Podcasts about Allen Ginsberg

American poet

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Best podcasts about Allen Ginsberg

Latest podcast episodes about Allen Ginsberg

Here, There, and Everywhere: A Beatles Podcast

Steve Silberman is an award-winning science writer whose articles have appeared in Wired, the New York Times, the New Yorker, and the Boston Globe. He is the author of "NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity" - a widely-praised bestseller in the US and the UK. His TED talk, “The Forgotten History of Autism,” has been viewed nearly 2 million times online. Steve also won a gold record from the Recording Industry Association of America for co-producing the Grateful Dead's career-spanning box set So Many Roads (1965-1995), which was Rolling Stone's box set of the year in 1999. His liner notes have been featured in CDs and DVDs by Crosby, Stills, and Nash, the Jerry Garcia Band, and many other groups. As a young man, he was Allen Ginsberg's teaching assistant at Naropa University.   On today's episode, Steve talks to Jack about the how The Beatles impacted his life, the importance of Sgt. Pepper in the counter culture revolution, and the influence of The Beatles on bands such as The Grateful Dead and Crosby Stills Nash and Young.   Check out Steve's website: https://www.stevesilberman.com/ Follow Steve on Twitter: https://twitter.com/stevesilberman   This episode is dedicated to David Crosby, who was one of the most influential musicians in rock history and a very close friend of Steve's. To the surprise of the world, David passed away just two weeks after this podcast was recorded.    One of the reasons I started this podcast was to ask great minds such as David's how The Beatles inspired his music - and thanks our guest Steve Silberman and his recent phone call with David Crosby, that question is answered in today's episode.   David will be sorely missed here on Earth, but as he once said, music is love. - and David has left behind a legacy of music and love that will live on forever.   If you like this episode, be sure to subscribe to this podcast! Follow us on Twitter and Instagram. Or click here for more information: Linktr.ee/BeatlesEarth   ----- The Beatles were an English rock band, formed in Liverpool in 1960, that comprised John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. They are regarded as the most influential band of all timeand were integral to the development of 1960s counterculture and popular music's recognition as an art form. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock 'n' roll, their sound incorporated elements of classical music and traditional pop in innovative ways; the band later explored music styles ranging from ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock. As pioneers in recording, songwriting and artistic presentation, the Beatles revolutionised many aspects of the music industry and were often publicised as leaders of the era's youth and sociocultural movements. Led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the Beatles evolved from Lennon's previous group, the Quarrymen, and built their reputation playing clubs in Liverpool and Hamburg over three years from 1960, initially with Stuart Sutcliffe playing bass. The core trio of Lennon, McCartney and Harrison, together since 1958, went through a succession of drummers, including Pete Best, before asking Starr to join them in 1962. Manager Brian Epstein moulded them into a professional act, and producer George Martin guided and developed their recordings, greatly expanding their domestic success after signing to EMI Records and achieving their first hit, "Love Me Do", in late 1962.   Lennon, McCartney, Harrison and Starr all released solo albums in 1970. Their solo records sometimes involved one or more of the others; Starr's Ringo (1973) was the only album to include compositions and performances by all four ex-Beatles, albeit on separate songs. With Starr's participation, Harrison staged the Concert for Bangladesh in New York City in August 1971. Other than an unreleased jam session in 1974, later bootlegged as A Toot and a Snore in '74, Lennon and McCartney never recorded together again. Two double-LP sets of the Beatles' greatest hits, compiled by Klein, 1962–1966 and 1967–1970, were released in 1973, at first under the Apple Records imprint. Commonly known as the "Red Album" and "Blue Album", respectively, each has earned a Multi-Platinum certification in the US and a Platinum certification in the UK. Between 1976 and 1982, EMI/Capitol released a wave of compilation albums without input from the ex-Beatles, starting with the double-disc compilation Rock 'n' Roll Music. The only one to feature previously unreleased material was The Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl (1977); the first officially issued concert recordings by the group, it contained selections from two shows they played during their 1964 and 1965 US tours. The music and enduring fame of the Beatles were commercially exploited in various other ways, again often outside their creative control. In April 1974, the musical John, Paul, George, Ringo ... and Bert, written by Willy Russell and featuring singer Barbara Dickson, opened in London. It included, with permission from Northern Songs, eleven Lennon-McCartney compositions and one by Harrison, "Here Comes the Sun". Displeased with the production's use of his song, Harrison withdrew his permission to use it.Later that year, the off-Broadway musical Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band on the Road opened. All This and World War II (1976) was an unorthodox nonfiction film that combined newsreel footage with covers of Beatles songs by performers ranging from Elton John and Keith Moon to the London Symphony Orchestra. The Broadway musical Beatlemania, an unauthorised nostalgia revue, opened in early 1977 and proved popular, spinning off five separate touring productions. In 1979, the band sued the producers, settling for several million dollars in damages. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1978), a musical film starring the Bee Gees and Peter Frampton, was a commercial failure and an "artistic fiasco", according to Ingham. Accompanying the wave of Beatles nostalgia and persistent reunion rumours in the US during the 1970s, several entrepreneurs made public offers to the Beatles for a reunion concert.Promoter Bill Sargent first offered the Beatles $10 million for a reunion concert in 1974. He raised his offer to $30 million in January 1976 and then to $50 million the following month. On 24 April 1976, during a broadcast of Saturday Night Live, producer Lorne Michaels jokingly offered the Beatles $3,000 to reunite on the show. Lennon and McCartney were watching the live broadcast at Lennon's apartment at the Dakota in New York, which was within driving distance of the NBC studio where the show was being broadcast. The former bandmates briefly entertained the idea of going to the studio and surprising Michaels by accepting his offer, but decided not to.   Steve Silberman is an award-winning science writer whose articles have appeared in Wired, the New York Times, the New Yorker, the Financial Times, the Boston Globe, the MIT Technology Review, Nature, Salon, Shambhala Sun, and many other publications. He is the author of NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity (Avery 2015), which Oliver Sacks called a “sweeping and penetrating history…presented with a rare sympathy and sensitivity.” The book became a widely-praised bestseller in the United States and the United Kingdom, and won the 2015 Samuel Johnson prize for non-fiction, a California Book Award, and a Books for a Better Life award. It was chosen as one of the Best Books of 2015 by The New York Times, The Economist, The Financial Times, The Boston Globe, The Independent, and many other publications, and is being translated into 15 languages. In April 2016, Silberman gave the keynote speech at the United Nations for World Autism Awareness Day. He has given talks on the history of autism at Yale, Harvard, MIT, Oxford, the National Academy of Sciences, Queen Mary University, Apple, Microsoft, Google, the 92nd Street Y, Imperial College London, the MIND Institute at UC Davis, and many other major institutions. His TED talk, “The Forgotten History of Autism,” has been viewed more than a million times and translated into 25 languages. His article “The Placebo Problem” won the 2010 Science Journalism Award for Magazine Writing from the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Kavli Foundation, and was featured on The Colbert Report. His writing on science, culture, and literature has been collected in a number of major anthologies including The Best American Science Writing of the Year and The Best Business Stories of the Year. Silberman's Twitter account @stevesilberman made Time magazine's list of the best Twitter feeds for the year 2011. He is proud to be a member of the PEN American Center. Silberman also won a gold record from the Recording Industry Association of America for co-producing the Grateful Dead's career-spanning box set So Many Roads (1965-1995), which was Rolling Stone's box set of the year. His liner notes have been featured in CDs and DVDs by Crosby, Stills, and Nash, the Jerry Garcia Band, and many other groups. As a young man, he was Allen Ginsberg's teaching assistant at Naropa University. He lives with his husband Keith in San Francisco.  

united states america new york time new york city google english earth science apple uk rock future books new york times san francisco young nature united kingdom microsoft mit indian harvard nbc broadway sun beatles world war ii independent oxford dvd concerts saturday night live liverpool rolling stones united nations autism new yorker yale led hamburg economists sciences elton john wired rooted klein salon pepper lp cds john lennon paul mccartney bangladesh financial times advancement platinum american association sgt boston globe michaels grateful dead national academy better life uc davis george harrison bee gees mccartney ringo starr neurodiversity ringo best books stills imperial college london hollywood bowl accompanying david crosby toot peter frampton allen ginsberg george martin mit technology review colbert report beatlemania lorne michaels naropa university lonely hearts club band snore samuel johnson oliver sacks london symphony orchestra keith moon queen mary university multi platinum street y ingham forgotten history silberman his ted pete best blue album lennon mccartney apple records crosby stills nash recording industry association displeased world autism awareness day emi records love me do california book award steve silberman quarrymen best american science writing roll music mind institute northern songs red album jerry garcia band pen american center stuart sutcliffe willy russell neurotribes the legacy barbara dickson shambhala sun science journalism award so many roads
Bureau of Lost Culture
Flashing On the Sixties: Part 1

Bureau of Lost Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 52:14


*Dylan, The Velvet Underground, Janis Joplin, The Beatles,  Otis Redding, Nico, Peter Fonda, Denis Hopper, Timothy Leary, Ram Dass, Allen Ginsberg and many, many more  - Lisa Law's images are extraordinary. But then her story is extraordinary.   *On Christmas eve, Lisa sat in her home in Yelapa, Mexico and recounted some of her countercultural life and times in this, the first of two episodes that provide an unparalleled glimpse into the music scenes of the 60s and 70s and California's blossoming counterculture.   *We hear about the American folk revival ,beatniks, bohemians, Mexican shamans and the weird and wonderful world of hippy communes in New Mexico, some of the many moments that she lived, witnessed, and recorded on the frontier of society on the brink of cultural change.   *For more on Lisa's life, images, book and documentary: www.flashingonthesixties.com/ *For more on the Bureau of Lost Culture: www.bureauoflostculture.com   Images copyright Lisa Law   #Dylan, #TheVelvetUnderground, #JanisJoplin, #TheBeatles,  #OtisRedding, #PeterFonda, #DenisHopper, #TimothyLeary, #RamDass, #AllenGinsberg, KenKesey, thehogfarm, themerrypranksters, #wavygravy, #peter,paulandmary #haightashbury, #hippies, #psychedelicmushrooms, #lisalaw    

Les Nuits de France Culture

durée : 01:00:28 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - Une visite guidée dans le New-York artistique des années 1970 proposée par le journaliste Jean-François Vallée. - invités : Allen Ginsberg; James Baldwin écrivain; Joséphine Baker Chanteuse, danseuse, actrice, meneuse de revue et résistante française d'origine américaine

Rejected Religion Podcast
RR Pod E25P2 Dr. Luke Walker- Allen Ginsberg & His Blakean Revival: 'Counterculture' and Esoteric Intersections

Rejected Religion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 68:49


In Part 2, Luke and I discuss the esoteric connections and intersections with the figures of Blake and Ginsberg. We talk about in the influence of Emmanuel Swedenborg and Gnosticism on the worldviews of both Blake and Ginsberg, how Ginsberg saw Buddhism and Gnosticism as being connected in a syncretic way, and what contemporary artists could be viewed as ‘carrying on the Blakean torch' in our own popular culture. Dr Luke Walker has published widely on the intersections between British Romantic poetry, American counterculture, and esotericism.His publications include "‘One physical-mental inspiration of thought': Allen Ginsberg and Black Mountain poetics", in The Beats, Black Mountain, and New Modes in American Poetry, ed. Matt Theado (2021), “Beat Britain: poetic vision and division in Albion's ‘underground'”, in The Routledge Handbook of International Beat Literature, ed. A. Robert Lee (2018), “Tangled up in Blake: the triangular relationship among Dylan, Blake, and the Beats”, in Rock and Romanticism: Blake, Wordsworth, and Rock from Dylan to U2, ed. James Rovira (2018), “Allen Ginsberg's ‘Wales Visitation' as a neo-Romantic response to Wordsworth's ‘Tintern Abbey'”, in Romanticism journal (2013), and “Allen Ginsberg's Blakean Albion,” in Comparative American Studies journal (2013). Most recently, Luke co-edited a special issue of the Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, on “The Artist of the Future Age: William Blake, Neo-Romanticism, Counterculture and Now” (2022). He is now writing a book entitled William Blake and Allen Ginsberg: Romanticism, Counterculture and Radical Reception.PROGRAM NOTESDr. Luke Walker:academia.edu page: (99+) Luke Walker | Home - Academia.eduTwitter: Luke Walker (@DrLukeWalker) / TwitterSelected Articles:(99+) Tangled Up in Blake: the Triangular Relationship among Dylan, Blake, and the Beats | Luke Walker - Academia.edu(99+) Allen Ginsberg's Blakean Albion | Luke Walker - Academia.edu(99+) Beat Britain: poetic vision and division in Albion's 'underground' | Luke Walker - Academia.edu(99+) Psychedelic Romanticism: Ginsberg, Blake and Wordsworth | Luke Walker - Academia.edu(99+) 'One physical-mental inspiration of thought': Allen Ginsberg and Black Mountain Poetics | Luke Walker - Academia.eduWilliam Blake Archive: The William Blake ArchiveAllen Ginsberg sings William Blake's 'The Nurse's Song': Allen Ginsberg sings William Blake's "The Nurse's Song" - YouTubeMike Goode, 'Blakespotting': (99+) Blakespotting | Mike Goode - Academia.eduAllen Ginsberg: The Allen Ginsberg Project - AllenGinsberg.org'Wichita Vortex Sutra': Allen Ginsberg: Wichita Vortex Sutra (chriscander.com)Bob Dylan 'Tempest': Bob Dylan - Tempest (Official Audio) - YouTube'Rough and Rowdy Ways': I Contain Multitudes - YouTube'Subterranean Homesick Blues': Bob Dylan - Subterranean Homesick Blues (Official HD Video) - YouTubeOTHER RESOURCES:patti smith: official siteHome - Kae TempestJohn Higgs – Author of Love And Let Die, William Blake Vs The World, Watling Street and The KLFTheme Music: Daniel P. SheaOther music: Stephanie Shea

Rejected Religion Podcast
RR Pod E25P1 Dr. Luke Walker- Allen Ginsberg & His Blakean Revival: 'Counterculture' and Esoteric Intersections

Rejected Religion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 73:06


In Part One, Luke discusses the great influence of the poet and artist William Blake on Allen Ginsberg, one of the most influential people from the Beat Generation and the ‘counterculture' movement of 1960s United States. He also talks in detail about Ginsberg's “Blake Vision,” the name Ginsberg gave to a series of extraordinary events in his life in 1948. We then discuss Luke's article “Tangled Up in Blake” that focuses on Ginsberg's views about Bob Dylan and their complex relationship. Lastly, we talk about the influence of Buddhism on Ginsberg and how this affected his views about Blake and his worldview in general.Dr Luke Walker has published widely on the intersections between British Romantic poetry, American counterculture, and esotericism.His publications include "‘One physical-mental inspiration of thought': Allen Ginsberg and Black Mountain poetics", in The Beats, Black Mountain, and New Modes in American Poetry, ed. Matt Theado (2021), “Beat Britain: poetic vision and division in Albion's ‘underground'”, in The Routledge Handbook of International Beat Literature, ed. A. Robert Lee (2018), “Tangled up in Blake: the triangular relationship among Dylan, Blake, and the Beats”, in Rock and Romanticism: Blake, Wordsworth, and Rock from Dylan to U2, ed. James Rovira (2018), “Allen Ginsberg's ‘Wales Visitation' as a neo-Romantic response to Wordsworth's ‘Tintern Abbey'”, in Romanticism journal (2013), and “Allen Ginsberg's Blakean Albion,” in Comparative American Studies journal (2013). Most recently, Luke co-edited a special issue of the Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, on “The Artist of the Future Age: William Blake, Neo-Romanticism, Counterculture and Now” (2022). He is now writing a book entitled William Blake and Allen Ginsberg: Romanticism, Counterculture and Radical Reception.PROGRAM NOTESDr. Luke Walker:academia.edu page: (99+) Luke Walker | Home - Academia.eduTwitter: Luke Walker (@DrLukeWalker) / TwitterSelected Articles:(99+) Tangled Up in Blake: the Triangular Relationship among Dylan, Blake, and the Beats | Luke Walker - Academia.edu(99+) Allen Ginsberg's Blakean Albion | Luke Walker - Academia.edu(99+) Beat Britain: poetic vision and division in Albion's 'underground' | Luke Walker - Academia.edu(99+) Psychedelic Romanticism: Ginsberg, Blake and Wordsworth | Luke Walker - Academia.edu(99+) 'One physical-mental inspiration of thought': Allen Ginsberg and Black Mountain Poetics | Luke Walker - Academia.eduWilliam Blake Archive: The William Blake ArchiveAllen Ginsberg sings William Blake's 'The Nurse's Song': Allen Ginsberg sings William Blake's "The Nurse's Song" - YouTubeMike Goode, 'Blakespotting': (99+) Blakespotting | Mike Goode - Academia.eduAllen Ginsberg: The Allen Ginsberg Project - AllenGinsberg.org'Wichita Vortex Sutra': Allen Ginsberg: Wichita Vortex Sutra (chriscander.com)Bob Dylan 'Tempest': Bob Dylan - Tempest (Official Audio) - YouTube'Rough and Rowdy Ways': I Contain Multitudes - YouTube'Subterranean Homesick Blues': Bob Dylan - Subterranean Homesick Blues (Official HD Video) - YouTubeOTHER RESOURCES:patti smith: official siteHome - Kae TempestJohn Higgs – Author of Love And Let Die, William Blake Vs The World, Watling Street and The KLFTheme Music: Daniel P. SheaOther music: Stephanie Shea

Musikens Makt
#053: En spänstig och fräsch mix

Musikens Makt

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 174:47


En julklapp i form av ett MYCKET fullmatat avsnitt! Robert lyfter fram den nyligen hädangångne Jerry Lee Lewis utmärkta kåntryplattor och spelar lite rykande aktuell antropofagia av Os Mutantes. Love introducerar den förmodade onanisten C Duncan och håller en snabbkurs i Divine Comedy. Robert har gjort en mycket akademisk djupanalys av det norska progmetalbandet Leprous användning av polyrytmik. Love presenterar premiären för det nya fasta inslaget "Skiva sammanfattad som en spänstig och fräsch mix" genom att ge Komeda den uppmärksamhet de förtjänar. Robert presenterar i sin tur sina högstadiepersoner, i synnerhet en som bevisar att det går att vara besatt av Donovaan och Kenneth & the Knutters nästan samtidigt. Love har gjort såväl en hyllad låt som en mashup på Julian Cope och Magnetic Fields. Robert gör en DJ-mix med generösa doser öststatsfunk, turkadelica, HARD DRIVING ROCK och maoism. PJ Proby, Alan Hawkshaw, Tolkien, Iron Maiden, Moonspell, Kim Fowley, Timothy Leary, Allen Ginsberg, The Keffat Liv, Clark Gable, Joe Venuti, Stephane Grappelli, Kurt Weil, Burt Bacharach, Disney och Jussi Björling namecheckas och tungor talas i. I Bisarra hörnan hörs The Crooked Yet Fabulous Onions "vi vill vara Residents"-musik och urval från den avdankade storbandssångaren John Arcesis egenutgivna och mycket personliga lounge-psych-LP under artistnamnet Arcesia. Dessutom hörs valda stycken av The Carter Family, Billie Holiday, Ulf Dageby, Malicorne, Four Tet, Meatloaf, Black Sabbath och Ulf Ekman. ERRATA 1: Robert menade såklart "tenor" fastän han, på tal om Jussi Björling, råkade nämna en helt annan stämma. ERRATA 2: Robert tar tydligt avstånd från sitt underlåtande att nämna Stuff Smith när kända jazzviolinister kom på tal. Gör oss sällskap på Discord: https://discord.gg/Cywtq7vaqZ Gilla, kommentera och recensera på The Facebook: https://facebook.com/musikensmaktpodcast/ Bidra till Loves fysiska överlevnad och få lite bonusmaterial: https://www.patreon.com/musikensmakt

Zig at the gig podcasts
Mark Bingham

Zig at the gig podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 86:35


Interview with Mark Bingham Guitarist-singer-songwriter-arranger and esteemed producer Mark Bingham (a 2021 recipient of Offbeat magazine's Lifetime Achievement in Music Business Award), has dedicated over 50 years to pursuing creativity regardless of category. From working with seminal punk and No Wave bands MX-80 Sound and Bush Tetras to Cajun groups Michot's Melody Makers and Lost Bayou Ramblers to Beat poets Ed Sanders and Allen Ginsberg to jazz artists John Scofield, Wycliffe Gordon and Nicholas Payton to celebrated pop stars like Marianne Faithfull, Dr. John, R.E.M., Roy Orbison and Jon Batiste, Bingham has always sought out projects that get his creative juices flowing. “There's been no linear path,” he said of his storied career. “It's been up and down and all around, and you just try to find good people to work with.” A true child of the ‘60s, Bingham is from an era when ‘Question Authority' was de rigueur. He ended up taking it to heart, both politically and musically. While attending Indiana University in the early ‘70s, at the peak of the anti-war movement on the campuses all across America, the Bloomington, Indiana native formed the Screaming Gypsy Bandits, a sprawling 10-piece theatrical psych rock group with an absurdist/prankster bent that shared the renegade stance of such bands of the day as Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention, Captain Beefheart and His Magic Band and the Hampton Grease Band (led by visionary frontman Col. Bruce Hampton).   Mark's Info  https://markbingham.bandcamp.com/music    

Convidado
"Memórias em Tempo de Amnésia", o mais recente livro de Álvaro Vasconcelos - Parte 2

Convidado

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 15:05


Álvaro Vasconcelos, antigo director do Instituto de Estudos de Segurança da União Europeia, cujas análises sobre Relações Internacionais são frequentemente ouvidas nas antenas da RFI acaba neste mês de Dezembro de publicar o seu mais recente livro, "Memórias em Tempo de Amnésia", um relato na primeira pessoa sobre o seu percurso de vida que nos primeiros anos passou por Moçambique e pela África do Sul. Dividido em dois volumes cujo primeiro é intitulado "Uma campa em África", este livro conta a vivência do autor na cidade da Beira onde chegou aos 9 anos em 1953 e onde residiu durante 12 anos, antes de ir estudar em Joanesburgo durante os anos 60. A violência da época colonial, os debates políticos e culturais que então alimentavam a sua geração estão no centro desta obra, para além da sua experiência pessoal, o autor fala muito dos livros que o marcaram. Na entrevista concedida por Álvaro Vasconcelos que dividimos em 2 episódios e cujo primeiro ouviram ontem, o estudioso aborda agora a presença muito forte da literatura na sua vida, nomeadamente na Beira, onde relata ter sentido menos a censura do que em Portugal, o que lhe permitiu conhecer os principais escritores europeus para, em seguida mergulhar na contra-cultura americana que conheceu quando foi estudar a Joanesburgo nos anos 60. RFI: "Memórias em Tempo de Amnésia" fala dos seus primeiros anos, em Portugal, em Moçambique e na África do Sul, mas fala também muito dos livros que o acompanharam naquela época. Álvaro Vasconcelos: É verdade que a literatura foi algo extremamente importante na minha vida. Foi pela literatura, sobretudo a literatura Europeia -e não só, também a literatura moçambicana- que eu fui descobrindo aquilo que eu chamei Humanismo radical, ou seja, o dever de se ter posição de se assumir um compromisso com a sociedade. O livro que mais me marcou na minha juventude foi a "Guerra e Paz" de Tolstoi. No fundo, comecei a identificar-me com o Pedro da "Guerra e Paz". Lia este livro todos os anos e o Pedro, para mim, era um herói, mas um herói que lutava pelos ideais da Revolução Francesa. É verdade que pensou que Napoleão representava esses ideais e depois compreendeu que as guerras napoleónicas eram guerras imperiais que nada tinham a ver com os ideais da Revolução Francesa. Mas a descoberta dos ideais da Revolução Francesa através de Victor Hugo, de Tolstoi em particular, tiveram uma grande influência para mim. Depois, comecei a ler a literatura que o meu pai lia, da segunda guerra mundial, de Erich Maria Remarque, Stefan Zweig, escritores alemães, austríacos, que falavam das circunstâncias da subida do Fascismo e do Nazismo. Isso evidentemente foi muito importante na minha formação. Depois, toda a literatura francesa ligada ao movimento existencialista. Nós na Beira, começamos a pensar que éramos existencialistas porque líamos Sartre, Camus, Roger Vailland, Simone de Beauvoir, mas fundamentalmente Sartre. Devo dizer que foi fundamentalmente Sartre que teve um grande impacto em nós. Ao dizer que "todo o homem nasce livre e é capaz de fazer a sua escolha, tem a liberdade de escolher", Sartre teve em nós uma grande influência. Passávamos horas nos cafés, no "Capri" (na Beira), a discutir sobre Roger Vailland, "A cabra cega", sobre o Sartre, "A náusea", "as mãos sujas", o Camus evidentemente, para nós era muito importante, toda a problemática da angústia. Tudo isto fez parte da nossa formação que era acompanhada -para grande sorte que tínhamos na Beira- de ter um cineclube que nos dava a conhecer o grande cinema europeu do pós-guerra, o neo-realismo italiano, a "Nouvelle Vague" francesa, o cinema soviético e evidentemente também os escritores americanos. Estou a lembrar-me, por exemplo, da importância de Steinbeck, das "Vinhas da ira". Ao nos dar uma perspectiva das questões sociais que estavam menos presentes nesta literatura que acabo de referir, que era uma literatura mais sobre a liberdade e sobre o perigo do nazismo, do fascismo, do racismo, Steinbeck conta-nos uma história da crise dos anos 30, da extraordinária desigualdade social, fala daqueles que não tinham voz. Tenho-me lembrado disso, quando Annie Ernaux recebeu o Prémio Nobel de Literatura que, no fundo, há aqui -e ela própria o diz- uma relação entre a sua literatura e esta literatura americana que eu lia quando estava na Beira. RFI: Na África do Sul, contacta mais com a contracultura americana que influencia muito o meio universitário de Joanesburgo. Álvaro Vasconcelos: Sem dúvida. Quando eu cheguei a África do Sul, era em 1966 e vivia-se o auge da contracultura americana, o movimento Hippie nos Estados Unidos, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, da marcha sobre o Capitólio, os movimentos contra a guerra do Vietname e uma reflexão sobre os jovens, a juventude que dizia "não" e o pôr em causa a sociedade de consumo, Andy Warhol, o Pop Art, tudo isto estava muito presente na África do Sul. Eu mergulhei nessa contracultura americana e encontrei nela de facto uma resposta para muitas das minhas questões. No fundo, fui aprendendo a olhar o mundo num primeiro momento através da contracultura americana, das canções do Bob Dylan, da poesia da contracultura americana e tudo isto era absolutamente extraordinário no ambiente em que vivíamos na África do Sul. Por exemplo, a poesia do Allen Ginsberg -eu refiro isso no livro- "O peso do mundo é o amor, o peso que carregamos é o amor", jovens, como somos todos um pouco românticos, que nos sentíamos sós num mundo em que não revíamos, o mundo da guerra do Vietname, e as canções do Bob Dylan, as suas canções contra a bomba atómica, tudo isto batia completamente certo com aquilo que nós víamos. Depois, na África do Sul, líamos "Os condenados da Terra" de Frantz Fanon e eu que estava mergulhado naquele movimento da contracultura americana e no movimento Hippie pacifista, ao ler este livro e ver a razão pela qual as pessoas se revoltavam, tinham direito de se revoltar e tinham inclusivamente o direito de resistirem de armas na mão se fosse necessário às tropas coloniais, evidentemente ganhei uma consciência diferente. Fui-me aproximando daquilo que é o tema do segundo volume deste livro, que são os meus anos de exílio na Bélgica e em França em que me fui aproximando do marxismo, nessa mistura entre o marxismo e a contracultura americana que foram as ideias libertárias dos anos 70 na Europa. RFI: No epílogo deste livro, conta uma visita virtual que fez recentemente na Beira. Como foi este regresso virtual à cidade da Beira? Nunca tinha lá regressado? Álvaro Vasconcelos: Eu não tinha regressado à Beira. De certa forma, não me sentia bem. Achava que a Beira era uma cidade-fantasma. Já ninguém do meu tempo vivia lá. Só me fazia lembrar as coisas mais cruéis que vivi ou às quais assisti na minha juventude. Portanto, regressar à Beira, era como regressar a uma cidade-fantasma. Metia-me medo, provocava-me angústia. Portanto não fui à Beira quando fui a Moçambique depois da guerra civil (em 1992). Organizei uma série de seminários em Maputo sobre as transições democráticas que aliás também organizei na África do Sul, no fim do apartheid. Não fui à Beira, mas agora tinha pensado que como agora tinha finalmente decidido escrever sobre o período que tinha vivido na Beira, que devia ir lá. Mas como veio o covid, não pude ir à Beira. Então, imaginei uma visita guiada pelo Marcelino Francisco que é um famoso youtuber da Beira, uma viagem virtual em que eu visitasse a cidade. De facto, é extraordinário. Com o youtuber Marcelino Francisco, fui de facto à cidade da Beira. Evidentemente que não tinha os cheiros, não havia o calor que sentia quando vivia na Beira, tinha que imaginar, mas eu falava com as pessoas, entrava nas livrarias, entrava nos cafés, entrava nos clubes que tinha frequentado. Portanto, foi uma experiência muito interessante. RFI: Pensa que um dia vai regressar "em carne e osso" à cidade da Beira? Álvaro Vasconcelos: Penso regressar à Beira. Existe lá uma livraria que é a Fundza, que é a única livraria da cidade e que é a propriedade de um escritor, livreiro e editor. ele quer organizar lá uma apresentação do livro naquele espaço e eu estou a imaginar ir lá, voltar à Beira depois destes anos todos. Da Beira restam só da nossa passagem como de muitas famílias portuguesas, o túmulo da minha avó que foi morrer à Beira. Acho que isto também é uma característica do colonialismo. Deixou para trás túmulos. Túmulos de colonos, túmulos de soldados que morreram na guerra colonial e túmulos de africanos que foram mortos na guerra colonial. A herança do colonialismo, em grande parte, são túmulos. Por isso é que eu chamei o primeiro volume do meu livro "Uma campa em África", porque é a campa da minha avó, Amélia Clara Vasconcelos, que foi morrer à Beira porque já estava muito doente e foi ter connosco, morreu lá.

Mozaika
Bukovacova panna. Nový cyklus obrazů Tomáše Císařovského je k vidění v Galerii Václava Špály

Mozaika

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 6:10


Panna – loutka je hlavní hrdinkou nového obrazového figurálního cyklu malíře Tomáše Císařovského. Spolu s ní se na Císařovského obrazech objevují také Max Švabinský, bratři Čapkové, básníci Vladimír Holan a Vítězslav Nezval, Hurvínek či americký básník Allen Ginsberg.Všechny díly podcastu Mozaika můžete pohodlně poslouchat v mobilní aplikaci mujRozhlas pro Android a iOS nebo na webu mujRozhlas.cz.

Vltava
Mozaika: Bukovacova panna. Nový cyklus obrazů Tomáše Císařovského je k vidění v Galerii Václava Špály

Vltava

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 6:10


Panna – loutka je hlavní hrdinkou nového obrazového figurálního cyklu malíře Tomáše Císařovského. Spolu s ní se na Císařovského obrazech objevují také Max Švabinský, bratři Čapkové, básníci Vladimír Holan a Vítězslav Nezval, Hurvínek či americký básník Allen Ginsberg.

AJC Passport
Celebrating Mizrahi Heritage Month with The Forgotten Exodus: Iran

AJC Passport

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 37:56


Too few people know that parts of the Arab world and Iran were once home to large Jewish communities. This Mizrahi Heritage Month, let's change the story, with the final episode of the first season of The Forgotten Exodus, the first-ever narrative podcast series devoted exclusively to the rich, fascinating, and often-overlooked history of Mizrahi and Sephardic Jewry. Thank you for lifting up these stories to celebrate Mizrahi Heritage Month. If you enjoy this episode, be sure to listen to the rest of The Forgotten Exodus, wherever you get your podcasts.   __ Home to one of the world's oldest Jewish communities, the story of Jews in Iran has been one of prosperity and suffering through the millennia. During the mid-20th century, when Jews were being driven from their homes in Arab lands, Iran assisted Jewish refugees in providing safe passage to Israel. Under the Shah, Israel was an important economic and political ally. Yet that all swiftly changed in the 1979 Iranian Revolution, which ushered in Islamic rule, while chants of “Death to Israel” and “Death to America” rang out from the streets of Tehran.   Author, journalist, and poet Roya Hakakian shares her personal story of growing up Jewish in Iran during the reign of the Shah and then Ayatollah Khomeini, which she wrote about in her memoir Journey From the Land of No. Joining Hakakian is Dr. Saba Soomekh, a professor of world religions and Middle Eastern history who wrote From the Shahs to Los Angeles: Three Generations of Iranian Jewish Women between Religion and Culture. She also serves as associate director of AJC Los Angeles, home to America's largest concentration of Persian Jewish immigrants.  In this sixth and final episode of the season, the Hakakian family's saga captures the common thread that has run throughout this series – when the history of an uprooted community is left untold, it can become vulnerable to others' narratives and assumptions, or become lost forever and forgotten. How do you leave behind a beloved homeland, safeguard its Jewish legacy, and figure out where you belong? __ Show notes: Listen to The Forgotten Exodus and sign up to receive updates about future episodes.  Song credits:  Chag Purim · The Jewish Guitar Project Hevenu Shalom · Violin Heart Pond5:  “Desert Caravans”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Tiemur Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837 “Oud Nation”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Haygaz Yossoulkanian (BMI), IPI#1001905418 “Persian”: Publisher: STUDEO88; Composer: Siddhartha Sharma “Meditative Middle Eastern Flute”: Publisher: N/; Composer: DANIELYAN ASHOT MAKICHEVICH (IPI NAME #00855552512), UNITED STATES BMI Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837 “Sentimental Oud Middle Eastern”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989. “Frontiers”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Pete Checkley (BMI), IPI#380407375 “Persian Investigative Mystery”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Peter Cole (BMI), IPI#679735384 “Persian Wind”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Sigma (SESAC); Composer: Abbas Premjee (SESAC), IPI#572363837 “Modern Middle Eastern Underscore”: Publisher: All Pro Audio LLC (611803484); Composer: Alan T Fagan (347654928) “Persian Fantasy Tavern”: Publisher: N/A; Composer: John Hoge “Adventures in the East”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI) Composer: Petar Milinkovic (BMI), IPI#00738313833. ___ Episode Transcript: ROYA HAKAKIAN: In 1984, when my mother and I left and my father was left alone in Iran, that was yet another major dramatic and traumatic separation. When I look back at the events of 1979, I think, people constantly think about the revolution having, in some ways, blown up Tehran, but it also blew up families. And my own family was among them.  MANYA BRACHEAR PASHMAN: The world has overlooked an important episode in modern history: the 800,000 Jews who left or were driven from their homes in Arab nations and Iran in the mid-20th century. This series, brought to you by American Jewish Committee, explores that pivotal moment in Jewish history and the rich Jewish heritage of Iran and Arab nations as some begin to build relations with Israel. I'm your host, Manya Brachear Pashman. Join us as we explore family histories and personal stories of courage, perseverance, and resilience. This is The Forgotten Exodus.  Today's episode: Leaving Iran MANYA: Outside Israel, Iran has the largest Jewish population in the Middle East. Yes, the Islamic Republic of Iran. In 2022. Though there is no official census, experts estimate about 10,000 Jews now live in the region previously known as Persia.  But since the 1979 Iranian Revolution, Jews in Iran don't advertise their Jewish identity. They adhere to Iran's morality code: women stay veiled from head to toe and men and women who aren't married or related stay apart in public. They don't express support for Israel, they don't ask questions, and they don't disagree with the regime. One might ask, with all these don'ts, is this a way of living a Jewish life? Or a way to live – period?  For author, journalist, and poet Roya Hakakian and her family, the answer was ultimately no. Roya has devoted her life to being a fact-finder and truth-teller. A former associate producer at the CBS news show 60 Minutes and a Guggenheim Fellow, Roya has written two volumes of poetry in Persian and three books of nonfiction in English, the first of which was published in 2004 – Journey From the Land of No, a memoir about her charmed childhood and accursed adolescence growing up Jewish in Iran under two different regimes.  ROYA: It was hugely important for me to create an account that could be relied on as a historic document. And I did my best through being very, very careful about gathering, interviewing, talking to, observing facts, evidence, documents from everyone, including my most immediate members of my family, to do what we, both as reporters, but also as Jews, are called to do, which is to bear witness. No seemed to be the backdrop of life for women, especially of religious minorities, and, in my own case, Jewish background, and so I thought, what better way to name the book than to call it as what my experience had been, which was the constant nos that I heard. So, Land of No was Iran. MANYA: As a journalist, as a Jew, as a daughter of Iran, Roya will not accept no for an answer. After publishing her memoir, she went on to write Assassins of the Turquoise Palace, a meticulously reported book about a widely underreported incident. In 1992 at a Berlin restaurant, a terrorist attack by the Iranian proxy Hezbollah targeted and killed four Iranian-Kurdish exiles. The book highlighted Iran's enormous global footprint made possible by its terror proxies who don't let international borders get in the way of silencing Iran's critics.   Roya also co-founded the Iran Human Rights Documentation Center, an independent non-profit that reports on Iran's human rights abuses.  Her work has not prompted Ayatollah Khameini to publicly issue a fatwa against her  – like the murder order against Salman Rushdie issued by his predecessor. But in 2019, one of her teenage sons answered a knock at the door. It was the FBI, warning her that she was in the crosshairs of the Iranian regime's operatives in America. Most recently, Roya wrote A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious about the emotional roller coaster of arriving in America while still missing a beloved homeland, especially one where their community has endured for thousands of years. ROYA: I felt very strongly that one stays in one's homeland, that you don't just simply take off when things go wrong, that you stick around and try to figure a way through a bad situation. We came to the point where staying didn't seem like it would lead to any sort of real life and leaving was the only option. MANYA: The story of Jews in Iran, often referred to as Persia until 1935, is a millennia-long tale. A saga of suffering, repression, and persecution, peppered with brief moments of relief or at least relative peace – as long as everyone plays by the rules of the regime. SABA SOOMEKH: The history of Jews in Iran goes back to around 2,700 years ago. And a lot of people assume that Jews came to Iran, well at that time, it was called the Persian Empire, in 586 BCE, with the Babylonian exile. But Jews actually came a lot earlier, we're thinking 721-722 BCE with the Assyrian exile which makes us one of the oldest Jewish communities.  MANYA: That's Dr. Saba Soomekh, a professor of world religions and Middle Eastern history and the author of From the Shahs to Los Angeles: Three Generations of Iranian Jewish Women between Religion and Culture. She also serves as associate director of American Jewish Committee in Los Angeles, home to America's largest concentration of Persian Jewish immigrants. Saba's parents fled Iran in 1978, shortly before the revolution, when Saba and her sister were toddlers. She has devoted her career to preserving Iranian Jewish history.   Saba said Zoroastrian rulers until the 7th Century Common Era vacillated between tolerance and persecution of Jews. For example, according to the biblical account in the Book of Ezra, Cyrus the Great freed the Jews from Babylonian rule, granted all of them citizenship, and permitted them to return to Jerusalem to rebuild their Temple.  The Book of Esther goes on to tell the story of another Persian king, believed to be Xerxes I, whose closest adviser called Haman conspires to murder all the Jews – a plot that is foiled by his wife Queen Esther who is Jewish herself. Esther heroically pleads for mercy on behalf of her people – a valor that is celebrated on the Jewish holiday of Purim.  But by the time of the Islamic conquest in the middle of the 7th Century Common Era, the persecution had become so intense that Jews were hopeful about the new Arab Muslim regime, even if that meant being tolerated and treated as second-class citizens, or dhimmi status. But that status had a different interpretation for the Safavids. SABA: Really things didn't get bad for the Jews of the Persian Empire until the 16th century with the Safavid dynasty, because within Shia Islam in the Persian Empire, what they brought with them is this understanding of purity and impurity. And Jews were placed in the same category as dogs, pigs, and feces. They were seen as being religiously impure, what's referred to as najes. MANYA: Jews were placed in ghettos called mahaleh, where they wore yellow stars and special shoes to distinguish them from the rest of the population. They could not leave the mahaleh when it rained for fear that if water rolled off their bodies into the water system, it would render a Shia Muslim impure. For the same reason, they could not go to the bazaars for fear they might contaminate the food. They could not look Muslims in the eye. They were relegated to certain artisanal professions such as silversmithing and block printing – crafts that dirtied one's hands.  MANYA: By the 19th century, some European Jews did make their way to Persia to help. The Alliance Israélite Universelle, a Paris-based network of schools founded by French Jewish intellectuals, opened schools for Jewish children throughout the Middle East and North Africa, including within the mahalehs in Persia.  SABA: They saw themselves as being incredibly sophisticated because they were getting this, in a sense, secular European education, they were speaking French. The idea behind the Allianz schools was exactly that. These poor Middle Eastern Jews, one day the world is going to open up to them, their countries are going to become secular, and we need to prepare them for this, not only within the context of hygiene, but education, language.  And the Allianz schools were right when it came to the Persian Empire because who came into power was Reza Pahlavi, who was a Francophile. And he turned around and said, ‘Wow! Look at the population that speaks French, that knows European philosophy, etc. are the Jews.' He brought them out of the mahaleh, the Jewish ghettos, and said ‘I don't care about religion. Assimilate and acculturate. As long as you show, in a sense, devotion, and nationalism to the Pahlavi regime, which the Jews did—not all Jews—but a majority of them did. MANYA: Reza Pahlavi took control in 1925 and 16 years later, abdicated his throne to his son Muhammad Reza Pahlavi. In 1935, Persia adopted a new name: Iran. As king or the Shah, both father and son set Iran on a course of secularization and rapid modernization under which Jewish life and success seemed to flourish. The only condition was that religious observance was kept behind closed doors. SABA: The idea was that in public, you were secular and in private, you were a Jew. You had Shabbat, you only married a Jew, it was considered blasphemous if you married outside of the Jewish community. And it was happening because people were becoming a part of everyday schools, universities.  But that's why the Jewish day schools became so important. They weren't learning Judaism. What it did was ensure that in a secular Muslim society, that the Jewish kids were marrying within each other and within the community. It was, in a sense, the Golden Age. And that will explain to you why, unlike the early 1950s, where you had this exodus of Mizrahi Jews, Arab Jews from the Arab world and North Africa, you didn't really have that in Iran.  MANYA: In fact, Iran provided a safe passage to Israel for Jewish refugees during that exodus, specifically those fleeing Iraq. The Pahlavi regime considered Israel a critical ally in the face of pan-Arab fervor and hostility in the region. Because of the Arab economic boycott, Israel needed energy sources and Iran needed customers for its oil exports.  A number of Israelis even moved to Tehran, including farmers from kibbutzim who had come to teach agriculture, and doctors and nurses from Hadassah Hospital who had come to teach medicine.  El Al flew in and out of Tehran airport, albeit from a separate terminal. Taking advantage of these warm relations between the two countries, Roya recalls visiting aunts, uncles, and cousins in Israel.  ROYA: We arrived, and my mom and dad did what all visiting Jews from elsewhere do. They dropped to their knees, and they started kissing the ground. I did the same, and it was so moving. Israel was the promised land, we thought about Israel, we dreamed about Israel. But, at the same time, we were Iranians and, and we were living in Iran, and things were good.  This seems to non-Iranian Jews an impossibility. But I think for most of us, it was the way things were. We lived in the country where we had lived for, God knows how many years, and there was this other place that we somehow, in the back of our minds thought we would be going to, without knowing exactly when, but that it would be the destination. MANYA: Relations between the Shah and America flourished as well. In 1951, a hugely popular politician by the name of Mohammad Mosaddegh became prime minister and tried to institute reforms. His attempts to nationalize the oil industry and reduce the monarchy's authority didn't go over well. American and British intelligence backed a coup that restored the Shah's power. Many Iranians resented America's meddling, which became a rallying cry for the revolution. U.S. officials have since expressed regret for the CIA's involvement.  In November 1977, President Jimmy Carter welcomed the Shah and his wife to Washington, D.C., to discuss peace between Egypt and Israel, nuclear nonproliferation, and the energy crisis.  As an extension of these warm relations, the Shah sent many young Iranians to America to enhance their university studies, exposing them to Western ideals and values.  Meanwhile, a savvy fundamentalist cleric was biding his time in a Paris basement. It wouldn't be long before relations crumbled between Iran and Israel, Iran and the U.S,. and Iran and its Jews.  Roya recalls the Hakakian house at the corner of Alley of the Distinguished in Tehran as a lush oasis surrounded by fragrant flowers, full of her father's poetry, and brimming with family memories. Located in the heart of a trendy neighborhood, across the street from the Shah's charity organization, the tall juniper trees, fragrant honeysuckle, and gold mezuzah mounted on the door frame set it apart from the rest of the homes.  Roya's father, Haghnazar, was a poet and a respected headmaster at a Hebrew school. Roya, which means dream in Persian, was a budding poet herself with the typical hopes and dreams of a Jewish teenage girl.  ROYA: Prior to the revolution, life in an average Tehran Hebrew Day School looked very much like life in a Hebrew Day School anywhere else. In the afternoons we had all Hebrew and Jewish studies. We used to put on a Purim show every year. I wanted to be Esther. I never got to be Esther. We had emissaries, I think a couple of years, from Israel, who came to teach us how to do Israeli folk dance. MANYA: There were moments when Roya recalls feeling self-conscious about her Jewishness, particularly at Passover. That's when the family spent two weeks cleaning, demonstrating they weren't najes, or dirty Jews. The work was rewarded when the house filled with the fragrance of cumin and saffron and Persian dishes flowed from the kitchen, including apple and plum beef stew, tarragon veal balls stuffed with raisins, and rice garnished with currants and slivers of almonds.  When her oldest brother Alberto left to study in America, a little fact-finding work on Roya's part revealed that his departure wasn't simply the pursuit of a promising opportunity. As a talented cartoonist whose work had been showcased during an exhibition in Tehran, his family feared Alberto's pen might have gone too far, offending the Pahlavi regime and drawing the attention of the Shah's secret police.  Reports of repression, rapid modernization, the wide gap between Tehran's rich and the rest of the country's poor, and a feeling that Iranians weren't in control of their own destiny all became ingredients for a revolution, stoked by an exiled cleric named Ruhollah Khomeini who was recording cassette tapes in a Paris basement and circulating them back home.  SABA: He would just sit there and go on and on for hours, going against the Shah and West toxification. And then the recordings ended up in Iran. He wasn't even in Iran until the Shah left. MANYA: Promises of democracy and equality galvanized Iranians of all ages to overthrow the Shah in February 1979. Even the CIA was surprised.  SABA: I think a lot of people didn't believe it. Because number one, the Shah, the son, was getting the most amount of military equipment from the United States than anyone in the Middle East and in the Persian Gulf. And the idea was: you protect us in the Gulf, and we will give you whatever you need. So they never thought that a man with a beard down to his knee was able to overthrow this regime that was being propped up and supported by America, and also the Europeans. Khomeini comes in and represents himself as a person for everyone. And he was brilliant in the way he spoke about it. And the reason why this revolution was also successful was that it wasn't just religious people who supported Khomeini, there was this concept you had, the men with the turbans, meaning the religious people, and the you know, the bow ties or the ties, meaning the secular man, a lot of them who were sent by the Shah abroad to Europe and America to get an education, who came back, saw democracy there, and wanted it for their country.  MANYA: Very few of the revolutionaries could predict that Tehran was headed in the opposite direction and was about to revert to 16th Century Shia Islamic rule. For almost a year, Tehran and the rest of the nation were swept up in revolutionary euphoria.  Roya recalls how the flag remained green, white, and red, but an Allah insignia replaced its old sword-bearing lion. New currency was printed, with portraits bearing beards and turbans. An ode to Khomeini became the new national anthem. While the Shah had escaped on an Air France flight, corpses of his henchmen graced the front pages of newspapers alongside smiling executioners. All celebrated, until the day one of the corpses was Habib Elghanian, the Jewish philanthropist who supported all of Iran's Hebrew schools. Charged and convicted as a Zionist spy.  Elders in the community remembered the insurmountable accusations of blood libel during darker times for Iran's Jews. But younger generations like Roya's, who had not lived through the eras of more ruthless antisemitism and persecution, continued to root for the revolution, regardless of its victims. Meanwhile, Roya's Jewish day school was taken over by a new veiled headmistress who replaced Hebrew lessons with other kinds of religious instruction, and required robes and headscarves for all the students.  ROYA: In the afternoons, from then on, we used to have lessons in a series of what she called: ‘Is religion something that you inherit, or is it something that you choose?' And so I think the intention, clearly, was to convince us that we didn't need to inherit our religions from our parents and ancestors, that we ought to consider better choices. MANYA: But when the headmistress cut short the eight-day Passover break, that was the last straw for Roya and her classmates. Their revolt got her expelled from school.  Though Jews did not universally support Khomeini, some saw themselves as members of the Iranian Communist, or Tudeh Party. They opposed the Shah and the human rights abuses of his monarchy and cautiously considered Khomeini the better option, or at least the lesser of two evils. Alarmed by the developments such as Elghanian's execution and changes like the ones at Roya's school, Jewish community leaders traveled to the Shia holy city of Qom to assure the Supreme Leader of their loyalty to Iran.  SABA: They did this because they wanted to make sure that they protected the Jewish community that was left in Iran. Khomeini made that distinction: ‘I am not against Jews, I'm against Zionists. You could be Jewish in this country. You cannot be a Zionist in this country.'  MANYA: But that wasn't the only change. Right away, the Family Protection Law was reversed, lifting a law against polygamy, giving men full rights in divorce and custody, and lowering the marriage age for girls to nine. Women were banned from serving as judges, and beaches and sports events were segregated by gender.  But it took longer to shut down universities, albeit for only two years, segregate public schools by gender, and stone to death women who were found to have committed adultery. Though Khomeini was certainly proving that he was not the man he promised to be, he backed away from those promises gradually – one brutal crackdown at a time. As a result, the trickle of Jews out of Iran was slow.  ROYA: My father thought, let's wait a few years and see what happens. In retrospect, I think the overwhelming reason was probably that nobody believed that things had changed, and so drastically. It seemed so unbelievable. I mean, a country that had been under monarchy for 2,500 years, couldn't simply see it all go and have a whole new system put in place, especially when it was such a radical shift from what had been there before. So I think, in many ways, we were among the unbelievers, or at least my father was, we thought it could never be, it would not happen. My father proved to be wrong, nothing changed for the better, and the conditions continued to deteriorate. So, so much catastrophe happened in those few years that Iran just simply was steeped into a very dark, intense, and period of political radicalism and also, all sorts of economic shortages and pressures. And so the five years that we were left behind, that we stayed back, changed our perspective on so many things. MANYA: In November 1979, a group of radical university students who supported the Iranian Revolution, took over the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, seized hostages, and held them for 444 days until President Ronald Reagan's inauguration on January 20, 1981. During the hostages' captivity, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein invaded Iran. The conflict that ensued for eight years created shortages on everything from dairy products to sanitary napkins. Mosques became distribution centers for rations. ROYA: We stood in line for hours and hours for eggs, and just the very basic things of daily life. And then it became also clear that religious minorities, including Jews, would no longer be enjoying the same privileges as everyone else. There were bombings that kept coming closer and closer to Tehran, which is where we lived. It was very clear that half of my family that was in the United States could not and would not return, because they were boys who would have been conscripted to go to war. Everything had just come apart in a way that was inconceivable to think that they would change for the better again. MANYA: By 1983, new laws had been passed instituting Islamic dress for all women – violations of which earned a penalty of 74 lashes. Other laws imposed an Islamic morality code that barred co-ed gatherings. Roya and her friends found refuge in the sterile office building that housed the Jewish Iranian Students Association. But she soon figured out that the regime hadn't allowed it to remain for the benefit of the Jewish community. It functioned more like a ghetto to keep Jews off the streets and out of their way. Even the activities that previously gave her comfort were marred by the regime. Poetry books were redacted. Mountain hiking trails were arbitrarily closed to mourn the deaths of countless clerics.  SABA: Slowly what they realize, when Khomeini gained power, was that he was not the person that he claimed to be. He was not this feminist, if anything, all this misogynistic rule came in, and a lot of people realize they, in a sense, got duped and he stole the revolution from them. MANYA: By 1984, the war with Iraq had entered its fourth year. But it was no longer about protecting Iran from Saddam Hussein. Now the Ayatollah wanted to conquer Baghdad, then Jerusalem where he aspired to deliver a sermon from the Temple Mount. Meanwhile, Muslim soldiers wounded in the war chose to bleed rather than receive treatment from Jewish doctors. Boys as young as 12 – regardless of faith – were drafted and sent on suicide missions to open the way for Iranian troops to do battle.  SABA: They were basically used as an army of children that the bombs would detonate, their parents would get a plastic key that was the key to heaven. And the bombs would detonate, and then the army would come in Iranian army would come in. And so that's when a lot of the Persian parents, the Jewish parents freaked out. And that's when they were like: we're getting out of here.  MANYA: By this time, the Hakakian family had moved into a rented apartment building and Roya was attending the neighborhood school. Non-Muslim students were required to take Koran classes and could only use designated water fountains and bathrooms.  As a precaution, Roya's father submitted their passports for renewal. Her mother's application was denied; Roya's passport was held for further consideration; her father's was confiscated.  One night, Roya returned home to find her father burning her books and journals on the balcony of their building. The bonfire of words was for the best, he told her. And at long last, so was leaving. With the help of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, Roya and her mother, Helen, fled to Geneva, and after wandering in Europe for several months, eventually reunited with her brothers in the United States. Roya did not see her father again for five years. Still unable to acquire a passport, he was smuggled out of Iran into Pakistan, on foot.  ROYA: My eldest brother left to come to America in the mid-70s. There was a crack in the body of the family then. But then came 1979, and my two other brothers followed. And so we were apart for all those very, very formative years. And then, in 1984, when my mother and I left and my father was left alone in Iran, that was yet another major dramatic and traumatic separation. So, you know, it's interesting that when I look back at the events of 1979, I think, people constantly think about the revolution having, in some ways, blown up Tehran, but it also blew up families. And my own family was among them.  MANYA: While her father's arrival in America was delayed, Roya describes her arrival in stages. She first arrived as a Jewish refugee in 1985 and found her place doing what she had always done – writing in Persian – rebuilding a body of work that had been reduced to ashes.  ROYA: As a teen I had become a writer, people were encouraging me. So, I continued to do it. It was the thing I knew how to do. And it gave me a sense of grounding and identity. So, I kept on doing it, and it kind of worked its magic, as I suppose good writing does for all writers. It connected me to a new community of people who read Persian and who appreciated what I was trying to do. And I found that with each book that I write, I find a new tribe for myself.  MANYA: She arrived again once she learned English. In her first year at Brooklyn College, she tape-recorded her professors to listen again later. She eventually took a course with renowned poet Allen Ginsberg, whose poetry was best known for its condemnation of persecution and imperial politics and whose 1950s poem “Howl” tested the boundaries of America's freedom of speech.  ROYA: When I mastered the language enough to feel comfortable to be a writer once more, then I found a footing and through Allen and a community of literary people that I met here began to kind of foresee a possibility of writing in English. MANYA: There was also her arrival to an American Jewish community that was largely unaware of the role Jews played in shaping Iran long before the advent of Islam. Likewise, they were just as unaware of the role Iran played in shaping ancient Jewish life. They were oblivious to the community's traditions, and the indignities and abuses Iranian Jews had suffered, continue to suffer, with other religious minorities to keep those traditions alive in their homeland.   ROYA: People would say, ‘Oh, you have an accent, where are you from?' I would say, ‘Iran,' and the Jews at the synagogue would say, ‘Are there Jews in Iran?' MANYA: In Roya's most recent book A Beginner's Guide to America, a sequel of sorts to her memoir, she reflects on the lessons learned and the observations made once she arrived in the U.S. She counsels newcomers to take their time answering what might at first seem like an ominous or loaded question. Here's an excerpt: ROYA: “In the early days after your arrival, “Where are you from?” is above all a reminder of your unpreparedness to speak of the past. You have yet to shape your story – what you saw, why you left, how you left, and what it took to get here. This narrative is your personal Book of Genesis: the American Volume, the one you will sooner or later pen, in the mind, if not on the page. You must take your time to do it well and do it justice.” MANYA: No two immigrants' experiences are the same, she writes. The only thing they all have in common is that they have been uprooted and the stories of their displacement have been hijacked by others' assumptions and agendas. ROYA: I witnessed, as so many other Iranian Jews witness, that the story of how we came, why we came, who we had been, was being narrated by those who had a certain partisan perspective about what the history of what Jewish people should be, or how this history needs to be cast, for whatever purposes they had. And I would see that our own recollections of what had happened were being shaded by, or filtered through views other than our own, or facts other than our own. MANYA: As we wrap up this sixth and final episode of the first season of The Forgotten Exodus, it is clear that the same can be said about the stories of the Jewish people. No two tales are the same. Jews have lived everywhere, and there are reasons why they don't anymore. Some fled as refugees. Some embarked as dreamers. Some forged ahead without looking back. Others counted the days until they could return home. What ties them together is their courage, perseverance, and resilience–whether they hailed from Eastern Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, or parts beyond. These six episodes offer only a handful of those stories–shaped by memories and experiences. ROYA: That became sort of an additional incentive, if not burden for me to, to be a witness for several communities, to tell the story of what happened in Iran for American audiences, to Jews, to non-Iranian Jews who didn't realize that there were Jews in Iran, but also to record the history, according to how I had witnessed it, for ourselves, to make sure that it goes down, as I knew it. MANYA: Iranian Jews are just one of the many Jewish communities who in the last century left their homes in the Middle East to forge new lives for themselves and future generations.  Many thanks to Roya for sharing her family's story and for helping us wrap up this season of The Forgotten Exodus. If you're listening for the first time, check out our previous episodes on Jews from Iraq, Yemen, Egypt, Libya, and Sudan. Go to ajc.org/theforgottenexodus where you'll also find transcripts, show notes, and family photos. There are still so many stories to tell. Stay tuned in coming months. Does your family have roots in North Africa or the Middle East? One of the goals of this series is to make sure we gather these stories before they are lost. Too many times during my reporting, I encountered children and grandchildren who didn't have the answers to my questions because they never asked. That's why one of the goals of this project is to encourage you to find more of these stories.  Call The Forgotten Exodus hotline. Tell us where your family is from and something you'd like for our listeners to know such as how you've tried to keep the traditions and memories alive. Call 212.891.1336 and leave a message of 2 minutes or less. Be sure to leave your name and where you live now. You can also send an email to theforgottenexodus@ajc.org and we'll be in touch. Tune in every Friday for AJC's weekly podcast about global affairs through a Jewish lens, People of the Pod, brought to you by the same team behind The Forgotten Exodus.  Atara Lakritz is our producer, CucHuong Do is our production manager. T.K. Broderick is our sound engineer. Special thanks to Jon Schweitzer, Sean Savage, Ian Kaplan, and so many of our colleagues, too many to name, for making this series possible. And extra special thanks to David Harris, who has been a constant champion for making sure these stories do not remain untold. You can follow The Forgotten Exodus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can sign up to receive updates at AJC.org/forgottenexodussignup. The views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC.  You can reach us at theforgottenexodus@ajc.org. If you've enjoyed the episode, please be sure to spread the word, and hop onto Apple Podcasts to rate us and write a review to help more listeners find us.

il posto delle parole
Andrea Tomasetig "Maria Mulas. Milano, ritratti di fine '900"

il posto delle parole

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 24:16


Andrea Tomasetig"Maria Mulas"Milano, ritratti di fine '900Palazzo Reale, Milanofino all'8 gennaio 2023Le sale dell'Appartamento dei Principi di Palazzo Reale a Milano ospitano - fino all'8 gennaio 2023 - la mostra Maria Mulas. Milano, ritratti di fine '900, promossa dal Comune di Milano – Cultura prodotta e organizzata da Palazzo Reale e dall'Archivio Maria Mulas, con la curatela di Andrea Tomasetig. L'archivio fotografico contiene, oltre a reportage e lavori di ricerca, anche un numero imponente di ritratti – oltre 500 – di personaggi di primo piano delle arti e della cultura. In mostra ve ne sono un centinaio, giunti da una lunga esposizione al Museo Nazionale Slovacco promossa dall'Istituto Italiano di Cultura di Bratislava e frutto di una selezione che documenta lo stretto rapporto della fotografa con Milano e i suoi protagonisti nel trentennio che conclude il Novecento.Milano in quegli anni sta affermandosi come la capitale del design, della moda, dell'editoria, e non solo. È il luogo intorno a cui ruota un universo di talenti nativi o d'adozione, giunti da tutta Italia e dal mondo. Maria, arrivata poco più che ventenne nel lontano 1956 dalla natia Manerba del Garda sulla scia del fratello, li ritrae nei posti giusti e nei momenti giusti e ce li restituisce con una freschezza e intensità senza eguali, degna erede del fratello maggiore Ugo scomparso prematuramente nel 1973. Gli anni Settanta, Ottanta e Novanta sono per lei una girandola di incontri, Biennali veneziane e Kassel, allestimenti e inaugurazioni di mostre, presentazioni letterarie, feste e reportage in giro per il mondo. Ma il luogo d'osservazione privilegiato è sempre Milano che, come un magnete, accoglie e integra le varie provenienze regionali e straniere, ed è in quegli anni uno straordinario laboratorio di creatività e modernità che poi ritrasmette in Italia e nel mondo. Facendo della città il proprio epicentro, Maria Mulas ha mostrato come nessun altro il volto del mondo artistico e culturale milanese, italiano e internazionale.Sono centinaia e centinaia coloro che sono stati ritratti da lei: artisti, galleristi, critici, designer, architetti, scrittori, editori, giornalisti, stilisti, registi, attori, intellettuali, imprenditori, amici. Un elenco dettagliato ne riporta ben 539, dalla “A” di Claudio Abbado alla “Z” di Franco Zeffirelli. Non meraviglia che il Comune le abbia dedicato nel 1998 una grande mostra sempre a Palazzo Reale, consacrandola come “l'occhio di Milano”, e che oggi la celebri nuovamente come la fotografa che - pur appartata rispetto al circuito delle gallerie e del mercato dell'arte - ha colto l'anima profonda, vera di Milano, che è una città non in posa, ma dinamica, al lavoro, la città delle arti e delle professioni e dell'imprenditoria più avanzata.Per facilitare il percorso del visitatore l'esposizione è suddivisa in sei sezioni: Architettura e Design; Arte; Letteratura e Editoria; Moda; Arti dello Spettacolo; Milano cosmopolita e Maria nel mondo. È evidente che, dato lo spazio a disposizione, non ci possono essere tutti i nomi importanti che ha ritratto, né Maria Mulas poteva allora fotografare tutti quelli che noi oggi riteniamo importanti. Ma dal suo formidabile archivio emerge una sequenza altamente rappresentativa di personalità che incarnano molta parte della cultura italiana e del made in Italy. Alcuni nomi: Giorgio Armani, Gae Aulenti, Joseph Beuys, Giorgio Bocca, Roberto Calasso, Gillo Dorfles, Umberto Eco, Inge Feltrinelli, Dario Fo, Carla Fracci, Allen Ginsberg, Krizia, Vico Magistretti, Enzo Mari, Marcello Mastroianni, Ottavio Missoni, Bruno Munari, Fernanda Pivano, Gio Ponti, Miuccia Prada, Ettore Sottsass, Giorgio Strehler, Ornella Vanoni, Lea Vergine, Luigi Veronesi, Gianni Versace, Andy Warhol.La mostra è accompagnata da un catalogo pubblicato dall'editore Umberto Allemandi, con scritti di Andrea Tomasetig, Paolo Fallai, Stefano Salis e Patrizia Zappa Mulas.https://www.allemandi.com/IL POSTO DELLE PAROLEAscoltare fa Pensarehttps://ilpostodelleparole.it/

Writers Read Their Early Sh*t
S2/E5 - Dave Olson (aka Uncle Weed): priorities & bad decisions

Writers Read Their Early Sh*t

Play Episode Play 52 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 54:01


Jason welcomes under-qualified window-washer Dave Olson & his fantastic beard & beautiful hands for a natter about punching or hugging Dostoevsky, see-through loincloths, meeting REM, borrowing mustard from Allen Ginsberg, dodgy Greyhound stations, working out the writing life math, and how cheerleaders are people too. There's ropey Egyptian history, a savage polemic, the details of hippy teacher Mr Boris's new motorized home, a few bits & Brother Bobs of Dave's early poetry & prose, & Jason getting his Tutankhamun timeline wrong by only 3700 years. An unnerving—if not terrifying—time is guaranteed for all. Check out Dave's creative life archive at https://daveostory.com—much to enjoy there. Music by the outrageous DJ Max in Tokyo. Join the early sh*t chat at https://www.facebook.com/WRTESpodcast & on Instagram @writersreadtheirearlyshit. You can also send an email to WritersReadTheirEarlyShit@gmail.com. Many thanks, wherever & whoever & however you are, for listening. Support the show

Quotomania
QUOTOMANIA 350: Lawrence Ferlinghetti

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 2:33


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!On March 24, 1919, Lawrence Ferlinghetti was born in Yonkers, New York. After spending his early childhood in France, he received his BA from the University of North Carolina, an MA from Columbia University, and a PhD from the Sorbonne. He is the author of more than thirty books of poetry, including Poetry as Insurgent Art (New Directions, 2007); Americus, Book I (New Directions, 2004); A Far Rockaway of the Heart (New Directions, 1997); and A Coney Island of the Mind (New Directions, 1958). He has translated the works of a number of poets, including Nicanor Parra, Jacques Prevert, and Pier Paolo Pasolini. In addition to poetry, he is also the author of more than eight plays and three novels, including Little Boy: A Novel (Doubleday, 2019), Love in the Days of Rage (Overlook, 1988), and Her (New Directions, 1966).In 1953, Ferlinghetti and Peter Martin opened the City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco, California, helping to support their magazine, City Lights. Two years later, they launched City Lights Publishers, a book-publishing venture, which helped start the careers of many alternative local and international poets. In 1956, Ferlinghetti published Allen Ginsberg's book Howl and Other Poems, which resulted in his being arrested by the San Francisco Police for publishing “obscene work” and a subsequent trial that gained international attention. At the end, the judge concluded that “Howl” had “some redeeming social importance” and “was not obscene”; Ferlinghetti prevailed. City Lights became known as the heart of the Beat movement, which also included the writers Kenneth Rexroth, Gary Snyder, and Jack Kerouac.In 1994, San Francisco renamed a street in Ferlinghetti's honor, and in 1998, he was named the first poet laureate of San Francisco. He is the recipient of many international awards and honors, including the National Book Critics Circle Ivan Sandrof Award for Contribution to American Arts and Letters, the Robert Frost Memorial Medal, and the National Book Foundation's Literarian Award, presented for “outstanding service to the American literary community,” among others. In 2003, he was elected as a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and in 2007, he was named Commandeur of the French Order of Arts and Letters. He died on February 22, 2021, in San Francisco, California.  From https://poets.org/poet/lawrence-ferlinghetti. For more information about Lawrence Ferlinghetti:“I Am Waiting”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/42869/i-am-waiting-56d22183d718aA Coney Island of the Mind: https://www.ndbooks.com/book/a-coney-island-of-the-mind1/“Lawrence Ferlinghetti”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/lawrence-ferlinghetti“Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Poet Who Nurtured the Beats, Dies at 101”: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/23/obituaries/lawrence-ferlinghetti-dead.html“Thank You, Lawrence Ferlinghetti”: https://lithub.com/thank-you-lawrence-ferlinghetti/

KPFA - The Pacifica Evening News, Weekdays
Pacifica Evening News 11-15 Pacifica Radio Archives Fund Drive Hour 13

KPFA - The Pacifica Evening News, Weekdays

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 59:58


The Pacifica Radio Archives is pleased to be offering of their most ambitious gift to date for each donation you make: VOICES THAT CHANGE THE WORLD 64 GB USB drive. $250 Voices that Changed the World – The original collection of historic Collection of Pacifica Recordings since 1949. Or making a donation on our secure online website: www.SupportPRA.org Over 1400 hours of some of the greatest voices of our time: James Baldwin, Alan Watts, Rosa Parks, Bob Dylan, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Maya Angelou, W.E.B. Du Bois, Fannie Lou Hamer, John Coltrane, Leonard Cohen, George Orwell's 1984; full audiobook, Ralph Ellison's, "Invisible Man” full audio book, Allen Ginsberg, Amy Goodman & Democracy Now!, Malcolm X, Paul Robeson, George Carlin, Alice Walker, Lily Tomlin and more. Hour 1: 6:00am    Michael Beckwith Spiritual Collection with Mark Torres and Ernie G Hour 2: 7:00am    Sojourner Truth Margaret Prescod (Pre recorded) news headlines KPFA Hour 3: 8:00am    Democracy Now (half show) with PRA Pitch (prerecorded) Hour 4: 9:00am    Women's Rights Reproductive Rights Nanci Luna Jimenez and Lourdes Rivera Hosts Maria Elena Fernandez and Victoria Fernandez (Prerecorded) Hour 5: 10:00am Mitch Jeserich (Pre recorded) Hour 6: 11:00am  Civil Rights collection Highlights with PRA Pitch (Mark Torres and Cristine Blosdale) Hour 7: 12:00pm  Michael Beckwith Spiritual Collection with Mark Torres and Ernie G repeat Hour 8: 1:00pm    Democracy Now repeat Hour 9: 2:00pm    Women's Movement Hour with Professor Marta Lopez Garza and Naomi Quiñonez poet, educator and cultural activist. Hosts Maria Elena Fernandez Hour 10: 3:00pm    Remembering Mike Davis with Suzie Weismann Hour 11: 4:00pm    Remembering John Trudell with Jackson Browne (prerecorded) Hour 12: 5:00pm    Women's Rights Hour Reproductive Rights Nanci Luna Jimenez and Lourdes Rivera Hosts Maria Elena Fernandez and Victoria (Prerecorded) Hour 13: 6:00pm    News from KPFA Hour 14: 7:00pm    BEST HOUR of the Day (prerecorded) Hour 15: 8:00pm PRA Staff Live Pitch and Wrap Up for the Day Hour 16: 9:00pm Return to normal programming The post Pacifica Evening News 11-15 Pacifica Radio Archives Fund Drive Hour 13 appeared first on KPFA.

Takin A Walk
A Man Who Changed The Face Of Rock N Roll

Takin A Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 39:12


Join Host Buzz Knight on this episode of Takin A Walk with legendary music maven Danny Fields as they walk and talk in Greenwich Village. Danny is the former manager of Lou Reed and The Ramones. Here are show notes. Danny Fields: A Man who Changed the Face of Rock N Roll from Greenwich Village New York City is a city of neighborhoods, and Greenwich Village is no exception. Its cobblestone streets, historic brownstones, and lively restaurants make it one of the most frequented neighborhoods. It's also a place for people to live and work who want to stay in the heart of Manhattan without having to face the costly living costs. One unique thing about this neighborhood is that it's very diverse regarding race, culture, and geography.   Greenwich Village is a lively, urban neighborhood with many cafes, bars and restaurants, jazz clubs, Broadway productions, and historical brownstones. It can be a great place to explore as a tourist. Writers and poets, artists and radicals, runaway socialites, and others seeking freedom from conventional lifestyles have long flocked to this spot, lit most famously by the counterculture figures of the 1950s and '60s: Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, James Baldwin, Bob Dylan, and others. Take this walking tour with me, Buzz, and Danny Fields to better orient yourself in the Village and to hear more about his music career.   Danny Fields is an American music manager, publicist, journalist, and author. As a music industry executive from the 1960s to the 1980s, he was one of the most influential figures in punk rock history.   Tune in!   During this episode, you will learn about; [00:01] Episode intro with Danny Fields and a chat about Greenwich Village [04:56] The year that Danny moved into Greenwich village [09:06] Danny's views on how things have dramatically changed in Manhattan [15:20] Concert groups at Greenwich Village [26:09] How various streets have changed their names over time [27:50] A bit about some best historic hotels in Greenwich Village [30:12] What Danny gets himself busy with currently [32:04] Know more about one of  this village's historic street [34:53] A theatre where Danny managed the Ramones [45:41] Ending the show and call to action Connect With Danny Fields Website: http://dannysaysfilm.com/Danny_Says/Danny_Says.html Facebook: https://web.facebook.com/dannysaysfilm/ Wikipedia Page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danny_Fields Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dannysaysfilm/   About the Show  *****Thank you so much for listening to the TAKIN' A WALK PODCAST SHOW hosted by Buzz Knight!   Listen to more honest conversations with a compelling mix of guests ranging from musicians, authors, and insiders with their own stories. Get inspired, motivated, and gain insights, motivated, and tuned up with honest conversations every week that can help you with your own journey. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and be part of this blessed family.   Please consider subscribing, leaving a review, and sharing it with your friends and family!                                            

The Pensky Podcast
Death Wish

The Pensky Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 70:46


A member of the Q Continuum comes aboard Voyager, seeking asylum so he can commit suicide. Q arrives onboard to stop him, leaving Captain Janeway to mediate a moral dilemma. In this episode of the podcast, Wes and Clay discuss "Death Wish" and the first appearance of Q(s) on Star Trek: Voyager. Plus! The guys talk about the less successful cousin of Allen Ginsberg, the internal politics of the Q, and dying just because. Are you looking for older episodes? Find this and every other episode at The Pensky Podcast! Thanks for listening. Stay connected: • https://thepenskyfile.com/links/ • e-mail: thepenskyfilevideo(at)gmail.com

You Must Be Some Kind of Therapist
29. Corey Drayton: "Cancer Was the Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me"

You Must Be Some Kind of Therapist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 107:28


Before he reached 40, Corey was told he had a 27% chance of surviving stage 4 prostate cancer. Up until this point, he had been pushing through grueling 15-hour days in the film industry, despite his body's painful attempts to alert him that something was wrong. Corey's cancer crisis finally forced him to face deeply ingrained habits of people-pleasing, overwork, and self-neglect that he attributes to factors dating back to childhood. Corey followed Winston Churchill's timeless wisdom: “If you're going through hell, keep going.” He learned to get through three years of misery, 15 minutes at a time. Through the process, he transformed his “emotional source code,” learned to say no, prioritized his wellbeing for the first time in his life, and came home to his body. Corey also discovered a revolutionary new treatment called Stellate Ganglion Block (SGB), invented by Dr. Eugene Lipov, said to reset the nervous system after periods of "high allostatic (stress) load.” He felt that the SGB treatment helped him recover from the PTSD symptoms induced by his battle with cancer.Now cancer-free, Corey is back in action as a writer and cinematographer. He re-entered the world with a newfound commitment to being authentic, and soon discovered that the behavior of “woke progressives” in his community felt anything but, sparking a new phase of his creative career in which he speaks openly and honestly about the hypocrisy he sees in so-called socially progressive communities, such as Portland, Oregon, where we both reside. This episode includes verbal details of medical suffering, and may not be suitable for all listeners.Corey Drayton is a British-American fine artist, writer, producer and cinematographer, with 23 years in motion pictures across four continents, including work for Rolling Stone, WELT and The Times of London. He was notable crew on Academy Award Winner The Cove, The Life and Times of Allen Ginsberg and the upcoming The Invisible Machine. Corey featured opposite Peter Boghossian in the independent docuseries The Woke Reformation. In it he leveled his fusion of Perecian observation and Gonzo-style immersive critique — learned from longtime friend Hunter S. Thompson — at the problem of wokeness in the film industry. He is a frequent guest on TNT Radio, a contributor to Alternate Current Radio and a regular in The Boiler Room.If you enjoyed this conversation, please rate & review it on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. Share this episode with a friend, or on social media. You can also head over to my YouTube channel, subscribe, like, comment, & share there as well.To get $200 off your EightSleep Pod Pro Cover visit EightSleep.com & enter promo code SOMETHERAPIST. Take 20% off your entire purchase of nourishing superfood beverages at Organifi with code SOMETHERAPIST.Be sure to check out my shop. In addition to wellness products, you can now find my favorite books!MUSIC: Special thanks to Joey Pecoraro for our theme song, “Half Awake,” used with gratitude and permission. www.joeypecoraro.comPRODUCTION: Thanks to Eric and Amber Beels at DifMix.com ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Cult
Cult di giovedì 27/10/2022

Cult

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 57:26


Oggi a Cult: Gianni De Gregorio sul suo film "Astolfo", Roberto Sommella sulla serata "Europa e antiEuropa" all'Elfo Puccini, Ruben Jais sulla settimana verdiana dell'Orchestra Sinfonica di Milano, Peter Stein firma la regia di "Il compleanno" di Harold Pinter al Teatro Menotti, Ferdinando Bruni riprende "Kaddish" da Allen Ginsberg, la rubrica di lirica di Giovanni Chiodi... Cult è condotto da Ira Rubini e realizzato dalla redazione culturale di Radio Popolare. Cult è cinema, arti visive, musica, teatro, letteratura, filosofia, sociologia, comunicazione, danza, fumetti e graphic-novels… e molto altro! Cult è in onda dal lunedì al venerdì dalle 11.30 alle 12.30. La sigla di Cult è “Two Dots” di Lusine. CHIAMA IN DIRETTA: 02.33.001.001

Topic Lords
157. The Boy Who Cried ARG

Topic Lords

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 70:23


Support Topic Lords on Patreon and get episodes a week early! (https://www.patreon.com/topiclords) Lords: * Tyriq * https://twitter.com/FourbitFriday * https://frror.bandcamp.com/ * Chall * https://twitter.com/mrchrislhall Topics: * The future/present of Jim's mario videos. * https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3SbI8kec0Ntxnf9mof2tU-QZLQ0Mq6zd * Catatcomb Kids lore in the context of the fact that I like worldbuilding but find it hard to tell actual stories. * Bigger Luke * The Green Street Mortuary Marching Band. * http://www.syndicjournal.us/a-ferlinghetti-memorial-supplement-60-narrations/ferlinghetti-memorial-supplement-the-green-street-mortuary-marching-band/ * Have you seen any phantom kangaroos? And also: should I choose to believe in cryptids? If so, which ones? Microtopics: * Giving someone else's biography. * 7-Day Roguelikes. * Feeling ambiently like you are hanging out with somebody. * An emulator that works when you are not screen-capturing in OBS, but freezes when you are. * Making a backup of your Bowser's Fury save. * Video recording setup evolutions. * The pros and cons of extremely variable video lengths. * Playing Tony Hawk with Mario modded in. * What working on a Zelda game does to a person, psychologically. * Doing things that make people believe you're doing an ARG. * Twinbeard Rates Mario. * A robot co-host that eventually starts finishing your words for you. * Wanting to be a writer until you try writing. * A world that naturally develops in your brain. * How to tell stories. * Coming up with a bunch of characters that want things. * Reading stories in hopes that stories rub off on you. * Putting yourself in a situation where you write a lot of dialog trees. * How to make a platformer without doing any level design. * Expecting the same person to write the music and the lyrics. * The difference in the ideation process of world building and story telling. * A fact about the world that is true. * Captain Thalmoo surveying the battlefield. * Figuring out mid-burrito that there was a war, and deciding who won it. * A grain that flowers like lavender. * Searching Fiverr for Conlangers. * Paying $2 for something at the Dollar Store. * Logging Onto JimNet. * The Canon Bigger Luke Hypothesis vs. the Hamill Hypothesis. * The Inch-Luke Hypothesis. * Inch-Lukers. * Bigger Luke conspiracy theorists just assume that Han Solo stays the same size. * The real Skywalker was the bigger Luke all along. * The Boy Who Cried ARG. * Promising your wife that your son will not be Frog Fractions 3. * How many pages of laws a person is subject to at any given time. * Designing an ARG for your teenage son and he's like "ugh dad, again?" * Mortuary marching bands. * The patriarch who has just croaked. * The sister with the bent frame. * Uncle Louie with the wig. * Getting a free concert because someone died. * A funeral as a pleasant gathering of people you haven't seen in a long time. * Getting arrested for publishing Allen Ginsberg's "Howl." * Dressing up as an ancient sea captain. * How many funerals this marching band is playing today. * Hiring your nephew who has a Casiotone keyboard to play your funeral. * Hiring the Green Street Mortuary Marching Band to play at your kid's birthday but all they know how to play is Taps. * Bringing an axe to the funeral in case there's an emergency and you need to open up the coffin quickly. * If a guitar is an axe, a tuba is a bent axe. * Unbending the Tuba. * Why brass instruments are so twisty. * If you unwind a French horn it'll reach the moon and back. * The large flutes that are curly. * The son of a flautist. * A bookshelf that you blow into and music comes out. * Potential downsides of cryptids. * Wanting to take EMF meters into a creepy house even though you don't believe in ghosts. * The script scientists developed to let you fall in love at will. * How many blue coins out of five you would rate your wife. * Taking the Race IAT every week and analyzing your results over time.

Subliminal Jihad
#127 - THE PURPOSE OF A 9/11 IS WHAT IT DOES: A Subliminal History of Cybernetics, Pt. 2 (w/ Jay)

Subliminal Jihad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 141:04


Dimitri, Khalid, and Neuroscientist Jay (@The_Hague_ICC) continue exploring the complex history of cybernetics, including: “from electroshock to the psychedelic sixties”, Grey Walter's EEG research, the discovery of alpha/beta/delta brainwaves, the expectancy wave and readiness potential, Walter's robotic tortoises, the popularity of biofeedback today, the sus “world brain”, computer-brain interfaces for video gaming, SRI's “Changing Images of Man”, Ross Ashby, “forcing an environment to reveal itself” and the mass shooter phenomenon, feedback flicker and the Stroboscope, silk topper sicko William Seward Burroughs, Jr. and Allen Ginsberg's MK-Ultra LSD flicker experiments in Palo Alto, the California Ideology, the Dream Machine, the embrace of stroboscopic lights by Ken Kesey, Del Close, and The Grateful Dead, Stafford Beer and Chile's Project CYBERSYN, Beer's 2002 lecture about cybernetically understanding 9/11, the Satanic Panic artificial dialectic, cybernetics-as-dialectics, and counter-erming Western leftists who reject the synthesis of “parapolitical” and Historical Materialist analyses. For access to full-length premium episodes and the SJ Grotto of Truth Discord, subscribe to the Al-Wara' Frequency at patreon.com/subliminaljihad.

Textual Healing
S1E61 - Midnights with C.E. Hoffman

Textual Healing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 79:54


This is a special edition episode where I am joined by C.E. Hoffman to talk about Taylor Swift's new album, Midnights. We geek out about our favorite tracks, dive deep into how Taylor has grown as an artist, admit that neither of us were "swifties", and attempt to figure out what kind of literature Taylor Swift might be into. For those who don't know C.E. Hoffman: C.E. Hoffman is a published writer from Canada. Sluts and Whores, their #OwnVoices Urban Fantasy debut, was released Feb 2021 by Thurston Howl Publications. They've edited the e-zine Visceral Uterus since 2012. Meanwhile, their novels incubate. Inspirations run from Edith Wharton to Martin Millar to Zadie Smith. C's brain hosts tea parties for Haruki Murakami and C S Lewis. J D Salinger rants to Allen Ginsberg while Allen makes eyes at Irvine Welsh. Michelle Tea recites with Assata Shakur, Joy Harjo, and Saul Williams. Shakespeare's always there, but he's shy. So are the musicians. (MCR, Marianas Trench, The Hold Steady, Azealia Banks, Eminem, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Meredith Wilson…) C devours books. Favourites of late: There There by Tommy Orange, Jack Wang's We Two Alone, and Neil S Reddy's forthcoming JubJub Juice. They're psyched to read Second Bell by Gabriela Houston, whilst enjoying Girl, Woman, Other by Bernadine Evaristo. C writes about magic, sex, and death. They hug trees, love cats, and clearly dig Taylor Swift's new album. Website: https://cehoffman.net Twitter: https://twitter.com/CEHoffman2 Select Publications: https://razorcake.org/sneaker-club-outer-rooms-june-body-and-brocoy-at-duffys-tavern-toronto-on-nov-21-2019-by-c-e-hoffman/… https://maudlinhouse.net/gtfo-1/ https://punkpoetry.com/ce-hoffman/ https://thurstonhowlpub.storenvy.com/products/31670962-sluts-and-whores beats by God'Aryan Support Textual Healing with Mallory Smart by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/textual-healing

Radio Duna - Lugares Notables
Las cartas de amor entre Allen Ginsberg y Peter Orlovsky

Radio Duna - Lugares Notables

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022


1954 - Se conocen los poetas Allen Ginsberg y Peter Orlovsky. Diría el primero que desde ese mismo momento quedaron convertidos en un matrimonio. Fue un amor apasionado, complejo y promiscuo también, pero lejos de las drogas, los viajes y esa libertad obligada del mundo beat, como si hubieran hecho a su alrededor una burbuja protectora construida, en parte, con sus propias cartas. Ena la voz, Bárbara Espejo.

Things Observed
Process Church of the Final Judgement 2: The Satanic Undercurrent of the Sixties Counterculture and the Many Lives of the Process

Things Observed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 103:11


In this episode we pick up where we left off with the process church of the final judgement. We discuss how figures such as William Burroughs, Timothy Leary, Allen Ginsberg and other counterculture giants relate to the Process. We also discuss musician Gensis P-Orridge and the Temple Ov Psychick Youth the group modeled after the process and the sex magic and SRA allegations surrounding it this occult group. Put on your waders cause we're about to be knee deep in muck

The Hive Poetry Collective
S4.E32 Matt Sedillo with Victoria Bañales

The Hive Poetry Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 56:04


Matt Sedillo takes on the Western canon, discussing how many of the literary giants, such as Walt Whitman and Allen Ginsberg, disparaged Mexico/Mexicans. In his poems, Matt reclaims Chicanx/Latinx/Indigenous literary traditions and histories. Matt Sedillo has been described by critics as the "best political poet in America" as well as "the poet laureate of the struggle." Sedillo was the recipient of the 2017 Joe Hill Labor Poetry award, a panelist at the 2020 Texas book festival, and a participant in the 2011 San Francisco International Poetry Festival and the 2022 Elba Poetry Festival. Sedillo has appeared on CSPAN and has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, Axios, and the Associated Press among other publications. Sedillo has spoken at Casa de las Americas in Havana, Cuba, at numerous conferences and forums, such as the Association of Writers and Writing Programs, the National Conference on Race & Ethnicity in American Higher Education, the National Association of Chicana/Chicano Studies, the Left Forum, the US Social Forum, and at over a hundred universities and colleges, including the University of Cambridge, among many others. Matt Sedillo is the author of Mowing Leaves of Grass (FlowerSong Press, 2019) and City on the Second Floor (FlowerSong Press, 2022). Sedillo is the current literary director of The Mexican Cultural Institute of Los Angeles. https://www.mattsedillo.com/ https://www.lataco.com/best-american-political-poet-matt-sedillo/ https://www.hamptonthink.org/read/proletarian-poetry-returns-review-of-matt-sedillos-city-on-the-second-floor https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/09/11/i-like-you-am-made-of-stars-matt-sedillos-mowing-leaves-of-grass/

Inciting A Riot
What makes a good poem? with Taylor Mali

Inciting A Riot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 82:56


Poetry has a weird reputation in literature. I cannot think of a time when it felt cool to like poetry. All sorts of other genres and styles of writing have had their heyday - seriously who would've thought that "dinosaur smut" would bring in such big bucks? - but poetry seems continually relegated to being that thing you had to get through back in school. Taylor Mali has been on a mission to transform the way we think about, read, listen to, and consider poetry. He has been featured in Russell Simmons' Def Poetry, as well as the documentaries SlamNation and Slam Planet. He has shared stages with Billy Collins and Allen Ginsberg. He's published several books and been featured in even more anthologies, and he took time out of all that to have a conversation with me about bad poetry, good poetry, and all the poetry you aren't reading but should be. Social links: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/headonfirepod/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/headonfirepod TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@headonfirepod Support my work on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/headonfirepod Subscribe to the Head On Fire podcast Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/head-on-fire/id337689333 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4qTYYhCLMdFc4PhQmSL1Yh?si=5387b774ed6e4524 YouTube: https://youtube.com/c/HeadOnFirePod

Spotlight On
Steven Hall

Spotlight On

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 57:38


Steven Hall grew up in Scotland in the '60s, singing in church choirs and learning the bagpipes. "I was shy, and wanted to be cool and meet boys and girls, so I taught myself the guitar and learned the songs of The Beatles, Joni Mitchell, and Donovan." Steven emigrated to the US at age 15. After high school, he moved to New York where he hung out with artists, dancers, and musicians. There he met Allen Ginsberg who invited him to attend Naropa Buddhist University in Colorado. At Naropa Steven studied writing with Ginsberg and William Burroughs and music with Don Cherry. Upon returning to NYC "Allen introduced me to Arthur Russell – we became Allen's backup band, then Arthur asked me to sing and play guitar as a duo." Steven and Arthur performed together in downtown clubs like CBGBs, The Mudd Club, and Max's Kansas City as The Sailboats. Steven later sang on some of Arthur's disco hits like "Tell You Today" and "Is It All Over My Face?" After Arthur died, Steven and a bunch of mutual friends formed Arthur's Landing to remember Arthur by playing his music. Meanwhile, Nirosta Steel is the name Steven uses for his own music – queer love songs and remixes he creates for friends.DOWNLOAD THE PREMIERE OF A NEW TRACK MENTIONED IN THE PODCAST HERE The track is “PLEASE DON'T!” by Nirosta Steel, DROP OUT ORCHESTRA MIX featuring Nell Shakespeare!Learn more about Steven and hear more of his music: www.buddhistarmy.orghttps://buddhistarmy.bandcamp.com/musichttps://www.instagram.com/nirosta_steel/Foto of Steven Hall in the Spotlight On graphic is by Surachai Saengsuwan.Lean more about Lyte.Find more great podcasts from Osiris Media, the leading storyteller in music. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Spot Lyte On...
Steven Hall

Spot Lyte On...

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 57:38


Steven Hall grew up in Scotland in the '60s, singing in church choirs and learning the bagpipes. "I was shy, and wanted to be cool and meet boys and girls, so I taught myself the guitar and learned the songs of The Beatles, Joni Mitchell, and Donovan." Steven emigrated to the US at age 15. After high school, he moved to New York where he hung out with artists, dancers, and musicians. There he met Allen Ginsberg who invited him to attend Naropa Buddhist University in Colorado. At Naropa Steven studied writing with Ginsberg and William Burroughs and music with Don Cherry. Upon returning to NYC "Allen introduced me to Arthur Russell – we became Allen's backup band, then Arthur asked me to sing and play guitar as a duo." Steven and Arthur performed together in downtown clubs like CBGBs, The Mudd Club, and Max's Kansas City as The Sailboats. Steven later sang on some of Arthur's disco hits like "Tell You Today" and "Is It All Over My Face?" After Arthur died, Steven and a bunch of mutual friends formed Arthur's Landing to remember Arthur by playing his music. Meanwhile, Nirosta Steel is the name Steven uses for his own music – queer love songs and remixes he creates for friends.DOWNLOAD THE PREMIERE OF A NEW TRACK MENTIONED IN THE PODCAST HERE The track is “PLEASE DON'T!” by Nirosta Steel, DROP OUT ORCHESTRA MIX featuring Nell Shakespeare!Learn more about Steven and hear more of his music: www.buddhistarmy.orghttps://buddhistarmy.bandcamp.com/musichttps://www.instagram.com/nirosta_steel/Foto of Steven Hall in the Spotlight On graphic is by Surachai Saengsuwan.Lean more about Lyte.Find more great podcasts from Osiris Media, the leading storyteller in music. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Poem-a-Day
Andrea Carter Brown: "On Reading Allen Ginsberg's 'Homework'"

Poem-a-Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 4:27


Recorded by Andrea Carter Brown for Poem-a-Day, a series produced by the Academy of American Poets. Published on September 12, 2022. www.poets.org

The Forgotten Exodus

Home to one of the world's oldest Jewish communities, the story of Jews in Iran has been one of prosperity and suffering through the millennia. During the mid-20th century, when Jews were being driven from their homes in Arab lands, Iran assisted Jewish refugees in providing safe passage to Israel. Under the Shah, Israel was an important economic and political ally. Yet that all swiftly changed in the 1979 Iranian Revolution, which ushered in Islamic rule, while chants of “Death to Israel” and “Death to America” rang out from the streets of Tehran.   Author, journalist, and poet Roya Hakakian shares her personal story of growing up Jewish in Iran during the reign of the Shah and then Ayatollah Khomeini, which she wrote about in her memoir Journey From the Land of No. Joining Hakakian is Dr. Saba Soomekh, a professor of world religions and Middle Eastern history who wrote From the Shahs to Los Angeles: Three Generations of Iranian Jewish Women between Religion and Culture. She also serves as associate director of AJC Los Angeles, home to America's largest concentration of Persian Jewish immigrants.  In this sixth and final episode of the season, the Hakakian family's saga captures the common thread that has run throughout this series – when the history of an uprooted community is left untold, it can become vulnerable to others' narratives and assumptions, or become lost forever and forgotten. How do you leave behind a beloved homeland, safeguard its Jewish legacy, and figure out where you belong? ___ Show notes: Sign up to receive podcast updates here. Learn more about the series here. Song credits:  Chag Purim · The Jewish Guitar Project Hevenu Shalom · Violin Heart Pond5:  “Desert Caravans”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Tiemur Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837 “Oud Nation”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Haygaz Yossoulkanian (BMI), IPI#1001905418 “Persian”: Publisher: STUDEO88; Composer: Siddhartha Sharma “Meditative Middle Eastern Flute”: Publisher: N/; Composer: DANIELYAN ASHOT MAKICHEVICH (IPI NAME #00855552512), UNITED STATES BMI Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837 “Sentimental Oud Middle Eastern”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989. “Frontiers”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Pete Checkley (BMI), IPI#380407375 “Persian Investigative Mystery”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Peter Cole (BMI), IPI#679735384 “Persian Wind”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Sigma (SESAC); Composer: Abbas Premjee (SESAC), IPI#572363837 “Modern Middle Eastern Underscore”: Publisher: All Pro Audio LLC (611803484); Composer: Alan T Fagan (347654928) “Persian Fantasy Tavern”: Publisher: N/A; Composer: John Hoge “Adventures in the East”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI) Composer: Petar Milinkovic (BMI), IPI#00738313833.   ___ Episode Transcript: ROYA HAKAKIAN: In 1984, when my mother and I left and my father was left alone in Iran, that was yet another major dramatic and traumatic separation. When I look back at the events of 1979, I think, people constantly think about the revolution having, in some ways, blown up Tehran, but it also blew up families. And my own family was among them.  MANYA BRACHEAR PASHMAN: The world has overlooked an important episode in modern history: the 800,000 Jews who left or were driven from their homes in Arab nations and Iran in the mid-20th century. This series, brought to you by American Jewish Committee, explores that pivotal moment in Jewish history and the rich Jewish heritage of Iran and Arab nations as some begin to build relations with Israel. I'm your host, Manya Brachear Pashman. Join us as we explore family histories and personal stories of courage, perseverance, and resilience. This is The Forgotten Exodus.  Today's episode: Leaving Iran MANYA: Outside Israel, Iran has the largest Jewish population in the Middle East. Yes, the Islamic Republic of Iran. In 2022. Though there is no official census, experts estimate about 10,000 Jews now live in the region previously known as Persia.  But since the 1979 Iranian Revolution, Jews in Iran don't advertise their Jewish identity. They adhere to Iran's morality code: women stay veiled from head to toe and men and women who aren't married or related stay apart in public. They don't express support for Israel, they don't ask questions, and they don't disagree with the regime. One might ask, with all these don'ts, is this a way of living a Jewish life? Or a way to live – period?  For author, journalist, and poet Roya Hakakian and her family, the answer was ultimately no. Roya has devoted her life to being a fact-finder and truth-teller. A former associate producer at the CBS news show 60 Minutes and a Guggenheim Fellow, Roya has written two volumes of poetry in Persian and three books of nonfiction in English, the first of which was published in 2004 – Journey From the Land of No, a memoir about her charmed childhood and accursed adolescence growing up Jewish in Iran under two different regimes.  ROYA: It was hugely important for me to create an account that could be relied on as a historic document. And I did my best through being very, very careful about gathering, interviewing, talking to, observing facts, evidence, documents from everyone, including my most immediate members of my family, to do what we, both as reporters, but also as Jews, are called to do, which is to bear witness. No seemed to be the backdrop of life for women, especially of religious minorities, and, in my own case, Jewish background, and so I thought, what better way to name the book than to call it as what my experience had been, which was the constant nos that I heard. So, Land of No was Iran. MANYA: As a journalist, as a Jew, as a daughter of Iran, Roya will not accept no for an answer. After publishing her memoir, she went on to write Assassins of the Turquoise Palace, a meticulously reported book about a widely underreported incident. In 1992 at a Berlin restaurant, a terrorist attack by the Iranian proxy Hezbollah targeted and killed four Iranian-Kurdish exiles. The book highlighted Iran's enormous global footprint made possible by its terror proxies who don't let international borders get in the way of silencing Iran's critics.   Roya also co-founded the Iran Human Rights Documentation Center, an independent non-profit that reports on Iran's human rights abuses.  Her work has not prompted Ayatollah Khameini to publicly issue a fatwa against her  – like the murder order against Salman Rushdie issued by his predecessor. But in 2019, one of her teenage sons answered a knock at the door. It was the FBI, warning her that she was in the crosshairs of the Iranian regime's operatives in America. Most recently, Roya wrote A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious about the emotional roller coaster of arriving in America while still missing a beloved homeland, especially one where their community has endured for thousands of years. ROYA: I felt very strongly that one stays in one's homeland, that you don't just simply take off when things go wrong, that you stick around and try to figure a way through a bad situation. We came to the point where staying didn't seem like it would lead to any sort of real life and leaving was the only option. MANYA: The story of Jews in Iran, often referred to as Persia until 1935, is a millennia-long tale. A saga of suffering, repression, and persecution, peppered with brief moments of relief or at least relative peace – as long as everyone plays by the rules of the regime. SABA SOOMEKH: The history of Jews in Iran goes back to around 2,700 years ago. And a lot of people assume that Jews came to Iran, well at that time, it was called the Persian Empire, in 586 BCE, with the Babylonian exile. But Jews actually came a lot earlier, we're thinking 721-722 BCE with the Assyrian exile which makes us one of the oldest Jewish communities.  MANYA: That's Dr. Saba Soomekh, a professor of world religions and Middle Eastern history and the author of From the Shahs to Los Angeles: Three Generations of Iranian Jewish Women between Religion and Culture. She also serves as associate director of American Jewish Committee in Los Angeles, home to America's largest concentration of Persian Jewish immigrants. Saba's parents fled Iran in 1978, shortly before the revolution, when Saba and her sister were toddlers. She has devoted her career to preserving Iranian Jewish history.   Saba said Zoroastrian rulers until the 7th Century Common Era vacillated between tolerance and persecution of Jews. For example, according to the biblical account in the Book of Ezra, Cyrus the Great freed the Jews from Babylonian rule, granted all of them citizenship, and permitted them to return to Jerusalem to rebuild their Temple.  The Book of Esther goes on to tell the story of another Persian king, believed to be Xerxes I, whose closest adviser called Haman conspires to murder all the Jews – a plot that is foiled by his wife Queen Esther who is Jewish herself. Esther heroically pleads for mercy on behalf of her people – a valor that is celebrated on the Jewish holiday of Purim.  But by the time of the Islamic conquest in the middle of the 7th Century Common Era, the persecution had become so intense that Jews were hopeful about the new Arab Muslim regime, even if that meant being tolerated and treated as second-class citizens, or dhimmi status. But that status had a different interpretation for the Safavids. SABA: Really things didn't get bad for the Jews of the Persian Empire until the 16th century with the Safavid dynasty, because within Shia Islam in the Persian Empire, what they brought with them is this understanding of purity and impurity. And Jews were placed in the same category as dogs, pigs, and feces. They were seen as being religiously impure, what's referred to as najes. MANYA: Jews were placed in ghettos called mahaleh, where they wore yellow stars and special shoes to distinguish them from the rest of the population. They could not leave the mahaleh when it rained for fear that if water rolled off their bodies into the water system, it would render a Shia Muslim impure. For the same reason, they could not go to the bazaars for fear they might contaminate the food. They could not look Muslims in the eye. They were relegated to certain artisanal professions such as silversmithing and block printing – crafts that dirtied one's hands.  MANYA: By the 19th century, some European Jews did make their way to Persia to help. The Alliance Israélite Universelle, a Paris-based network of schools founded by French Jewish intellectuals, opened schools for Jewish children throughout the Middle East and North Africa, including within the mahalehs in Persia.  SABA: They saw themselves as being incredibly sophisticated because they were getting this, in a sense, secular European education, they were speaking French. The idea behind the Allianz schools was exactly that. These poor Middle Eastern Jews, one day the world is going to open up to them, their countries are going to become secular, and we need to prepare them for this, not only within the context of hygiene, but education, language.  And the Allianz schools were right when it came to the Persian Empire because who came into power was Reza Pahlavi, who was a Francophile. And he turned around and said, ‘Wow! Look at the population that speaks French, that knows European philosophy, etc. are the Jews.' He brought them out of the mahaleh, the Jewish ghettos, and said ‘I don't care about religion. Assimilate and acculturate. As long as you show, in a sense, devotion, and nationalism to the Pahlavi regime, which the Jews did—not all Jews—but a majority of them did. MANYA: Reza Pahlavi took control in 1925 and 16 years later, abdicated his throne to his son Muhammad Reza Pahlavi. In 1935, Persia adopted a new name: Iran. As king or the Shah, both father and son set Iran on a course of secularization and rapid modernization under which Jewish life and success seemed to flourish. The only condition was that religious observance was kept behind closed doors. SABA: The idea was that in public, you were secular and in private, you were a Jew. You had Shabbat, you only married a Jew, it was considered blasphemous if you married outside of the Jewish community. And it was happening because people were becoming a part of everyday schools, universities.  But that's why the Jewish day schools became so important. They weren't learning Judaism. What it did was ensure that in a secular Muslim society, that the Jewish kids were marrying within each other and within the community. It was, in a sense, the Golden Age. And that will explain to you why, unlike the early 1950s, where you had this exodus of Mizrahi Jews, Arab Jews from the Arab world and North Africa, you didn't really have that in Iran.  MANYA: In fact, Iran provided a safe passage to Israel for Jewish refugees during that exodus, specifically those fleeing Iraq. The Pahlavi regime considered Israel a critical ally in the face of pan-Arab fervor and hostility in the region. Because of the Arab economic boycott, Israel needed energy sources and Iran needed customers for its oil exports.  A number of Israelis even moved to Tehran, including farmers from kibbutzim who had come to teach agriculture, and doctors and nurses from Hadassah Hospital who had come to teach medicine.  El Al flew in and out of Tehran airport, albeit from a separate terminal. Taking advantage of these warm relations between the two countries, Roya recalls visiting aunts, uncles, and cousins in Israel.  ROYA: We arrived, and my mom and dad did what all visiting Jews from elsewhere do. They dropped to their knees, and they started kissing the ground. I did the same, and it was so moving. Israel was the promised land, we thought about Israel, we dreamed about Israel. But, at the same time, we were Iranians and, and we were living in Iran, and things were good.  This seems to non-Iranian Jews an impossibility. But I think for most of us, it was the way things were. We lived in the country where we had lived for, God knows how many years, and there was this other place that we somehow, in the back of our minds thought we would be going to, without knowing exactly when, but that it would be the destination. MANYA: Relations between the Shah and America flourished as well. In 1951, a hugely popular politician by the name of Mohammad Mosaddegh became prime minister and tried to institute reforms. His attempts to nationalize the oil industry and reduce the monarchy's authority didn't go over well. American and British intelligence backed a coup that restored the Shah's power. Many Iranians resented America's meddling, which became a rallying cry for the revolution. U.S. officials have since expressed regret for the CIA's involvement.  In November 1977, President Jimmy Carter welcomed the Shah and his wife to Washington, D.C., to discuss peace between Egypt and Israel, nuclear nonproliferation, and the energy crisis.  As an extension of these warm relations, the Shah sent many young Iranians to America to enhance their university studies, exposing them to Western ideals and values.  Meanwhile, a savvy fundamentalist cleric was biding his time in a Paris basement. It wouldn't be long before relations crumbled between Iran and Israel, Iran and the U.S,. and Iran and its Jews.  Roya recalls the Hakakian house at the corner of Alley of the Distinguished in Tehran as a lush oasis surrounded by fragrant flowers, full of her father's poetry, and brimming with family memories. Located in the heart of a trendy neighborhood, across the street from the Shah's charity organization, the tall juniper trees, fragrant honeysuckle, and gold mezuzah mounted on the door frame set it apart from the rest of the homes.  Roya's father, Haghnazar, was a poet and a respected headmaster at a Hebrew school. Roya, which means dream in Persian, was a budding poet herself with the typical hopes and dreams of a Jewish teenage girl.  ROYA: Prior to the revolution, life in an average Tehran Hebrew Day School looked very much like life in a Hebrew Day School anywhere else. In the afternoons we had all Hebrew and Jewish studies. We used to put on a Purim show every year. I wanted to be Esther. I never got to be Esther. We had emissaries, I think a couple of years, from Israel, who came to teach us how to do Israeli folk dance. MANYA: There were moments when Roya recalls feeling self-conscious about her Jewishness, particularly at Passover. That's when the family spent two weeks cleaning, demonstrating they weren't najes, or dirty Jews. The work was rewarded when the house filled with the fragrance of cumin and saffron and Persian dishes flowed from the kitchen, including apple and plum beef stew, tarragon veal balls stuffed with raisins, and rice garnished with currants and slivers of almonds.  When her oldest brother Alberto left to study in America, a little fact-finding work on Roya's part revealed that his departure wasn't simply the pursuit of a promising opportunity. As a talented cartoonist whose work had been showcased during an exhibition in Tehran, his family feared Alberto's pen might have gone too far, offending the Pahlavi regime and drawing the attention of the Shah's secret police.  Reports of repression, rapid modernization, the wide gap between Tehran's rich and the rest of the country's poor, and a feeling that Iranians weren't in control of their own destiny all became ingredients for a revolution, stoked by an exiled cleric named Ruhollah Khomeini who was recording cassette tapes in a Paris basement and circulating them back home.  SABA: He would just sit there and go on and on for hours, going against the Shah and West toxification. And then the recordings ended up in Iran. He wasn't even in Iran until the Shah left. MANYA: Promises of democracy and equality galvanized Iranians of all ages to overthrow the Shah in February 1979. Even the CIA was surprised.  SABA: I think a lot of people didn't believe it. Because number one, the Shah, the son, was getting the most amount of military equipment from the United States than anyone in the Middle East and in the Persian Gulf. And the idea was: you protect us in the Gulf, and we will give you whatever you need. So they never thought that a man with a beard down to his knee was able to overthrow this regime that was being propped up and supported by America, and also the Europeans. Khomeini comes in and represents himself as a person for everyone. And he was brilliant in the way he spoke about it. And the reason why this revolution was also successful was that it wasn't just religious people who supported Khomeini, there was this concept you had, the men with the turbans, meaning the religious people, and the you know, the bow ties or the ties, meaning the secular man, a lot of them who were sent by the Shah abroad to Europe and America to get an education, who came back, saw democracy there, and wanted it for their country.  MANYA: Very few of the revolutionaries could predict that Tehran was headed in the opposite direction and was about to revert to 16th Century Shia Islamic rule. For almost a year, Tehran and the rest of the nation were swept up in revolutionary euphoria.  Roya recalls how the flag remained green, white, and red, but an Allah insignia replaced its old sword-bearing lion. New currency was printed, with portraits bearing beards and turbans. An ode to Khomeini became the new national anthem. While the Shah had escaped on an Air France flight, corpses of his henchmen graced the front pages of newspapers alongside smiling executioners. All celebrated, until the day one of the corpses was Habib Elghanian, the Jewish philanthropist who supported all of Iran's Hebrew schools. Charged and convicted as a Zionist spy.  Elders in the community remembered the insurmountable accusations of blood libel during darker times for Iran's Jews. But younger generations like Roya's, who had not lived through the eras of more ruthless antisemitism and persecution, continued to root for the revolution, regardless of its victims. Meanwhile, Roya's Jewish day school was taken over by a new veiled headmistress who replaced Hebrew lessons with other kinds of religious instruction, and required robes and headscarves for all the students.  ROYA: In the afternoons, from then on, we used to have lessons in a series of what she called: ‘Is religion something that you inherit, or is it something that you choose?' And so I think the intention, clearly, was to convince us that we didn't need to inherit our religions from our parents and ancestors, that we ought to consider better choices. MANYA: But when the headmistress cut short the eight-day Passover break, that was the last straw for Roya and her classmates. Their revolt got her expelled from school.  Though Jews did not universally support Khomeini, some saw themselves as members of the Iranian Communist, or Tudeh Party. They opposed the Shah and the human rights abuses of his monarchy and cautiously considered Khomeini the better option, or at least the lesser of two evils. Alarmed by the developments such as Elghanian's execution and changes like the ones at Roya's school, Jewish community leaders traveled to the Shia holy city of Qom to assure the Supreme Leader of their loyalty to Iran.  SABA: They did this because they wanted to make sure that they protected the Jewish community that was left in Iran. Khomeini made that distinction: ‘I am not against Jews, I'm against Zionists. You could be Jewish in this country. You cannot be a Zionist in this country.'  MANYA: But that wasn't the only change. Right away, the Family Protection Law was reversed, lifting a law against polygamy, giving men full rights in divorce and custody, and lowering the marriage age for girls to nine. Women were banned from serving as judges, and beaches and sports events were segregated by gender.  But it took longer to shut down universities, albeit for only two years, segregate public schools by gender, and stone to death women who were found to have committed adultery. Though Khomeini was certainly proving that he was not the man he promised to be, he backed away from those promises gradually – one brutal crackdown at a time. As a result, the trickle of Jews out of Iran was slow.  ROYA: My father thought, let's wait a few years and see what happens. In retrospect, I think the overwhelming reason was probably that nobody believed that things had changed, and so drastically. It seemed so unbelievable. I mean, a country that had been under monarchy for 2,500 years, couldn't simply see it all go and have a whole new system put in place, especially when it was such a radical shift from what had been there before. So I think, in many ways, we were among the unbelievers, or at least my father was, we thought it could never be, it would not happen. My father proved to be wrong, nothing changed for the better, and the conditions continued to deteriorate. So, so much catastrophe happened in those few years that Iran just simply was steeped into a very dark, intense, and period of political radicalism and also, all sorts of economic shortages and pressures. And so the five years that we were left behind, that we stayed back, changed our perspective on so many things. MANYA: In November 1979, a group of radical university students who supported the Iranian Revolution, took over the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, seized hostages, and held them for 444 days until President Ronald Reagan's inauguration on January 20, 1981. During the hostages' captivity, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein invaded Iran. The conflict that ensued for eight years created shortages on everything from dairy products to sanitary napkins. Mosques became distribution centers for rations. ROYA: We stood in line for hours and hours for eggs, and just the very basic things of daily life. And then it became also clear that religious minorities, including Jews, would no longer be enjoying the same privileges as everyone else. There were bombings that kept coming closer and closer to Tehran, which is where we lived. It was very clear that half of my family that was in the United States could not and would not return, because they were boys who would have been conscripted to go to war. Everything had just come apart in a way that was inconceivable to think that they would change for the better again. MANYA: By 1983, new laws had been passed instituting Islamic dress for all women – violations of which earned a penalty of 74 lashes. Other laws imposed an Islamic morality code that barred co-ed gatherings. Roya and her friends found refuge in the sterile office building that housed the Jewish Iranian Students Association. But she soon figured out that the regime hadn't allowed it to remain for the benefit of the Jewish community. It functioned more like a ghetto to keep Jews off the streets and out of their way. Even the activities that previously gave her comfort were marred by the regime. Poetry books were redacted. Mountain hiking trails were arbitrarily closed to mourn the deaths of countless clerics.  SABA: Slowly what they realize, when Khomeini gained power, was that he was not the person that he claimed to be. He was not this feminist, if anything, all this misogynistic rule came in, and a lot of people realize they, in a sense, got duped and he stole the revolution from them. MANYA: By 1984, the war with Iraq had entered its fourth year. But it was no longer about protecting Iran from Saddam Hussein. Now the Ayatollah wanted to conquer Baghdad, then Jerusalem where he aspired to deliver a sermon from the Temple Mount. Meanwhile, Muslim soldiers wounded in the war chose to bleed rather than receive treatment from Jewish doctors. Boys as young as 12 – regardless of faith – were drafted and sent on suicide missions to open the way for Iranian troops to do battle.  SABA: They were basically used as an army of children that the bombs would detonate, their parents would get a plastic key that was the key to heaven. And the bombs would detonate, and then the army would come in Iranian army would come in. And so that's when a lot of the Persian parents, the Jewish parents freaked out. And that's when they were like: we're getting out of here.  MANYA: By this time, the Hakakian family had moved into a rented apartment building and Roya was attending the neighborhood school. Non-Muslim students were required to take Koran classes and could only use designated water fountains and bathrooms.  As a precaution, Roya's father submitted their passports for renewal. Her mother's application was denied; Roya's passport was held for further consideration; her father's was confiscated.  One night, Roya returned home to find her father burning her books and journals on the balcony of their building. The bonfire of words was for the best, he told her. And at long last, so was leaving. With the help of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, Roya and her mother, Helen, fled to Geneva, and after wandering in Europe for several months, eventually reunited with her brothers in the United States. Roya did not see her father again for five years. Still unable to acquire a passport, he was smuggled out of Iran into Pakistan, on foot.  ROYA: My eldest brother left to come to America in the mid-70s. There was a crack in the body of the family then. But then came 1979, and my two other brothers followed. And so we were apart for all those very, very formative years. And then, in 1984, when my mother and I left and my father was left alone in Iran, that was yet another major dramatic and traumatic separation. So, you know, it's interesting that when I look back at the events of 1979, I think, people constantly think about the revolution having, in some ways, blown up Tehran, but it also blew up families. And my own family was among them.  MANYA: While her father's arrival in America was delayed, Roya describes her arrival in stages. She first arrived as a Jewish refugee in 1985 and found her place doing what she had always done – writing in Persian – rebuilding a body of work that had been reduced to ashes.  ROYA: As a teen I had become a writer, people were encouraging me. So, I continued to do it. It was the thing I knew how to do. And it gave me a sense of grounding and identity. So, I kept on doing it, and it kind of worked its magic, as I suppose good writing does for all writers. It connected me to a new community of people who read Persian and who appreciated what I was trying to do. And I found that with each book that I write, I find a new tribe for myself.  MANYA: She arrived again once she learned English. In her first year at Brooklyn College, she tape-recorded her professors to listen again later. She eventually took a course with renowned poet Allen Ginsberg, whose poetry was best known for its condemnation of persecution and imperial politics and whose 1950s poem “Howl” tested the boundaries of America's freedom of speech.  ROYA: When I mastered the language enough to feel comfortable to be a writer once more, then I found a footing and through Allen and a community of literary people that I met here began to kind of foresee a possibility of writing in English. MANYA: There was also her arrival to an American Jewish community that was largely unaware of the role Jews played in shaping Iran long before the advent of Islam. Likewise, they were just as unaware of the role Iran played in shaping ancient Jewish life. They were oblivious to the community's traditions, and the indignities and abuses Iranian Jews had suffered, continue to suffer, with other religious minorities to keep those traditions alive in their homeland.   ROYA: People would say, ‘Oh, you have an accent, where are you from?' I would say, ‘Iran,' and the Jews at the synagogue would say, ‘Are there Jews in Iran?' MANYA: In Roya's most recent book A Beginner's Guide to America, a sequel of sorts to her memoir, she reflects on the lessons learned and the observations made once she arrived in the U.S. She counsels newcomers to take their time answering what might at first seem like an ominous or loaded question. Here's an excerpt: ROYA: “In the early days after your arrival, “Where are you from?” is above all a reminder of your unpreparedness to speak of the past. You have yet to shape your story – what you saw, why you left, how you left, and what it took to get here. This narrative is your personal Book of Genesis: the American Volume, the one you will sooner or later pen, in the mind, if not on the page. You must take your time to do it well and do it justice.” MANYA: No two immigrants' experiences are the same, she writes. The only thing they all have in common is that they have been uprooted and the stories of their displacement have been hijacked by others' assumptions and agendas. ROYA: I witnessed, as so many other Iranian Jews witness, that the story of how we came, why we came, who we had been, was being narrated by those who had a certain partisan perspective about what the history of what Jewish people should be, or how this history needs to be cast, for whatever purposes they had. And I would see that our own recollections of what had happened were being shaded by, or filtered through views other than our own, or facts other than our own. MANYA: As we wrap up this sixth and final episode of the first season of The Forgotten Exodus, it is clear that the same can be said about the stories of the Jewish people. No two tales are the same. Jews have lived everywhere, and there are reasons why they don't anymore. Some fled as refugees. Some embarked as dreamers. Some forged ahead without looking back. Others counted the days until they could return home. What ties them together is their courage, perseverance, and resilience–whether they hailed from Eastern Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, or parts beyond. These six episodes offer only a handful of those stories–shaped by memories and experiences. ROYA: That became sort of an additional incentive, if not burden for me to, to be a witness for several communities, to tell the story of what happened in Iran for American audiences, to Jews, to non-Iranian Jews who didn't realize that there were Jews in Iran, but also to record the history, according to how I had witnessed it, for ourselves, to make sure that it goes down, as I knew it. MANYA: Iranian Jews are just one of the many Jewish communities who in the last century left their homes in the Middle East to forge new lives for themselves and future generations.  Many thanks to Roya for sharing her family's story and for helping us wrap up this season of The Forgotten Exodus. If you're listening for the first time, check out our previous episodes on Jews from Iraq, Yemen, Egypt, Libya, and Sudan. Go to ajc.org/theforgottenexodus where you'll also find transcripts, show notes, and family photos. There are still so many stories to tell. Stay tuned in coming months. Does your family have roots in North Africa or the Middle East? One of the goals of this series is to make sure we gather these stories before they are lost. Too many times during my reporting, I encountered children and grandchildren who didn't have the answers to my questions because they never asked. That's why one of the goals of this project is to encourage you to find more of these stories.  Call The Forgotten Exodus hotline. Tell us where your family is from and something you'd like for our listeners to know such as how you've tried to keep the traditions and memories alive. Call 212.891.1336 and leave a message of 2 minutes or less. Be sure to leave your name and where you live now. You can also send an email to theforgottenexodus@ajc.org and we'll be in touch. Tune in every Friday for AJC's weekly podcast about global affairs through a Jewish lens, People of the Pod, brought to you by the same team behind The Forgotten Exodus.  Atara Lakritz is our producer, CucHuong Do is our production manager. T.K. Broderick is our sound engineer. Special thanks to Jon Schweitzer, Sean Savage, Ian Kaplan, and so many of our colleagues, too many to name, for making this series possible. And extra special thanks to David Harris, who has been a constant champion for making sure these stories do not remain untold. You can follow The Forgotten Exodus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can sign up to receive updates at AJC.org/forgottenexodussignup. The views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC.  You can reach us at theforgottenexodus@ajc.org. 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