “The two beams are part of the steel-framed clerestory roof structure, an architectural feature that will allow natural light to reach the study and reading rooms inside the library,” writes Matt Kelly in an article posted yesterday. The library itself is only two thirds of the way to being completed. When it’s done, there will be a new entrance that faces University Avenue. Bill Palmer is with the UVA Office of the Architect and he gave an update to the Charlottesville Planning Commission on Tuesday. “That’s a big milestone of a transformative project over there that will really open up the library towards University Avenue as you’re going up and down that thoroughfare,” Palmer said. The original library opened in 1937, but was closed off to University Avenue in 1967 when the “stacks” were built. I’ll have more from the Planning Commission in a future edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement. In today’s other three shout-outsCode for Charlottesville is seeking volunteers with tech, data, design, and research skills to work on community service projects. Founded in September 2019, Code for Charlottesville has worked on projects with the Legal Aid Justice Center, the Charlottesville Fire Department, and the Charlottesville Office of Human Rights. Visit codeforcville.org to learn about those projects. In the middle, I’d like to take the opportunity to wish my brother, Steve Tubbs, a happy birthday for tomorrow. The final comes from another Patreon supporter who wants you to go out and read a local news story written by a local journalist. Whether it be the Daily Progress, Charlottesville Tomorrow, C-Ville Weekly, NBC29, CBS19, WINA, or some other place I’ve not mentioned - the community depends on a network of people writing about the community. Go learn about this place today!Eugenics and the Making of Modern VirginiaThe newsletter and podcast you’re experiencing stems from a website I created in 2005 to bring lectures, interviews, and audio segments to the public as an experiment. The Charlottesville Podcasting Network has been in the hands of my friend Dan Gould for several years, but he recently retired and passed the baton back to me. From time to time, I’ll end this newsletter with a small taste of what you might hear there. The Reverend Alex Joyner is the pastor of Charlottesville First United Methodist Church, and he wants to ask questions about what it takes to make a place more whole. One thread in his questioning is the future of Market Street Park in downtown Charlottesville. In February, he interviewed Elizabeth Catte, the author of Pure America: Eugenics and the Making of Modern Virginia. Catte said she wrote the book after learning about some of the history of Western State Hospital. After the original structure closed in 2005, the site was turned over to the Staunton Industrial Authority for redevelopment as apartments. At one point, the facility was known bluntly as the Western State Lunatic Asylum. “Its history became part of its branding identity and that was a really interesting transformation to me,” Catte said.“Yeah, that’s a long stretch to pull those two things together,” Joyner said. “So 200 years of history had to get condensed into something that could be about two paragraphs on a website and could also be anchored to branding material for tourism, for community development, so it developed this really cozy kind of positive story about early physicians who committed themselves to the humane treatment of mental illnesses,” Catte said. “That was certainly one of the chapters of that sites’ history but the larger chapter that I knew as a historian was the history of the institution during the eugenics era.”Eugenics was the legal practice of sterilizing those thought to be inferior so they would not reproduce. The 1927 United States Supreme Court ruling of Buck v. Bell cleared the way for the practice, with Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes delivering the line “three generations of imbeciles is enough.” The practice was legal until the 1970’s.“At least 1,700 people were sterilized against their will at Western State Hospital,” Catte said. “The longest serving superintendent was a vocal leader of the Virginia eugenics movement and it has a very harrowing history.”To hear more from Alex Joyner’s interview with Elizabeth Catte, visit the Charlottesville Podcasting Network.Or view the interview on YouTube. Help Ting help support Town Crier productions!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Chicago's Morning Answer with Dan Proft & Amy Jacobson

0:00 -Lori does Dallas   10:13 - Dan & Amy investigate the baby formula shortage and reports of pallets of formula sent to the border     28:07 -Garland vs. parents   45:09 - Dan & Amy listen in as San Francisco school teachers discuss Creating and Sustaining GSAs   01:03:18 - Markets Specialist for Market Day Report! at RFD-TV, Scott “the Cow Guy” Shellady, doesn't think anybody has ever seen a recession and a shrinking economy at the same time. Be sure to follow the Cow Guy on twitter  @ScottTheCowGuy   01:19:31 - Republican US Senator for Iowa, Joni Ernst, discusses Ukraine funding and the baby formula shortage. For more on Senator Ernst visit Ernst.Senate.Gov   01:32:35 - Emily Mais, former assistant principal at Agnor-Hurt Elementary School in Charlottesville, Va: Why I'm suing my former employer, a school district, over critical race theory. Joining Emily is her attorney Hal Frampton, senior counsel at ADF. For more on Alliance Defending Freedom visit ADFlegal.org   01:49:50 - OPEN MIC FRIDAY!!!! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Clemson Sports Talk
The "In or Out" Edition

Clemson Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 84:48


After a strange season, Clemson's baseball team could host a regional or be out of the NCAA Tournament depending on how they close. The Tigers head to Charlottesville for a big weekend series with No. 9 Virginia.

Rockin' the Suburbs
1364: What Was First: Jagjaguwar Records

Rockin' the Suburbs

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 17:59


Our What Was First series stops in Charlottesville, Virginia today to pick up the story of Jagjaguwar Records.  Along the way, Dungeons and Dragons, Tokyo Rose and Bloomington, Indiana will feature. The first release is by The Curious Digit and yeah, we hadn't heard it either.  Hit play and enter the world of Darius Van Arman. Subscribe to Rockin' the Suburbs on Apple Podcasts/iTunes or other podcast platforms, including audioBoom, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon, iHeart, Stitcher and TuneIn. Or listen at SuburbsPod.com. Please rate/review the show on Apple Podcasts and share it with your friends. Visit our website at SuburbsPod.com Email Jim & Patrick at rock@suburbspod.com Follow us on the Twitter, Facebook or Instagram @suburbspod If you're glad or sad or high, call the Suburban Party Line — 612-440-1984. Theme music: "Ascension," originally by Quartjar, covered by Frank Muffin. Visit quartjar.bandcamp.com and frankmuffin.bandcamp.com

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051122 @107wchv #podcast #NetNeutrality Lesson from the EU

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 23:13


Seton Motley, President of Less Government is on to share THIS column on how the European Union has borne proof of all the things that free market conservatives said all along about "Net Neutrality." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051122 @107wchv #Election22 With Bryce @ReevesVA

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 19:05


Virginia State Senator Bryce Reeves is on as the early voting window has opened in the 7th Congressional District GOP primary on the issues of the day and the stalemate in the General Assembly budget process. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
051022 @107wchv #economy "The Vanishing Workforce" w/ @KSEconomist

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 14:56


Michael Austin joins Joe from Project 21 and the Kansas Policy Institute to get into the stunning number from this month's Jobs Report... the 300K + that have LEFT the workforce! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.