Podcasts about RoboCop

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1987 action film directed by Paul Verhoeven

  • 2,736PODCASTS
  • 4,205EPISODES
  • 1h 12mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 1, 2021LATEST
RoboCop

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Best podcasts about RoboCop

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Latest podcast episodes about RoboCop

Under The Puppet
66 - Greg Ballora (Spider-Man 2, Ratched, Team America) - Under The Puppet

Under The Puppet

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 67:51


http://www.UnderThePuppet.com - Greg Ballora is a puppeteer and builder who has had an incredible career in the business starting out working on projects such as Timmy the Tooth, Muppets Tonight, and Spider-Man 2 through to today working on shows like Earth to Ned and Ratched.  Greg has also trained new puppeteers at the Disney Parks so there is a lot of great puppetry advice in the discussion ahead. Also, this month you can win a Monkey Boys Productions FLICK Beginner Puppet Building Kit!  Listen to find out how to enter. Transcript of this interview is available to the Saturday Morning Media Patreon Patrons! CONNECT WITH GREG BALLORA: Instagram - https://instagram.com/gregballora DISCUSSED ON THE SHOW: Magpie Time - https://vimeo.com/2050758 Bob Hartman - http://hartmanpuppetry.com  Lisa Sturz - https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0836456/ Len Levitt - https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0506229/ Marty Krofft - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2020/01/utp-36/ DC Follies - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D.C._Follies Jim Gamble - http://www.jimgamble.com Gremlins 2 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gremlins_2:_The_New_Batch Robocop 2 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RoboCop_2 Batman Returns - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batman_Returns Men in Black II - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Men_in_Black_II Spider-Man 2 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spider-Man_2 Timmy the Tooth - https://youtu.be/bi6eA-W_C4Y Phil Baron - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phil_Baron Allan Trautman - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2017/09/utp-007/ Michael Earl - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Earl_(puppeteer) Bruce Lanoil - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2017/12/utp-010/ James Murray - https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0615015/ Alef Bet Blastoff - https://youtu.be/dcrE7sx25jI Muppets Tonight - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muppets_Tonight Kevin Clash - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2020/10/utp-52/ Brian Henson - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Henson The Mr. Potato Head - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mr._Potato_Head_Show Kevin Carlson - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2017/11/utp-009/ Michelle Zamora - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2021/06/utp-60/ Team America: World Police - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_America:_World_Police Bill Baird - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bil_Baird Peter Baird - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Baird Thom Fountain - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2017/07/utp-005/ Chiodo Brothers - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chiodo_Brothers Tim Lagasse - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Lagasse Crash & Bernstein - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crash_&_Bernstein Christine Papalexis - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2018/05/utp-16/ Ratched - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ratched_(TV_series) Ratched Clip (trigger warning) - https://youtu.be/IgTvmeSdShg Earth to Ned - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_to_Ned Donna Kimball - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2017/06/utp-004/ Raymond Carr - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2020/02/utp-37/ Mr. World Commercial - https://youtu.be/22Vkdfxwfco CLIPS HEARD ON THIS EPISODE: Spider-Man 2 - https://youtu.be/P6mkjW5rAmU Mr. Potato Head Show - https://youtu.be/JbrEsZGwIGw CONNECT WITH THE SHOW http://www.instagram.com/underthepuppet http://www.twitter.com/underthepuppet CONNECT WITH GRANT http://www.MrGrant.comhttp://www.twitter.com/toasterboy https://instagram.com/throwingtoasters/ Art by Parker Jacobs Music by Dan Ring Edited by Stephen Staver Help us make more shows like this one.  Become a patron of Saturday Morning Media and get cool rewards!  Visit www.patreon.com/saturdaymorningmedia for info! ©2021 Saturday Morning Media - http://www.saturdaymorningmedia.com

Cali High
Episode 49: Master Hollywood Arranger and Orchestrator, Steven Scott Smalley

Cali High

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 73:47


This week we have a very enlightening conversation with Steven Scott Smalley, aka Scotty, who I have known since kindergarten, and who has remained a friend of mine for 60 years. Scotty has orchestrated over 100 movie scores including Batman and Robocop and started professionally at age 21 arranging for the hit TV show, Charlie's Angels.He developed an orchestration technique which he taught for ten years at UCLA's extension and started the Film Music Institute, teaching a worldwide network of enthusiasts for 21 years. We speak of our early days selling the high quality cannabis in the 818 and the effect the herb had on the Hollywood music scene. Scotty also describes how cannabis enlightens the mind and inspires creativity as well as boosting productivity! This is an episode not to miss!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/calihighla?fan_landing=true)

Prof. Spira's Mucus-free Life Podcast
Ep. 39 - Stuntman & Athlete Eli Martyr on Living Mucus-Free While Working in Film/TV, Fasting

Prof. Spira's Mucus-free Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 151:28


Download the Top 10 Mucus-free Foods List & Menu-Planning Guide FREE: http://bit.ly/5-free-recipes-to-detox-mucus ​| In this episode of the Mucus-free Life Podcast, Prof. Spira interviews professional stuntman and athlete Eli Martyr on living mucus-free while working in Film/TV. They will discuss some of his fasting experiences as well as the harsh, totalitarian mandates and lockdowns due to Co*&$d, and how people are resisting. They will also discuss why diets like the “keto diet” do not work and are unhealthy. Eli has acted in numerous big budget movies and well-known TV shows, including War for the Planet of the Apes, Pacific Rim, The Colony, RoboCop(2014), Arrow, and The Umbrella Academy. Follow Eli Martyr and his FreeMelon Society on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheFreeMelonSociety. *** ​Transform your health with the Mucusless Diet today!: http://bit.ly/ultimate-mucus-free-book-bundle-1  ​ Enroll in the NEW Mucusless Diet Healing System eCourse: http://bit.ly/MDHS-eCourse-Enrollment  ​ Get Mucus-free Books on Amazon: http://bit.ly/prof-spira-amazon-author  Protect Yourself online and Save 72% on NordVPN and help out the Mucus-free Life Podcast: https://www.mucusfreelife.com/nordvpn  *** The Mucusless Diet Healing System is a complete course for every person who desires to learn how to control their health. The diet is a combination of individually advised long and short-term fasts, menus that progressively change to non-Mucus-Forming Foods, and periodic colon irrigation. ​ For More Information visit: http://bit.ly/ultimate-mucus-free-book-bundle-1  ​Readers of the Mucus-free Life catalog of books will learn what the "Mucusless Diet Healing System" is, what foods are pus and mucus-forming, how to get rid of that annoying stuffy nose, and much more. ​ You will find out why the transition diet is one of the most misunderstood aspects of a Mucus-free Lifestyle, why intermittent fasting and alkaline foods are important for health, and what transitional meals are best when someone craves their favorite mucus-forming foods. ​ *** General Disclaimer: The content found in this video and associated websites are based upon the opinions and research of Prof. Spira and his guests, and is strictly for informational and educational purposes only. The content is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a licensed healthcare professional or licensed dietitian, and is not intended as medical advice. Prof. Spira is not a medical practitioner or licensed dietitian and does not hold academic degrees in fields related to medicine, nutrition, or healthcare. You are encouraged to consult with the appropriate professionals before beginning any exercise, weight loss, or dietary program. This video and accompanying text is a sharing of personal experiences, opinions, and information about practicing a mucusless or mucus-free diet based on the works of Prof. Arnold Ehret. ​ https://www.mucusfreelife.com 

Podcast Under The Stairs
The Podcast Under the Stairs - Arrow Video Assortment EP 37 - ROBOCOP

Podcast Under The Stairs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 29:28


Welcome to this sub-set of show exclusively looking at the Duncan's Arrow Video collection. Every 3 weeks Duncan will pick, at random, a title from his collection and review them on The Podcast Under the Stairs Episode 37 - ROBOCOP (1987). The grading follows the Netflix rating style of 1 = Hated It, 2 = Didn't Like It, 3 = Liked It, 4 = Really Liked It & 5 = Loved It ROBOCOP: Duncan: 5 Up next on The Arrow Video Assortment Ep 38 - Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974). Our new RSS Feed: https://anchor.fm/s/13ba6ef0/podcast/rss Check out the show on iTunes, TuneIn & on Stitcher Radio. Join our Discord Community. Please leave us feedback on iTunes, podcastunderthestairs@gmail.com and follow us on Facebook & Twitter.

Overcrest: A Pretty Good Car Podcast
Drag Cars, Batmobiles, Robocop, Knight Rider, and the longest Limo Ever Made

Overcrest: A Pretty Good Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 79:15


Jay Ohrberg is a car builder and collector that built some of the most famous movie cars of all time as well as the longest and most absurd limousine ever created. We delve into this 100-foot long, 26-wheel, helipad-carrying beast, and where it is today.   Check out the Overcrest Drivers Club and SUPPORT Overcrest! https://overcrestproductions.com/driversclub    

Pop Saga
Ep. 73: Robocop (1987)

Pop Saga

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 71:12


Dead or alive, you're listening to this episode! Now that we've covered the classic Robocop cartoon that everyone loves (?) we're moving on to the 1987 movie that inspired it all. Have suggestions? Contact us at: Thepopsaga@gmail.com Follow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/thepopsaga/ Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/thepopsaga Merch?: https://www.teepublic.com/user/pop-saga Special thanks to burtonm6 at https://www.fiverr.com/burtonm6 for the amazing theme song

The Yak
RoboCop (1987) Rewatch With Commentary From Paddy The Baddy | The Yak 11-19-21

The Yak

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 66:39


The WILL be college football

Soldiers of Cinema - Exploring the Works and Philosophies of filmmaker Werner Herzog

In this episode, we luxuriate in the joy that is Paul Verhoeven's 1987 (dare we say it) masterpiece, Robocop. We discuss darn near every aspect of this film - a film that punches well above its weight and ended up a much better film than it had any right to be.

Let's THINK about it
Step 50: The Hero Trendency

Let's THINK about it

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 27:11


The Hero Story Perhaps there has always been an effort towards optimization, and it generally looks like technology. When speaking of self optimization, or overcoming , we are speaking of the hero's journey popularized by Joseph Campbell. Campbell spoke a lot of the parallels of the external journey and the internal journey… the external circumstances gave the individual the opportunity to react and grow.In the 50's-70's there was a wave of belief in unlocking human potential through psycho-science-type things like intensive practice hypnosis and subliminal training… or just LSD. Some of these practices were previously used in religious awakening, but we wrapped them up under the guise of science, and then they were abused by programs like MK Ultra.During this time, people thought of the human as a blank slate that could be written, molded or shaped. (optimized?) An example of this is Laszlo Polgar, born in Hungary, and with an idea about raising children, ended up getting married and having his first child in 1969. He and his wife Clara, raised children around the idea that they could create a genius through specific narrow focus. They had three children, the Polgar sisters, who all excelled at chess, reaching amazing heights, and were declared National Treasures. In fiction, chess is too boring, so the blank slates are in the genre of assassin Killers: examples are Kill Bill, Atomic Blonde, or Leon the Professional where they are trained, usually for revenge or duty. On the darker side you have children raised by handlers or governments as weapons, like in John Wick, Black Widow, Hannah, or Kate. So what if instead of being a badass with Kalashnikovs and stilettos you're a phenom with golf clubs? This is the Tiger Woods story, a history of brutal authoritarian parenting generating mental resiliency and overcoming. A lot of success, but a lot of trauma.Physically, many of us are not capable of such heroic heights: we cannot optimize enough to overcome our genetics, despite how much protein we consume. Enter science to the rescue as the mythical augmented man: Perhaps the Six Million Dollar Man or the darker side of Robocop, more of an automaton cyborg. Talk about efficiency: just turn the man into a machine. We are culturally conditioned to accept this is the way of the future as far back as cartoons like Inspector Gadget: the bumbling doofus with all sorts of extensions and rockets and wheels that both saved the day and naturally lead to slapstick pratfalls.Backtrack: This takes us back to an earlier podcast, step 28, in which I mentioned Henri Bergson, and his summary of what makes something funny, which is “the mechanical encrusted upon the living.”Of course, the real warning: when we lean too heavily into external power, technology, optimization (or even habits and productivity), we cease to be human in a certain way. We trade in the hard path of “overcoming” for the easy path of instant power, and in that substitution, we lose something. Yet, an alternate form optimization technology exists: Arcane Magics. I'm going to suggest, this path of learning the secrets of Arcane magics of habit stacking and personal productivity is the most alluring current path to be super, to achieve your potential. From Fiction to Fact While I have been talking about science through fictional stories, in many ways it has stepped into reality.You want to see something insane: look up clips from the 1920's Olympics compared to todays Olympics: Over 100 years the science of optimization and dedicated practice works… physically at least… until they turn into that unhinged balance beam killer super model from “The Spy who dumped me.” In America, we seem to live in a society that links success and progress and achievement with wealth and appearance. This is the manifest destiny of self-actualization woven into the Protestant work ethic, capitalist, American Mythos… and technology is often the vehicle and the key.But dedication to science and technology is problematically deterministic and class eugenics can spring up from it, as played out in the movie Gattaca. The secret to tricking an unjust technocracy? Keep secrets, and work harder than everyone else.But in this age of the internet we need to know exactly how: what was his diet? What drugs was he on? Boxers or briefs?And this is the trap we are in today: there are so many paths laid out before us by the millionaires and self-hacking crowds that we have a myriad of paths to successful optimization. Yet when someone, like in Gattaca, has an overpowering, all-consuming goal to be more… or in Kill Bill to kill more… we find their dedication and focus grants results. This can be called “dedicated practice” and myths of a 10,000 hour rule to mastery circulate around it. The beauty of it is that maybe we don't need neural implants and bionic arms. Maybe the new magics are habit stacks, routines, the mystical arcana of time-blocking and flow state. The only thing left is to find an all-consuming, overpowering desire that we can shape our life around… and that is not so much hero stuff, as a very old question of all of mankind: what is my purpose? What is my mission?  The Superman, the Ubermensch, Nietzsche How can we do an episode on superheroes, and overcoming without at least bringing up Friedrich Nietzsche. He popularized the concept of Übermensch or Overman or Beyondman… now most commonly seen as Superman.(By the way, this concept is affiliated with the Nazi party due to Nietzsche's sister misusing his texts.)The Overman is really a man of overcoming… and to confuse it with physical power as the Superman warrior is quite superficial. In our society many people appear superhero, overcoming physicality, but staying in vanity. The hero's journey is ultimately a journey towards self-integration, towards wholeness, and as Jung said “individuation” through the unification of opposites.In Nietzsche's book thus spoke zarathustra the prophet Zarathustra, who comes down from his mountaintop to share his knowledge with masses is spurned by the people. He attempts to tell them of the Ubermensch, but they reject this hard life of overcoming. All spiteful and disappointed, Zarathustra decides to prophesy the disgusting concept of Last man: a lazy decadent person, born of a civilization incapable of standing up to challenge or hardship, only interested in comfort. The last man takes no risks, preferring security. This is the soft and secure rationalist who has forgotten how to dream and everything the Ubermensch would do appears as illness, or madness.Intentional hardship? Are you crazy? So, how do we push back against the zombie conformity of security that seems so rational? It seems – indeed – to be illogical to try. Isn't it in our best interest to protect ourselves and stay comfortably in the middle of the herd? Yes, for survival maybe, but what about thriving? What about self-actualization?One way is to find something external to ourselves that is more important, someway we can help: A hero uses the challenge, the tension and hardship, to manifest creativity, to innovate. Are scientists and technologists our superheroes, the innovators or our time? How about the optimizers, the overcomers?  The guys and gals hitting flow state, or testing intermittent fasting: testing, and testing, and suffering, and sharing all this data with us. Are they climbing the mountain and coming back down with the mountain-top insights? Perhaps. But what if their motivation is internet rewards, or just a whole bucket full of hacks? That would be a less than noble goal.Experimentation can happen culturally, too. Can we not appreciate the heroism of the alternate lifestyle?The real challenge, the wisdom handed down to us through some religion, philosophy, and myths is to blend all opposites: overcome and move beyond dualities of good and evil, conscious and unconscious, spiritual and earthly… this is how you become an individual.Most of us are what is called a “dividual”, not undivided, as an “individual.” We are the divided self. Fragmented. We have not overcome or transcended, or as Hegel would say “subsumed.” Sure, we might be fit, we may look like the image of the superhero, but is maintaining appearances more like the act of the lastman? I am not saying they cannot coincide, but the motivation is a vital distinction to understanding conformity and overcoming.What I do know, is we -in our society- are really good at superficial appearances… placing the signifier before the signified.  The point, I think, is that to become a real human, a whole and integrated self, is a harder and a more heroic a journey than scientific shortcutting or following formulas that guarantee results. Sure, science/tech is great and helpful, but it shouldn't do the overcoming for you: you have to do that. Also, the hero is often portrayed alone, the monk ascending the mountain to find enlightenment or Superman in his Fortress of Solitude after keeping secrets, but you do not have to do this alone. Sure, you will have to work and push back against mindless conformity, but take the journey with others and avoid the solipsistic individuality of the shallow villain. 

Review Party Dot Com
Episode 75: Probably Casserole Competitions

Review Party Dot Com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 54:19


What are moms up to in the great white north? This week the party ventures out to find out just that. Today's topics include a topological goober, Calgary, getting names of NHL teams wrong, rad incarnate, walking around like Robocop, white gumballs, Mona Lisa for the Nintendo 3DS, Paris Syndrome, little dope fiends on monkey bars, the banana slicer, Harold and the Purple Crayon, and crocodile death-rolls. Want more party? Check out https://www.reviewpartydotcom.com

Shelved
Starship Troopers

Shelved

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 71:29


Paul Verhoeven is maybe the king of the cult classic, and Starship Troopers is perhaps the most self aware of his blockbusters. A movie that was misunderstood when it was released, it later gained a large cult following that was strong enough to spawn multiple sequels, video games, and even animated movies. Today I sit down with Victor Grubbs  as we discuss the one of the best cult classics of all time. Do you want to learn more? Then give it a listen! Don't forget to use promo code DEFENDING at The Cryptic Closet for 21% off your order. Special thanks to: Seth Decker, Patrick Hall Patreon: Merch: Guest Twitter: Cryptic Closet: Music by: Kevin Aldridge

60 Minutes With
Episode 393: Spotlight Reflection - RoboCop

60 Minutes With

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 216:36


Chris and Adam once again return in another ‘Spotlight Reflection' show, where they reflect on movies from their past and see if they are still as good as they remember them, or do they not fare as well re-watching as an older adult?  In this episode they chat about the 1987 movie RoboCop. Make sure to visit www.60MW.co.uk for news, reviews, podcasts, how to join our World Tour, and a very easy way to leave us a review. Thank you for listening.

Out of Curiosity with kt mather
59 - David Scott Hay - RoboCop

Out of Curiosity with kt mather

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 115:14


DSH and I talk egg preference, chicken life, pandemic publishing (not recommended), book reviews, douchey agents, conflict vs. character in writing, the great comedy that is PEN15, and then a deep dive into the 80s classic, RoboCop (which was evidently SUCH good satire, that the director, Paul Verhoeven, almost passed on it...)

Southern Fried Geekery
Ep. 203 Captain Angst and the Crotchfruit

Southern Fried Geekery

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 98:25


*Spoilers for: Disney drops new Marvel series first looks, Diamond gets hit with malware, Shortstack-o-comics; Robin & Batman #1 (35:00); Refrigerator Full of Heads #1(1:06:00); Frank Miller's RoboCop #1 (1:14:00); The Me You Loved in the Dark #4 (1:24:00) NCBD picks: Wonder Woman Evolution #1; Dracula of Transylvania OGN; Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters #8

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Is Your Firewall Actually Protecting You? What Should You Be Doing?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 84:27


Is Your Firewall Actually Protecting You? What Should You Be Doing? New stats are out this week. So what's the number one vector of attack against us? Our Firewalls. And they're failing. So, what's going on. And what can you do about it? [Automated transcript follows] [00:00:16] And of course, I'm always talking about cyber security, because if you ask me that is one of the biggest problems we have in business. [00:00:27] Today. Well, yeah, you got to find employees. In fact, uh, it's almost impossible to find them in the cyber security space as well. And it's been hard for years. So I try to keep you up-to-date here. We've got boot camps that are coming up and you are really going to like them. We've been working on some supplemental materials for it. [00:00:47] And of course these boot camps are always free, so you can join it. You can have your friends come and learn the. Basics. It's not one of these high sell things. Right. I, I got a little letter in the mail this week saying, Hey, you can come and get a free steak dinner. And of course it's kind of like a timeshare, right? [00:01:09] Jay, you have to listen to the pitch. Yes. Stay over. On us. And you are going to be sitting there for four hours listening to this crazy pitch that's going on. That's not what my bootcamps are. Anybody that's been to. One of them will tell you we work on it. I explain it. You know what you have to do, how you have to do it, the wise, the winds, the wherefores. [00:01:35] So if you would like to learn more for yourself, Make sure you sign up Craig peterson.com sign up for my newsletter. And when a bootcamp is coming up, I will be sure to tell you about it in the newsletter so that you can attend. And it's important to, to understand that this is yeah. Aimed at business, the, these boot camps, but almost everything businesses have to do or shouldn't be doing the same thing applies to you in your. [00:02:08] So, if you are a small business person, if you're someone who has some it experience, and you've been assigned to worry about cyber security, this is for you. If you are a very small business and you're kind of the Jack of all trades, and you've got to worry about cybersecurity, this is for you. And I just got. [00:02:31] This week from someone on my email list who is retired and she was talking about her husband and her, they don't have any kids, no errors. They're trying to protect their financial investments. And of course I responded saying, Hey, I'm not a financial investment advisor, but I can certainly give you some cyber security input, which I did. [00:02:53] And you can ask your questions as well. I'm more than glad to hear them. And you probably, if you've sent them in, you know, I always answer them now. My big man, a few days might take me a week, but I will get around to it. And I try and respond to the emails. Sometimes I answered here on the radio show or on my podcast, but usually it's via email me. [00:03:17] At Craig peterson.com. And of course, that's also on my website, Craig peterson.com. And that's also my name Craig Peters on.com. So let's get into the firewall thing. When you have a network, you are connecting that network to your computers, maybe. To your security cameras, to your printers that you have, maybe there's a lock system. [00:03:44] Maybe there's more, all of this stuff is interconnected and it's all rather well and good. You can have a whole lot of fun with it, but it is not as particularly good if you can't get out to the internet. So what do we do? We hook our network, whether it's home or if it's business to the internet. Now, you know, all of this stuff so far, right? [00:04:06] You're following me. The internet is actually inter connected networks. In case you didn't know, there are now millions of networks that are connected on the internet. There are core networks out there. We were my company like number 10,000. I think it was, uh, a S an R a S number autonomous system. So we were fairly early on. [00:04:32] And of course, as you know, I've been on the internet in various forums since the early 1980s and helping to develop the protocols, but it is important to remember it is an interconnected network of networks. You might ask why? Well, the bottom line is you aren't connecting your network with other networks that have malicious software on them. [00:04:58] Maybe they're just poorly configured. Maybe they're causing a denial of service attack effectively because there's so badly configured. But whatever the case may be, you are still exposed. If you look at the traffic that's coming to your router. So your router is sitting at the edge of your network connected to your internet service provider. [00:05:19] So it might be Comcast or Verizon or a whole slew of others. But your network is connected via a router. Then the router knows how do I get my data from the input to the output or from the output to the input, if you will upstream and downstream data, that's what the router is for. And if you look at the data on your router and most of us can't, but if you were able to, what you will see is hundreds of thousands of internet packets coming to, and from your. [00:05:55] Router your endpoint every day. Usually these are bad guys doing what are called scans. They do port scans. They're primarily looking for services. So what do you, do you have a firewall now in many cases, you'll get a device from your Janette service provider that has a router built in and has a firewall built in, and it has wifi. [00:06:19] All of this stuff, all built in together makes life all nice and warm and fuzzy and Catalina, doesn't it. But in reality, it's not necessarily a good thing to have it all in one, because you're definitely not going to get the best of breed and router or firewall or wifi, but that's a different story. What is that firewall for that router? [00:06:41] Of course, it's getting all this internet traffic and anything that's on the internet that is. I'm trying to get to you is going to go through the. And anything that you are trying to send up to the internet, like for instance, to try and get a web page or something is also going to go up through that router. [00:07:02] So how do you protect yourself time? Was that there wasn't really much of a way to protect yourself. And frankly, there weren't a lot of reasons. To try and protect yourself. And the internet was just this wonderful open thing, lots of fun and played around a lot. Back in the early nineties, it was, it was just a joy in the late eighties to, to be connected up to the internet and then bad guys started doing bad things. [00:07:30] We took the concept of what you have in an automobile and applied it to the. If you're driving your car, your in the passenger compartment and that passenger compartment is hopefully warm in the winter and cool in the summertime. And you are protected from that big mean nasty engine that's in front of you, or if you're driving an electric car from those mean nasty batteries that are probably below you in that car and what's between you and the. [00:08:04] Of course a firewall. And the idea is to keep the nastiness of that engine, all of the heat, the oil, the grime, the wind, everything else is associated with that engine. Keep that away from you so that you can now drive that car just comfortably in that controlled climate of the passenger compartment, that concept was then applied to the inter. [00:08:30] And in fact, I designed and implemented one of the first firewalls ever made way back when and the firewall in the internet Partland is very similar to the car in the car. You have some protrusions through that fire. Don't you, you you've got a steering wheel. How does that get up to the front of the car? [00:08:53] Well, it goes through the firewall and around that steering wheel, of course there's some EBDM, some rubber type stuff that helps stop anything from coming through right next to that steering column. Same, thing's true with the brake pedal and the gas pedal. At least it used to be. Nowadays, it's so much of this as drive by wire, that the only thing going through the firewall is a wire and there's no mechanical linkage. [00:09:24] Unlike my car, which is a 1980 Mercedes-Benz diesel. Where yes, indeed. Direct linkages to everything. So the firewall in the cars protecting you from the nastiness in the engine compartment and the firewall, when it comes to your internet is doing something very similar. Think about your house for a minute, you have a house with doors and windows. [00:09:53] I would hope. And a chimney and maybe a couple of other protrusions that are going outside of the house. Well, you have some similar problems and when it comes to the internet and when it comes to the firewall, With your house, sir. Sure. You could post a guard out front, a whole series of them. You've got a dozen guards out front and they are all guarding that front door. [00:10:19] But if no, one's watching the back door, if no one's paying attention to the windows, there's still ways for the bad guys to get in. And that's what we're going to talk about. How does the internet firewall tie into this analogy of cars and the analogy of your home? Because it's a very important point when you get right down to it. [00:10:44] We need to understand this because the number one tactic reported this week by MITRE and Cisco is exploitation of public facing application. So I'm going to explain what that is. What's your firewall can do for you and what you should do for your firewall. A stick around. We've got a lot more coming up. [00:11:09] I want to invite you to go. Of course, right now, online to Craig peterson.com. Once you're there, just sign up for mind's newsletter. Simple Craig peterson.com. [00:11:25] This week, we found out what the top five tactics are that are most frequently being used by bad guys to attack us. This is done by MITRE and Cisco systems. Number one, public facing applications. What does that mean? [00:11:42] We've been talking about this report, but really what we've been delving into is how data flows on your network, whether it's a home network or maybe it's a business network, how does this whole mess work? [00:11:58] And when miters talks about the biggest problem here, 91% of the time being what's called an exploit of a public facing application, what does that mean? We went through the basics of a firewall and a router. So all of the data coming from the internet, coming into the router, then handed to the firewall. [00:12:24] Any data going out, goes into the firewall. And then the. So that's the pretty simplistic version. And of course the firewall on your network does a similar thing to the firewall in your car. It stops the bad stuff, at least it's supposed to, but your home and your car both have different ways of getting. [00:12:48] Past the firewall in the house. It's your doors and your windows in the car. Of course, it's where the steering column goes through where the brake pedal and the gas pedal go through the clutch, all of that stuff that perch, um, permeates, it goes through. That firewall. And of course, you've probably, if you're been around for awhile, you've had leaks coming through your firewall and, uh, you know, how poorest they can be sometimes. [00:13:18] Well, we have the same type of thing on our internet firewalls. Every home has doors and what we call the doors in on the internet is similar to what they call them. On the, in the Navy, on the water, the reports. So think about a porthole in a boat, or think about a, a door, a port, which is the French word for door. [00:13:45] What happens on the internet? For instance, if you're trying to connect to Craig peterson.com, you are going to connect to a specific port on my server. So the address typically, uh, is going to be resolved by DNS. And then once it gets to the server, you can connect to port 4 43. You might try and connect to port 80, but I'll do a redirect, but that's neither here nor there. [00:14:12] So you're going to connect to that port four 40. So my firewall has to say, Hey, if somebody is coming in and wants to get to port 4 43, which is called a well-known port, that's the port that all web server. Listen on. So if someone's trying to get to my port, my web server on port 4 43, let them in. But if someone's trying to get to another port, don't let them in. [00:14:48] Now there's multiple ways to respond or not respond. I can talk about that right now. That'd be for deep dive workshop, but the idea is. Each application that you are connecting to, or that your providing has. Part of the problem that we've been seen. And this is a very big problem is that people are not changing the administrative passwords on their machines. [00:15:20] So administrative passwords mean things like admin for the username and admin for the password on your firewall. So. Your firewall, if you have what's called when admin enabled, what that means is someone on the wide area network. In other words, The internet, someone on the internet or on the, when can connect to your firewall and control it. [00:15:51] This is, as you can imagine, a very big thing, and it is something that we cover in one of our workshops, explained it all and all of the details and what to do, but most businesses and most people have not properly configured their firewalls. When we're talking about number one, problem, 91% of the time being an exploit against public facing applications. [00:16:18] What that means is they could very well just be trying to connect to the administrative interface on your firewall. Unfortunately, they will often offer. Change the software on your firewall. So they won't just reconfigure. They'll just change it entirely. And they'll do all kinds of evil things. Again, we're not going to get into all of that and what to look for and what can happen. [00:16:44] But number one thing everybody's got to do, and I saw some stats this week as well, that made me want to bring the. Most people and most businesses about two thirds have not changed the default passwords on the hardware that they have. Now it can understand sometimes the kids confusing. No question about. [00:17:07] But if you don't change the password on something that's public facing, in other words, something that can be reached from the internet or again, the wide area network. I know there's a lot of terms for this, but something that someone else can get at from outside your network. And it's the default password like admin admin, you could be in a whole lot of. [00:17:35] So check that right now, please double check that triple check that because even if you have a router from a big internet service provider, again, like the Comcast Verizon's, et cetera of the world, they will almost always have it set up. So you can change that administrative password and Jewish. Now I, again, for clients, I have some different advice than I have for, for just regular users, but make sure you change that. [00:18:09] And here's the second part of the problem. What happens if you have a business and let's say you're not hosting your own website, like I've been doing for a couple of decades and how three 30 years, I guess now. Um, and so you've got your website hosted at some. Web height site, hosting place, you know, Gator or one eye and one eye and one or GoDaddy or whatever. [00:18:35] Okay. So, okay. That's fine. So let's not inside our network. Uh, w we don't worry about the security because that's the vendor's problem. Now we're talking about, okay, what happens. My users who need to work from home. This gets to be a very big problem for so many people, because work from home is important. [00:19:00] So what are you going to do? Well, basically in most cases, unfortunately, businesses are just exposing an application to the internet. So they might, they might. Terribly configured networks, where there is a direct connection that goes right to the files. So you connect to a port on their firewall and it immediately redirects it internally. [00:19:30] Remaps it to the file server. And some people are really, really clever. Alright. Or so they think, because what they'll do is they'll say, okay, well, you know, that, that normal port number. Okay. So I'm going to move. Port number. So you're going to connect to port 17, 17 on my firewall, and it's going to connect you to the file share on my file server so that people from home can just connect to port 17, 17, and ta-da, there are all the files and yeah, we're, we're using passwords, so it'll be okay. [00:20:06] It'll be fine. Um, but, uh, guess what it isn't for a few. Different reasons are we're going to be talking about those here in just a minute. Yeah, I want to encourage you right now. Take a minute. Go online. Craig peterson.com. You'll find lots of information there. I've got 3,500 articles, all searchable, Craig peterson.com. [00:20:32] But more importantly, make sure you sign up for my newsletter. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. So that you can keep up to date on everything that is important in all of our lives. [00:20:51] We're talking about firewalls at home at the office, what it means to have public facing services, really applications, people working from home. How can you make it easy for them and hard for the bad guy? [00:21:15] Many businesses had to quickly change the way their computers were set up because of course the lockdown and people working from home. [00:21:26] And, um, unfortunately. Many mistakes were made. And some of this, in fact, I'm going to talk a lot of this problem up to these managed services providers break, fix shops. My, my fellow information technology contractors, if you will, because they didn't know any. Most of these people have been computer people, their whole lives, right. [00:21:55] They played with PCs when they were young and they might've taken a course or two and wow. MCSC certified. Believe me, this is not something that a straight up MCSC or. And frankly, most of the it certifications can really understand or really handle the cybersecurity can be done, but there's so many things they overlook just like what I was just talking about, exposing a file server directly to the internet. [00:22:29] I mentioned, okay. While they thought it was going to be safe because there's a username and password, but there's a couple of huge problems here. Problem. Number one. When you're exposing a service to the internet, like for instance, the files server, you are exposing software that may have exploitable, but. [00:22:54] And again, going back to those stats from earlier this week, more than half of all of the systems that are out there are not patched to date. It's so bad that president Biden just ordered the federal government agencies to apply patches some as old as three years. So what happens now? Well, the bad guy scan, and guess what they found. [00:23:23] Port that you thought was just so clever because it wasn't the standard port number for that service. Maybe it's SMB or CIFS or something else. And, uh, they found it because they scan, they look, they see what the response is that tells them what type of a server sitting there. And then they try, well, let me see. [00:23:45] There's the zero day exploits, but why bother with those? Let's just start with the good old standard ones. And unfortunately, because so many machines are not patched up at all, let alone properly patched up. You, they end up getting into the machine. It's really that simple, just because it's not patched up. [00:24:08] How does that sound? Huh? Yeah, it's just plain, not patched up. It's not available for anyone to be able to use anybody to be able to access. Right. It there it's not restricted. So the passwords don't matter if you haven't patched your systems. And then the second problem is that. Are brute force attacks against so many servers out there. [00:24:36] And most of the time, what we're talking about is Microsoft, but, you know, there's the share of bugs kind of goes around, but Microsoft and really, they get nailed a lot more than most beet, mainly because they're probably the number one out there that's in use today, not in the server community, certainly, but certainly also in the. [00:24:59] It's been, you know, small businesses, that's all they know. So they just run a Microsoft server and more and more, you kind of have to run it because I, I get it. You know, there's so many apps that depend on the various functions that are provided by the active directory server at Microsoft and stuff. So we, we do that for our customers as well. [00:25:19] So are you starting to see why the brute force against a server will often get them in and the smarter guys figure out what the business is? And then they go to the dark web and they look up those business emails. Addresses that they have that have been stolen along with the passwords that were used. [00:25:43] That's why we keep saying, use a different password on every site because that stolen password now. Is going to be tried against your service, your, your file server. That might be there. You might be trying to have a VPN service that the people are VPN in from home. You might have remote desktop, which has been. [00:26:08] Abject failure when it comes to cybersecurity, it's just been absolutely terrible. So you might have any of those types of things. And if they've got your email address and they've got the passwords you've used on other sites, which they've stolen and they try them, are they going to work? Odds are yes, because most people, I got another set of stats this week. [00:26:36] Most people use the same password for every site out there or every type of site. So they might get a second, most common is they use one password for all of their social media sites. They use another one for all of their banking sites. So we cover this in some depth in our bootcamp so that you understand how to do the whole password thing. [00:27:03] And what I recommend is a piece of software called one password. I don't recommend that you just use one password for everything. I was misunderstood by someone the other day. You mean just w w I use one password for everything. Yeah, you do. And then I talked to them a little bit more because I thought that was an odd question. [00:27:24] And it turned out, he was thinking, you just have the one password, like, like, you know, P at sign SSW, zero RD. Right? You use that everywhere. No, there's a piece of software go to one password.com. That's what I recommend as a password manager. And I show you how to use that and how to use it effectively in my bootcamp. [00:27:48] Absolutely free. Just like the radio is free. I'm trying to get the information out to as many people as possible, but you gotta be on my list. Craig peterson.com. Make sure you go there. So I've explained the basics here of what happens. We have a door open or windows, open ports on our servers, on our firewalls at home. [00:28:15] And at work. So the thing to do, particularly if you're a business, but even if your home user is check that firewall configuration. And let me tell you something that probably won't come as a surprise. Most of these internet server. The providers are in the business to make as much money as possible. And cybersecurity is very much secondary. [00:28:40] They know they talk about it and they talk about software defined networks and things that sound really cool. But in reality, what they give you is. Configured very well and is going to expose you. So make sure you go in, they will set it up. For instance, if they're providing you with television services, they'll set it up so that they can just bypass your firewall and get into the cable box that they installed in your house. [00:29:09] Yeah. Obviously that's not something they should be doing because now they are opening you up to attack. What happens when there's a cybersecurity problem with the cable box? We've seen this problem too, with television vendors where they poke a hole out through your firewall so that they can then gather statistics and do firmer updates and everything else. [00:29:34] It's insane. It really is. These vendors are not thinking about you. They're not thinking about the consequences. It is a very, very sad situation, but now you know what to do and how to do it. Okay. I explained today, firewalls. I explained router. I explained ports, which should be open, which should not be open. [00:29:58] And the reasons why I even mentioned passwords, I get into that in a lot of detail in my bootcamp, Craig peterson.com to get on that waiting list. Craig peterson.com, just subscribe and you'll be kept up to date. [00:30:14] There has been a whole lot of discussion lately about Metta. You might've heard. In fact, you probably did that. Facebook changed its name to Metta and they're aiming for something called the metaverse. So what is it exactly and what's it going to do for or to you? [00:30:32] The metaverse oh my gosh. I had a great discussion this week about the metaverse this came out in, um, and originally anyways, in this novel called the what was it now? [00:30:47] A snow crash. That's what it was 1992, Neil. Stevenson or Steffenson. I'm not sure how he pronounces it, but in this book, which was a cyberpunk model and I've, I've always thought cyber punk was cool. Uh, is the metal versus an imaginary place that's made available to the public over the world wide fiber optics network. [00:31:13] And it's projected onto virtual reality goggles sound familiar yet. And in the. You can build a buildings park signs as well as things that do not exist. In reality, such as vast hovering overhead light show, special neighborhoods were three where the rules of three-dimensional spacetime are ignored and free combat zones where people can go hunt and kill each other. [00:31:42] Great article about this in ARS Technica this week. And, uh, that was a little quote from the book and from the article. Phenomenal idea. Well, if you have read or seen the movie ready player one, and I have seen the movie, but a friend of mine this week said the book is so much better. So I'm going to have to read that book, ready player one. [00:32:06] But in it, you have these people living in. Dystopian future where everything is badly worn down, the mega cities, people building on top of each other and they get their entertainment and relaxation and even make money in. Prison time by being inside this virtual world, they can go anywhere, do anything and play games, or just have fun. [00:32:39] One of the vendors that we work with at my company mainstream has this kind of a virtual reality thing for. I kind of a summit, so people can go and watch this presentation and I think it's stupid, but they, you walk in. And it's, uh, this is just on a screen. They're not using like those Oculus 3d graph glasses, but you walk into an auditorium. [00:33:13] So you've got to make your little avatar walked on. Dun dun, dun dun, dun, dun, dun, dun, dun, and then go to an empty seat. And then you have to make your avatar sit down. Right? I, I have never played a game like this. I never played second life. Never any of that sort of thing. It was kind of crazy to me. And then I was doing a presentation, so I had to go Dundon then, then, then the, up onto the rostrum there and stand behind the podium and, and then put my slides up on this virtual screen. [00:33:49] It was ridiculous. I have a full television production studio here in my, in my lab. Right. And that's, this is where I do the radio show. This is where I do my television appearances. This is where I do pretty much everything. Right. And so what I can do is I can split screen with my face, with the desktop. [00:34:12] You can see my desktop, I can draw on it, circle things, highlight things or whatever I want to do. Right. But no, no, no, no. I was in their virtual reality. And so all I could do is. I have the slides come up. In fact, I had prepared beforehand, pre-taped it? A, the whole presentation, but I couldn't play that video. [00:34:37] No, no, no. I had to show a slide deck, you know, death by PowerPoint. I'm sure you've been there before. It's very, very frustrating in case you can tell for me, well, we've seen this type of thing. I mentioned some of the things like that. I'm in second life. I'm sure you've heard of that before. Sims is another one you've probably heard of before. [00:35:01] These types of semi metaverses have been around a very long time. And, and in fact, all the way on back to the nineties is Habbo hotel. G I don't know if you ever heard of that thing, but it was non-line gaming and social space. I helped to develop one for a client of mine back in the early nineties. [00:35:23] Didn't really go very far. I think it was ahead of its time. It's it's interesting right now, enter. Mark Zuckerberg. Do you remember a few years ago, mark Zuckerberg had a presentation. He was going to make this huge announcement, right? They bought Oculus. What was it? It was like crazy amount of money. And then he came in the back of the hall. [00:35:50] And nobody noticed he walked all the way up to the front and nobody even saw him because they were all wearing these 3d glasses. And of course, today they are huge. They are awkward and they don't look that great, the pictures inside, but the idea is you can move your head around and the figures move as your head moves, almost like you're in the real world. [00:36:13] And that's kind of cool and people thought it was kind of cool and they didn't see Zuckerberg because they all had these things on. And the inside was playing a little presentation about what Facebook was going to do with Oculus. Well, they just killed off the Oculus name anyways here a couple of weeks ago, over at Facebook about the same time that got rid of the Facebook name and went to meta. [00:36:39] The Facebook product is so-called Facebook and it appears what they are going to be doing is taking the concept of a metaverse much, much further than anyone has ever taken it before. They're planning on there's speculation here. Okay. So, you know, don't obviously I don't get invested. I don't give investment advice, investment advice. [00:37:10] Um, but I do talk about technology and, uh, I've been usually five to 10 years. I had so take that as well. They as the grain of salt, but I think what they're planning on doing is Facebook wants to become the foundation for Mehta versus think about things like world of Warcraft, where you've got the. Gain that people are playing. [00:37:39] And it's a virtual reality, basically, right? It might be two D, but some of it's moving into the three-dimensional world. Other games like Minecraft and roadblocks, they have some pretty simple building blocks that people can use network effects and play your creativity to make your little world and the ability. [00:38:04] To exchange and or sell your virtual property. That's where I think Mr. Zuckerberg is getting really interested now because if they can build the platform that everybody else the wants to have a virtual world builds their virtual world on top of. Man, do they have a moneymaker? Now? People like me, we're going to look at this and just poo poo it. [00:38:35] I I'm sure I'm absolutely sure, because it will be another 20 years before you really think it's. You know, some of these scifi shows have talked about it. You know, you can feel someone touching you, et cetera, et cetera. Yeah. That's going to be very crude for a very long time. And now CGI is pretty good. [00:38:57] Yeah. You watch the movies. CGI is great, but that takes weeks worth of rendering time on huge farms, clusters of servers. So it's going to take quite a while. Looking at the normal advancement of technology before this really becomes real. Now there have also been us court cases over who owns what in bad happened with Eve online. [00:39:28] Second life where disagreements over player ownership of the virtual land created by the publisher, which was Linden labs. When. And I've also mentioned in the past how our friends over at the IRS have tried to tax some of the land that you own inside these virtual worlds. So ownership, do you really own it? [00:39:55] Does it really exist? What would non fungible tokens maybe it does. And these non fungible tokens are. Basically just a check, some verification, I'm really oversimplifying of some sort of a digital something rather lately. And initially it was mostly pictures. And so you had a picture of something and you owned that and you could prove it because of the blockchain behind it. [00:40:27] But I think this is where he's really interested because if he can build the base platform. Let the developers come up with the rules of what's it called it a game and come up with what the properties look like and how people can trade them and sell them and what kind of upgrades they can get. Right. [00:40:48] So let's nothing Zuckerberg has to worry about. Uh, Metta or Zuckerberg then worries about, okay. So how do we collect money for these? How do we check with the transactions? Uh, somebody wants to buy those sort of Damocles. How does that transaction work and how do we Facebook Metta? How do we get a slice of the act? [00:41:16] You got to believe that that's where things are going. And if they have the ability to make this base platform and be able to take characters from one part of a developer to another part of the developer, you could have worlds where Gandalf might be fighting bugs bunny. Right? Interesting. Interesting and Warner brothers, all these movie companies would probably be coming out with complete virtual reality. [00:41:49] So when you're watching James Bond, you're not just watching James Bond, you can look around, you can see what's happening. People sneaking up behind. And ultimately you could be James Bond, but that's decades away. I think a good 20 years. All right, everybody. Thanks for sticking around here. Make sure you go online. [00:42:11] Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Get my weekly newsletter. Find out about these free boot camps and other things that I have. So we can keep you up to date and keep you safe. [00:42:25] We already talked about Metta and their name, change the metaverse, but there's something else. Facebook did this last week that surprised a lot of users, something they started in 2010, but has been controversial ever since. [00:42:41] We had a pretty big announcement, frankly, this last week from our friends over at Facebook, not the one where they change their name and the. [00:42:51] Basically trying to create a metaverse platform. That's going to be the one platform that rules the world. Although those are my words by the way. But Facebook has announced plans now to shut down a decade old. Facial recognition system this month. We'll see what they do with this. If they follow through entirely, but they're planning on deleting over 1 billion faces that they have already gone through and analyzed. [00:43:26] You might remember. In 2010, Facebook had a brand new feature. It started announcing, Hey, did you know that so-and-so just posted your picture? Is this you? Is this your friend, is this sewn? So do you remember all of those questions? If you're a Facebook user back in the day? Well, they were automatically identifying people who appeared in digital photos and suggested that users or users tagged them with a click we're going to get to and admitted here. [00:43:57] Uh, and of course that then linked the Facebook account for. The picture that you tagged to the images and let that person know. And of course Facebook's ultimate goal is to get you to stay on long, as long online, as long as possible. Because if you're online, you are going to be looking at ads that are aimed primarily at. [00:44:18] Well, facial recognition has been a problem. We've seen it a worldwide. I just read through a restatement from the electronic frontier foundation, talking about facial recognition and the problems with it, how some people have been arrested based on facial recognition and held for over a day. We'll have cases where the police use to kind of a crummy photograph of them from a surveillance video sometimes also from a police car, in some areas, the police cars are continually taking video and uploading it to the internet, looking for things like license plates, to see if a car. [00:45:00] Parking ticket that hasn't been paid or it hasn't paid us registration all the way through looking at faces, who is this person? And some in law enforcement have kind of thought it would be great to have kind of like Robocop. You remember Robocop, not the ed 2 0 9. There was also in that movie. That's also very scary, but when they look at someone who's on a street at autonomous. [00:45:24] Pops up in their glasses, who it is, any criminal record, if there any sort of a threat to et cetera. And I can understand that from the policemen standpoint. And I interviewed out at the consumer electronic show, a manufacturer of. That technology, it was kind of big and bulky at the time. This was probably about six or eight years ago, but nowadays you're talking about something that's kind of Google glass size, although that's kind of gone by the wayside too. [00:45:54] There are others that are out there that you. Facial recognition. Technology has really advanced in its ability to identify people, but you still get false positives and false negatives. And that's where part of the problem becomes from they have been taking and they been private companies primarily, but also some government agencies they've been taking pictures from. [00:46:21] They can find them. We've talked about Clearview AI before this is a company that literally stole pitchers, that it could get off the internet. They scan through Facebook, Instagram, everywhere. They could find faces and they tied it all back in. They did facial recognition. On all of those photos that they had taken and then sold the data to law enforcement agencies. [00:46:49] There's an app you can get from Clearview AI. That runs on your smartphone and you can take a picture of someone in the street, clear view. AI will run that face through their database and we'll tell you who it is, what their, what their background is, where their LinkedIn page is their Facebook page, wherever it found them online. [00:47:13] Basically what they've been doing. Now Clearview had a problem here this last couple of weeks because the Australian government ordered them to delete all facial recognition, data belonging, to anyone that lives. In Australia. Now that's going to be a bit of a problem for clear view, because it's hard to identify exactly where people live just based on a photograph. [00:47:40] And the United Kingdom is also considering doing this exact same thing. Now, clear views have been sued. They violated the terms of service from Facebook and some of these other sites that I mentioned, but they did it anyway. And clear view was. To destroy all the facial images and facial templates they had retrieved about any Australian. [00:48:08] I think that's probably a pretty good idea. I don't like the idea of this data being out there. Well, if your password is stolen and we're going to be talking about that in our bootcamp, coming up here in a couple of weeks about how to determine if your username or your password is stolen. But, uh, and of course, if you want to get that. [00:48:29] Bootcamp and go to that. There's no charge for it, but you have to know about it. And the only way is to sign up. You have to make sure you're on my email list@craigpeterson.com. But what happens when your email address is stolen or your password, or both are stolen from a web. Oh, typically they end up on the dark web. [00:48:50] They sell personal identification for very little money. In some cases it's only a few dollars per thousand people's identities. It is absolutely crazy. So the bad guys are looking for that information, but you can change your password. You can change your email address, but if your facial information is stolen, Can't change your face. [00:49:18] If your eye print is stolen, you can't change your eye. I have a friend who's pretty excited because he got to go right through the security at the airport ever so quickly. Cause all they had to do was scan his eyeball. Well, that data is valuable data because it cannot be changed. And it can, in some cases be replicated. [00:49:41] In fact, the department of Homeland security and the transportation safety administration had the database of face print stolen from them in 2019. To about 200,000 people's identities were stolen, the face sprints. It's just absolutely crazy. And this was some, a vendor of us customs and border protection. [00:50:05] And it, it, you can't write down to it. I read the detailed report on it just now. And the report that came out of the federal government said, well, it went to a contractor who. Took the data, all of the face prints off site over to their own site. And it wasn't encrypted when they took it over there. But it does mention that it was taken from an un-encrypted system at customs and border protection. [00:50:34] So wait a minute. Now you're blaming the contractor that you hired because it wasn't encrypted and yet you didn't encrypt it yourself either. I, you know, I guess that kind of goes around, but they want to. They want your biometric information just as much as they want anything else. Think about your phones. [00:50:53] Nowadays, apple has done a very good job with the biometrics and the fingerprints and making sure that that information is only ever stored on the phone. It never goes to apple, never leaves the phone it's in what apple calls, the secure long term. And if you mess with it at all, it destroys itself, which is part of the problem with replacing a cracked screen yourself on an iPhone, because you're going to disturb that secure enclave and the phone will no longer work. [00:51:24] That is not true when it comes to many other devices, including most of your Android phones that are out there. It is. So if the bad guys have. Your face print, they, and they can create 3d models that can and do in fact, go ahead and fool it into letting you in that that's information they want. So why are we allowing these companies to like clear view AI? [00:51:52] And others to buy our driver's license photos to the federal government, to also by the way, by our driver's license photos, by them from other sites and also our passport information. It's getting kind of scary, especially when you look into. China has a social credit system. And the Biden administration has made rumblings about the same here in the U S but in China, what they're doing is they have cameras all over the place and your faces. [00:52:27] And they can identify you. So if you jaywalk, they take so many points off of your social credit. If you don't do something that they want you to do or be somewhere, they want you to be, you lose credits again, and you can gain them as well by doing various things that the government wants you to do. And. [00:52:49] And ultimately, if you don't have enough social credit, you can't even get on a train to get to work. But the real bad part are the users. This is a minority in China and China's authorities are using. Us facial recognition, technology and artificial intelligence technology. Hey, thanks Google for moving your artificial intelligence lab to China in order to control and track the users. [00:53:19] Absolutely amazing in the United States law enforcement is using this type of software to aid policing, and we've already seen problems of overreach and mistaken IRS. So Facebook to you're leading a billion of these frameworks. If you will, of people's faces biometrics. Good for them. Hopefully this will continue a tread elsewhere. [00:53:46] Well, we've talked a little bit today about firewalls, what they do, how your network is set up. If you miss that, make sure you catch up online. My podcast@craigpeterson.com, but there's a whole new term out there that is changing security. [00:54:03] It's difficult to set up a secure network. [00:54:07] Let's just say mostly secure because if there's a power plug going into it, there's probably a security issue, but it's difficult to do that. And historically, what we've done is we've segmented the networks. So we have various devices that. Maybe be a little more harmful and on one network, other devices at a different level of security and many businesses that we've worked with, we have five different networks each with its own level of secure. [00:54:38] And in order to get from one part of the network, for instance, let's say you're an accounting and you want to get to the accounting file server. We make sure your machine is allowed access at the network level. And then obviously on top of that, you've got usernames and passwords. Maybe you've got multifactor authentication or something else. [00:54:59] I'll make sense, doesn't it? Well, the new move today is to kind of move away from that somewhat. And instead of having a machine or a network have firewall rules to get to a different network or different machine within an organization. There's something called zero trust. So again, think of it. You've, you've got a network that just has salespeople on it. [00:55:25] You have another network that might have just your accounting people. Another network has your administrative people and other network has your software developers, et cetera. So all of these networks are separate from each other and they're all firewalled from each other. So that only for instance, at county people can get to the accounting server. [00:55:44] Okay, et cetera. Right? The sales guys can enter the sales data and the programmers can get at their programs. And maybe the servers that are running their virtual machines are doing testing on what was zero trust. It is substantially different. What they're doing with zero trust is assuming that you always have to be authentic. [00:56:11] So instead of traditional security, where, where you're coming from helps to determine your level of access, you are assuming that basically no units of trust. So I don't care where you're coming from. If you are on a machine in the accounting department, We want to verify a lot of other information before we grant you access. [00:56:38] So that information probably does include what network you're on. Probably does include the machine you're on, but it's going to all. You as a user. So you're going to have a username. You're going to have an ID. You're going to have a multi-factor authentication. And then we're going to know specifically what your job is and what you need to have specific access. [00:57:04] Because this follows the overall principle of least privilege to get your job done. Now you might've thought in the past that, oh my gosh, these firewalls, they're just so annoying. It's just so difficult to be able to do anything right. Well, zero trust is really going to get your attention. If that's what you've been saying. [00:57:23] But here's an example of the traditional security approach. If you're in the office, you get access to the full network. Cause that's pretty common, right? That's not what we've been doing, but that's pretty common where we have been kind of working in the middle between zero trust and this traditional you're in the office. [00:57:41] So you can potentially get it. Everything that's on the off. And if you're at home while all you have to do is access a specific portal, or as I've explained before, well, you are just connecting to an IP address in a hidden port, which won't remain hidden for. So maybe in a traditional security approach, the bouncer checks your ID. [00:58:08] You can go anywhere inside this club and it's multi floor, right. But in a zero trust approach, getting into the club, having that bouncer look at your ID is only the first check, the bartender or the waiter. They also have to check your ID before you could be served. No matter where you are in the club and that's kind of how they do it right now, though, they'll make a mark on your hand or they'll stamp it. [00:58:35] And now they know, okay, this person cannot get a drink for instance. So think of it that way, where every resource that's available inside the business independently checks whether or not you should have access to. This is the next level of security. It's something that most businesses are starting to move towards. [00:58:57] I'm talking about the bigger guys, the guys that have had to deal with cybersecurity for awhile, not just the people who have a small business, most small businesses have that flat network that. Again about right. The traditional security approach of all you're in the office. So yeah, you can get at anything. [00:59:15] It doesn't matter. And then you, you have the sales guys walking out with your client list and who knows what else is going on? Think of Ferris, Bueller, where he was updating his grades and miss days at high school, from his home computer. And you've got an idea of why you might want to secure. You are network internally because of, again, those internal threats. [00:59:40] So keep an eye out for it. If you're looking to replace your network, obviously this is something that we've had a lot of experience with. Cisco is probably the best one out there for this, but there are a few other vendors that are pretty good. If you want to drop me an email, I'll put together a list of some of the top tier zero. [01:00:02] Providers so that you can look at those. I don't have one right now, but I'd be glad to just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. We can point you in the right direction, but if you have an it person or department, or whether you outsource it to an MSP, a managed services provider, make sure you have the discussion with them about zero. [01:00:28] Now, when I'm looking at security, I'm concerned about a bunch of things. So let me tell you something that Karen and I have been working on the last, oh man, few weeks. I mentioned the boot camp earlier in the show today. And one of the things that we're going to do for those people that attend the bootcamp is I think incredible. [01:00:49] This has taken Karen so much time to dig up. Once she's done is she's worked with me to figure out what are the things that you need to keep tabs on. Now, again, this is aimed primarily at businesses, but let me tell you, this is going to be great for home users as well. And we've put together this list of what you should be doing. [01:01:15] About cybersecurity every week. And in fact, a couple of things that are daily, but every week, every month, every quarter, every six months and every year, it's a full checklist. So you can take this and sit down with it and, you know, okay. So I have to do these things this week and this isn't. Response to anything in particular, it does meet most requirements, but frankly, it's something that every business should be doing when it comes to the cybersecurity. [01:01:53] It includes things like passwords. Are they being done? Right? Did you do some training with your employees on fishing or a few other topics all the way on down to make sure you got some canned air and blew out the fan? In your workstations, you'd be amazed at how dirty they get. And he is the enemy of computers that makes them just fail much, much faster than, than 82, same thing with server. [01:02:22] So it is everything. It is a lot of pages and it is just check she'd made it nice and big. Right. So even I can read it. But it's little check marks that you can mark on doing while you're going through it. So we're doing some more work on that. She's got the first couple of iterations done. We're going to do a couple more, make sure it is completely what you would need in order to help keep your cyber security in. [01:02:50] But the only way you're going to get it is if you are in the BR the bootcamp absolutely free. So it was this list, or of course you won't find out unless you are on my email list. Craig Peterson.com/subscribe. [01:03:06] One of the questions I get asked pretty frequently has to do with artificial intelligence and robots. Where are we going? What are we going to see first? What is the technology that's first going to get into our businesses and our homes. [01:03:22] Artificial intelligence is something that isn't even very well-defined there's machine learning and there's artificial intelligence. [01:03:33] Some people put machine learning as a subset of artificial intelligence. Other people kind of mess around with it and do it the other way. I tend to think that artificial intelligence is kind of the top of the heap, if you will. And that machine learning is a little bit further down because machines can be programmed to learn. [01:03:54] For instance, look at your robot, your eye robot cleans the floor, cleans the carpet. It moves around. It has sensors and it learned, Hey, I have to turn here. Now. I robot is actually pretty much randomly drew. But there are some other little vacuum robots that, that do learn the makeup of your house. The reason for the randomization is while chairs move people, move things, move. [01:04:22] So trying to count on the house, being exactly the same every time isn't isn't exactly right. Uh, by the way, a lot of those little vacuums that are running around are also sending data about your house, up to the manufacturer in the. So they often will know how big the house is. They know where it's located because you're using the app for their robot. [01:04:47] And that, of course it has access to GPS, et cetera, et cetera. Right. But where are we going? Obviously, the little by robot, the little vacuum does not need much intelligence to do what it's doing, but one of the pursuits that we've had for. Really since the late nineties for 20, 25 years are what are called follower robots. [01:05:13] And that's when I think we're going to start seeing much more frequently, it's going to be kind of the first, um, I called it machine learning. They call it artificial intelligence who you really could argue either one of them, but there's a little device called a Piaggio fast forward. And it is really kind of cool. [01:05:34] Think of it almost like R2D2 or BB eight from star wars following you around. It's frankly, a little hard to do. And I want to point out right now, a robot that came out, I think it was last year from Amazon is called the Astro robot. And you might remember Astro from the Jetsons and. This little robot was available in limited quantities. [01:06:01] I'm looking at a picture of it right now. It, frankly, Astro is quite cute. It's got two front wheels, one little toggle wheel in the back. It's got cameras. It has a display that kind of makes it look like kids are face, has got two eyeballs on them. And the main idea behind this robot is that it will. [01:06:23] Provide some protection for your home. So it has a telescoping camera and sensor that goes up out of its head up fairly high, probably about three or four feet up looking at this picture. And it walks around your one rolls around your home, scanning for things that are out of the normal listening for things like windows breaking there, there's all kinds of security. [01:06:50] That's rolled into some of these. But it is a robot and it is kind of cool, but it's not great. It's not absolutely fantastic. Amazon's dubbing the technology it's using for Astro intelligent motion. So it's using location and mapping data to make sure that Astro. Gets around without crashing into things. [01:07:18] Unlike that little vacuum cleaner that you have, because if someone loves something on the floor that wasn't there before, they don't want to run over it, they don't want to cause harm. They don't want to run into your cats and dogs. And oh my maybe lions and bears too. But, uh, they're also using this computer vision technology called visual ID and that is used. [01:07:41] With facial recognition, drum roll, please, to recognize specific members of the family. So it's kind of like the dog right in the house. It's sitting there barking until it recognizes who you are, but Astro, in this case, Recognizes you and then provide you with messages and reminders can even bring you the remote or something else and you just drop it in the bin and off it goes. [01:08:08] But what I am looking at now with this Piaggio fast forward, you might want to look it up online, cause it's really. Cool is it does the following, like we've talked about here following you around and doing things, but it is really designed to change how people and goods are moving around. So there's a couple of cool technologies along this line as well. [01:08:35] That it's not, aren't just these little small things. You might've seen. Robots delivery robots. The Domino's for instance, has been working on there's another real cool one out there called a bird. And this is an autonomous driving power. Basically. It's a kind of a four wheel ATV and it's designed to move between the rows of fruit orchards in California or other places. [01:09:01] So what you do to train this borough robot is you press a follow button on it. You start walking around the field or wherever you want it to go. It's using, uh, some basic technology to follow you, cameras and computer vision, and it's recording it with GPS and it memorizes the route at that point. Now it can ferry all of your goods. [01:09:29] Around that path and communicate the path by the way to other burrow robots. So if you're out doing harvesting or whether it's apples out in the east coast, or maybe as I said out in California, you've got it. Helping you with some of the fruit orchards. It's amazing. So this is going to be something that is going to save a lot of time and money, these things, by the way, way up to 500 pounds and it can carry as much as a half a ton. [01:09:58] You might've seen some of the devices also from a company down in Boston, and I have thought that they were kind of creepy when, when you look at it, but the company's called Boston dynamics and. They were just bought, I think it was Hondai the bought them trying to remember. And, uh, anyway, These are kind of, they have robots that kind of look like a dog and they have other robots that kind of look like a human and they can do a lot of different chores. [01:10:33] The military has used them as have others to haul stuff. This one, this is like the little dog, it has four legs. So unlike a lot of these other robots that are on wheels, this thing can go over very, very. Terrain it can self write, et cetera. And they're also using them for things like loading trucks and moving things around, um, kind of think of Ripley again, another science fiction tie, uh, where she's loading the cargo in the bay of that spaceship. [01:11:05] And she is inside a machine. That's actually doing all of that heavy lifting now. Today, the technology, we have a can do all of that for us. So it is cool. Uh, I get kind of concerned when I see some of these things. Military robots are my favorite, especially when we're talking about artificial intelligence, but expect the first thing for these to be doing is to be almost like a companion, helping us carry things around, go fetch things for us and in the business space. [01:11:40] Go ahead and load up those trucks and haul that heavy stuff. So people aren't hurting their backs. Pretty darn cool. Hey, I want to remind you if you would like to get some of the free training or you want some help with something the best place to start is Craig peterson.com. And if you want professional help, well, not the shrink type, but with cyber security. [01:12:06] email me M E at Craig peterson.com. [01:12:10] Just in time for the holidays, we have another scam out there and this one is really rather clever and is fooling a lot of people and is costing them, frankly, a whole lot of money. [01:12:26] This is a very big cyber problem because it has been very effective. And although there have been efforts in place to try and stop it, they've still been able to kind of get ahead of it. There's a great article on vice that's in this week's newsletter. In my show notes up on the website and it is talking about a call that came in to one of the writers, Lorenzo, B cherry, um, probably completely messy and that name up, but the call came in from. [01:13:03] Supposedly right. Paid pals, uh, fraud prevention system. Someone apparently had tried to use his PayPal account to spend $58 and 82 cents. According to the automated voice on the line, PayPal needed to verify my identity to block the transfer. And here's a quote from the call, uh, in order to secure your account, please enter the code we have sent to your mobile device. [01:13:32] Now the voice said PayPal, sometimes texts, users, a code in order to protect their account. You know, I've said many times don't use SMS, right? Text messages for multi-factor authentication. There are much better ways to do it. Uh, after entering a string of six digits, the voice said, thank you. Your account has been secured and this request has been blocked. [01:13:57] Quote, again, don't worry. If any payment has been charged your account, we will refund it within 24 to 48 hours. Your reference ID is 1 5 4 9 9 2 6. You may now hang up, but this call was actually. Hacker they're using a type of bot is what they're called. These are these automated robotic response systems that just dramatically streamlined the process for the hackers to gain access into your account. [01:14:31] Particularly when you have multi-factor authentication codes where you're using. An SMS messages, but it also works for other types of one-time passwords. For instance, I suggest to everybody and we use these with our clients that they should use something called one password.com. That's really you'll find them online. [01:14:54] And one password.com allows you to use and create one time password, same thing with Google authenticator, same thing with Microsoft authenticator, they all have one-time password. So if a bad guy has found your email address and has found your password online in one of these hacks, how can they possibly get into your PayPal account or Amazon or Coinbase or apple pay or. [01:15:26] Because you've got a one time password set up or SMS, right? Multifactor authentication of some sort. Well they're full and people and absolute victims. Here's what's happening. Th this bot by the way, is great for bad guys that don't have social engineering skills, social engineering skills, or when someone calls up and says, hi, I'm from it. [01:15:51] And there's a problem. And we're going to be doing an upgrade on your Microsoft word account this weekend because of a bug or a security vulnerability. So what, what I need from you is I need to know what username you're normally using so that I can upgrade the right. So we don't, it doesn't cost us a whole bunch by upgrading accounts that aren't being used. [01:16:15] So once the account name that you use on the computer and what's the password, so we can get in and test it afterwards, that's a social engineering type attack. That's where someone calls on the phone, those tend to be pretty effective. But how about if you don't speak English very well? At all frankly, or if you're not good at tricking people by talking to them, well, this one is really great. [01:16:44] Cause these bots only cost a few hundred bucks and anybody can get started using these bots to get around multi-factor authentication. See, here's how it works. In order to break into someone's account, they need your username, email address and password. Right? Well, I already said. Much many of those have been stolen. [01:17:07] And in our boot camp coming up in a few weeks, we're going to go through how you can find out if your username has been stolen and has been posted on the dark web and same thing for your password. Right? So that's going to be part of the. Coming up that I'll announce in the newsletter. Once we finished getting everything already for you guys, they also go ahead and buy what are called bank logs, which are login details from spammers who have already tricked you into giving away some of this information. [01:17:41] But what if you have multi-factor authentication enabled something I'm always talking about, always telling you to do. Well, these bots work with platforms like Twilio, for instance, uh, and they are using other things as well, like slack, et cetera. And all the bad guy has to do with that point is going. [01:18:07] And, uh, say, they're trying to break into your account right now. So they're going to, let's get really, really specific TD bank. That's where my daughter works. So let's say you have a TD bank account. And the hacker has a good idea that you have a TD bank account knows it because they entered in your username and password and TD bank was letting them in. [01:18:32] But TD bank sent you a text message with that six character code, right? It's usually digits. It's usually a number. So what happens then? So the bad guys says, okay, so it's asking me for this six digit SMS

On Second Watch
80's Movies Starring Robots - Spin the Wheel

On Second Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 22:03


You chose the category, we choose our picks, and fate decides our nostalgia review. Allow us to introduce to you our "Spin The Wheel" event. Long ago, our listeners and friends voted on which category they wanted us to do next, and the winning category was "80s films starring robots".We each thought long and hard about our pick that fit that category and shared why we made our pick. Then, we let fate take over as they were all randomly added to our randomizer app, Kari chanted "Spin The Wheel", and our fate was sealed. Which movie's did we pick and which one are we reviewing next? Listen and find out...----------*NEW* Become a member exclusively on Ko-fi for as little as $1 per month. Access to our personal Discord server, Ad-free RSS feed, merch, and more awaits! Join today - https://ko-fi.com/movie/tiers -----------Request a personalized shout out - https://ko-fi.com/movie -Commission a movie review of your choice! - https://ko-fi.com/movie/commissions -Check out all our episodes and subscribe – www.oswpodcast.com -Twitter – www.twitter.com/oswpodcast1 -Facebook – www.facebook.com/oswpodcast -Instagram – www.instagram.com/oswpodcast -

Dude Could You Imagine?!
Ep.36: Son Of Robocop | Dude Could You Imagine

Dude Could You Imagine?!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 40:45


Our two manly men, Will & Tom, are running from the long robotic arm of the law, while trying to repopulate to world... Remember, you can tell us what YOU are imagining at dudecouldyouimagine@gmail.com and don't forget that you can follow us on Instagram, Patreon, Twitter, YouTube and Discord! Just click the links below! Patreon Follow DCYI And always, please leave a like, comment & subscribe as well as an Apple Podcasts review! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dudecouldyouimagine/support

Election Profit Makers
Episode 118: Aesop, RoboCop, Bitcoin Bad Boys

Election Profit Makers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 39:41


Jon preps for Virginia's gubernatorial election, David wonders if the cop who interrupted the episode was a bot. Featuring new bit.ly links! Support us on Patreon at patreon.com/electionprofitmakers. Send your election prediction questions to contact@electionprofitmakers.com. Go to www.PredictIt.org/promo/EPM20 to receive up to $20.00 in matching funds. If you'd like to buy a Digital Copy of David's album YOU AINT GOIN NOWHERE, you can do that here: http://davidreesrecords.bandcamp.com

WhatCulture
10 Movie Remakes That Completely Screwed Up Iconic Scenes - The Karate Kid! Robocop! Straw Dogs! Planet Of The Apes?!

WhatCulture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 8:00


Misunderstanding what made the originals so great. Simon Miller presents 10 Movie Remakes That Completely Screwed Up Iconic Scenes... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Two True Freaks! Mega Feed
The Honeywell Experiment – Phase 22 – Eliminators

Two True Freaks! Mega Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021


This time on The Honeywell Experiment, Thomas Deja is joined by his lab monkey, Chris Honeywell for an energetic mash up of Romancing The Stone, Robocop and time travel called ELIMINATORS!

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More

Cheers from beyond the grave, folks! William S. Castle, Jr. here, warning you of the latest advancement in spook technology destined to turn the podCastle world upside-down! You may THINK you've seen the 2001 remake of my beloved Thir13en Ghosts, but you can't call yourself a cinephile until you've experienced it in COMMENT-O-SCOPE. Do you dare listen to this BOP n' A Tragedy commentary track, as your thr3e hosts explore their love/hate/love relationship with Scott Beck's disorienting cult classic? Some say this haunted house ride of a film paved the road that Dark Castle and others would follow for a decade, but can YOU walk the same path, dodging knife-wielding beauties, plus-sized babies, and spasming Matthew Lillards? The faint of heart need not worry, though, if the secrets of the Black Zodiac are too much for you, just press the "PANIC" button on your seat, and you'll be escorted to our NPR Corner, where you can listen to harmless shows more befitting a... well, I'M not going to say it! Now where is that skeleton waiter with my vodka and boo-bon? Avoid The Hammer, The Jackal, and The Juggernaut by downloading now! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BoxOfficePulpPodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BoxOfficePulp Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/box-office-pulp/id577338641 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=37192&refid=stpr Amazon Podcasts:https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/7c11ff8b-2875-454d-8770-8b1d36d04b52

FounderQuest
Talking SaaS With Garrett Dimon

FounderQuest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 47:11


Show notes:Links:Garrett DimonMinitest HeatHeat Map Reporter for MinitestReviewStarting & SustainingSifter AppAutomated transcript (only about 70% accurate)Ben  Welcome to FounderQuest, this has been Today, I'm interviewing Garrett Diamond Star and josh are taking the day off and I get a chat with Garrett, who's a longtime friend of mine and fantastic entrepreneur and all around great person in the world, so I'm excited to have you here. Gary, Thanks, Garrett  thanks for having me. Ben  It's always fun catching up with you. I think the last time we chatted was business of software a few years ago, wasn't it? Garrett  Yeah, not frequently enough, Ben  so that was, yeah, definitely not frequent enough. One thing I most remember about that business of software was that was when the hurricane was coming through and so I was standing out there in boston with all the wind and the Garrett  right, having grown Ben  up in the south, that was kind of ironic that I was there in the northeast and getting a hurricane. Mhm. So have you been Garrett  three, so just uh probably about the same as everybody else man, you know, just kinda one day at a time and keeping it going um and yeah, I just kind of dabbling and exploring and for once the last year just kind of let myself be undirected and just kind of followed what was interesting and pulled on threads and uh a little unnerving but also kind of nice and refreshing, I don't know, you know, so kind of bouncing around like a ping pong ball. Ben  Well, that's, that sounds pretty cool. Well, let's talk about that in a minute. I want to catch people up so I'm sure most people know you, but just for those who don't. So Garrett again, it's been a long time entrepreneur I think. I think I first bumped into you with doing sifter, your, your, your app from a few years ago, you built that from scratch solo entrepreneur and then you sold that. Then you're, you're at post uh, postmark for awhile for that. Right. Garrett  Well, wild bit at large, but primarily on postmark. Yeah. Ben  Okay. Right. Right. So you're a while, but for a while and then I guess it was a couple of years ago now that you've left wild. Garrett  Yeah, it's been about . years, I guess. No. Okay. Ben  Yeah. And so I guess also during that time you kind of did the starting and sustaining books slash video series slash thing. That was cool. Garrett  Yeah, I've been dabbling in all that, trying to share my battle wounds so that other people can maybe avoid them or less than them. Ben  Yeah, that's awesome. I remember, I remember buying that. It's good, good stuff. So also linked in the show notes. Maybe we'll get a sailor to uh, you spoke, you spoke at Microsoft a few times or at least once that I can remember Garrett  I can't even keep track now. Microsoft spoke once attended a couple of times. Yeah. Ben  And so now you're doing some, some interesting stuff. So I remember, remember when you left a wild bit, you were, you're really interested in getting started on helping amputees have a community and so you started adapted, right? So, we're gonna talk about that for a second, and then we can talk about, you know, how that plan kind of changed for you with the passage? Garrett  Um, I mean, so I'm a left below knee amputee. And when I was trying to make that decision, I couldn't find any information on what life is really like as an amputee, um, let alone specific information about, can I play basketball still, if so, how does that work? Or what other activities can I do? And there's just not a lot of detailed information, and with disability, even just within amputees, the range is incredible, like above me and bologna makes a complete difference in how you function and your body mechanics, and so I just couldn't find this information out there. And so that kind of planted the seed that obviously it's not out there and, you know, it's woefully under informed, which at first was kind of scary, it's like, oh, I guess nobody does any of this stuff Garrett  and for me, the whole, ironically, the whole point of amputating was so that I could get back to doing things because of my ankle fusion was horrible and all that, it's just hurt and was miserable and through the whole thing, I was blogging about it, and what would happen is people would email me because they'd go on google and search for amputation, ankle fusion, that kind of thing, and then they'd ask me like, I'm, because I was the only person that came up and I would get these emails, you know, it kind of varies and go ebbs and flows, you know, to a month, once a week, you know, so frequently enough. Um, and uh, one uh, young woman that reached out to me, she actually amputated and then just won a couple of gold medals in the paralympics and like, Garrett  it just blew my mind is like, how do you find the answers to this stuff? And uh, after being an amputee now about five years and trying stuff and just kind of figuring it out. Uh, my hope was originally, I was like, well, I'm a software developer, I'll build a platform so people can share that information, um, you know, and I figured I was really optimistic about that specifically, because, well I built sifter and rails has gotten way better and I learned a ton from sifters, it'll be way easier this time around, but I didn't really account for was now I've got a family and I'm  years older, uh and so it's been more challenging at the end of the day, I'm just tapped on software because I'm doing that all day and my brain is fried. Garrett  Um, but I've been doing videos kind of explaining this stuff to people about how legs work and the logistics of like how they change your body mechanics and um, how to do things like go to the beach and deal with sand in your foot and that kind of stuff. Uh, and I did that more is like an exploratory whimsical thing because that was the kind of content I hope people would create and put on the platform. So then you could filter and say, here's my disability, here's the activity I want to do. Give me all the information about that specific thing. Um, but I did it and it just kind of left it for a year, but it just kept going and then more people have been contacting me and so now what I'm doing is kind of Garrett  stepping back from the software side of it and I'm just gonna keep recording videos for the next short term, um, and having them produced and that kind of stuff and hopefully increasing the quality and the depth and then doing interviews with other amputees and really kind of getting into more stuff, um, and then eventually circling back to building a platform to help people find the right things that meet their needs and that kind of thing. Um, so, you know, it's, it's, it's been tough. I think the toughest thing is realizing that nonprofit side projects are the hardest thing to make time for, um because it's never going to offset my income or anything. And so like Garrett  now I've kind of been thinking, I guess I need to build a business again. So I've got more ironically more free time um, just because Sassen recurring revenue all that's so great that it would give me the flexibility to do that and to spend more time helping people and building um software and all that. So kind of just juggling things and figuring it out. And that's kind of where a lot of the exploration has come in. I haven't really prescribed where I'm taking things and uh um spending a lot of time dabbling and ruby and getting kind of deeper into it than I ever have previously. And uh exploring video and trying to help people with that stuff. So just kind of playing around and tinkering and trying to make ends meet at the same time and I'll figure it out, I guess Ben  that's cool. There's a whole lot to unpack in there. So let's, let's talk about some of that. So, Some of the, some of the themes, well, at first, I guess I should say I can totally relate to you with the whole, you know,  years later and now, there's. yeah, there's more demands on your time. There's less energy in the body and there's, you know, less energy in the brain probably is more importantly. Um, I've had that, that same thing I recently started picking up some side projects, you know, and like, yeah, they're just, you have fewer hours in the day that you really feel like being really into that kind of mode, you know, that your brain stuff and, Ben  and I've noticed that uh I can tell like when my blood sugar is getting low and now we're like, I've I've used up too many brain cells, I gotta go back and recharge, you Garrett  know? Uh Ben  So it's interesting that dynamics, like, I don't quite have the appetite that I used to have to just dive in and, and, you know, slog away at the keyboard for hours. And then Garrett  for me, it's also been awareness, like, I recognize it more now when I, when I was younger I would push through and be like, oh, grind and hustle and you know, and now I'm like, ok, I need to stop, this isn't, you know, if I don't stop, I'm going to be a complete mess tomorrow and not want to work and not be able to think. And so I catch it earlier and I just stopped and I hate it because I still, like, interested in whatever problem is in my head is still tugging on it and, you know, it's trying to and it's really hard to just turn it off and walk away. Um but I've gotten better at that a little, Ben  One of the things that I've noticed as, as I've gotten older in this tech world. So I guess I've been doing it  years or  years or so, is that, um, uh, so that that energy for doing all the things is not there? Like it used to be, but it seems like the deep thinking is more refined is more home. So like you said, like you're going to be, you know, you're just not going to have the energy, you're not going to be wasted the next day. And I think I've seen that too. And I think it's not just from like the energy of working, it's from the energy of thinking deeply about what's the right solution here, right? Ben  It's not so much like just powering through it. Okay, I'm gonna build this stuff and I'm gonna backtrack and I'm gonna redo and backtrack and redo now. It's like, oh, I'm gonna think about this and I'm going to get it right right? And then you apply that precision cut I guess. Garrett  And for me, the struggle is having the wisdom to recognize they should stop, but I can't turn off the excitement or the interest, right? And so I do still want to work on it. I just know better. And it's hard when those two don't align. Yeah, that's, that's been a struggle. Ben  Yeah, I've seen saying the same thing, but I think my living experience so far has been like the, the eventual outcome is better, even even when I have that, you know, I want to do more, but I don't know, I don't have the energy to more, But having that time to reflect more when I do sit down next time and have that  minutes an hour or whatever, like that time is much better spent coming up with the right solution rather than Garrett  just uh just the other day. I was and I mean, I think we've all had this happen a million times, but this just happened. I don't know, friday, I think banging my head on the desk for an hour and a half on this thing. That just makes no sense. There's a ruby thing like this doesn't make sense. What am I missing here? Like is there some really quirky ruby behavior I don't understand. Um And hour and a half and finally was like, I've got to give up, I've got to stop, this isn't getting anywhere. And it was only like , right? So I still was like, I had time in the day, I was like, I just got to stop The next morning. I sat down with in  minutes, Garrett  like solve cold, right? Like there's no, that was from the time I sat at my desk at the time, I solve the problem and it was just, you've got to step away and clear your head or you know, it just doesn't go well, Ben  yeah, yeah, I've had that same experience so many times and uh I think a lot of times you hear people say yeah just take a break, go for a walk whenever you're like yeah what everyone's gonna power through it but it actually does work Garrett  well for me. Walking doesn't cause then I'll just fix it on it too much and like I need to let go like my brain has to let it go. Um And so for me usually it's more getting a getting a night of sleep um is what kind of resets it for me at least from what I've found. But I've probably every three or four months. It's one of those where like This is going poorly and the next morning less than  minutes it's solved. Uh Ben  Yeah I have that too, like a good night. So definitely goes to reset. The one. The one problem I've had with that though is that then I will wake up at four a.m. I have the solution in my head, I'm like I got to go do it, Garrett  I do that too and for better or worse I don't even fight the sleep anymore, I just get up and go start working. Um And then if I need a nap later or something I just Ben  so be Garrett  it. Uh But like that's so much of that like We're so indoctrinated that like  is when people work. And that's been a really hard thing to let go of two and not feel that way every day and to basically, it's not about like working when you feel like it, but it's not like pushing back when the urge to get something done strikes, like go do it and then circle back, yeah, you know, and get some either for rest or whatever. Um you know, take a long lunch or whatever it is. Uh and that's uh I've found that to be helpful to just to try and not forced to work, but do it when it's fresh in my head and just go, Ben  yeah, yeah, I love having that flexibility as a, as an entrepreneur or business owner and being able to work when it's most effective. So You know, if it's  and then I take a break and maybe come back in a couple hours in the afternoon and then I'm done for the day, that's, it's cool. Right? So I wanted to hit on one other thing from, you're talking about there about with adaptable and you know, I love what you're saying about there's a, there's a software solution here, let me go build that, right? And then over time. Like uh maybe not. And I can totally relate to that because I feel the same way. It's like, oh if there's something missing in the world, there's, there's obviously assad's there that can satisfy that need, but Ben  but in reality like salad, you don't have to go all the way to says, right, you can uh, you can start with, you know, youtube videos or uh, maybe even just a reddit, right? Maybe maybe you're hanging out in the community and on offering back and building up that stuff that you want to see in the world. Garrett  Uh, so there's definitely still an element of that with what I want to do and uh, a lot of it is like, right now I'm focused on videos and more mechanics and uh, you know, here's things to think about if you want to get into mountain biking as an amputee or things to think about with snowboarding or, you know, whatever it is. Um, but there's this whole other facet or many facets really, um, of like limb care and recovery and you know, when you beat your leg up doing something active in a carbon fiber socket all day Garrett  and then you get home and it's destroyed, uh, you know, you got to take care of it. And so there's things like that and there's a financial aspect that like insurance only helped so much with prosthetics and they help with basic, like daily kind of day to day prosthetics, but they don't help if you need more advanced prosthetics, um, for certain activities. And so for that, you're either on your own or you need to find financial assistance and there's a ton of great organizations out there that help with that, but they're all non profits and their websites are less than stellar and less than informative. Um, Garrett  and in a lot of ways it's difficult to find the one that is right for you that will cover the type of equipment you need based on, you know, just your disability fall into the disabilities that they cover. Um, and so there's all these different requirements and details and it's difficult or you forget right, like life happens and some organization has an annual grant cycle and it's in october and then october blows by and you're like, oh crap, I totally forgot to apply for that grant and now you got to wait till next year. And so, you know, my thinking is that it's not just a tool to like educate people and help people find the information. They need something to proactively help reduce friction and remove the barriers that stop people with disabilities from being active. Garrett  Um, and that could be everything from pain to financial stuff to simply, you know, needing somebody to talk to who's done it. Um, and there's just, there's so many solutions and everybody, even within a category of disability is unique, even if they're not unique from the disability perspective, the activity they want to pursue might be more unique. Um, and so it's just really difficult to make it all work and to find answers and you kind of just gotta go try and you know, from experience the first couple of times I try new activity is miserable because I'm just figuring it out and that takes a lot of the fun out of it. And a lot of people like this isn't for me and you know, until you learn Garrett  kind of about that learning curve and how it exists and how it's a lot steeper than it is without a prosthetic or what have you. Um it's tough and it's easy to give up because it hurts and it's inconvenient and you know, there's just you're worried about your prosthetic, right? You've got this $, prosthetic that you need to survive day to day and you're like, oh I'm going to go paddleboarding, so what if it gets wet, can it get wet? I don't know, and there's just so many questions and so many easy reasons to give up or be intimidated and Garrett  you know, it doesn't need to be that way because more more importantly, like once you're in that situation is more important than ever to be active and to stay active and to not let it just lock you down on the couch or something. Um but it's not easy, you know, it's way harder than before and I don't think it needs to be, it doesn't need to be as hard as it is. So yeah, I'm hoping could help people get answers and you know, do their thing, whatever it is that moves them figuratively and literally Ben  yeah, yeah, that sounds like a tagline for the website Garrett  actually. Right. Ben  Right. Garrett  Yeah. Ben  Yeah. I I have uh so we have in our in our family some some experience with a kind of obscure medical issues like uh which is kind of similar to, you know, go into a prosthetic situation, right? Where all of a sudden you're into this community where you have to, you can get the speed really quickly on what does life look like now. And how do I do the things that I want to do and where do I go to find that information? And so often it seems that in our in our experience is that the only people who really know much of anything are the doctors that you're working with or the therapists or the nurses, right? And and they can connect with resources. But like if you just happen to have the wrong, you know, chemistry, Ben  you know, with with someone or you don't just happen to the right person, you can just feel pretty isolated. And uh so I thank you for having having resources for, for that is is so helpful because I've told my wife a number of times like you could write a book on on all the things that you've learned, you know, through this experience. And and then my my my brother's family there was a significant motorcycle accident that left someone with, you know, just a lot of parallelization from the waist down basically and his his, you know, going through all the things that he went through two surgeries and the rehab. And so to get back to a point where he could walk, you know, uh, which was, which was assisted so much by the great people that he had around him. Ben  But fortunately he had them right for those that don't, it's got to be a much, much harder rodeo Garrett  and it's just all over the board. Um, amputations really interesting is what most most frequently right into with people is there surgeon doesn't want them to amputate and is constantly trying to talk them out of it. But after you go through it, I saw my surgeon, I mean, my surgeon, I had to switch surgeons. Um, but he saw me twice after my amputation. He's never seen me with a prosthetic. He has no idea what I'm doing now. And so these people are asking their surgeons about amputation. The truth is the surgeons, unless they're actively helping. Um, you know, in other contexts and volunteering. Uh, they have no clue what life is like after amputation. They might read some stuff, Garrett  right. And you know, there's plenty of paralympians that are amazing. But then you wonder those people edge cases or you know, can anybody run and do that stuff again? Maybe not at that level. Um, and the, your surgeon just doesn't know. And so people are asking the surgeon because that's supposed to be the expert and then the surgeons giving them, I don't want to say bad information but incomplete information. And so it's tough for people because you can't get those answers, you know, and again, every disability so different how it affects people and how your doctor, what their background is in terms of how they understand like being active or you know, doing more than just day to day functioning. All right. Yeah. There's so many layers to it all. Mhm. Ben  So, one thing I wanted to go back to was talking about, you know, the time that you spend on that, obviously it's it's tough when you've got a family, you're the breadwinner. You know, you're trying to build a nonprofit thing. And at some point it sounds like you realize, you know what, I just gotta I gotta do some work. I got to bring the money in the door, right? I can't spend all my time focusing on this this nonprofit platform. So it sounds like you're doing that in your spare time and that you're you're paying the bills of freelancing doing a bunch of bunch of rail stuff. But as you've been doing that, you've actually built some tools that I want to talk about. So it sounds it sounds like Ben  you've been doing this work and this work has prompted you to build the review thing you've been working on. And also the heat map thing for many tests, let's talk about that a little bit. Garrett  Uh Yeah. So the nice thing, the one the only intentional thing I've done the last . years is to try and make sure that whatever I'm doing at all kind of syncs up somehow um and for the most part that was always leading back to ruby and or rails um and you know, so a lot of my client work is helping with legacy apps that are profitable now, but they built the app quickly and there's some, you know, legacy pain that needs to be fixed, re factoring that kind of thing. Um And then there was adaptable where I was starting with a Greenfield fresh modern rails app um and one of them was fun and the other one wasn't and I'll let you guess. Mhm. And so a lot of what I started thinking more about was like how does an app that Garrett  has all this legacy craft get from there to a point where it's not miserable to work on and you know, there's a lot of ways, there's a lot of paths, there's a lot of great books on re factoring um and a lot of that kind of stuff, uh what I started getting more interested in was how we've got all these great letters and static analysis tools for um security for syntax for just cleaning up code, right? And a lot of little auto correct and format stuff for you. Uh and the more I I dabbled with the tools previously but they were always so difficult to use because they're all command line um you know and they all have different syntax, different names for the same flags that do the same thing like Summer Garrett  auto, correct, some are right, some are, you know, and so like you gotta then remember the quirks, they're using the wrong flags with the wrong tools and it just gets tedious, right or like you know, you want to use a dozen tools, but if you run them all at once, like it's going to take  minutes to run through your whole project when really all you want is like just look at the files, I'm about to commit or uh you know look at the files, I just committed and let's do a pass it like with Robocop or whatever, clean them up and then I'll commit a separate one that's just pure clean up, you know, all these kind of things and but it was so tedious, I love these tools but I just wouldn't use them because there was too much friction. Garrett  Uh and so with adaptable and like when I start a Greenfield project, I was like I've got to use these tools from the beginning to make sure that never gets into a bad state because once that ship sails it's too much effort to go back and too much risk to like make those kind of wholesale changes and uh so it started with just that it's like how can I make it easier to use these tools and remove the friction so that they're enjoyable to use and kind of in the back of my mind was because like Guard does a lot of this, right, if you're running guard constantly. Uh But Guard also drove me nuts because it would my fans would spin up and make so much noise and I couldn't concentrate. Um Garrett  and so kind of and I still like guard, but my thinking was what if the tool could be so convenient that you didn't feel like you needed to use guard to watch files as you changed them and that you could do more than just have your automated test front, right? So like what if and I mean there's there's integrations for like Robocop and stuff, but like what if you change five files and you could just run a tool that will automatically run all of the relevant things you have against those files that you updated and potentially auto correct them if you want or um you know, this is all theory and it's it's come together and I'm using it on itself but it's not ready to like use in other projects yet. Um that's kind of the next step. Uh Garrett  But yeah and that's what I just I wanted that I want to be able to take it on a project that's raw and has a ton of craft and then every time I commit basically start cleaning up there and just make sure it doesn't regress, right it only gets better, you know and basically it makes it easier to or hopefully it will make it easier to just make constant steady improvement, right? It's not you run it and then it's like you know the tool just throws up its hands, it's like this code base is a mess, Ben  don't even Garrett  use this tool. Um Instead I want it to be you know what okay make some progress, let's start there and eventually, you know, over the course of a year, two years you're gonna touch so much of the code and eventually it's gonna get cleaner and it's gonna get better right? And it's not just formatting but like you've got things like brake man and things that are for scanning for security issues and all this stuff and there's so much bundler audit right and all these things to make sure that your dependencies and you know there's a lot of great tools out there like code, climate for reporting. But what drives me nuts is when I commit and then it gets to see I Garrett  and then the ci finds the mistake because the tool you don't run it locally like okay well now I've got to fix it and I gotta wait for ci again and like I want all these tools to be so frictionless to use, it never even makes it to see i like CS board because it never has anything to complain about because by the time it gets there it's already perfect. Um So yeah, so that's kind of the that's a reviewer um and it'll hopefully be more like the end of the year. Um And then I've also been obsessed with many tests lately because I used to use ours back and I just it never messed with me. It was too, I don't know, it's Garrett  the way I've always described, feels like it's the only thing in ruby that I feel like is simultaneously very ruby and very un ruby and it's just never worked with my head. Um And all the I'm very dependency averse from years of you know dependency breaks or has a security issue and the chain reaction of things that need to be updated and can't be updated because and so I'm very dependency averse. Um and uh so that's another reason I've gone with many tests because it's just there there's fewer dependencies, it's simpler. Um But many tests output even with all the formatting options out there just always, I felt like I was doing way more work than I should have to to figure out what failed what went wrong and how to fix it Garrett  and so what I've done is really over engineered to test reporter for many tests to uh when a test fails, it kind of catalogs what file was in the stack trace what line number in that file. Um and so what it's doing is in the background, it's kind of building up a heat map of everything that triggered a problem. And it's also differentiating between like failures and exceptions because if your test fails, okay, that's interesting. You want to start with the assertion, what was the assertion that failed? But if there is an exception, then the assertions kind of irrelevant. You want to go dig into the exception. But what if the exception came out of the test, Garrett  then you don't want to waste your time and source code just fix the test. Otherwise you're not. And so it differentiates between failures, a broken test and an exception. And it presents the output differently to kind of guide you in the right direction based on those. And if you've got anything that's failing or broken, it's not going to harass you about skipped tests or slow tests, right? It suppresses those until everything's fixed. And it's like, hey, by the way, you've got four tests here that you've skipped, you need to go right? Those, uh, and actually won't bother you about slow tests until all your skip tests are fixed, Right? Garrett  Uh, and so it kind of lets you focus on what's important at the time without reminding you of the fact that you've got a lot going on that is pending and problematic or whatever it is. Um, you know, so there's a lot of little things like that and like when you make that one change that breaks  things across your whole project, you're renaming a class or whatever it is. Uh And then it's just you will go from like a perfect test suite  failing tests like crap. Okay. Where do I even start? Uh And so the heat map will show you like look all of these problems come back to this one file, you know, whatever it is so you can get to the heart of the matter instead of having to like Garrett  visually scanned through  failures and try to find and recognize a pattern. Uh So it's kind of uh a proactive pattern matching reporter. Um you know with a few other tweaks to just help uh nudge and simplify kind of the output so that you can my hope be, you know, you see a test failure and you know exactly what you need to do to fix it before you even go back to your text editor because you've got enough context. Um And obviously that's not always possible, but more often than not and definitely more often than with just the generic reporter. Uh That's been the case and has been really helpful and saves me a ton of time fishing for what needs to be fixed and what what's worth fixing first and that kind of thing. So I have to think a lot less. Garrett  I just have to go fix it. Ah And so both of those combined are going to kind of I'm hoping work in a way that you know you type R. V. W. And it's just smart and it says here's all your problems. You're like oh my gosh, everything's perfect. But you could stand to improve your documentation here in this file, you're like okay I can do that real quick. Um You know so it kind of nudges you in the right direction without like wearing you out about how horrible your code is. Um Because when you're one of those tools just raw, that's basically what it feels like. It's like oh my gosh I'm horrible. I have no idea, I have no business writing code. Uh Garrett  And that's not a good feeling but if it's like hey you can fix this, here's how okay I can do that. Um You know there's a lot of really interesting ideas. There are like you know you ever run your test suite and it fails and you run it again and it passes. They're like oh crap what was the seed that it used when it failed? And uh so what reviewer does too in the background, it's recording a bunch of history. Um And so it will remember that last failed seed and so you can you be able to type our VW rerun and it would rerun just the failure and let you zero in on that and focus on fixing that. Um So there's a lot of little things like that that Garrett  I just want to make it easier. I mean there's bisect and some great tools out there. Um, but sometimes they're overkill and slow and they take you out of the zone and I want to make it easier to stay in the zone and get things done and get back on track. Ben  That sounds sounds really cool. Yeah, we um, remember having done some a few major rails version upgrades with the honey badger card base, you know, go from  to  or  or whatever it is. And like all of a sudden half your tests, you got thousands of tests and like thousands of them. It's the Garrett  most defeating feeling. You're just like, oh, okay, I quit for today. Ben  Yeah. And then, and then, you know, you dive through all those things like, okay, these all look the same. It's all the same. It's all the same and go and try this thing here and that thing there and oh, I made this one change and now half of those failing tests are now passing okay. Now, you know? So yeah, having the heat map I think is uh, it sounds like a great idea. And then of course, you know, you mentioned, uh, if it's an exception, you know exactly where to go, like it sounds like honey badger, right? You get the context that you need to know what to fix, right, yep. Yeah. Although I must say I'm, I'm an I respect fan Ben  have been for a long time and I've tried, you know, going back to many tests because I'll start your rails app like this, this new side project, I started a few a few months ago, like it's a new rails happen to me, you know, let me try any test again because that's the default and so I'll get in there for a bit. But then like one of the things I've come to realize is that I, what I love about our spec is despite how, you know, I can feel you about the dependency aversion, but at the same time our spec is kind of like a batteries included kind of thing. Like Ben  you've got the mocking right? Not the stubbing, you don't have to worry about what I do. I do, I do many test mock or do I do mocha, you know, like all that's kind of rails itself, right? It's kind of kind of its own duck and it has everything included. So you don't think about, you Garrett  know, and don't get me wrong, I don't dislike our spec, it just doesn't work with my head and like, I just get overwhelmed with how much it has. And so for me with many tests, like you're like, oh, which marked thing to use neither. Like if I feel like I need to mock something, I need to re factor it so it's more easy to test efficiently and directly. Um, because like marks, I mean that has all has its own issues, right? Like uh and so for me uh and and it was very much a mental thing. Like I just fully embraced accepted many tests limitations and now I use that as kind of a nudge to be like, all right, if this is really difficult to do, Garrett  then it's not that I need better testing tools. It's that I need my code to be organized in a way that lets me test this appropriately And efficiently without getting to set up  unrelated models so that it won't fall over. Uh And so that's kind of been more of a philosophical thing for me because previously when I drive many tests, that's exactly how to drive me nuts. I'm like, how the hell do I do any of this? Because my brain what little I did understand of our respect. I had learned to think that way about things. And so then I found myself doing all this like how do you mock in many tests and how do you, And it's like you don't, you know, use mocha or you know what have Ben  you. Garrett  Uh and so kind of accepting that and just saying, you know what, When it, when many test pushes back, I'm going to listen and I'll just re factor. Um and at first was a little painful. But now it actually has been really, really nice. Uh But I will say to a lot of that goes hand in hand with like I've been doing a lot of like deeper deeper reading on ruby and thus kind of understanding patterns, you know being able to see more patterns to re factor like oh this is why this is hard to test really. Just need to re factor using this pattern and take this approach instead or whatever. Um And so that's helped because otherwise I feel like I know I need to change this but I don't even know where to start. Um Garrett  So you know, that's definitely been a philosophical thing I had to accept. Ben  Yeah, that makes sense. So you mentioned code climate and I know, you know in the early days when kokonas started like it was basically a wrapper on top of flay and flaw right and eventually break man and stuff. Right? They assembled all these open source tools and put a nice ui on top of it, which is fine, you know, but you could just run off tools yourself, right? Um But review sounds pretty cool because you're basically giving that code climate kind of experience, but it's on your own right, in your own cli and you could I mean conceivably you could even use it like with left hook or something to do get pre commit kind of thing which might have its own problems but still it's an option. Garrett  It's definitely on the radar, there's a lot of get integration that I'm planning on. So you can do like our VW staged and it'll just look at the staged files or R. V. W untracked, it'll just looked at your file that you haven't staged, That kind of thing. Ben  Super handy. So do you do you see a path where review because there's some sort of commercial component to review or do you think it could always be pure, Garrett  there's, I've got a bunch of ideas that I think could um I mean the core one is just gonna be an open source jim. Um if I do follow any model um you know, it's probably going to be something more like sidekick where there's the core thing that is helpful and useful and free for eternity. Um and then there would be more advanced, either team functionality or kind of sharing of configuration files. Um There's a whole ton of tools that I've thought about building to to um things like if you have an existing app, it kind of auto detect and suggest, hey you might want to use these gems, these tools um obviously it's built in ruby but the idea is that it has to be ruby centric. It's really at the end of the day, it's just a wrapper for command line tools Garrett  that gives you some kind of either pass fail or score output. Um and so like if you've got  tools set up, like one reviewer, I've just gone overboard. Like I'll use everything because I want to kind of test it, you know, and dog food it um And so like if one fails it doesn't bother running the rest of them. And so the idea is if you can figure in the order of priority, like start with bundler audit right? Because if you've got a gym that's out of whack, then you need to fix that because that'll ripple And so it'll just stop there, so you have to wait  minutes for a whole suite to run on a huge project, it just fails immediately, insist fix this and then you fix that and then it runs Garrett  um and then two and this is all theoretical at this point because I haven't played with it, but I've got some, I'm really excited about the idea potentially. Um and I hate to make it ruby three only, but playing with tractors and some some threading and stuff so that you can have Robocop running in parallel with, you know, especially with multi core processors picking up and all this kind of stuff, I feel like there's a lot of potential Like what if you could run  tools in parallel and have the whole thing run in seconds instead of minutes and that could be really cool, There's other challenges there, but um you know that reporting obviously um like code climate, I feel like that's one of code climates really big things, Garrett  but for me the reporting is gonna be more an afterthought, I wanted to be a local thing that you can use friction free and then if people like it, which I hope they will, I mean I'm really excited about, I love using it to build itself, it's been wildly helpful. Um you know, then yeah, I'd start thinking about, you know, what other options are there for, how it could be better um and do even more cool stuff for teams or people who are just really serious about using it or you know, what have you? Ben  Mhm Yeah, I think, I mean I love, I love the sidekick model uh you know, give that great open source core that has great functionality and then build on top of that, you know, things that are useful to people who are going to use it more intensely and I think, I think the psychic definitely has that sweet spot, if it's it's an operations kind of thing where you're gonna be, you're gonna be running this forever in your production environment. So you want to pay that licensing fee, you know, every month, every year or whatever. And then there's also like the ASCII corp model, right? Where they have very, very good open source tools, you know, you can use Packer or Terror Form or whatever, Ben  you know, never paying them a dime but they also have great team collaboration tools if you want to move to their platform, you know, and coordinate your Terror Form running or you know, your console, you know, or your vault or whatever, right? They have a pro or enterprise offering for every one of those that can do additional stuff enhancing it, you know? So yeah, some great options there, Garrett  yeah, you know, I will say to a lot of my Garrett  thinking since selling sifter has been, I don't really want to run a sas app again, uh and I'm sure you can guess all the reasons uh at the end of the day, the simplest thing um and I mean I knew it when I was running sifter but I didn't fully appreciate it was the degree to which I let it change me to notifications and alerts of problems and a never ending fear that as soon as I went camping or hiking out of cell service was the day it was going to fall over in a bad way and uh like it wasn't this like huge thing, but it was just in this like ever present anxiety and after I didn't have that anymore, it was just such a like epiphany Garrett  that was like, I don't really want to go back there and if I build a SAS up, it needs to be something that can be designed in such a way that it's resilient and I know that, you know, if it goes into a certain state and it's like that for six hours or something, nobody's gonna be too upset. Um and I couldn't think of anything and uh so yeah, so then I just started building these gyms and I was like, I'm just gonna build the gyms and see where that takes me. I mean really, I feel like I'm just kind of pulling on a thread right now based on my personal curiosity and then just trying to also keep in mind like let's make sure this would also be useful for other people at some point, wherever that is. Ben  Yeah, I'm of course totally with you on the whole like it's tough to run this as because yeah, it is and yeah, I think about this the other day as this, this side project, I'm working on it, like, well it's it's actually right now just for fun, but of course it's like well how would I how to make money on this if I wanted to? And I could run a sad and this is a sad thing, it integrates with GIT hub. And uh so it's it's definitely a web based kind of stuff you do. Um Ben  but you know, if it went down for a few hours, people wouldn't be screaming like screaming about honey badger going down for a few hours. So like that's like that's okay. And then on the other hand, it's like, well it's it is very tightly integrated to get hub. So I could do a self hosted, here's a doctor image kind of thing, you go run this and it talks to your get up enterprise installation behind your firewall. Right? Ben  So I think, yeah, it's really good for entrepreneurs today who are so low to be thinking about that because there are a lot of options. There's the, you know, there's a psychic model. We just give one some someone some code, right? They license it, they run it and it's it's all them right. Or maybe you build a SAAS app that is also a docker image that they can deploy themselves. Maybe the codes available, you know, as maybe it's an open source thing, even like a matter most right, you can they have a hosted option, they have an open source options, have a self host adoption. Um Yeah, I think really good to be thinking about these things as you're, you know, deciding what you're doing day to day because it does, does affect quality of life. Like Ben  my first thought was, and I was when I think about this says I was like this side project, as I says, I was like, well then I got to have the laptop in the night time because Garrett  I'm like, I think I would much rather have an imac, but like as long as I'm involved in anything that can go offline, I don't think I can survive with just an imac, I've got to have a laptop and like yeah, I don't like that, feel like, I don't know, I mean, I don't think anybody but uh Yeah, Ben  Yeah, well that's, and I sometimes I think about a kind of metal level like oh that's a problem to solve, like how do you help? So the entrepreneurs run saAS operations without having to be, you know, always on like yeah, that's an unsolved problem. If someone solves that, that will be I think worth some. I mean Hiroko has done a pretty good job solving that problem, but it's not % solved yet. Garrett  So Well there's Ben  for me, Garrett  like I built a job board for our community here in the valley um because tourism based economies like the turnover and stuff is high and ah and so like for me I was staying with that and I haven't done this because it's just not critical enough. Um but the only thing I thought it would be like with a job board, if you could have it fall into read only mode where it's basically heavily cached on the front end and that's something that could work. But most apps where you're interacting with them because posting jobs, it's not like you constantly post jobs, you post a job and if you can't post a job right now you can come back in six hours and that's fine. It's not the end of the day, you know, into the world. Garrett  Uh but that's the only thing I've been able to come up with that has felt like it wouldn't be a huge issue as long as you designed and built it, right, so that I could do that. But everything else I'm like, nope, that won't work, That won't work. Like, I think that's why haven't start another business yet is because I've become really picky, like after selling stuff to, I'm like, what do I really want to do and not do again? And so much of the sad stuff while it's great. Um it was just like, it took a toll. Like, it made me not want to do so many things that now I love doing, like camping and hiking and like getting out of cell service. Um, and so I don't want to give that up anymore. Ben  So I guess the moral of the story is do all that kind of stuff when you're in your twenties have plenty of energy, right? You don't hate it yet, right? And then try to come up with something different by the time you're in your s, Garrett  use the experience to uh more wisely choose your battles. Ben  Yeah. Right. Yeah. Yeah. Cool. Well, this has been total fun. Yeah. Yeah. Garrett  Glad, Glad to catch up. Ben  Is there anything that we should have talked about that we didn't? Garrett  Oh, probably a ton of stuff. Uh, no, I mean, I wish this stuff was all in a better state. Many test heat is good to use now, I need to add a little bit more exception handling because now every now and then something goes wrong with many test heat and like you can't see your own test failures because it fell over. Uh so that's kind of my next step is to add some resiliency to that so that if it breaks, it says, hey many test heat fell over on this, but your things fine and have some like simple output. So you at least can see something because every now and then I have to go disable it and switch back to the regular reporter so I can actually see the the failure. Um but uh you know, it's ready to use, I'm using it Garrett  every day on all my projects now. Um and it's been pretty, pretty fine. Today was the first time in like a week that I've seen any kind of issue that didn't work so that people can use it. It definitely needs some tidying up and improvements, but that's forthcoming, then reviewer will hopefully be the end of the year will kind of see how, how things shake out with the holidays and all that, how much work I'm able to get done, but um I'm optimistic because I want it, I want to use it on other projects, like every time I go work on reviewer, I'm like, I really wish I had this for my other projects where I've just got dumb scripts that just run the same commands in order and you know, it's close, but it's not the same. Um Garrett  you know, I'm really excited about how much I know it's going to help my day to day work flow and I'm hopeful anybody else that's using rubio find those same benefits. Um And hopefully other languages too. I don't know. I haven't really tried, I mean in theory, javascript and a lot of that stuff will work like with the rails app. Um and like er be learning and and what night. Um So hopefully, but I haven't tried anything wholly outside of a ruby project to see if it could be useful there, but it should be, it's just a wrapper around command line, right? Strings. So hopefully Ben  and then next step V. S. Code plug in right where it's all just running all the time Garrett  code, right? Ben  Yeah, maybe that's your thing you sell. I don't know. Garrett  Yeah. You know, I haven't thought about that too much because most of them you can plug in on their own. Uh But then that gets overwhelming when you're trying to edit your file and it's like just yelling at you about everything. Like just let me think first, then yell at me after the fact after I've like figured it out. Yeah, I'm excited about it. It's kind of the most fun I've had programming in a long time. Um So we'll see. Ben  I love it. Well, scratching your niche is always fun and if you can make some money while you're at it. Hey, even funny Garrett  right? Well and so like that's the thing, like just kind of circle back and wrap it up, like part of it is in order for me to really pursue adaptable, I've got to have some kind of automatic income and like with sifter that would've been perfect, you know, it's recurring revenues, Great. And uh so a lot of it too is like, I'm really gonna unlock adaptable potential. I need to not be, you know, have an income tied to hourly rates. It's got to be divorced from how much time I'm actually sitting at my computer and uh so that's kind of been a driver too, but again, more just wandering and figuring it out, hoping it all comes together somehow. Ben  That's, we're all in the same boat. Garrett  Right, Ben  well, we will definitely link up uh the heat map and review and uh definitely get some people check it out if you're ruby ist and we'll link up your twitter so people can follow you and keep track of what you're doing. Uh Thanks again, yeah, hanging out with, Garrett  thanks. Great to catch up Ben  and thanks everybody for listening Again, you've been listening to found request from the founders of honey badger. We're excited to continue to bring you exciting episodes on podcast and a fantastic product, honey badger of course. So check us out on the bed, radio and you know, as star always says, review as if you like and don't review us, if you don't like, have a great one. 

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More
Crisis on Infinite Nights He Came Home: The Many Timelines of Michael Myers

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021


Death has come to our little podcast. We can either ignore it, confront it, or choose our own version to stare down as we shout SIX TIMES! at it. For this episode, we discuss the night HE came home... or is it the night HE continued being home? Or, wait, was it the night HE came home ten years later? Twenty years later? FORTY years later? Resurrected? Out to return? For revenge? Quite frankly, we're not sure what's going on with serial slasher and mechanic coverall enthusiast Michael Myers of the famed HALLOWEEN franchise, but we're putting our best tan trench coats on and figuring it out, tackling the many differing timelines of the horror series and what's unique and occasionally broken about each! You don't know what death is/was/could be but download the episode and find out! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BoxOfficePulpPodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BoxOfficePulp Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/box-office-pulp/id577338641 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=37192&refid=stpr Amazon Podcasts:https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/7c11ff8b-2875-454d-8770-8b1d36d04b52

The Fox and the Foxhound: Love, Marriage, and Harry Potter

It's the first battle (and first major death) of Book 7, and The Wilsons are turning to RoboCop comparisons, Napoleon Dynamite impressions, and trash-talking an incompetent Voldemort for comfort. Support the show (http://patreon.com/thefoxandthefoxhound)

60 Seconds to Comply
60 Seconds to Comply - Minute 53 - You're Surprised Robocop Isn't Holding His F--king Tazer Sideways

60 Seconds to Comply

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 43:58


Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Robocopminute/  Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/60secondstocomply/Follow Courtney at Travian Designs: https://traviandesigns.com/  https://www.facebook.com/prometheusbyminute/  https://www.patreon.com/traviandesignsFollow Simon at Fandom Crossing and Helios Photo:  https://www.facebook.com/fandomcrossing/  https://www.facebook.com/heliosphotograph/  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCATzkJ0zQBaUIffJ4PmLACg'

Canned Air: A Tribute to Comics and Pop Culture
Canned Air #413 The Movies That Made Us Season 3 with Brian Volk-Weiss

Canned Air: A Tribute to Comics and Pop Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 72:02


We start this week discussing the movies featured in season 3 of the Netflix original series “The Movies That Made Us” in our Retro Roundtable. We talk “Aliens", "Coming To America", “RoboCop", "A Nightmare On Elmstreet", "Friday the 13th", and “Halloween”. Let us know your favorite on Facebook! Then we welcome the creator and executive producer of “The Movies That Made Us”, the President of The Nacelle Company, Brian Volk-Weiss back to the show! We talk with Brian about The Nacelle Company acquiring “RoboForce", the new season of “The Movies That Made Us”, and then we just talk toys. Get in here! @NacelleCompany @toysnacelle @BrianVolkWeiss CannedAirPodcast.com @CannedAirPod @Canned_Air If you'd like to show your support, you can either visit our Patreon page at Patreon.com/CannedAirPod or you can leave us a review on iTunes! Thanks for listening! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Podcast Under The Stairs
The Podcast Under the Stairs - Arrow Video Assortment EP 36 - Zombie for Sale

Podcast Under The Stairs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 20:27


Welcome to this sub-set of show exclusively looking at the Duncan's Arrow Video collection. Every 3 weeks Duncan will pick, at random, a title from his collection and review them on The Podcast Under the Stairs Episode 36 - Zombie for Sale (2019). The grading follows the Netflix rating style of 1 = Hated It, 2 = Didn't Like It, 3 = Liked It, 4 = Really Liked It & 5 = Loved It Zombie for Sale: Duncan: 5 Up next on The Arrow Video Assortment Ep 37 - Robocop (1987). Our new RSS Feed: https://anchor.fm/s/13ba6ef0/podcast/rss Check out the show on iTunes, TuneIn & on Stitcher Radio. Join our Discord Community. Please leave us feedback on iTunes, podcastunderthestairs@gmail.com and follow us on Facebook & Twitter.

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More

Ohhhh yes! Wrestling fans rejoice, Netflix has released a spooky—allegedly—treat for this Halloween season, starring the Deadman himself, The Undertaker. Ever wanted to play a game with the BOP Crew? Now you can! Join us and adventure-along as we enter Death Valley and the Phenom's Yard to uncover the mysterious secrets of Taker's posh mansion. Will we guide The New Day through this Interactive movie and steal the Urn with the power of positivity? Or will we merely… rest… in… peace…? Knock Rikishi off the top of the Cell by downloading the commentary now. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BoxOfficePulpPodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BoxOfficePulp Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/box-office-pulp/id577338641 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=37192&refid=stpr Amazon Podcasts:https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/7c11ff8b-2875-454d-8770-8b1d36d04b52

El Café Comiquero Podcast
El Café Comiquero #426 - Robocop (Retroreview)

El Café Comiquero Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021


Bourbon 'n BrownTown
Ep. 76 - Surveillance Capitalism & Abolitionist Tech, Pt. 2 ft. Alyxandra Goodwin

Bourbon 'n BrownTown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 115:05


EPISODE NOTE: Content warning for sounds of violence (gunshots); and spoiler alert for films mentioned belowGUESTAlyx is currently a Deputy Campaign Director on Policing and Incarceration at the Action Center on Race and the Economy (ACRE), organizes with BYP100 Chicago, and is a co-founder and writer with LEFT OUT Magazine. Her writing and activism are centered around the momentum and challenges of building Black power and self-determination. Her work at ACRE currently focuses on the relationship between the finance industry and policing, racialized capitalism, and how they exacerbate oppressions.OVERVIEWBrownTown spills even more the tea on in part two of the surveillance capitalism and abolitionist tech conversation with Alyx Goodwin. The team finishes their lengthy two-part discussion by breaking down myths of tech neutrality, offering anti-capitalist and anti-authoritarian critiques of dystopian tech action movies, and lean into what their abolitionist tech future  looks like.Alyx and BrownTown pick up where they left off centering a couple reminders and updates before the dig in. The gang discusses the observations and broader lessons from the October 4th Chicago Police Department budget hearing, then-updates of the #StopShotSpotter campaign (1, 2), and the global ramifications of Facebook going down for several hours before unpacking policing as a logic, disaster capitalism, and the bias of tech. Alyx and Caullen discuss how prison tech came home during COVID-19 lockdowns and the advantages of public tech. David re-introduces the role of popular culture in both reinforcing copaganda and problematic systems while also offering heightened critiques of such "fictional" future worlds with tech and spectacle at the forefront. Caullen offers his abolitionist and anti-capitalist critiques of RoboCop (1987) and its early 90's sequels, RoboCop (2014), The Running Man (1987), Demolition Man (1993), and Minority Report (2002) while David and Alyx build out the real world implications, deducing the highly reflexive relationship between art and culture. Once again, they close out encouraging us to interrogate not only the uses of new technologies, but the technologies themselves as well as the unaltered violent systems that they often embolden. If surveillance capitalism and the prison-industrial complex is the puppet master of technology, who is the show for? Here's their take. Originally recorded October 7, 2021.Go back and re-listen to Part One!--Corrections and information on films mentioned:RoboCop  (2014) - 5 Reasons Why RoboCop 2014 Isn't As Bad As People Say It Is (& 5 Reasons It Is) (Screenrant)RoboCop (2014) - Opening scene takes place in Tehran, Iran, presented as "Operation: Tehran" in the film.The Politics of Demolition Man (video)The Running Man (1987) synopsis: By 2017, the United States has become a totalitarian police state following a worldwide economic collapse. The government pacifies the populace through The Running Man, a broadcast game show, where criminals fight for their lives as "runners", fleeing from armed mercenaries named the "stalkers", to earn a state pardon. (Wikipedia)Minority Report (2002) - Filming took place from March 22 to July 18, 2001, in Washington, D.C., Virgina, and Los Angeles. Film locations included the Ronald Reagan Building (as Pre Crime headquarters) and Georgetown. (Wikipedia)Mentioned in episode and extra information:Shoshana Zuboff featured in 'The goal is to automate us': Welcome to the Age of Surveillance Capitalism (Naughton, The Guardian)Gang database under a new fancy name Criminal Enterprise Information System (CEIS) (MacArthur Justice Center)Operation Legend is Bringing Surveillance Tech to Cities (Schwenk, The Intercept)Students Are Pushing Back Against Proctoring Surveillance Apps (Kelly, EFF)For Tech to be equitable, the people must control it (Alyx Goodwin, LEFT OUT)Issues in "crime" reporting  (Alex Karakatsanis)Afghan Activist: We All Deserve Refuge, Not Just Those Who Served the U.S. (Lazare, In These Times)Where Counter-terrorism Got Us  (Todd St. Hill, LEFT OUT)General McKenzie apologies for Kabul strike killing 10 civilians, not ISIS-K (Smith, The Guardian)Plans for $400-billion new city in the American desert unveiled (Holland, CNN)Dystopian world': Singapore patrol robots stoke fears of surveillance state (France-Presse, The Guardian)Chicago Drill 'n' Activism cross-platform documentary and multimedia project on drill rap and activismObama CBA Coalition and SoapBox projectPredictive policing and Chicago's Heat List (The Verge)Neighborhoods Watched: The Rise of Urban Mass Surveillance (Stein, et. al)Social justice solutions for BIPOC communities (SXSW)Citizens Police Data ProjectTech is Not Neutral--Sign the #StopShotSpotter petition and take action with the toolkit! Check #DefundCPD's social media for updates on the campaign (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Linktree). Watch SoapBox's Stop ShotSpotter PSA here!Follow Alyxandra on Instagram and Twitter! Read her and others' work at LEFTOUTmag.com and follow LEFT OUT on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.Follow ACRE on their site, Facebook, Instagram, and Medium; and BYP100 on their site, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.--CREDITS: Intro soundbite from SoapBox's Stop ShotSpotter PSA edited by James Edward Murray and outro song Police State by Dead Prez. Audio engineered by Genta Tamashiro and Kiera Battles. Episode photo by Thoughtpoet.--Bourbon 'n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support

5GFA
Episode 65: Hocus Pocus (Spooktober)

5GFA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 137:14


What do the Wizard of Oz, Hereditary, Robocop, Dumb and Dumber and Valentine's Day have in common? They're all mentioned in this episode about Hocus Pocus. Plus Dan Miller returns for his 3rd consecutive Spooktober and Magic Mike phones it in - literally and figuratively.

To Avoid Fainting
Ep 10: V/H/S/94

To Avoid Fainting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 72:55


Ep 10, y'all! This episode has been a pain our asses to record, but Stacey, Ash, and Mike are back to talk about the newest installment in the franchise, V/H/S/94. Does this one redeem the mess that was Viral? Listen to find out! There's RoboCop references that I don't get, Ash educates us on gun laws, we spend too much time analyzing a movie that doesn't need it, and there's plenty of loud background noises!  Follow us on Instagram @ToAvoidFaintingPodcast

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More

It seems we're entitled to yet another good scare as The BOP Crew forms a mob to discuss the latest entry in Michael Myers' Life Story. No, not the old life story, the new life story. As one of the most divisive sequels in the franchise slashes cinema and streaming screens everywhere, we tackle heady spoiler territory, the deeper themes at play, what it adds to Michael and the ramifications thereof, plus why the discourse might be so controversial. All in all we discover, once and for all, that yes indeed... HALLOWEEN KILLS. Don't stare outward, stare inward by downloading the episode now. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BoxOfficePulpPodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BoxOfficePulp Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/box-office-pulp/id577338641 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=37192&refid=stpr Amazon Podcasts:https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/7c11ff8b-2875-454d-8770-8b1d36d04b52

V3Tv Network
Who Knews | Man Becomes an Alien & RoboCops Enforce Social Distancing Law

V3Tv Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 14:29


  ENTERTAINMENT / WORLD Alien wannabe gets lips removed — past ops include ear removal, tongue-splitting, eyeball tattoo and skin implants [Video] by Nena SerranoJanuary 27, 20210 SHARETWEETPIN ITSHARE WHAT'S BEING CLAIMED: Anthony Loffredo, 32, recently had his top lip sliced off, in the desire to turn himself into an extra-terrestrial being. In previous body modifications, the “black alien” had his nose and ears removed, his tongue sliced, his eyeballs tattooed, and his skin embedded with reptile-like implants. Loffredo's next goal is to remove his skin and replace it with metal.

The Babylon Bee
THE BEE WEEKLY: Headlines With Pie, Culture Gets Kunkled, and Robocop is Real

The Babylon Bee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 68:03


Kyle, Ethan, and Brett Kunkle from MAVEN guess which headlines are real or fake and have to eat mystery pie if they guess wrong. Brett Kunkle also kunkles some culture and helps us discern what is good or harmful in pop culture today. There's weird news headlines, glorious hate mail, and other shenanigans going on at The Babylon Bee. Be sure to check out MAVEN which exists to help the next generation know truth, pursue goodness, and create beauty, all for the cause of Christ at: http://maventruth.com Don't miss the upcoming Bee interview with Vocab Malone. See Vocab's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/VocabMalone Kyle, Ethan and Brett Kunkle talk about the Maven Parent podcast and how conversations about Animal Crossing in the recent Bee Interview with James Poulos were deemed by Twitter to be intense. They talk about Bee articles that are banging and bombing and then get into this week's weird news. The guys play Headlines With Pie and Kunkle Culture before reading a glorious hate mail about how our website has become literary pornography. In the subscriber lounge, they read top subscriber-submitted headlines, special love mail, bonus hate mail, and finally subject Brett to the Next Ten Questions, giving the Bee the opportunity to show off their new trolly dilemma display featuring Lego replicas of Kyle, Ethan, and The Newsboys.

Booking The Territory Pro Wrestling Podcast
NWA Sat Night on TBS Recap May 19, 1990! It‘s the go home show before Capital Combat 90 and Robocop!

Booking The Territory Pro Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 86:44


Please stay safe and healthy! If you can afford it and love what we do, please consider supporting our show by becoming a BTT Podcast Patreon Member! Also, purchase a BTT Podcast t-shirt or two from our Pro Wrestling Tees Store!  This week's Time Stamps for our NWA Saturday Night on TBS recap from May 19, 1990 review are as follows: Opening Shenanigans, Harper wanted to start early but now he's not here? What's new? ( 0:01:08 )  Patreon shout outs. Become a patron! https://www.patreon.com/BookingTheTerritory, ANNUAL MEMBERSHIPS NOW AVAILABLE. SAVE 10% WHEN SIGNING UP FOR THE YEAR! ( 0:07:45 )  Harper's late but joins the show once again with the shoot job blues ( 0:08:40 )  SPOILER ALERT: Harper and Doc talk about the new Sopranos movie. So fast forward to the next time stamp. ( 0:09:50 )  Arn Anderson's Glock Promo. ( 0:20:51 )  What the hell is a Throckmorton? ( 0:24:46 )  NWA Sat Night on TBS recap from May 19, 1990. ( 0:28:49 )  Ratings and Rolex Time! ( 1:16:50 )  Information on Harper's Video Shoutout, Life and Relationship Advice. ( 1:23:00 ) Information regarding Harper's Video Shoutouts and we play Harper's first shoutout in case you're not on social media!  1. First things first, email Harper with the details of what you want in your video shoutout or who the shoutout is too. His email address is ChrisHarper16Wildkat@gmail.com. Also in that email tell him what your paypal address is. 2. Paypal him $20. Harper's PayPal is, get your pen and paper out, cc30388cc@yahoo.com .  3. Harper will then send you the video to the email address that you emailed him from requesting your video shoutout. That's it! Don't email the show email address. Email Harper. If you missed any of those directions, hit rewind and listen again. Official BTT Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/BookingTheTerritory BTT Facebook Group! https://www.facebook.com/groups/281458405926389/ Pay Pal: https://www.paypal.me/BTTPod Follow us on Twitter @BTT_Podcast, @Mike504Saints, @CJHWhoDat and Like us on Facebook.

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More
BLACK PUMPKIN Commentary Track (A Big-Ass Pumpkin Day Extravaganza)

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


The gourdiest time of year is here! And while we may have all started the festivities a month ago like Satan intended, the official-official start of this pumpkin spiced season is here and now! HAPPY BIG-ASS PUMPKIN DAY! Yes, it's our favorite holiday, and per usual we're celebrating the only way we know how: with a random horror movie featuring a pumpkin. This time it's another round of Amazon Prime roulette and the winner is the legend of Bloody Bobby in the surprisingly goosebump-y BLACK PUMPKIN. So crack open your can of gourd guts and join us for this feature commentary track! Begin carving and download here! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BoxOfficePulpPodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BoxOfficePulp Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/box-office-pulp/id577338641 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=37192&refid=stpr Amazon Podcasts:https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/7c11ff8b-2875-454d-8770-8b1d36d04b52

Les chemins de la philosophie
Paul Verhoeven, cinéaste de l'ironie 1/4 : RoboCop, humain après tout

Les chemins de la philosophie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 57:41


durée : 00:57:41 - Les Chemins de la philosophie - par : Géraldine Mosna-Savoye, Adèle Van Reeth - "RoboCop", sorti en 1988 dans les salles françaises, est le 8ème film de Paul Verhoeven et son premier film américain. Duplicité, premier degré, deuxième degré, troisième degré, ironie, critique politique... : ce film contient-il tout le cinéma de Verhoeven ? - réalisation : Nicolas Berger, Laurence Malonda - invités : Axel Cadieux Journaliste, critique de cinéma, rédacteur en chef adjoint de la revue So Film

Cosmic Potato: The Super Fantalk Podcast
Cartoons Based on Live Action

Cosmic Potato: The Super Fantalk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 87:02


Episode 197: There have been a lot of cartoons that were based on live action film and TV. Some of the original source material is not even appropriate for the audience the cartoon is made for. Did you know they made a Robocop cartoon? Robocop was rated R! We're talking about some of that stuff today. Be sure to check out all of our episodes at InfinitePotato.com! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/that-super-fantalk-pod/message

Destiny Community Podcast
Retro Slot Ep. 27 Robocop Versus Terminator

Destiny Community Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 106:39


This week JSniperton and Briar talk about all the weeks Retro Gaming news + ROBOCOP VERSUS TERMINATOR for Sega Genesis!Retro Slot is: @JSniperton | @TheBriarRabbit |Find all of the DCP Members on Twitter: @teft |@TheBriarRabbit | @franmirabella | @Mrs5oooWatts | @JSniperton | @ArekkzGaming Art by Ash: @AR_McDSocial Media and Twitch Management by Mr_Ar3s: @Mr_Ar3s--------------------------------------------------------Join us on our DCP LIVE Twitch Channel! https://www.twitch.tv/dcp_live/Our Patreon is now LIVE! https://www.patreon.com/dcp_liveJoin our DCP Discord Server! https://discord.gg/dcp--------------------------------------------------------We have a new merch store! Exclusive t-shirts and more incoming! https://www.dcplivemerch.com Want some sweet DCP tshirts/coffee mugs? https://society6.com/dcp Save 5% on Scuf Gaming with code "DCP" https://scufgaming.com/

What's Your Movie?
"Robocop"

What's Your Movie?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 33:54


"Dead or Alive, You're Coming With Me." Sorry, we had to reference at least one of those iconic lines. Take a trip with us to Delta City in this episode, as Emily tries to guess the plot to Paul Verhoeven's 1987 Science Fiction classic. This movie spawned several sequels, video games, tv spinoffs, and a remake (which was actually pretty good). So listen in, have some laughs, and just remember... "It's your move, Creep." Enjoy!!! And Follow us @What's Your Movie? --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/whatsyourmovie/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/whatsyourmovie/support

Frankenstein's Podcast
39 - Robocop w/Jim Tandberg

Frankenstein's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 90:56


Friend of the podcast & artist, Jim Tandberg, pops back in to chat with Joe & Kalid about the 1987 Verhoeven classic, Robocop. Along the way the crew dig into the satire the film is presenting, discuss how Robocop mirrors Frankenstein, and (aggressively) unpack the mechanics of the four bears test. ** Special shout out to Jim Hall for the music! Check out more of his music here, and if you like what you hear, please consider donating to support his work here! Episode notes can be found here.

Papo Furado Podcast
Papo Furado Podcast #98 - RoboCop - o policial do futuro

Papo Furado Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 88:01


Olá, amigos! Hoje, o Papo Furado Podcast conversa sobre um clássico do cinema, Robocop - o policial do futuro, de 1987! Nesse episódio, Marcus Cardoso, Rogério Roma e Guga Ferrari recebem nosso querido amigo, jornalista, crítico de cinema e podcaster Marcelo Miranda, do Podcast Saco de Ossos e do Hora do Espanto, para falar sobre esse filmaço do diretor Paul Verhoeven. "Ouvão!" :) Sejam padrinhos ou madrinhas do Papo Furado doando mensalmente a partir de 2 reais. Acessem nosso Padrim e ajudem-nos a manter essa baguncinha gostosa que fazemos na internet. https://www.padrim.com.br/papofurado Assine nossos planos também no PicPay! https://app.picpay.com/user/papofuradopod Comprem nossas camisas na lojinha do Papo Furado no MercadoLivre: Masculina P>GG: https://produto.mercadolivre.com.br/MLB-1502148393-camisa-papo-furado-podcast-masculina-azul-marinho-_JM Masculina XG: https://produto.mercadolivre.com.br/MLB-1502143047-camisa-papo-furado-podcast-masculina-xg-azul-marinho-_JM Feminina P>G: https://produto.mercadolivre.com.br/MLB-1502148374-camisa-papo-furado-podcast-feminina-azul-marinho-_JM Visitem nosso site: https://papofuradopodcast.wordpress.com Curtam nossa página no Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/papofuradopodcast Para críticas, elogios e sugestões: papofuradopodcast@gmail.com Sigam o Marcelo Miranda no Twitter https://twitter.com/marcelomiranda1 Apoie o projeto do livro “Poderes das Trevas, de Bram Stoker” https://www.catarse.me/poderes Sigam-nos no Twitter: https://twitter.com/PapoFuradoPod E no Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/papofuradopod/ Mais uma fantástica edição de som realizada por Eduardo Garcia: https://twitter.com/edugarcya Blocos: Leitura de E-mails - 00h07min29s Início da discussão - 00h21min14s Considerações finais - 01h19min06s

Retro Ramble
EP67: Timon Singh - Born To Be Bad

Retro Ramble

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 49:34


In this month's podcast special, Charlie and George get nasty and talk villains with author, podcaster and filmmaker, Timon Singh! The brothers talk to Timon about his books Born to Be Bad and Born to Be Bad Part 2, where he interviews the greatest villains of 80s and 90s cinema! Timon's books are recommended reading for Retro Ramble listeners, as they include interviews with the likes of Vernon Wells (Commando), Ronny Cox (Total Recall, Robocop), Martin Kove (The Karate Kid) and Robert Partick (Terminator 2) amongst many others!  The brothers also find time to also discuss Timon's other ventures, hosting the Bristol Bad Film Club, the documentary he produced, In Search of The Last Action Heroes, and his thoughts on the current state of action cinema. Twitter: @TimonSingh Facebook: www.facebook.com/BornToBeBadBook

Have A Drink With Me
Robocop & Greyhound Cocktails with Chad Opitz

Have A Drink With Me

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 45:00


Dylan and Chad drink Greyhounds and talk about a movie known only for a penis shooting scene, Robocop.Find Chad on social media @chadopitz and be sure to tip John Stout at the Punchline in San Francisco----Follow Dylan on a drunken journey as he attempts to discuss movies, television, and things his guests love.Each episode Dylan picks what he and the guests talk about, but the guests tell Dylan what he has to drink.#hadwm #greyhound #cocktails #chadopitz #comedypodcast----http://shop.stricterpictures.comhttp://instagram.com/stricterpicshttp://twitter.com/stricterpicshttp://facebook.com/stricterpicsSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/hadwm)

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More

It's time to scream the lyrics to Hotel California incoherently at some Razor Fisted assassins, because the BOP Crew is harnessing the power of magical microphones found in a cave thousands of years ago in order to gush about Shang-Chi And The Legend Of The Ten Rings! The kung-fu/superhero/fantasy we didn't know we always wanted. Simu Liu, Tony Leung, and Still Going By Awkwafina round out Marvel Studio's best cast in years, but are they given the screen time they deserve, or  is this a roster of Koraths and Malakeths? And is there anything at all to Death Dealer besides the cool mask? What's pulled from the 70s comics and what's been left on the problematic curb? You'll find out the answers at our side, dear listener. Oh, thank God you're real. Make Iron Man 3 retroactively relevant by listening now! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BoxOfficePulpPodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BoxOfficePulp Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/box-office-pulp/id577338641 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=37192&refid=stpr Amazon Podcasts:https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/7c11ff8b-2875-454d-8770-8b1d36d04b52

Through the Booth Window
Episode 26 - Technology

Through the Booth Window

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 54:12


Film is a medium reliant on technology, and yet most movies about technology paint it in a dangerous light. This week we look at this strange dichotomy and dissect why this might be, which few films celebrate technology, and the tropes and patterns of the tech film. With in depth discussion on Her, RoboCop, WarGames, and Things to Come, and reference to A Trip to the Moon, 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Man Who Fell to Earth, and many many more. Email us at boothwindow@gmail.com, and/or follow us on instagram @throughtheboothwindowpodcast @theobveeus and @caitlinstow

BlackLITE
35. Origin Story

BlackLITE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 57:53


Superman's home planet exploding, Captain America frozen in ice, Robocop murked by a crime boss. Every legend has its origin story and today BlackLITE shares theirs. In this episode, the guys tell the true story of 4 strangers picked to live in a house... oops - wrong show - 4 friends who picked themselves to form the BlackLITE Podcast. They also share some stories they probably shouldn't have.... YOLO! Connect with BlackLITE on Instagram and Twitter @BlackLITEpod. If you have a topic, idea, or feedback you'd like to share with us, you can hit us up at Blacklitepodcast@gmail.com

Film Alchemist
Robocop

Film Alchemist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 58:49


The Alchemist clean up the streets with Robocop.  Key Elements: Murphy's law, Ed Squeels, Claymation Arms Join our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/filmalchemistpod

Your Mental Breakdown
054: A Little Bit Robocop - Sarah #3

Your Mental Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 51:42


Meredith updates us on the intruder in her backyard - who came back again! We continue the new season with Sarah, in spite of a few audio hiccups in the session. Doug and Sarah talk about feeling frustrated, annoyed, and overwhelmed when others don't get to a solution as quickly and easily as you do, especially when that means you take it on and do it all yourself. This has been a part of Sarah for so long as a survival mechanism growing up in, and running away from, a cult. Doug and Mer highlight the process of helping clients like Sarah recognize and begin to change their patterns, rather than stay focused on the details and the content of their current narrative. Mentioned in this episode: Doug Friedman Meredith Levy Your Mental Breakdown The Facebook Group General Sherman Aluminum Blanket Wrap Wimpy from Popeye