Podcasts about Nikita Khrushchev

1950–1964 First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

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Nikita Khrushchev

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Best podcasts about Nikita Khrushchev

Latest podcast episodes about Nikita Khrushchev

The Takeaway
The Prospect of Peace Talks

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 11:17


Last week, President Biden signaled that he was willing and ready to engage with Vladimir Putin on peace talks.  But a day later, a Kremlin spokesperson dismissed those talks as unlikely, pointing to the unwillingness by the U.S. and other allies to recognize Russia's illegal annexation of new territories in Ukraine. Meanwhile, Russia continues to target Ukrainian civilian infrastructure with airstrikes, which has left millions of Ukrainians without power, heat, or running water as the cold winter months set in. We speak with Nina Khrushcheva, a professor of international affairs at the New School in New York and the great-granddaughter of former Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, about where things stand in the war, and what shape peace talks could take.

The Takeaway
The Prospect of Peace Talks

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 11:17


Last week, President Biden signaled that he was willing and ready to engage with Vladimir Putin on peace talks.  But a day later, a Kremlin spokesperson dismissed those talks as unlikely, pointing to the unwillingness by the U.S. and other allies to recognize Russia's illegal annexation of new territories in Ukraine. Meanwhile, Russia continues to target Ukrainian civilian infrastructure with airstrikes, which has left millions of Ukrainians without power, heat, or running water as the cold winter months set in. We speak with Nina Khrushcheva, a professor of international affairs at the New School in New York and the great-granddaughter of former Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, about where things stand in the war, and what shape peace talks could take.

Democracy in Question?
Charles Taylor on Degenerations and Regenerations of Democracy

Democracy in Question?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 30:15


Guests featured in this episode: Charles Taylor, one of the most preeminent contemporary philosophers of our times. He is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at McGill University in Montreal. He was Fellow of All Souls College and Professor of Social and Political Theory at Oxford University. His remarkably vast oeuvre includes landmark monographs on Hegel, social theory, religion, language, and multiculturalism. Among his books let me mention Sources of the Self: The Making of Modern Identity (1989), Multiculturalism and the Politics of Recognition (1992), or A Secular Age (2007) which have decisively shaped contemporary debates in their respective fields. His latest book, co-authored with Craig Calhoun and Dilip Gaonkar is called Degenerations of Democracy. GlossaryWhat is the murder of George Floyd?(08:51 or p.3 in the transcript)On May 25, 2020, white Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin killed George Floyd, a Black man, by kneeling on his neck for almost 10 minutes. The death, recorded by bystanders, touched off what may have been the largest protest movement in U.S. history and a nationwide reckoning on race and policing. After video of the incident was posted on Facebook, protests began almost immediately in Minneapolis and quickly spread across the nation. Demonstrators chanting “Black Lives Matter” and “I Can't Breathe” took to the streets from coast to coast, and police departments around the country responded at times with riot-control tactics. By early June, protests were so widespread that over 200 American cities had imposed curfews and half of the United States had activated the National Guard. Marches continued and spread throughout June, despite the restrictions on gathering during the COVID-19 pandemic and militarized resistance from federal and local law enforcement. More than 2,000 cities and towns in all 50 states saw some form of demonstration in the weeks after Floyd's death, as well as major cities across the globe: source What is the Hungarian Revolution of 1956?(13:06 or p.4 in the transcript)Hungarian Revolution was a popular uprising in Hungary in 1956, following a speech by Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev in which he attacked the period of Joseph Stalin's rule. Encouraged by the new freedom of debate and criticism, a rising tide of unrest and discontent in Hungary broke out into active fighting in October 1956. Rebels won the first phase of the revolution, and Imre Nagy became premier, agreeing to establish a multiparty system. On November 1, 1956, he declared Hungarian neutrality and appealed to the United Nations for support, but Western powers were reluctant to risk a global confrontation. On November 4 the Soviet Union invaded Hungary to stop the revolution, and Nagy was executed for treason in 1958. Nevertheless, Stalinist-type domination and exploitation did not return, and Hungary thereafter experienced a slow evolution toward some internal autonomy: source What is the Ukrainian refugee crisis?(15:16 or p.4 in the transcript)The ongoing Ukrainian refugee crisis began in February 2022 immediately after the Russian invasion of Ukraine. At present, around 8 million of Ukrainians fled the country as Russia indiscriminately targeted civilian populations with rockets and artillery strikes. By late March some four million Ukrainians had fled the fighting; this represented Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II. The overwhelming majority would find safety in Poland, Germany, and the Czech Republic. 90% of the refugees are women and children as Ukrainian men between 18 and 60 are banned from leaving the country: sourceWhat is the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?(18:13 or p.5 in the transcript)Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), foundational document of international human rights law. It has been referred to as humanity's Magna Carta by Eleanor Roosevelt, who chaired the United Nations (UN) Commission on Human Rights that was responsible for the drafting of the document. After minor changes it was adopted unanimously—though with abstentions from the Belorussian Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR), Czechoslovakia, Poland, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, the Soviet Union, the Ukrainian SSR, and Yugoslavia—by the UN General Assembly on December 10, 1948 (now celebrated annually as Human Rights Day), as a “common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations.” The French jurist René Cassin was originally recognized as the principal author of the UDHR. It is now well established, however, that, although no individual can claim ownership of this document, John Humphrey, a Canadian professor of law and the UN Secretariat's Human Rights Director, authored its first draft. Also instrumental in the drafting of the UDHR were Roosevelt; Chang Peng-chun, a Chinese playwright, philosopher, and diplomat; and Charles Habib Malik, a Lebanese philosopher and diplomat: source  Democracy in Question? is brought to you by:• Central European University: CEU• The Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: AHCD• The Podcast Company: Novel Follow us on social media!• Central European University: @CEU• Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: @AHDCentreSubscribe to the show. If you enjoyed what you listened to, you can support us by leaving a review and sharing our podcast in your networks!  

The People’s School for Marxist-Leninist Studies
Cuban Missile Crisis 60th Anniversary

The People’s School for Marxist-Leninist Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 81:41


In the PSMLS class of 10/18/22 and 10/20/22, we studied the Cuban Missile Crisis on the occasion of its 60th anniversary. The crisis has many parallels to our current situation, where Western imperialist aggression and NATO-backed fascism have brought the world to the brink of nuclear war once again. Connect with PSMLS: linktr.ee/peoplesschool Sign up to join the PSMLS mailing list and get notified of new Zoom classes every Tuesday and Thursday: eepurl.com/h9YxPb Content Used in Class: "The Cuban Missile Crisis Explained in 20 Minutes" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1UbVu... Letter from Khruschev to Kennedy, October 27, 1962 microsites.jfklibrary.org/cmc/oct27/doc4.html Letter from Kennedy to Khruschev, October 28, 1962 microsites.jfklibrary.org/cmc/oct28/ Timestamps: 0:00 Introduction - Background to the Cuban Missile Crisis 2:55 Video Section 1 from "The Cuban Missile Crisis Explained in 20 Minutes" 8:05 Q&A 9:26 Castro's Threat of First Strike was a Mistake 11:58 America Started It; Nuclear War is Never Worth It 13:40 Video Section 2 20:00 Reading from Khruschev's Letter to Kennedy 22:50 Sino-Soviet split; Mao's Support for Nuclear War 25:30 In Nuclear War, the First One to Shoot is the Second to Die 27:00 Close Calls between the USA and the Soviet Union 29:35 Nuclear Deterrence 32:10 Duck and Cover; Cold War Paranoia 35:50 Video Section 3 42:40 Q&A 44:20 Zelensky urging NATO to carry out "Preventative" First Strikes 45:40 Both Imperialism and the Communist Movement Are Divided Today 49:00 Poland has Agreed to Host NATO's Nuclear Weapons 53:35 Video Section 4 56:40 Q&A 57:00 Khruschev's Letter: Untie the Knot 1:01:30 Putting Missiles in Cuba Got Them Out of Turkey 1:03:20 Why We Call Each Other "Comrade" 1:06:30 Why the US Put Nuclear Weapons in Turkey 1:09:00 Khrushchev's Letter: Proposal for Resolution 1:12:00 Kennedy's Response 1:15:30 Q&A 1:19:10 Dr. Strangelove 1:19:45 Conclusion - The Importance of Our Work The People's School needs you! Email info@peoplesschool.us if you are interested in volunteering for any of the following roles: Facilitators* Moderators Web Controls* Audio Design Video Design Narrators** * Requires reliable internet connection ** Requires decent quality recording equipment This is the official channel of the People's School for Marxist Leninist Studies and any other channel posing as the People's School should be disregarded and does not reflect the official content, curriculum or decisions of the People's School for Marxist Leninist Studies.

Nixon and Watergate
Episode 159 RICHARD NIXON and WATERGATE 1974 The Fall , The Relationship with Anatoly Dobrynin, ( Tape Series 7 edition 1)

Nixon and Watergate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 80:04


From Wikipedia:" Anatoly Fyodorovich Dobrynin (Russian: Анато́лий Фёдорович Добры́нин, 16 November 1919 – 6 April 2010) was a Soviet statesman, diplomat, and politician. He was the Soviet ambassador to the United States for more than two decades, from 1962 to 1986.He attracted notoriety among the American public during and after the Cuban Missile Crisis at the beginning of his ambassadorship, when he denied the presence of Soviet missiles in Cuba. However, he did not know until days later that Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev had already sent the missiles and that the Americans already had photographs of them. Between 1968 and 1974, he was known as the Soviet end of the Kissinger–Dobrynin direct communication and negotiation link between the Nixon administration and the Soviet Politburo. "Dobrynin served as the Soviet Ambassador throughout the height of the Cold War during the terms of six American Presidents, John Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan. He served under Nikita Khrushchev, Leonid Brezhnev, Yuri Andropov, Konstantin Chernenko, and Mikhail Gorbachev.  He was an instrumental figure in the relationship between the Soviet Union and the United States during all of that time but never more so than during the Nixon years. He was a direct line to the Kremlin and that line helped get us out of Vietnam. In this episode we look back at the relationship between Anatoly Dobrynin and Henry Kissinger during the Presidency of Richard Nixon. We see diplomacy practiced with extraordinary expertise, and candor, as both sides work to ease the tensions of the Cold War, and find an exit for America from Vietnam. Much of what these two episodes present come from the writings of Dr. Luke Nichter, America's leading expert on the Richard Nixon Administration, as he leads us through this treasure of phone calls and meetings at a particularly important moments of the era.  Questions or comments at , Randalrgw1@aol.com , https://twitter.com/randal_wallace , and http://www.randalwallace.com/Please Leave us a review at wherever you get your podcastsThanks for listening!!

History Unplugged Podcast
In 1963, A Stuttering, Nebbish Magazine Editor Negotiated a Secret Deal Between JFK and Khrushchev, Averting Nuclear War

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 47:24


As the editor of the Saturday Review for more than thirty years, Norman Cousins had a powerful platform to shape American public debate during the height of the Cold War. Although he was a low-key, nebbish figure, under Cousins's leadership, the magazine was considered one of the most influential in the literary world and his advocacy on nuclear disarmament affect world politics ( his 1945 anti-nuclear essay “Modern Man is Obsolete” was read by over 40 million).Cousins was respected by both JFK and Soviet Premier Nikita Krushchev, whom he visited at his vacation home on the Black Sea. As such, he met with both and passed messages between the two, getting involved in several secret citizen diplomacy missions during the height of the Cold War. He even played a major role in getting the Limited Test Ban Treaty signed. He also wrote JFK's famous 1963 American University commencement speech ("not merely peace in our time but peace for all time."Today's guest is Allen Pietrobon, author of Norman Cousins: Peacemaker in the Atomic AgeCousins was much more important than we realize: he may very well have averted nuclear war.

JFK35
Atomic Gambit: The Challenges Ahead

JFK35

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 46:01


Sixty years after the Cuban Missile Crisis, today's world leaders can apply lessons learned to potential future nuclear crises. Former Obama Administration Deputy National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes, Executive Director of the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University Alexandra Vacroux, and former Pulitzer-prize winning reporter and author Jonathan Kaufman discuss potential crises ahead and how the Cuban Missile Crisis's legacy remains relevant.

JFK35
Atomic Gambit: We Are All Mortal

JFK35

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 45:24


After the United States and Soviet Union survived the Cuban Missile Crisis and its immediate aftermath, the next steps for the two superpowers would be critical. This episode looks at Kennedy's "strategy of peace" speech at American University and the limited test ban treaty negotiated between Khrushchev and Kennedy, that some say saved the world a second time. It looks ahead at the positive and negative steps made towards Kennedy's vision of a world with fewer nuclear weapons and what challenges today's leaders face involving the spread of nuclear weapons.

JFK35
Atomic Gambit: Uneasy Peace

JFK35

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 35:35


John F. Kennedy and Nikita Khrushchev reached an agreement about the Cuban Missile Crisis on October 28, but the crisis wouldn't end there. Fidel Castro, angered by Nikita Khrushchev's decision, threatened a serious setback in the negotiations to remove all offensive weapons - including tactical nuclear weapons - from his country.

JFK35
Atomic Gambit: Black Saturday

JFK35

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 39:47


October 27, 1962, also known as “Black Saturday," was the most dangerous day of the Cuban Missile Crisis as events began to spiral out of control. With two contrasting messages from Chairman Khrushchev, President Kennedy had to find a way to resolve the crisis or risk a nuclear war. Outside of the White House, the crisis took a fatal turn and war was expected to break out at any moment.

JFK35
Atomic Gambit: Duck and Cover

JFK35

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 56:42


By October 22, 1962, after days of long discussions with his advisors, President John F. Kennedy was ready to go public about the Soviet missiles in Cuba. His address to the American people laid out his plan to initiate a naval quarantine to prevent more Soviet ships and weapons from reaching Cuba. He also stressed the uncertainty and danger that lay in the days and months ahead. In Moscow, this announcement stunned and angered Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, who learned that his atomic gambit had failed. As the specter of a devastating nuclear war loomed larger than ever, the White House waited to see how the Soviets would react.

American Scandal
The Cuban Missile Crisis | Black Saturday | 5

American Scandal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 39:52 Very Popular


An American pilot comes under attack. With nuclear war on the horizon, Kennedy and Khrushchev race to pull off a secret deal.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/americanscandal.Support us by supporting our sponsors!Sleep Number - Special offers now available for a limited time only at sleepnumber.com/scandal!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

JFK35
Atomic Gambit: A Pretty Bad Fix

JFK35

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 40:15


In the first few days of the Cuban Missile Crisis, President Kennedy and his advisors faced an extremely difficult choice on whether to attack Cuba, and how to do it without engulfing the world in a nuclear war. In this episode, you'll hear some of the conversations from the top secret meetings between Kennedy and his advisors as he considered his options. Meanwhile, the President would have to act in public as if nothing is going on to keep the Soviets from finding out what he knew until he was ready to make a decision. With the public still unaware, the President would face several challenges – including opposition from his top military advisors – as he decided what to do next.

Witness History
Cuban Missile Crisis - the showdown

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 10:51


Jo Fidgen hears what was happening in the Pentagon and the Kremlin in the final days of the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. The Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev finally offered to withdraw the missiles as the crisis came to a head. In 2012, his son Sergei remembered those fraught few days. (Photo: Nikita and Sergei Khrushchev. Credit: Sergei Khrushchev)

Dan Snow's History Hit
The Cuban Missile Crisis

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 23:49 Very Popular


In October 1962 the world came very close to annihilation during the Cuban Missile Crisis. During the autumn of 1962, a U2 reconnaissance aircraft produced clear evidence that the Soviet Union and the Cuban authorities were building medium-range ballistic missile facilities on the island of Cuba and only around 100 miles from the coast of Florida. The resulting confrontation between the USA under JFK and the Soviet Union led by Nikita Khrushchev lasted just over a month and it's often considered to be the closest that the Cold War came to escalating to full-scale nuclear war. Serhii Plokhy, author of Nuclear Folly: A New History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, is Dan's guest on the podcast.This episode was first released on 16 April 2021.The audio editor for this episode was Dougal Patmore.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe to History Hit today!To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store.Complete the survey and you'll be entered into a prize draw to win 5 Historical Non-Fiction Books- including a signed copy of Dan Snow's 'On This Day in History'. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Jimmy Akin's Mysterious World
The Secret Cuban Missile Crisis (Mikoyan, Castro, Kennedy, Khrushchev, November 1962)

Jimmy Akin's Mysterious World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 83:16 Very Popular


The Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962 is well-known, but as Jimmy Akin and Dom Bettinelli discuss it was followed in November by a second, secret Cuban missile crisis that the Soviets hid from the world. The post The Secret Cuban Missile Crisis (Mikoyan, Castro, Kennedy, Khrushchev, November 1962) appeared first on StarQuest Media.

The Castle Report
Casually Discussing Armageddon

The Castle Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 11:21


Darrell Castle talks about how President Joe Biden casually discusses the possibility of nuclear annihilation and even the probability of it. He refers to the growing likelihood of nuclear war with Russia as Armageddon, but he does nothing to tone down the rhetoric and openly suggests that is where war with Russia is headed. Transcription / Notes CASUALLY DISCUSSING ARMAGEDDON Hello this is Darrell Castle with today's Castle Report. This is Friday the 14th day of October in the year of our Lord 2022. I will be talking about how President Joe Biden casually discusses the possibility of nuclear annihilation and even the probability of it. He refers to the growing likelihood of nuclear war with Russia as Armageddon, but he does nothing to tone down the rhetoric and openly suggests that is where war with Russia is headed. Generally, the term Armageddon refers to an end of the world scenario and I don't remember an American president during my lifetime which runs from Truman to Biden using that term before. I remember the Cuban Missile Crisis quite well as I was 13 or 14 years old at the time. Everyone was terrified even in the rural area where my family lived. The newspaper and TV told us where the priority targets were located for the Russian ICBMs. I had a job delivering newspapers and I remember the homes with blankets over their windows to prevent flying glass. People were afraid to come to the door to pay me. That was legitimate terror with nuclear missiles only 90 miles away from our shore. Kennedy and Khrushchev worked it out in a mutually beneficial deal to save the world. Kennedy removed American missiles from Turkey just over the Bosporus from Russia and Khrushchev removed Russian missiles from Cuba. No confrontation on the high seas and no inflammatory rhetoric that made diplomacy impossible. In America we assumed we won, and in Russia I'm sure Russians thought they won. The two sides fought each other for 45 years and their wars were both real and proxy. From Korea, to Vietnam, to Afghanistan they tried to weaken each other and break each other's resolve but nuclear weapons were not threatened or discussed as a possibility. Their presence was obvious, but the threat of their use was too terrifying, but that fear, and respect doesn't seem to exist anymore. Thursday night, October 6th the President of the United States was in New York City for a fundraising dinner for the Democrat “elite” I assume to save the Democrat majority from Mid-Term election annihilation. This was a fundraising dinner, and the President was the keynote speaker. He spoke with the usual rant about horrible domestic enemies, Republican semi-fascists, abortion, the dangers of climate change, so on and so forth. Right in the middle of all that Maga Republican nonsense he casually started talking about nuclear annihilation. Ron Paul, in his Campaign for Liberty newsletter warned us of the danger in that speech. “Never in the cold war was an American President so casual and careless about the prospect of nuclear war.” Cold War presidents apparently felt no desire to terrify the American people. Democrats and Republicans alike tried to reassure the public that everything would be alright, and we could get through this together, which-ever this we were afraid of at the time. President Biden apparently has no such fear and is totally devoid of respect for Russia and its approximately 6000 nuclear weapons. This administration seems more reckless than cautions. It is arrogant and full of itself almost bursting with hubris. It backs up its military mistakes and misinterpretations with dangerous rhetoric. My fear is that this is no bluff and is an indication of what the people, whoever they are, running this administration's policy are actually thinking or planning. The Biden health department, the same one that gave us the Covid lockdown, and the ineffective vaccine then ordered us to take it, announced that is has spent $290 million on a drug to treat rad...

Jimmy Akin Podcast
The Secret Cuban Missile Crisis (Mikoyan, Castro, Kennedy, Khrushchev, November 1962) - Jimmy Akin's Mysterious World

Jimmy Akin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 83:16


The Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962 is well-known, but as Jimmy Akin and Dom Bettinelli discuss it was followed in November by a second, secret Cuban missile crisis that the Soviets hid from the world.

JFK35
Atomic Gambit: A Very Dangerous Road

JFK35

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 48:55


From the moment President Kennedy took office, he warned the country about the dangers of nuclear weapons that could result in the deaths of millions. It would be his decisions and actions that would keep the country from the brink of total nuclear war. In the years leading up to the Cuban Missile Crisis, Kennedy would face a number of embarrassing failures in both Cuba and on the world stage with Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev. It would be partly these failures and other escalations that would embolden Khrushchev to embark on his Atomic Gambit.

American Scandal
The Cuban Missile Crisis | Fire in the Sky | 4

American Scandal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 40:51 Very Popular


Nikita Khrushchev threatens to launch a nuclear strike. An American spy plane flies a risky mission.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/americanscandal.Support us by supporting our sponsors!June's Journey - Awaken your inner sleuth and download today in the app store today!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The John Batchelor Show
4/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 4/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 8:30


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 4/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 4/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons .

The John Batchelor Show
1/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 1/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 12:50


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 1/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 1/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons .

The John Batchelor Show
2/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 2/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 6:00


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 2/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 2/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons .

The John Batchelor Show
3/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 3/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 12:10


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 3/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 3/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons .

The John Batchelor Show
5/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 5/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 12:25


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 5/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 5/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons .

The John Batchelor Show
7/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 7/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 10:20


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 7/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 7/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons .

The John Batchelor Show
8/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 8/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 10:20


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 8/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 8/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons .

The John Batchelor Show
6/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 6/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 6:25


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 6/8: Tactical nukes deployed: 6/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons .

Going Rogue With Caitlin Johnstone
We Survived The Last Nuclear Standoff Through Compromise And De-Escalation

Going Rogue With Caitlin Johnstone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 6:52


Back in 2013 The Atlantic published a solid article titled "The Real Cuban Missile Crisis," subtitled "Everything you think you know about those 13 days is wrong." Its author Benjamin Schwartz details how the crisis was peacefully resolved not because JFK was on the phone yelling "Try and die" at Nikita Khrushchev, but because he secretly cut a deal to remove the Jupiter missiles the US had stationed in Italy and Turkey which provoked the 1962 incident in the first place. Moscow perceived that the only reason why that type of midrange weapon would be placed in such a way would be if the US was planning a nuclear first strike to disarm Russia, and Schwartz writes that that suspicion was entirely well-founded: the Kennedy administration had indeed strongly contemplated such a strike during the Berlin crisis of 1961. In response to this threat, as well as the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, Khrushchev moved ballistic missiles to Cuba, whose discovery led to the tense standoff which brought us far closer to nuclear annihilation than most of us care to contemplate. A secret deal was struck whose nature wouldn't become public knowledge until decades later, resulting in both sides removing their offending missile placements. Reading by Tim Foley.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
The Sad Truth About American Foreign Policy

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 56:07


https://youtu.be/YynHmjv1hmQ After America emerged as the undisputed leader of the West in 1945, however, the shocks, reversals, and humiliations at the hands of Stalin were greater than those that had caused Britain to declare war in 1939. America, however, chose a different course. Embracing the wisdom of George Kennan, America pursued a policy of containment and conscious avoidance of a Third World War.   When Stalin trashed the Yalta agreement, terrorizing the peoples of Poland and Eastern Europe for whom Britain had gone to war, America was stunned and sickened but issued no ultimata. When Moscow blockaded Berlin in violation of Allied rights, Truman responded with an airlift, not armored divisions or atom bombs.   When Stalin's agents carried out the Prague coup in 1948, Truman did not see in Czechoslovakia an issue that justified war, as Churchill had when the Czechs were forced to give up the Sudetenland. America's answer was NATO, drawing a red line across Europe that the West could defend, as Britain should have done in that March of 1939, instead of handing out the insane war guarantee to Poland. And where the British had failed to line up a Russian alliance before giving its war guarantee, America enlisted ten European allies before committing herself to defend West Germany.   Unlike Churchill in the 1930s, American leaders of the late 1940s and 1950s believed that, while the fate of Poland and Czechoslovakia was tragic, both were beyond any U.S. vital interest. From 1949 to 1989, the American army never crossed the Yalta line. When East Germans rose in 1953 and Hungarians in 1956, Eisenhower declined to act. In 1959, Ike welcomed the “Butcher of Budapest” to Camp David. When Khrushchev built the Berlin Wall, Kennedy called up the reserves, then sent them home after a year. In the missile crisis of 1962, Kennedy cut a secret deal to take U.S. missiles out of Turkey for Khrushchev's taking Russian missiles out of Cuba. When the Prague Spring was crushed in 1968, LBJ did nothing. U.S. inaction was not due to cowardice but cold calculation as to what was worth risking war with a nuclear-armed Soviet Union and what was not worth risking war. When the Polish workers' movement, Solidarity, was crushed in 1981, Ronald Reagan denounced the repression but he neither broke diplomatic relations with Warsaw nor imposed economic sanctions.   Eisenhower and Reagan were not Chamberlains, but neither were they Churchills. Who ruled in the capitals east of the Elbe was not to them a vital U.S. interest worth a war.   – Patrick J. Buchanan, Churchill, Hitler, and the Unnecessary War p. 417-8 Article discussed: Our Greatest Strength is Liberty, Not Force by Jeffrey Wernick Kyle Anzalone on the Libertarian Institute Conflicts of Interest on Odysee Kyle Anzalone on Twitter Spotify

Cold War Conversations History Podcast
The 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis with Sir Max Hastings

Cold War Conversations History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 58:44


The 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis is reckoned to be one of the most perilous events in history, when the World  faced a looming nuclear collision between the United States and Soviet Union. During those weeks, the world gazed into the abyss of potential annihilation.I speak with Sir Max Hastings whose new history  Abyss: The Cuban Missile Crisis 1962 tells the story from the viewpoints of national leaders, Russian officers, Cuban peasants, American pilots and British disarmers. The period is brought to life with eye-witness interviews, archive documents and diaries, White House tape recordings, and top-down analysis. More than purely a focus on the 13 days of the crisis, the book provides context through the Cold War experiences of Fidel Castro's Cuba, Nikita Khrushchev's Russia, and Kennedy's America. Among the areas we discuss are how Cuba became a crisis, the failure of intelligence on both sides,  and those nail-biting Thirteen Days in which Armageddon beckoned. Buy the book an support the podcast https://amzn.to/3rlPLsMCold War history is disappearing; however, a simple monthly donation will keep this podcast on the air. You'll become part of our community and get a sought after CWC coaster as a thank you and you'll bask in the warm glow of knowing you are helping to preserve Cold War history. Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/donate/If a monthly contribution is not your cup of tea, We also welcome one-off donations via the same link.I am delighted to welcome Sir Max Hastings  to our Cold War conversation…Episode notes here https://coldwarconversations.com/episode255/Follow us on Twitter here https://twitter.com/ColdWarPodFacebook here https://www.facebook.com/groups/coldwarpod/Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/coldwarconversations/This episode features the chance to win Sir Max Hasting's latest book Abyss: The Cuban Missile Crisis 1962. Just go to https://coldwarconversations.com/giveaway to see how you enter.Please leave a review. If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a written review.Support the show

Unpleasant Dreams
Dyatlov Pass - Unpleasant Dreams 28

Unpleasant Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 29:37 Very Popular


The mysterious disappearance of a group of nine Soviet hikers in 1959 has puzzled the world for decades. What happened? Was it simply horrible weather? A secret weapons test? Or, something otherworldly? That is the subject of this very Unpleasant Dream. EM Hilker is our writer and researcher with additional writing by Cassandra Harold. Jim Harold is our Executive Producer. CLICK HERE for EM Hilker's original article. SOURCES Borzenkov, Vladimir. “Trek Categories and Sports Ranks.” Dyatlov Pass. Retrieved 17 August 2022.  Eichar, Donnie. Dead Mountain: the Untold Story of the Dyatlov Pass Incident. Chronicle Books, 2013. Hadjiyska, Teodora, and Igor Pavlov. “Dyatlov Group.” Dyatlov Pass. Retrieved 17 August 2022. Gaume, Johan, and Alexander M. Puzrin. “Mechanisms of Slab Avalanche Release and Impact in the Dyatlov Pass Incident in 1959.” Nature News, Nature Publishing Group, 28 January 2021. Retrieved 17 August 2022. “Nikita Khrushchev.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 9 November 2009. Retrieved 15 August 2022. Niziol, Tom. “Whirls, Curls, and Little Swirls: The Science Behind Von Karman Vortices.” Weather Underground. Retrieved 18 August 2022.  Osadchuk, Svetlana. “Mysterious Deaths of 9 Skiers Still Unresolved.” The St. Petersburg Times, 19 February 2008. Retrieved 10 August 2022. Solly, Meilan. “Have Scientists Finally Unraveled the 60-Year Mystery Surrounding Nine Russian Hikers' Deaths?” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 29 January 2021. Retrieved 17 August 2022.  Speltz, Lorin. “Salo.” Russiapedia. Retrieved 17 August 2022.  Wedin, B, et al. “‘Paradoxical Undressing' in Fatal Hypothermia.” Journal of Forensic Sciences, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 1979. Retrieved 18 August 2022.

One Radio Network
09.27.22 Hendric

One Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 90:17


ORN Edward Hendrie show notes 9/27/22 Author of The Greatest Lie on Earth: Proof that Our World Is Not a Splnning Globe. Books and blog at greatmountainpublishing.com. Edward has written other books on the gospel, geopolitics, injections, salvation, Zionism, Roman Catholic Church, gospel of grace, and 911 conspiracy. Who came up with the idea of a spinning globe? It's a conspiracy against God and man by the Kings of the World. Acts 4:25. Unable to conceal the existence of God, so instead they're trying to conceal the creation of God. Romans 1:20. But God has revealed himself through his creation. Khrushchev speech about church in communist Russia. Why should you clutch at God? Gagarin flew in space and saw no God. Space is unfriendly and dark. See no heaven, see no God. They are concealing heaven. This earth is unique in creation. Stars are created by God. If it's concealed, man won't seek God. The Big Bang theory of creation presupposes there is no God as the Creator. Which means there are no rules from God. This results in people behaving without rules and harming others. So government is created and protect the innocent. The core is concealing the existence of God. Hiding God brings tyranny. At the core of the global earth belief is hiding God. Heliocentric model began with Pythagoras 500 B.C. Freemasons hold Pythagoras in high esteem. Gravity was necessary to explain spinning earth. Spinning creates centrifugal force, which would cause objects to spin off the earth via centripetal force. Centripetal force is gravity. If earth is a sphere spinning 1000 miles/hour at the equator, objects should weigh more going from poles to equator. It doesn't, stuff weighs the same everywhere. And in actuality, stuff weighs a fraction of percent less at equator because of atmospheric pressure. NASA is showing CGI photos. We're born in sin. Only way to be a spiritual being is to be born again. We're dead spiritually until we're made alive by God and born again. What is the Coriolis effect? When something spins, theres an effect on all the objects on it. There is no Coriolis effect on earth. It's a myth. How is there a north and south pole on a flat plane? There is no south pole. It's ceremonial. There is a north pole in the center of the flat earth. Antarctica is at the periphery. How can Polaris track earth when it's stationary over the earth? Polaris is embedded in the firmament. Stars rotate and come back to the same spot after a year. Time-lapse proves it's the stars that are spinning, not the earth. If earth was revolving, stars should be in an arc. NASA says we're spinning 1000 miles/hr to the east, yet stars travel both east and west on time-lapse photography. Where do rockets go? Into the ocean and crash. Is there a Van Allen belt? It's mythology. There is no outer space, so no space for it to exist. Radio waves supposedly bounce off the ionosphere and bounce off back down to earth. Yet astronauts can supposedly transmit radio waves through atmosphere. Is the moon solid or plasma? The moon is its own source of light. It's not a reflection. Temps in moonlight colder than moon shade. Is a different type of light than from sunlight. Google Earth turns flat earth into a globe. Turn it 360 degrees and you won't end up in the same spot as starting. They're using software to conform into appearance of globe. In-Q-Tel is a CIA operation. NASA is an intelligence operation – it's mind control of the masses. Need to keep the scam going.

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast
Gorbachev’s funeral, burial will reflect his varied legacy

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 1:52


The funeral and burial plans for Mikhail Gorbachev sum up the crosscurrents of his legacy — final farewells were said in the same place where his rigid Soviet predecessors also lay, but he was buried near men who broke the Soviet mold. Gorbachev, the Nobel Peace Prize winner who died August 20, was laid in state on September 3, in Moscow's House of Unions. The building located between the Bolshoi Theater and the Duma, the lower house of parliament, for decades held the bodies of deceased Soviet leaders, including Vladimir Lenin, Joseph Stalin, Leonid Brezhnev, Yuri Andropov and Konstantin Chernenko. All of them were then interred outside the Kremlin walls — the mummified Lenin in an enormous mausoleum and the others in the nearby necropolis. But Gorbachev was buried in the cemetery of Novodevichy Convent, the resting place for the ousted Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, who had criticized Stalin's “cult of personality,” and for Boris Yeltsin, the Russian president who became the ex-USSR's dominant leader. He was buried next to his wife Raisa, a demonstration of their public affection, which was such a contrast to the other leaders' barely visible personal lives. A few days before the funeral, the Kremlin had not yet announced whether it would be a state funeral. Gorbachev was a divisive, often-detested figure in Russia, and the state he led — the Soviet Union — no longer exists. Gorbachev was praised by some world leaders, including U.S. President Joe Biden, for being open to democratic changes. Others criticized efforts by Soviet authorities to crush dissent in their countries under his leadership. This article was provided by The Associated Press.

Coast Community Radio
An Adventure in History, September 11 2022

Coast Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 29:10


Mac and Alana share Nellie Flavel's account of the San Francisco Earthquake.  Plus, Special Guest appearances by Roman Vondriska,  Casanova, Khrushchev, the Monkees, and Hopalong Cassidy.  

On This Day In History
Nikita Khrushchev Was Elected Leader Of The Communist Party

On This Day In History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 1:49


Download the Volley.FM app for more short daily shows!

Realms of Memory
Remembering Stalin's Victims: Part 2

Realms of Memory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 46:25


In Part 2 of Remembering Stalin's Victims,  Georgetown University Professor Kathleen Smith explains how a conservative backlash swept Khrushchev from power and ended the first attempt to confront the Stalinist past.  While destalinization persisted in the form of the dissident movement, the nearly twenty year Brezhnev era that followed was one of official silence about the crimes of the past.  It was Gorbachev's attempt to rescue the Soviet economy that unleashed a much broader wave of popular participation in remembering the past.  Conservative efforts to once again reverse course ultimately failed and contributed to the acceleration of the dissolution of the Soviet Union.  Boris Yeltsin, as head of the Russian Federation successor state, had another opportunity to confront the Soviet past.  His failure to do so, and the general turbulence and instability of the period over which he presided, have been skillfully exploited by Vladimir Putin to return Russia to the authoritarianism we see today.  

JFK35
Atomic Gambit: The Cuban Missile Crisis 60 Years Later

JFK35

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 2:44


On October 16, 1962, President John F. Kennedy was told the Soviet Union was assembling nuclear warheads on the island of Cuba, just 90 miles from the Florida coastline. Over the course of the next 13 days and beyond, President Kennedy and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev would make decisions in a crisis that brought the world closer to all-out nuclear war than it has ever been. Today, we continue to live with the historic legacy of the Cuban Missile Crisis and its lessons of leadership, diplomacy, and ultimately, grace under pressure. Atomic Gambit, a JFK35 podcast special series, takes a deep dive into the history, the players, and the pivotal moments that made this episode a turning point in world history. First episode premieres on October 13, 2022.

Amanpour
Mikhail Gorbachev from the archives: 1991, 2012

Amanpour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 55:08


The tributes have been pouring in as the world marks the passing of Mikhail Gorbachev, who died last night at 91. A titan of the 20th century, he was the last leader of the Soviet Union, who raised the Iron Curtain and – along with his American partner President Ronald Reagan – ended the Cold War. Ten years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Christiane spoke with President Gorbachev about the dissolution of the Soviet Union and his reflections a decade on. They had another, very different conversation in 2012, just after Vladimir Putin's re-election, during which he expressed worries about the authoritarian tendencies taking shape in Russia.  Also on today's show: Nina Khrushcheva, historian and great-granddaughter of Nikita Khrushchev, who put up the Berlin Wall in 1961; former US Ambassador to Russia Thomas Pickering; Adam Entous on his New Yorker piece, The Untold History of the Biden Family.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Criminalia
Lavrentiy Beria, the Chief of Stalin's Secret Police Who Was Executed as a Traitor

Criminalia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 38:38


“Let me have a man for one night, and I'll have him confessing he's the king of England,” Lavrentiy Beria bragged to his colleague, Nikita Khrushchev. He was intelligent and intriguing and cynical. He was also violent, unethical, and prone to using ruthless measures, including kidnapping, torture, rape, and murder. And he was almost the ruler of the Soviet Union after the Second World War – until his former colleagues executed him for treason.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dead Presidents Podcast
PWF #7 - World War III

Dead Presidents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 84:19


The Presidential Wrestling Federation goes international in its latest pay-per-view spectacular, featuring:Zachary Taylor vs. Santa AnnaRichard Nixon & Ronald Reagan vs. Nikita Khrushchev & Mikhail GorbachevBarack Obama & Joe Biden vs. Vladimir Putin & Kim Jong UnThe Bushes vs. Saddam Hussein & Osama bin LadenJohn Adams vs. King George IIIFDR, Churchill & Stalin vs. Hitler, Mussolini & Hirohito 

The John Batchelor Show
5/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 5/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 12:31


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety 5/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 5/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons . . . 

The John Batchelor Show
7/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 7/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 10:11


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety 7/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 7/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons . . . 

The John Batchelor Show
6/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 6/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 6:18


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety 6/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 6/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons . . . 

The John Batchelor Show
8/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 8/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 10:27


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety 8/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 8/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons . . . 

The John Batchelor Show
4/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 4/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 8:31


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety 4/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 4/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons . . . 

The John Batchelor Show
3/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 3/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 13:32


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety 3/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 3/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons . . . 

The John Batchelor Show
2/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 2/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 6:04


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety 2/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 2/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons . . . 

The John Batchelor Show
1/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 1/8: Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 12:45


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety 1/8: The Soviet Empire comes to the Americas: 1/8:  Nuclear Folly: A History of the Cuban Missile Crisis, by Serhii Plokhy   https://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Folly-History-Missile-Crisis/dp/0393540812/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, today's world leaders are abandoning disarmament treaties, building up their nuclear arsenals, and exchanging threats of nuclear strikes. To survive this new atomic age, we must relearn the lessons of the most dangerous moment of the Cold War: the Cuban missile crisis. Serhii Plokhy's Nuclear Folly offers an international perspective on the crisis, tracing the tortuous decision-making that produced and then resolved it, which involved John Kennedy and his advisers, Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro, and their commanders on the ground. In breathtaking detail, Plokhy vividly recounts the young JFK being played by the canny Khrushchev; the hotheaded Castro willing to defy the USSR and threatening to align himself with China; the Soviet troops on the ground clearing jungle foliage in the tropical heat, and desperately trying to conceal nuclear installations on Cuba, which were nonetheless easily spotted by U-2 spy planes; and the hair-raising near misses at sea that nearly caused a Soviet nuclear-armed submarine to fire its weapons . . . 

Jimmy Akin's Mysterious World
The Edge of Armageddon (Cuban Missile Crisis, Kennedy, Khrushchev)

Jimmy Akin's Mysterious World

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 81:37 Very Popular


In 1962, the Cuban Missile Crisis brough the world the brink of nuclear war, 3 times just on one day. Jimmy Akin and Dom Bettinelli discuss how we can to the edge of Armageddon and avoided it, as well as the aftermath and ramifications of the crisis. The post The Edge of Armageddon (Cuban Missile Crisis, Kennedy, Khrushchev) appeared first on StarQuest Media.