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Political ideology and socioeconomic system advocating common ownership without classes, money or the state

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Best podcasts about communists

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Latest podcast episodes about communists

The Charlie Kirk Show
Translating Biden's Bizarre Presser + Taking on Chinese Communists with Senator Tom Cotton

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 33:44


Following a rambling marathon press conference from Joe Biden—only the second in his one-year-old presidency—Charlie highlights the most troubling moments, attempts to make sense of the incomprehensible, and does his best body-language analysis of our Septuagenarian Gaslighter-In-Chief. He's also joined by Senator Tom Cotton to talk GOP Politics, CCP Genocide, and to detail his important fight to protect free speech on college campuses.  Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Acid Horizon
The Refusal of Work in Guattari and Negri's 'Communists Like Us'

Acid Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 63:46


On this episode, the gang takes a look at Antonio Negri's and Felix Guattari's 1985 cowritten essay, “Communists Like US”. Guattari and Negri take a look at the state of socialist governmentality and examine the causes of the failure of the worker movement in Italy in the late seventies. The outlook seems bleak, but in these developments Negri and Guattari identify various communist potentialities in various opposition movements. Through a new pluralist approach, one that affirms singularities and seeks newer registers of solidarity, they see a promising future. This episode also explores the various schisms, some of which manifest in the discussion itself, that exist within the autonomist movements themselves. Whether you want to affirm the multitude or spread anarchy, this episode has something for you.Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/acidhorizonpodcastMerch: http://www.crit-drip.comApple Podcasts: https://tinyurl.com/169wvvhiHappy Hour at Hippel's (Adam's blog): https://happyhourathippels.wordpress.comDestratified (Matt's Blog): https://destratified.com/​Revolting Bodies (Will's Blog): https://revoltingbodies.com​Split Infinities (Craig's Substack): https://splitinfinities.substack.com/​Music: https://sereptie.bandcamp.com/Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/acidhorizonpodcast)

Warriors and Wildmen Podcast
E238: Life and Faith Behind the Berlin Wall: An Interview With Ingolf Schmidt

Warriors and Wildmen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 71:37


In this riveting interview, Rich speaks with Ingolf Schmidt, a pastor who lived in East Germany under communism. Ingolf talks about life and faith being raised by a Communist military father and the contrast of American freedom then and now.   What do you think about the episode?  Comment below or email us: http://waw.fm/hello

People's History of Ideas Podcast
The Wages of Revolution: Life Underground in Shanghai in the Late 1920s (Part 3)

People's History of Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 24:07


Discussing pay for professional revolutionaries, the role of servants in the lives of Communist leaders, and the Comintern in Shanghai.Further reading:Patricia Stranahan, Underground: The Shanghai Communist Party and the Politics of Survival, 1927-1937Elizabeth Perry, Shanghai on Strike: The Politics of Chinese LaborWang Fan-hsi [Wang Fanxi], Memoirs of a Chinese RevolutionaryGavin McCrea, Mrs. EngelsFrederick Litten, “The Noulens Affair” Anna Belogurova, “The Civic World of International Communism: Taiwanese communists and the Comintern (1921-1931)”Onimaru Takeshi, “Shanghai Connection: The Construction and Collapse of the Comintern Network in East and Southeast Asia”Jospehine Fowler, “From East to West and West to East: Ties of Solidarity in the Pan-Pacific Revolutionary Trade Union Movement, 1923-1934”Josephine Fowler, Japanese and Chinese Immigrant Activists: Organizing in American and International Communist Movements, 1919–1933Frederic Wakeman, Policing Shanghai, 1927-1937Some names from this episode:Liu Shaoqi, Leading CommunistHe Baozhen, Communist cadre and wife of Liu ShaoqiLi Dazhao, Co-founder of Chinese Communist PartyQu Qiubai, Top Communist leaderWang Fanxi, A member of the Central Committee Organization BureauZhang Guotao, Leading CommunistPeng Shuzi, Leading Communist expelled in 1929Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=DACDMMMEASJVJ)

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Gordon Chang, Bill Walton and Yoram Ettinger

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 52:58


GORDON CHANG, Contributor, Gatestone Institute, Newsweek, Author, “The Coming Collapse of China,” “Nuclear Showdown: North Korea Takes the World, “Losing South Korea,” and “The Great US-China Tech War,” @Gordongchang Gordon Chang discusses the various dangers athletes and spectators may be subjected to should they participate in the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympic Games Chang makes the case of decoupling from China: “You're not really looking at market fundamentals anymore, you're looking at political decisions of a Communist regime” Chang: China has somewhere between 35 to 45 million more men than women BILL WALTON, Chairman, Resolute Protector Foundation, Host, The Bill Walton Show, Senior Fellow, Discovery Institute's Center on Wealth, Poverty and Morality, @billwaltonshow Bill Walton responds to China's declining birthrates: “Population is one of the strong indicators that's linked to economic growth…China's curve's moving the other direction” What implications will President Joe Biden's nomination of Sarah Raskin to serve as the next vice chair for supervision at the U.S. Federal Reserve have on monetary policy moving forward? Will Raskin push the Fed to write about climate change as a “systemic risk” Walton: Larry Fink is a genius with money, not at climate change or public policy AMB. YORAM ETTINGER, Former Minister for Congressional Affairs, Embassy of Israel in the U.S., Former Consultant to Israeli and US legislators, @YoramEttinger Amb. Yoram Ettinger discusses how the Iranian regime has not changed since revolution Yoram delves into the wider relationship between the Palestinians and the international Arab community at larger What is the current state of Israel-China relations?

SkyPilot: Faith Quest
96 - Was Jesus A Communist?

SkyPilot: Faith Quest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 16:56


I have heard some Christians offer arguments to support their belief that Jesus was a Communist. It is an interesting question because the simple act of asking it has the power to agitate some believers beyond the capacity for rational thought.  This podcast takes the question and offers a definitive answer - while explaining why someone might ask the question in the first place. ——————————-———————————————————————————Have a spiritual, theological, or religious question you would like me to tackle?Contact me via email:    Dan@skypilot.zoneAnd be sure to check me out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SkyPilotFaithQuest...........................................................................................Music: Composed for SkyPilot: Faith Quest by Arlan Sunnarborg

The Jesse Kelly Show
TV: The Communist System

The Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 43:17


The cabal of institutions in America, otherwise known as The System, is becoming more reminiscent of a communist country each and every day. What's more frightening is that the FBI has seemingly been the poster child for this corruption. Jesse Kelly has the latest chilling example. Jesse also sounds off on the upcoming Beijing Olympics and slams the United States government for sending its athletes to a communist country. Plus, Five For Fighting joins the show to explain how an Anti-Biden music video got censored by big tech.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Midnight Train Podcast
The Shocking History of Execution.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 122:40


Tonight we are going to tell you a tale. A superb tale. A tale as old as time that takes us from the beginnings of civilization until today. This tale will thrill you and chill you. It may elicit feelings of dread and sadness. It may make you angry.  At times it may make you uneasily laugh like the friend at school that was kicked in the balls but couldn't show his weakness. It's a subject that people continually argue about and debate with savage ferocity. Tonight we are talking about executions! We'll talk about the methods and the reasons behind executions throughout the years. Then we'll talk about some famous executions, as well as some of the more fucked up ones. And by fucked up, we mean botched. Bad stuff. This episode isn't meant to be a debate for or against executions but merely to discuss them and the crazy shit surrounding them. So with all that being said, Let's rock and roll!           Capital punishment has been practiced in the history of virtually all known societies and places. The first established death penalty laws date as far back as the Eighteenth Century B.C. in the Code of King Hammurabi of Babylon, which codified the death penalty for 25 different crimes.  The Code of Hammurabi was one of the earliest and most complete written legal codes and was proclaimed by the Babylonian king Hammurabi, who reigned from 1792 to 1750 B.C. Hammurabi expanded the city-state of Babylon along the Euphrates River to unite all of southern Mesopotamia. The Hammurabi code of laws, a collection of 282 rules, established standards for commercial interactions and set fines and punishments to meet the requirements of justice. Hammurabi's Code was carved onto a massive, finger-shaped black stone stele (pillar) that was looted by invaders and finally rediscovered in 1901. The text, compiled at the end of Hammurabi's reign, is less a proclamation of principles than a collection of legal precedents, set between prose celebrating Hammurabi's just and pious rule. Hammurabi's Code provides some of the earliest examples of the doctrine of “lex talionis,” or the laws of retribution, sometimes better known as “an eye for an eye the greatest soulfly song ever!   The Code of Hammurabi includes many harsh punishments, sometimes demanding the removal of the guilty party's tongue, hands, breasts, eye, or ear. But the code is also one of the earliest examples of an accused person being considered innocent until proven guilty. The 282 laws are all written in an “if-then form.” For example, if a man steals an ox, he must pay back 30 times its value. The laws range from family law to professional contracts and administrative law, often outlining different standards of justice for the three classes of Babylonian society—the propertied class, freedmen, and slaves.   A doctor's fee for curing a severe wound would be ten silver shekels for a gentleman, five shekels for a freedman, and two shekels for a slave. So, it was less expensive when you were a lower-class citizen. Penalties for malpractice followed the same scheme: a doctor who killed a wealthy patient would have his hands cut off, while only financial restitution was required if the victim was a slave. Crazy!   Some examples of the death penalty laws at this time are as follows:         If a man accuses another man and charges him with homicide but cannot bring proof against him, his accuser shall be killed. Holy shit.         If a man breaks into a house, they shall kill him and hang him in front of that same house.          The death penalty was also part of the Hittite Code in the 14th century B.C., but only partially. The most severe offenses typically were punished through enslavement, although crimes of a sexual nature often were punishable by death. The Hittite laws, also known as the Code of the Nesilim, constitute an ancient legal code dating from c. 1650 – 1500 BCE. The Hittite laws were kept in use for roughly 500 years, and many copies show that other than changes in grammar, what might be called the 'original edition' with its apparent disorder, was copied slavishly; no attempt was made to 'tidy up' by placing even apparent afterthoughts in a more appropriate position.    The Draconian constitution, or Draco's code, was a written law code enforced by Draco near the end of the 7th century BC; its composition started around 621BC. It was written in response to the unjust interpretation and modification of oral law by Athenian aristocrats. Aristotle, the chief source for knowledge of Draco, claims that he was the first to write Athenian laws and that Draco established a constitution enfranchising hoplites, the lower class soldiers. The Draconian laws were most noteworthy for their harshness; they were written in blood rather than ink. Death was prescribed for almost all criminal offenses. Solon, who was the magistrate in 594 BCE, later repealed Draco's code and published new laws, retaining only Draco's homicide statutes.   In the 5th century B.C., the Roman Law of the Twelve Tables also contained the death penalty. Death sentences were carried out by such means as beheading, boiling in oil, burying alive, burning, crucifixion, disembowelment, drowning, flaying alive, hanging, impalement, stoning, strangling, being thrown to wild animals, and quartering. We'll talk more about that later. The earliest attempt by the Romans to create a code of law was the Laws of the Twelve Tables. A commission of ten men (Decemviri) was appointed (c. 455 B.C.) to draw up a code of law binding on patrician and plebeian and which consuls would have to enforce. The commission produced enough statutes to fill ten bronze tablets.    Mosaic Law codified many capital crimes. There is evidence that Jews used many different techniques, including stoning, hanging, beheading, crucifixion (copied from the Romans), throwing the criminal from a rock, and sawing asunder. The most infamous execution of history occurred approximately 29 AD with the crucifixion of that one guy, Jesus Christ, outside Jerusalem. About 300 years later, Emperor Constantine, after converting to Christianity, abolished crucifixion and other cruel death penalties in the Roman Empire. In 438, the Code of Theodosius made more than 80 crimes punishable by death.    Britain influenced the colonies more than any other country and has a long history of punishment by death. About 450 BC, the death penalty was often enforced by throwing the condemned into a quagmire, which is not only the character from Family Guy, and another word for dilemma but in this case is a soft boggy area of land. By the 10th Century, hanging from the gallows was the most frequent execution method. William the Conqueror opposed taking life except in war and ordered no person to be hanged or executed for any offense. Nice guy, right? However, he allowed criminals to be mutilated for their crimes.    During the middle ages, capital punishment was accompanied by torture. Most barons had a drowning pit as well as gallows, and they were used for major as well as minor crimes. For example, in 1279, two hundred and eighty-nine Jews were hanged for clipping coins. What the fuck is that you may be wondering. Well, Clipping was taking a small amount of metal off the edge of hand-struck coins. Over time, the precious metal clippings could be saved up and melted into bullion (a lump of precious metal) to be sold or used to make new coins. Under Edward I, two gatekeepers were killed because the city gate had not been closed in time to prevent the escape of an accused murderer. Burning was the punishment for women's high treason, and men were hanged, drawn, and quartered. Beheading was generally accepted for the upper classes. One could be burned to death for marrying a Jew. Pressing became the penalty for those who would not confess to their crimes—the executioner placed heavy weights on the victim's chest until death. On the first day, he gave the victim a small quantity of bread, on the second day a small drink of bad water, and so on until he confessed or died. Under the reign of Henry VIII, the number of those put to death is estimated as high as 72,000. Boiling to death was another penalty approved in 1531, and there are records to show some people cooked for up to two hours before death took them. When a woman was burned, the executioner tied a rope around her neck when she was connected to the stake. When the flames reached her, she could be strangled from outside the ring of fire. However, this often failed, and many were burnt alive.   In Britain, the number of capital offenses continually increased until the 1700's when two hundred and twenty-two crimes were punishable by death. These included stealing from a house for forty shillings, stealing from a shop the value of five shillings, robbing a rabbit warren, cutting down a tree, and counterfeiting tax stamps. However, juries tended not to convict when the penalty was significant, and the crime was not. Reforms began to take place. In 1823, five laws were passed, removing about a hundred crimes from the death penalty. Between 1832 and 1837, many capital offenses were swept away. In 1840, there was a failed attempt to abolish all capital punishment. Through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, more and more capital punishments were abolished, not only in Britain but also all across Europe; until today, only a few European countries retain the death penalty.   The first recorded execution in the English American colonies was in 1608 when officials executed George Kendall of Virginia for supposedly plotting to betray the British to the Spanish. In 1612, Virginia's governor, Sir Thomas Dale, implemented the Divine, Moral, and Martial Laws that made death the penalty for even minor offenses such as stealing grapes, killing chickens, killing dogs or horses without permission, or trading with Indians. Seven years later, these laws were softened because Virginia feared that no one would settle there. Well, no shit.   In 1622, the first legal execution of a criminal, Daniel Frank, occurred in, of course, Virginia for the crime of theft. Some colonies were very strict in using the death penalty, while others were less so. In Massachusetts Bay Colony, the first execution was in 1630, but the earliest capital statutes did not occur until later. Under the Capital Laws of New England that went into effect between 1636-1647, the death penalty was set forth for pre-meditated murder, sodomy, witchcraft, adultery, idolatry, blasphemy, assault in anger, rape, statutory rape, manstealing, perjury in a capital trial, rebellion, manslaughter, poisoning, and bestiality. A scripture from the Old Testament accompanied early laws. By 1780, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts only recognized seven capital crimes: murder, sodomy, burglary, buggery, arson, rape, and treason. And for those wondering, The Buggery Act of 1533, formally An Act for the punishment of the vice of Buggerie, was an Act of the Parliament of England that was passed during the reign of Henry VIII. It was the country's first civil sodomy law.   The Act defined buggery as an unnatural sexual act against the will of God and Man. This term was later determined by the courts to include only anal penetration and bestiality.   The New York colony instituted the so-called Duke's Laws of 1665. This list of laws directed the death penalty for denial of the true God, pre-meditated murder, killing someone who had no weapon of defense, killing by lying in wait or by poisoning, sodomy, buggery, kidnapping, perjury in a capital trial, traitorous denial of the king's rights or raising arms to resist his authority, conspiracy to invade towns or forts in the colony and striking one's mother or father (upon complaint of both). The two colonies that were more lenient concerning capital punishment were South Jersey and Pennsylvania. In South Jersey, there was no death penalty for any crime, and there were only two crimes, murder, and treason, punishable by death. Way to go, Jersey Raccoons!   Some states were more severe. For example, by 1837, North Carolina required death for the crimes of murder, rape, statutory rape, slave-stealing, stealing banknotes, highway robbery, burglary, arson, castration, buggery, sodomy, bestiality, dueling where death occurs, (and this insidious shit), hiding a slave with intent to free him, taking a free Negro out of state to sell him, bigamy, inciting slaves to rebel, circulating seditious literature among slaves, accessory to murder, robbery, burglary, arson, or mayhem and others. However, North Carolina did not have a state prison and, many said, no suitable alternative to capital punishment. So, instead of building a fucking prison to hold criminals, they just made the penalty for less severe crimes punishable by death. What the shit, North Carolina?!?   The first reforms of the death penalty occurred between 1776-1800. Thomas Jefferson and four others, authorized to undertake a complete revision of Virginia's laws, proposed a law that recommended the death penalty for only treason and murder. After a stormy debate, the legislature defeated the bill by one vote. The writing of European theorists such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Bentham had a significant effect on American intellectuals, as did English Quaker prison reformers John Bellers and John Howard.   Organizations were formed in different colonies for the abolition of the death penalty and to relieve poor prison conditions. Dr. Benjamin Rush, a renowned Philadelphia citizen, proposed abolishing capital punishment. William Bradford, Attorney General of Pennsylvania, was ordered to investigate capital punishment. In 1793 he published “An Enquiry How Far the Punishment of Death is Necessary” in Pennsylvania. Bradford strongly insisted that the death penalty be retained but admitted it was useless in preventing certain crimes. He said the death penalty made convictions harder to obtain because in Pennsylvania, and indeed in all states, the death penalty was mandatory. Juries would often not return a guilty verdict because of this fact, which makes sense. In response, in 1794, the Pennsylvania legislature abolished capital punishment for all crimes except murder “in the first degree,” the first time murder had been broken down into “degrees.” In New York, in 1796, the legislature authorized construction of the state's first prison, abolished whipping, and reduced the number of capital offenses from thirteen to two. Virginia and Kentucky passed similar reform bills. Four more states reduced their capital crimes: Vermont in 1797 to three; Maryland in 1810, to four; New Hampshire in 1812, to two and Ohio in 1815 to two. Each of these states built state penitentiaries. A few states went in the opposite direction. Rhode Island restored the death penalty for rape and arson; Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Connecticut raised death crimes from six to ten, including sodomy, maiming, robbery, and forgery. Many southern states made more crimes capital, especially for slaves. Assholes.   The first profound reform era occurred between 1833-1853. Public executions were attacked as cruel. Sometimes tens of thousands of eager viewers would show up to view hangings; local merchants would sell souvenirs and alcohol. Which, I'm not sure if I hate or absolutely love. Fighting and pushing would often break out as people jockeyed for the best view of the hanging or the corpse! Onlookers often cursed the widow or the victim and would try to tear down the scaffold or the rope for keepsakes. Violence and drunkenness often ruled towns far into the night after “justice had been served.” People are fucking weird, dude. Many states enacted laws providing private hangings. Rhode Island (1833), Pennsylvania (1834), New York (1835), Massachusetts (1835), and New Jersey (1835) all abolished public hangings. By 1849, fifteen states were holding private hangings. This move was opposed by many death penalty abolitionists who thought public executions would eventually cause people to cry out against execution itself. For example, in 1835, Maine enacted what was in effect a moratorium on capital punishment after over ten thousand people who watched a hanging had to be restrained by police after they became unruly and began fighting. All felons sentenced to death would have to remain in prison at hard labor and could not be executed until one year had elapsed and then only on the governor's order. No governor ordered an execution under the “Maine Law” for twenty-seven years. Though many states argued the merits of the death penalty, no state went as far as Maine. The most influential reformers were the clergy, of course. Ironically, the small but influential group that opposed the abolitionists was the clergy.    Ok, let's talk about electrocution. Want to know how the electric chair came to be? Well, Electrocution as a method of execution came onto the scene in an implausible manner. Edison Company, with its DC (direct current) electrical systems, began attacking Westinghouse Company and its AC (alternating current) electrical systems as they were pressing for nationwide electrification with alternating current. To show how dangerous AC could be, Edison Company began public demonstrations by electrocuting animals. People reasoned that if electricity could kill animals, it could kill people. In 1888, New York approved the dismantling of its gallows and the building of the nation's first electric chair. It held its first victim, William Kemmler, in 1890, and even though the first electrocution was clumsy at best, other states soon followed the lead.   Between 1917 and 1955, the death penalty abolition movement again slowed. Washington, Arizona, and Oregon in 1919-20 reinstated the death penalty. In 1924, the first execution by cyanide gas took place in Nevada, when Tong war gang murderer Gee Jon became its first victim. Get this shit. The frigging state wanted to secretly pump cyanide gas into Jon's cell at night while he was asleep as a more humanitarian way of carrying out the penalty. Still, technical difficulties prohibited this, and a special “gas chamber” was hastily built. Other concerns developed when less “civilized” methods of execution failed. In 1930, Mrs. Eva Dugan became the first female to be executed by Arizona. The execution was botched when the hangman misjudged the drop, and Mrs. Dugan's head was ripped from her body. More states converted to electric chairs and gas chambers. During this time, abolitionist organizations sprang up all across the country, but they had little effect. Several stormy protests were held against the execution of certain convicted felons, like Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were convicted of spying on behalf of the Soviet Union. The couple was convicted of providing top-secret information about radar, sonar, jet propulsion engines, and valuable nuclear weapon designs. At that time, the United States was supposedly the only country with nuclear weapons. Convicted of espionage in 1951, they were executed by the United States federal government in 1953 in the Sing Sing correctional facility in Ossining, New York, becoming the first American civilians to be executed for such charges and the first to receive that penalty during peacetime. However, these protests held little opposition against the death penalty itself. In fact, during the anti-Communist period, with all its fears and hysteria, Texas Governor Allan Shivers seriously suggested that capital punishment be the penalty for membership in the Communist Party.   The movement against capital punishment revived again between 1955 and 1972.   England and Canada completed exhaustive studies which were largely critical of the death penalty, and these were widely circulated in the U.S.  Death row criminals gave their moving accounts of capital punishment in books and films. Convicted robber, kidnapper, and rapist Caryl Chessman, published “Cell 2455 Death Row” and “Trial by Ordeal.” Barbara Graham's story was utilized in the book and movie “I Want to Live!” after her execution. She was executed in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison on the same day as two convicted accomplices, Jack Santo and Emmett Perkins. All of them were involved in a robbery that led to the murder of an elderly widow.  Television shows were broadcast on the death penalty. Hawaii and Alaska ended capital punishment in 1957, and Delaware did so the following year. Controversy over the death penalty gripped the nation, forcing politicians to take sides. Delaware restored the death penalty in 1961. Michigan abolished capital punishment for treason in 1963. Voters in 1964 abolished the death penalty in Oregon. In 1965 Iowa, New York, West Virginia, and Vermont ended the death penalty. New Mexico abolished the death penalty in 1969.   The controversy over the death penalty continues today. There is a strong movement against lawlessness propelled by citizens' fears of security. Politicians at the national and state levels are taking the floor of legislatures and calling for more frequent death penalties, death penalties for more crimes, and longer prison sentences. Those opposing these moves counter by arguing that harsher sentences do not slow crime and that crime is slightly or the same as in the past. FBI statistics show murders are now up. (For example, 9.3 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1973, and 9.4 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1992, and as of today, it's upwards of 14.4 people per 100,000. This upswing might be because of more advanced crime technology, as well as more prominent news and media.   Capital punishment has been completely abolished in all European countries except for Belarus and Russia, which has a moratorium and has not conducted an execution since September 1996. The complete ban on capital punishment is enshrined in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (EU). Two widely adopted protocols of the European Convention on Human Rights of the Council of Europe are thus considered a central value. Of all modern European countries, San Marino, Portugal, and the Netherlands were the first to abolish capital punishment, whereas only Belarus still practices capital punishment in some form or another. In 2012, Latvia became the last EU member state to abolish capital punishment in wartime.   Ok, so now let's switch gears from the history of capital punishment and executions in general and get into what we know you beautiful bastards come here for. Let's talk about some methods used throughout the years, and then we'll talk about some famous executions and some fucked and messed up ones.   Methods:   We've discussed a few of these before, but some are so fucked up we're going to discuss them again.   Boiling To Death:   A slow and agonizing punishment, this method traditionally saw the victim gradually lowered — feet-first — into boiling oil, water, or wax (although uses of boiling wine and molten lead have also been recorded).   If the shock of the pain did not render them immediately unconscious, the person would experience the excruciating sensation of their outer layers of skin, utterly destroyed by immersion burns, dissolving right off their body, followed by the complete breakdown of the fatty tissue, boiling away beneath.   Emperor Nero is said to have dispatched thousands of Christians in this manner. At the same time, in the Middle Ages, the primary recipients of the punishment were not killers or rapists but coin forgers, particularly in Germany and the Holy Roman Empire. In Britain, meanwhile, King Henry VIII introduced the practice for executing those who used poison to commit murder.   Shockingly, the practice is believed to have been carried out as recently as 2002, when the government of Uzbekistan, led by Islam Karimov, was alleged to have tortured several suspected terrorists to death by boiling.   The Blood Eagle:   A technique ascribed to ancient Norse warriors, the blood eagle, mixed brutality and poetic imagery that only the Vikings could. First, the victim's back would be hacked open, and the skin ripped apart, exposing the spinal column.   The ribs would then be snapped from the spine and forcibly bent backward until they faced outwards from the body, forming a pair of bloody, shattered eagle's wings. As a horrifying finale, the lungs would then be pulled from the body cavity and coated with stinging salt, causing eventual death by suffocation.   There is some question whether this technique was ever actually used as the only accounts come from Norse literature. Odin did this shit, you know it.   Several scholars claim that the act we know of today is simply a result of poor translating and misunderstands the strong association of the eagle with blood and death in Norse imagery. That said, every account is consistent in that in each case, the victim is a nobleman being punished for murdering his father.   The good news for any poor soul who might have suffered this brutal death? The agony and blood loss from the initial wounds would probably have caused them to pass out long before the lungs were removed from their bodies.    Impalement:   Most famously used by Vlad the Impaler, 15th-century ruler of Wallachia (in present-day Romania) and inspiration for Count Dracula, the act of impalement has a long, grim history. While images tend to depict people skewered through the midsection and then held aloft — in a manner that would almost certainly bring about a rapid death — the actual process was a much longer, horrifically drawn-out ordeal.   Traditionally, the stake would be partially sharpened and planted, point up, in the ground. The victim would then be placed over the spike as it was inserted partway into the rectum or vagina.   As their body weight dragged them further onto the pole, the semi-greased wooden stake would force its way up through their body, piercing organs with agonizing slowness as it eventually penetrated the entire torso, finally tearing an exit wound through the skin of the shoulder, neck or throat. Holy shishkabob. Or bill. Or Karen.   The earliest records of the torture come from 1772 B.C. in Babylon, where the aforementioned King Hammurabi ordered a woman be executed in this way for killing her husband. But its use continued until as recently as the 20th century when the Ottoman government employed the technique during the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923. Which is super fucked up.   According to some accounts, it could take the victim — exposed, bleeding, and writhing in tormented agony — as long as eight whole days to die. Oh my hell!   Keelhauling:   Walking the plank might not be the most pleasant of deaths, but it seems moderately more humane than the other favored maritime punishment of keelhauling.   A punishment that often ended in death due to the severity of the wounds sustained (or was simply carried out until the point of death), it saw the victim, legs weighted and suspended from a rope, dropped from the bow of the ship, and then rapidly pulled underwater along the length of the hull — and over the keel (the beam that runs longitudinally down the center of the underside to the stern.   In the age of old, old wooden sailing ships, the hull of a vessel would generally be coated in a thick layer of barnacles, whose shells could be rock hard and razor-sharp.   As the drowning sailor was yanked relentlessly through the saltwater, these barnacles would strip the skin from his body, gouging out raw chunks of flesh and even, by some accounts, tearing off whole limbs or severing the head.   If the sailor was still alive, they might be hung from the mast for 15 minutes before going in again. In some cases, the victim would have an oil-soaked sponge — containing a breath of air — stuffed into their mouth to prevent a “merciful” drowning.   Employed mainly by the Dutch and the French from the 1500s until it was abolished in 1853, accounts of its use date back to Greece in 800 B.C.   The Roman Candle:   Many of the worst execution methods ever devised involve fire — from burning witches at stake in medieval Britain to roasting criminals alive in the hot metal insides of the brazen bull in Ancient Greece — but few match the sheer lack of humanity as the Roman Candle.   A rumored favorite of the mad Roman Emperor Nero, this method saw the subject tied to a stake and smeared with flammable pitch (tree or plant resin), then set ablaze, slowly burning to death from the feet up.   What sets this above the many other similar methods is that the victims were sometimes lined up outside to provide the lighting for one of Nero's evening parties.   Being Hanged, Drawn, And Quartered:   First recorded in England during the 13th century, this unusually extreme — even for the time — mode of execution was made the statutory punishment for treason in 1351. Though it was intended to be an act of such barbarous severity that no one would ever risk committing a treasonous act, there were nevertheless plenty of recipients over the next 500 years.   The process of being hanged, drawn, and quartered began with the victim being dragged to the site of execution while strapped to a wooden panel, which was in turn tied to a horse.   They would then experience a slow hanging, in which, rather than being dropped to the traditional quick death of a broken neck, they would instead be left to choke horribly as the rope tore up the skin of their throat, their body weight dragging them downwards.   Some had the good fortune to die at this stage, including the infamous Gunpowder Plot conspirator Guy Fawkes, who ensured a faster death by leaping from the gallows.   Once half-strangled, the drawing would begin. The victim would be strapped down and then slowly disemboweled, their stomachs sliced open, and their intestines and other significant organs hacked apart and pulled — “drawn” — from the body.   The genitals would often be mutilated and ripped from between their legs. Those unlucky enough to still be alive at this point might witness their organs burned in front of them before they were finally decapitated.   Once death had finally claimed them, the recipient's body would be carved into four pieces — or “quartered” — and the parts sent to prominent areas of the country as a warning to others.   The head would often be taken to the infamous Tower of London, where it would be impaled on a spike and placed on the walls “for the mockery of London.”   Rat Torture:   As recently depicted in that horrible show, Game Of Thrones, rat torture is ingenious in its disgusting simplicity. In its most basic form, a bucket containing live rats is placed on the exposed torso of the victim, and heat is applied to the base of the bucket.   The rats, crazy with fear from the heat, tear and gnaw their way into the abdomen of the victim, clawing and ripping through skin, flesh, organs, and intestines in their quest to escape.   Possessing the most powerful biting and chewing motion of any rodent, rats can make short work of a human stomach. Along with the unimaginable pain, the victim would also suffer the sick horror of feeling the large, filthy creatures writhing around inside their guts as they died.   While associated with Elizabethan England — where the Tower of London was said to have housed a “Dungeon of Rats,” a pitch-black room below high watermark that would draw in rats from the River Thames to torment the room's inhabitants — the practice has been used far more recently.   General Pinochet is said to have employed the technique during his dictatorship of Chile (1973-1990), while reports from Argentina during the National Reorganization Process in the late 1970s and early '80s claimed victims were subjected to a version in which live rats — or sometimes spiders — were inserted into the subject's body via a tube in the rectum or vagina….yep.   Bamboo Torture   Forcing thin shards of bamboo under the fingernails has long been cited as an interrogation method, but bamboo has been used to creatively — and slowly — execute a person, too. Allegedly used by the Japanese on American prisoners of war, it saw the victim tied down to a frame over a patch of newly sprouting bamboo plants.   One of the fastest-growing plants in the world, capable of up to three feet of growth in 24 hours, the sharp-tipped plants would slowly pierce the victim's skin — and then continue to grow. The result was death by gradual, continuous, multiple impalements, the equivalent of being dropped on a bed of sharpened stakes in terrible slow motion.   Despite the practice having roots in the former areas of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and Siam (now Thailand) in the 19th century, there are no proven instances of it being used during WWII.   It's certainly possible, however, and it has been shown that the technique, among the worst execution methods ever, works: A 2008 episode of MythBusters found that bamboo was capable of penetrating a human-sized lump of ballistic gelatin over three days.   https://m.imdb.com/list/ls059738828/

new york canada japanese europe fighting american thailand man greece god history tower french spanish live oregon england british european human rights germany hawaii council burning babylon dc dungeon alaska united states vermont roman empire russia death washington public act arizona holy fbi maine north carolina pennsylvania new england philadelphia massachusetts west virginia middle ages netherlands delaware maryland new mexico rhode island connecticut romans norse new jersey bc ohio dutch portugal iowa michigan nevada wwii violence count dracula indians code new hampshire christians politicians argentina mrs controversy assholes ironically game of thrones commonwealth kentucky trial parliament european union divine rock and roll rats christianity ancient greece draco ac punishment britain chile soviet union henry viii family guy san marino armenian sri lanka death row jews voltaire bce roman law aristotle romania king henry viii boiling dugan execution old testament jesus christ moral conqueror shocking vikings jerusalem drawn san quentin prison wallachia communists ethel rosenberg vlad impaler european union eu laws ordeal athenian nero thomas jefferson belarus tong bradford european convention juries fundamental rights pressing latvia convicted allegedly siam ottoman voters reforms charter mythbusters montesquieu mesopotamia onlookers attorney general sing sing solon gunpowder plot draconian electrocution elizabethan england communist party holy roman empire guy fawkes south jersey english american babylonians ceylon bentham clipping river thames uzbekistan emperor constantine penalties roman candle john howard william bradford ossining beheadings islam karimov benjamin rush hammurabi euphrates river hittite theodosius twelve tables english quaker
London Calling
Is it Over?

London Calling

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 54:58


In this week’s London Calling, James and Toby argue about whether the global pandemic is over (Toby thinks it is, while James thinks it’s a false dawn) and discuss the Johnny-come-latelies who claim to have been lockdown sceptics all along. They compare them to repentant Communists after the fall of the Berlin Wall. They also worry that it may be all over for their old friend Boris (well, James isn’t that worried) and what is going to offered up to satisfy the Tory base in “Operation Save Big Dog,” whether that puts the television license back on the table. And if the BBC is such great value for the money why doesn’t it become a subscription service? In Culture Corner, thumbs up to Yellowjackets (Sky in the UK, Showtime in the US) with reservations and Dopesick (Disney+ in the UK, Hulu in the US), while Toby gives lukewarm reviews to The Duke, Being the Ricardos (Amazon Prime) and Red Rocket. Opening sound this week is the PM apologizing to the House for parties at No. 10.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
London Calling: Is it Over?

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 54:58


In this week’s London Calling, James and Toby argue about whether the global pandemic is over (Toby thinks it is, while James thinks it’s a false dawn) and discuss the Johnny-come-latelies who claim to have been lockdown sceptics all along. They compare them to repentant Communists after the fall of the Berlin Wall. They also […]

SGT Report's The Propaganda Antidote
GODLESS COMMUNIST TRAITORS -- SGT & Matt More

SGT Report's The Propaganda Antidote

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 48:36


In this episode Matt and I share all of the REAL NEWS that's fit to print, the REAL news the mainstream mockingbird whore media conceals or ignores. Thanks for tuning in. God bless you friends! STAY HEALTHY! GET Dr. Zelenko's Z STACK NOW: https://zstacklife.com/?ref=/sgtreport WATCH this episode HERE: https://www.bitchute.com/video/u3qJWUc3zpuQ/

Down These Mean Streets (Old Time Radio Detectives)
Episode 470 - If You Want It Dunne Right (Sam Spade & Deadline Mystery)

Down These Mean Streets (Old Time Radio Detectives)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 101:15


Steve Dunne had big shoes to fill when he was cast as Sam Spade. Dashiell Hammett's private eye had been thrilling listeners since 1946 in weekly adventures starring Howard Duff, but accusations of Communist sympathies cost Duff the gig. Dunne played a younger-sounding, less serious Sam for the final run of episodes. We'll hear two of them - "The Soap Opera Caper" (originally aired on NBC on February 16, 1951) and "The Sinister Siren Caper" (originally aired on NBC on March 16, 1951). Plus, we'll hear him as crime-solving reporter Lucky Larson in Deadline Mystery (originally aired on ABC on August 10, 1947).

Unleashed the Jeremy Hanson show
Its happened DC has turned into WWII Germany "OUTRAGEOUS"

Unleashed the Jeremy Hanson show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 32:49


Starting this Saturday you can only walk the streets of DC if you have identification, vaccination records and a mask. Conspiracy theories should now be called spoiler alerts and more on Unleashed Jeremy Hanson 1-14-22

Trumpet Daily Radio Show
#1683: The Unbelievable Case of Ray Epps

Trumpet Daily Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 54:43


[00:30] The DOJ Doesn't Know Ray Epps? (21 minutes)On Dec. 30, 2021, the U.S. Department of Justice reported that it had arrested more than 725 January 6 protesters from nearly all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Many of those arrested have been charged for impeding and obstructing official congressional proceedings, or attempting to do so. Ray Epps was caught on camera inciting protesters to “go into the Capitol” the day of the protest. Yet top-ranking officials at the DOJ, after making 725 arrests, claim to have no knowledge of Ray Epps—a man who not only incited the riot but was also on the FBI's most-wanted page for six months. [21:55] DOJ's War on Parents (5 minutes)According to an e-mail exchange reviewed by Fox News, the letter to the DOJ from the National School Boards Association (NSBA) that compared parents to domestic terrorists was solicited by U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona. In that e-mail, the NSBA suggested using the Patriot Act against parents. This is further proof that the Biden administration is using the DOJ to wage a Communist war on ordinary American citizens. [27:00] Biden in Georgia (9 minutes)Yesterday, Joe Biden visited Georgia to speak against Georgia's new voting laws meant to uphold voter integrity. He also endorsed removing the Senate filibuster rule, which would make changing the voting laws easier for his administration. Why is Biden taking such an unpopular stance against Georgia's voting laws? [36:40] Bible Study: Giving Up This World (18 minutes)In Matthew 19, Jesus Christ told a young man to go and sell everything he had if he would be perfect and to follow Him. That young man turned away sorrowful, unwilling to give up his earthly possessions. Can we do as Christ said and give up this world and all of its sinful ways—and faithfully follow in the steps of Christ?

Booknotes+
Ep. 44 John Berresford, The Hiss-Chambers Espionage Case

Booknotes+

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 78:51


The first ever televised congressional hearing was on August 3, 1948. The first witness was a man who said he didn't want to be there. He had been subpoenaed to testify before the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC). His name was Whittaker Chambers, an American who had been a Communist spy for the Soviet Union in the 1930s. We spoke to DC-based attorney John Berresford, who has spent years studying Chambers and the story and trial of the man Chambers accused of also being a Communist spy, Alger Hiss. Mr. Berresford has presented the story of the Hiss-Chambers espionage case in a series of 38 lectures on YouTube.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The History Listen
The Little Sparrow - the ASIO spy inside the Communist Party

The History Listen

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 28:36


In the early 1950s Adelaide housewife Anne Neill made a life-changing decision: she joined the Communist Party of Australia, and ended up travelling behind the Iron Curtain and befriending KGB spy Vladimir Petrov. But what did this extraordinary woman truly believe in?

Trumpet Daily Radio Show
#1681: The Communist War Against MAGA

Trumpet Daily Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 54:49


[00:30] Was January 6 Worse Than the Civil War, Pearl Harbor and 9/11? (40 minutes)We begin today's show with a montage of Kamala Harris and the legacy media claiming that the Jan. 6, 2021, protest was worse than the American Civil War of the 1800s, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and the 9/11 terrorist attack that brought down the Twin Towers. For more than a year now, the Communist left has purported that January 6 was an “insurrection” of historic proportions. The Department of Justice has arrested hundreds of people, and Attorney General Merrick Garland says, “The actions we have taken thus far will not be our last.” Why has the radical left been so fervently obsessed with their January 6 false narrative? [40:20] Bible Study: The Power to Choose (14 minutes)God's Word reveals two ways of life. One way leads to blessings and eternal life. The other way leads to curses and eternal death. Unlike animals, every man and woman was endowed by God with the ability to think and reason—the power to choose God's way of life! Why? So that we might do as He implores us to do in Deuteronomy 30:19: “Choose life, that both you and your seed may live.”

American Thought Leaders
How Communist China Manipulates the Narrative About China in the West—Leon Lee Talks New Film, “Unsilenced”

American Thought Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 41:36


“We often talk about how truth will prevail … but lies are sometimes more powerful. … If you don't make a conscious effort to seek out truth, to speak the truth, sometimes you can be surrounded by lies to the point that you can no longer tell [them] apart.” In this episode, we sit down with Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Leon Lee. In his new feature film, “Unsilenced,” he tells the story of a group of students who risk their lives to expose a brutal persecution in China. Like most things critical of the Chinese regime, forces were at work trying to make this film disappear. We discuss how the Chinese regime controls the narrative about China in the West, from Hollywood to major media organizations. Theaters and Showtimes: UnSilencedMovie.com Follow EpochTV on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EpochTVus Twitter: https://twitter.com/EpochTVus Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/EpochTV Gettr: https://gettr.com/user/epochtv Gab: https://gab.com/EpochTV Telegram: https://t.me/EpochTV Parler: https://parler.com/#/user/EpochTV

Trumpet Daily Radio Show
#1679: The Insurrection Hoax Is a Cover-up for the Stolen Election

Trumpet Daily Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 54:43


[00:30] ‘God's Truth About January 6, 2021' (27 minutes)This is a special day for the Communist infiltrators. In her speech earlier today, Kamala Harris equated Jan. 6, 2021, to 9/11 and the attack on Pearl Harbor, which is an insult to the victims of those national tragedies. In his speech, Joe Biden quoted John 8:32 and said he was delivering God's truth about Jan. 6, 2021. Throughout his speech, Biden pointed to Donald Trump as the one who had something to gain in the Capitol riot. But who really benefited from the “insurrection” of January 6? As Frank Miele with RealClearPolitics wrote, the only ones benefiting from January 6 are “the very Democrats who for the last year have worked tirelessly to discredit Trump and to find some way to disqualify him from being elected president again in 2024.” [27:40] Lost From View: What Happened in Congress on January 6 (27 minutes)During his speech at Capitol Hill this morning, Joe Biden said “every legal challenge” questioning the results of the 2020 presidential election had been made. That is patently false. In the early afternoon of Jan. 6, 2021, before the protesters entered the building, Sen. Ted Cruz stood up to contest the election results. That objection was essentially silenced after hundreds of protesters breached the Capitol.

The Jaipur Dialogues
2022 American Election Cycle - Will Biden flop_ _ Vibhuti Jha and Sanjay Dixit

The Jaipur Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 45:50


Joe Biden-Kamla Harris combo is facing serious political headwinds due to their handling of Covid and the economy, and their dalliance with the Communists and Islamists. Vibhuti Jha joins Sanjay Dixit to preview the mid-term American election cycle.

People's History of Ideas Podcast
Life Underground in Shanghai in the Late 1920s (Part 1)

People's History of Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 24:59


The Communist Party Center remained underground in the dangerous city of Shanghai during the late 1920s and early 1930s.Further reading/watching:Patricia Stranahan, Underground: The Shanghai Communist Party and the Politics of Survival, 1927-1937China: A Century of Revolution documentaryJosephine Fowler, Japanese and Chinese Immigrant Activists: Organizing in American and International Communist Movements, 1919–1933Chang Kuo-t'ao [Zhang Guotao], The Rise of the Chinese Communist Party (2 volumes)Wang Fan-hsi [Wang Fanxi], Memoirs of a Chinese RevolutionaryChristina Gilmartin, Engendering the Chinese Revolution: Radical Women, Communist Politics, and Mass Movements in the 1920sFrederic Wakeman, Policing Shanghai, 1927-1937Some names from this episode:Deng Yingchao, Communist Party activist and wife of Zhou EnlaiZhang Guotao, Leading CommunistLin Zhuhan, Leading CommunistLi Weihan, Head of CCP Organizational DepartmentGong Yinbing, CCP treasurerHe Shuheng, Communist cadreLi Lisan, Leading CommunistLiu Shaoqi, Leading CommunistHe Baozhen, Communist cadre and wife of Liu ShaoqiWang Yizhi, Communist cadre and widow of Zhang TaileiZhang Tailei, Leader of Guangzhou CommuneChen Yannian, Chair of Jiangsu Provincial Committee for a very short time until his arrestChen Duxiu, Co-founder of Communist PartyZhu De, Communist military leaderHe Zhihua, Zhe De's embittered lover from GermanyQu Qiubai, Top Communist leader from mid-1927 to mid-1928Wang Fanxi, Member of Organization bureauXu Baihao, Communist union leaderSupport the show (https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=DACDMMMEASJVJ)

Secure Freedom Minute
We're Losing Latin America - Paging President Monroe

Secure Freedom Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 1:01


President James Monroe declared that external powers' colonization of the Western Hemisphere would be regarded as a hostile act against this country. Yet today, the Chinese Communist Party, Russia and Iran are working with impunity to transform all of Latin America into a no-go zone for the United States and for freedom. Unfortunately, Joe Biden is uninterested in the Monroe Doctrine and, with the Communist takeovers of Peru and Chile last year, the stage is set for the region's last two important free nations – Colombia and Brazil – to undergo the radical left's “fundamental transformation.” As former Peruvian Vice President Francisco Tudela warns in a powerful new White Paper, that will mean trouble for us, too, with intensified drug-trafficking, destabilization of the hemisphere and intensified migration here of millions more illegal aliens. Learn how we can prevent such a disaster at SecureFreedom.org. This is Frank Gaffney. 

The Michael Knowles Show
Ep. 914 - Follow The Communists 

The Michael Knowles Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 52:59


Fauci accidentally admits he collaborated with Chinese Communists, Big Tech suspends a sitting U.S. congressman for wrongthink, and the libs and their collaborators gear up for the sacred feast of January Sixth. Sign the petition to stop Biden's vaccine mandate. Head to https://dailywire.com/donotcomply DW members get special product discounts up to 20% off PLUS access to exclusive Daily Wire merch. Grab your Daily Wire merch here: https://utm.io/udZpp  My new book 'Speechless: Controlling Words, Controlling Minds,' is now available wherever books are sold. Grab your copy today here: https://utm.io/udtMJ  Andrew Klavan's latest novel When Christmas Comes is now available on Amazon. Order in time for Christmas: https://utm.io/udW6u Matt Walsh is now a self-acclaimed beloved children's author. Reserve your copy of his new book here: https://utm.io/ud1Cb  Subscribe to Morning Wire, Daily Wire's new morning news podcast, and get the facts first on the news you need to know: https://utm.io/udyIF Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Plausibly Live! - The Official Podcast of The Dave Bowman Show

Dave joins Bill Mick to talk about some history and the media and why we will always be distrustful of those who control information. Last week, a “Producer” (whatever that means) for MSNBC created a small firestorm when he derisively referred to the Diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Olympics as being over the “alleged human rights violations” by Communist China, or as I refer to it, West Taiwan. For a brief moment, the hashtag “#alleged” was trending on social media. As you can probably guess, it didn't last long. Today you can more or less only the find any reference to the story on conservative media. We could spend a lot of time talking about the bias of media, the censorship by the tech media, the ignorance of the American people, or… We could talk about some history. Like that time a guy won a Nobel Prize (1932) for Correspondence by telling the entire world that in the Communist utopia there was (a) nothing going on and (b) even if something was going on, it was completely rational and totally necessary…

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast
Reconsidering Ethel Rosenberg

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 32:30


On 19th June 1953, Ethel Rosenberg was sent to the electric chair with her husband Julius. The young couple had been found guilty of conspiracy to commit espionage on behalf of the Soviet Union.  For those on the right, Ethel Rosenberg got what she deserved as a Communist spy. For those on the left, Ethel was an icon of flawed justice whose cause was championed by everyone from Einstein to the Pope.  A new biography offers a fresh take on Ethel's controversial story.

高效磨耳朵 | 最好的英语听力资源
(Level 3)-Day_51 The Islands of Caribbean

高效磨耳朵 | 最好的英语听力资源

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 5:59


词汇提示1.hemisphere 半球2.formerly 原先3.communist 共产主义的4.overthrew 推翻5.cigars 雪茄6.descendant 后代7.diverse 多种多样的8.destinations 目的地原文The Islands of CaribbeanThe Caribbean Sea is the large body of water that lies north of the northern tip of South America.Within the Caribbean Sea are many islands that have played an important role in the history and culture of the Western hemisphere.By far the largest island in the Caribbean is Cuba.Cuba was formerly a colony of Spain,but became independent in 1902.Cuba became a Communist country in 1959,when a revolution overthrew an unpopular government.After the revolution,many Cubans fled to the United States.Today,the American city of Miami,in the state of Florida,has been greatly influenced by Cuban culture.Tobacco is widely grown in Cuba,and the country is famous for the cigars that are produced in the capital city,Havana.The island of Hispaniola is located just east of Cuba.This island is divided into two countries.In the west is Haiti,where the people speak a variety of the French language that has been influenced by African languages.In the east is the Dominican Republic,where the people speak Spanish.Another important Caribbean island is Puerto Rico.This was previously a Spanish colony,but it is now governed by the United States.Many people from Puerto Rico have moved to the mainland United States,especially the New York area.In many other islands in Caribbean,English is the main language.The largest of these islands is Jamaica,which is located just south of Cuba.Most Jamaicans are the descendants of African people who were brought to work as slave on sugar plantations.Jamaica is famous as the birthplace of the style of music called“reggae”,which was popularized in other countries by Bob Marley,a famous Jamaican musician.Another important English-speaking Caribbean island is Trinidad.This island is located just north of South America.The population of Trinidad is very diverse.The largest groups of people are descended from people who came from Africa and India,but there are many other nationalities also.Trinidad is very famous for a style of music known as“calypso”,and for musicians who produce pleasant sounds by playing steel drums.There are many other smaller islands in the Caribbean,each with its own unique futures.Many of these islands possess fine beaches,and are popular tourist destinations.The warm weather of the Caribbean makes it a popular place for Northern American people who must live through cold winters!

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast
Trevor Loudon: Overcoming Communist, PC, Social Justice Wokeness

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 53:09


Trevor Loudon declares that what is commonly regarded as mainstream political policy is in fact driven and guided by hidden subversive elements. Much of what we're seeing in our government is literally communist policy, but even more alarming is the compromise of too many American churches. Daily podcast, relevant articles on issues pertaining to Christians and more can be found on Stand Up For The Truth.

Utah Liberty Talk
S2 E17: Let's be honest; Communism vs. Socialism vs. Capitalism

Utah Liberty Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 55:21


TD talks about communism from a real perspective, using definitions and arguments used by Communists. Without any sort of distorted connotations, TD attacks these concepts of economics on all fronts, and emphasizes why Capitalism must be the way to go.

The History of the Twentieth Century
266 After Hitler, Our Turn

The History of the Twentieth Century

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 43:53


In the late Twenties, Germany saw its Communist and National Socialist parties grow in popularity, especially the latter. Adolf Hitler became the unlikely leader of the right wing in Germany, while the Communists dismissed the Nazis as a temporary obstacle.

The Deen Show
China Hosts Olympics while Muslim Uyghurs in Communist Chinese Concentration Camps

The Deen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 38:14


Relic Radio Thrillers (Old Time Radio)
Traitors For Hire by A Communist For The FBI

Relic Radio Thrillers (Old Time Radio)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021


This week on Relic Radio Thrillers, we hear the May 4, 1952, episode of I Was A Communist For The FBI, titled, Traitors For Hire. More from I Was A Communist For The FBI https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/archive.org/download/rr22021/Thriller717.mp3 Download Thriller717 If you'd like to help support Relic Radio's upcoming 15th year of podcasting, please visit donate.relicradio.com for more information. [...]

Seriously…
The Great Pyramids of Albania

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 37:51


Throughout 1996, Albanians sold their houses and their livestock to buy into pyramid schemes that were doomed to fail. By the year's end, this new kind of financial product had swallowed up almost 50 per cent of the country's annual income, and touched nearly every adult's life. How did an entire country fall victim to scammers? Gavin Haynes explores the psychology of one of history's great mass delusions, 25 years on. He heads to Albania to hear how, in something like a fable, Europe's most repressive Communist state was suddenly turned loose into a capitalist Wild West it was ill-prepared for. And how the knock-on effects of financial meltdown pushed the country to the brink of total anarchy. At the heart of his journey is an ongoing mystery - what became of the life's savings of so many ordinary people? With: Prof. Dr. ARBEN MALAJ, President of the Institute of Public Policy and Good Governance, MP for Vlore LAZER SOKOLI, Lawyer and former prosecutor ETLEVA DEMOLLARI, Director of the House of Leaves Museum of Secret Surveillance, Tirana REMZI LANI, Executive Director of the Albanian Media Institute Dr ARTAN HOXHA, Chief Executive Officer Tirana Business School GJERGJI and MARIETA SPIRI – musician and violinist in Gjirokastre and their daughter STEFANIE; GEZIM ZILJA – former Mayor of Vlore GENC DEMIRAJ – theatre technician in Vlore and former video journalist/camera person Dr. JONILA GODOLE, Executive Director of the Institute for Democracy Media and Culture, Tirana ERION VILIAJ – Mayor of Tirana Presenter: Gavin Haynes Producer: Caroline Finnigan Executive Producer: Katherine Godfrey Fixer: Edit Pula Engineer: David Smith Music Sound Engineer: Martin Appleby Actor readings by Orli Shuka A Novel production for BBC Radio 4

Baltsheviks
Foot Long Covid, Coming Up!

Baltsheviks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 62:59


Imagine taking a covid test that goes so far up your nose you pee your pants ************* Www.baltsheviks.com Recorded 12-28-21

Teach Me Communism
Episode 82: Communist Move Club - Reds

Teach Me Communism

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 92:40


It's movie night and we're talking about Warren Beatty's Reds. Topics include the role of art and revolution, party infighting, and cute dogs. Christine is way too into young Edward Herrmann.   Check us out on social media: Merch: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/teach-me-communism?ref_id=10068 Instagram: @teachmecommunism Twitter: @teachcommunism Gmail: teachmecommunism@gmail.com Patreon: Patreon.com/teachmecommunism  And like and subscribe to us at Teach Me Communism on YouTube!   Solidarity forever!

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
The Kids Are Not "Commies"

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 9:07


Millennials and Gen Z are often called socialists, especially by Baby Boomers. But that label often isn't accurate and doesn't reflect how young people actually think the economy should be structured. Guest host Ethan Millard looks at a fascinating piece that was just published for the free market American Institute for Economic Research that outlines what young people's priorities really are. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times
The Chinese Communist Party and me, Part 2

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 29:30


This year, the Chinese Communist Party kicked off its 100th anniversary by celebrating China's economic success and ambitions to create a new world order. The festivities, of course, are carefully choreographed. For decades, the Communist Party has crushed any counter-narratives to promote a whitewashed version of Chinese history. Those who deviate from the party's official narrative suffer retribution — and in recent days, records of that punishment have been expunged as well. Today, we focus on a newly revised volume of Communist Party history that aims to airbrush its past for a younger generation who have come of age in a tightly controlled social environment. And we highlight the young activists who are trying to bring attention to this whitewashing — and are getting jailed or exiled for doing so. Our guest is L.A. Times Beijing bureau chief Alice Su.An earlier version of this episode was published July 2, 2021. More reading:As Communist Party turns 100, China's Xi rallies his compatriots and warns his criticsHe tried to commemorate erased history. China detained him, then erased that too China offers a minority a lifeline out of poverty — but what happens to its culture?

The Lance Wallnau Show
3 Ways God's Intervened to Disrupt Globalists Agenda

The Lance Wallnau Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 26:56


This is an excellent time to pause and reflect on God's gift of freedom that we have as Americans. Only once you are without that gift do you appreciate it fully. I traveled to China in 2012 to attend a controversial economic meeting that the Communist party shut down. We then realized that our emails and internet usage were being monitored. Once you've had an experience like that, you appreciate what a gift freedom is. Coming up on today's episode, we're looking at Jeremiah 1:10 and how it relates to current events in America, what the Pentagon has been doing to our military, God's gift of time, showing up and protesting the radical left-wing takeover, and more!

The Hartmann Report
COULD THE BERNIE SANDERS' STRATEGY FOR MANCHIN REALLY WORK IN 2022?

The Hartmann Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 58:14


Should the Senate vote on Build Back Better now and let Manchin go ahead and vote no? Could it actually be a winning strategy to vote progressive in 2022? See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times
The Chinese Communist Party and me, Part 1

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 29:21


Two years ago, the world watched as millions of people in Hong Kong marched in the streets to call for autonomy from China. Beijing responded by passing a national security law last summer that broadly defined acts of subversion, foreign collusion and terrorism. Critics say the law crushed civil liberties. Since it was enacted, many people have fled Hong Kong — some to neighboring Taiwan. Yet Taiwan, a self-governing island that China claims as its territory, is at risk as well. Today, we start a two-part series on the Chinese Communist Party's ambitions as it celebrates its 100th anniversary. This episode gets into the continued crackdown on freedom and democracy in Hong Kong, where authorities have arrested thousands of pro-democracy activists and shut down a major daily newspaper. We'll also discuss China's growing threats to absorb Taiwan. Tomorrow, how the Chinese Communist Party is rewriting China's history.An earlier version of this episode was published July 1, 2021. More ReadingBeleaguered pro-democracy Hong Kong newspaper Apple Daily says it's closing downAs democracy fades, Hong Kong's political opposition become political prisonersThe most important company you've never heard of is being dragged into the U.S.-China rivalry

SPYCRAFT 101
A Counterintelligence Agent Turned Romanov Heir with Tim Tate

SPYCRAFT 101

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 106:10


Today, prolific author and journalist Tim Tate shares the story of Polish Intelligence Officer Michael Goleniewski. A figure in James Angleton's complicated time with the CIA, Goleniewski was an expert counterintelligence agent who identified over a thousand Soviet Bloc spies across Europe and provided their details to the CIA and MI5. His complex story takes a rather interesting turn towards the end of his career when he claims to be the long-lost heir to Russia's final Czars, Alexei Romanov. What began as a play to claim the mythical Romanov fortune ends in true madness as Goleniewski becomes convinced that he really IS Alexei.Connect with Tim:timtate.co.ukTwitter: @TimTateBooksCheck out Tim's book, Agent Sniper, here.https://www.amazon.com/Agent-Sniper-Super-Ruthless-Despised/dp/1250274664Connect with Spycraft 101:IG: @spycraft101Patreon: Spycraft 101Buy the book: here on AmazonSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/spycraft101)

New Books in East Asian Studies
Shelly Chan, "Diaspora's Homeland: Modern China in the Age of Global Migration" (Duke UP, 2018)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 65:43


Diaspora's Homeland: Modern China in the Age of Global Migration (Duke University Press, 2018) by Shelly Chan provides a broad historical study of how the mass migration of more than twenty million Chinese overseas influenced China's politics, economics, and culture. Chan develops the concept of “diaspora moments” – a series of recurring disjunctions in which migrant temporalities come into tension with local, national, and global ones – to map the multiple historical geographies in which the Chinese homeland and diaspora emerge. Chan describes several distinct moments, including the lifting of the Qing emigration ban in 1893 and the legacy of indentured Chinese migration to the Americas, intellectual debates in the 1920s and 1930s about whether Chinese emigration in the South China Seas (Nanyang) and Southeast Asia constituted colonization and whether Confucianism should be the basis for a modern Chinese identity. She also looks at the intersection of gender, returns to China of displaced Chinese from Southeast Asia, and Communist campaigns in the 1950s and 1960s. Adopting a transnational frame, Chan narrates Chinese history through a reconceptualization of diaspora to show how mass migration helped establish China as a nation-state within a global system. Shelly Chan is an associate professor of history at the University of California, Santa Cruz, specializing in modern China and the Chinese diaspora. Shatrunjay Mall is a PhD candidate at the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He works on transnational Asian history, and his dissertation explores intellectual, political, and cultural intersections and affinities that emerged between Indian anti-colonialism and imperial Japan in the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

Global News Podcast
WHO issues global warning over Omicron

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 31:21


WHO says no country can boost its way out of the coronavirus pandemic; The Communist authorities in Hong Kong remove a statue commemorating the Tiananmen Square massacre....and the space telescope that hopes to unlock secrets of the early universe.

HistoryPod
22nd December 1989: Romanian Communist leader Nicolae Ceausescu overthrown

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021


Following his overthrow, Ceausescu and his wife were subjected to a show trial on Christmas Day and found guilty of crimes including genocide and illegally gathering wealth before being ...

The Jesse Kelly Show
Grateful

The Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 123:15


What are you grateful for? The tone is always off because you can't turn 'being a commie' off. The vanguards of our culture. I don't think Trump is running for President. The honeymoon phase. Communists are anti-human, they never cared about the people. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H3 – Dec 20 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 45:42


Buck's many pearls of wisdom: There's a mass anxiety disorder, the left weaponized it against Trump in 2020, and now they can't turn it off. To red state free Americans, don't get complacent, the liberal federal government is not going to give up pushing mandates on all of us. Because of vaccine mandates, the left turned on health care workers, morphing them from heroes to enemies of the state. Florida leads the nation in job creation, education and has a $15 billion surplus with no state income tax. Buck interacts with fed-up callers. Democratic Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal is sorry for attending Communist awards show. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

SPYCRAFT 101
Communist Indoctrination of American POWs with Brian D. McKnight

SPYCRAFT 101

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 73:08


Today, author and scholar Brian McKnight delves into Chinese treatment of American prisoners of war during in Korea. Following the armistice that ended the Korean War in 1954, 23 American POWs refused repatriation to the United States. McKnight delves into what made them want to live in China--namely mandatory communist indoctrination while they were kept prisoner. By playing upon the reality of inequities these men faced while living in poverty under capitalism, Chinese soldiers were able to convince many the alleged upward mobility afforded by communism was reason enough not to return home. Check out Brian's book, We Fight For Peace, here.https://www.amazon.com/Fight-Peace-Twenty-Three-Prisoners-Turncoats/dp/B06XFY3TQL/ref=sr_1_1?qid=1639608099&refinements=p_27%3ABrian+McKnight&s=books&sr=1-1Connect with Spycraft 101:IG: @spycraft101Patreon: Spycraft 101Buy the book: here on AmazonSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/spycraft101)

The Jesse Kelly Show
Communist Tendencies

The Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 120:53


American Communists always have three things in common: No love of country, no connection to the real world, and they believe they should rule over you. Terrorists in strange places. Communists come out and just say what they want to say. The price of an empire. Why hasn't China attacked us yet? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Jesse Kelly Show
TV: The Communist Comission

The Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 42:58


The January 6th sham commission has been weaponized politically against Republicans. Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene is fired up and sounding off on the entire situation in this special interview with Jesse Kelly. Plus, big tech is denying basic facts. Is it an effort to run cover for a lying President Biden? And should Joe Biden get impeached when the GOP takes over in 2022? Jesse Kelly's panel debates.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The John Batchelor Show
China dominates the UN. @AmbJohnBolton @NYPost

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 9:40


Photo:  "Center-of-the-world country.,"  China. (Communist characters, much simplified by Mao.) @Batchelorshow China dominates the UN. @AmbJohnBolton @NYPost https://nypost.com/2021/12/11/hunter-biden-never-fails-to-catch-a-break-from-white-house-or-elite-media/

The Liz Wheeler Show
Ep. 81: Build Back Communist

The Liz Wheeler Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 50:45


On the 80th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack, communists blocked World War II veterans from visiting the D.C. memorial. Yes, you read that right. Why were our roads shut down? To build back better, of course! Liz unravels the Marxist nonsense that Biden's "Build Back Better” plan. Plus, Stacey Abrams is a liar (you don't say!), and Liz has the receipts to prove it. And we'd be remiss if we didn't ask the question—is Dr. Oz a fraud? This is The Liz Wheeler Show. To get access to extended segments and more exclusive content, become a Liz Wheeler Show VIP for a special DISCOUNTED rate now through Christmas: https://lizwheelershow.com/locals. -- Join the Moink Movement today! Choose what meats you want delivered with your first box and get free bacon for a year: https://moinkbox.com/liz. -- Join over 2-million AMAC Members as we fight to uphold the values of the greatest nation on earth—faith, family, and freedom: https://amac.us/liz. -- Take the guesswork out of taking care of your skin with Disco. Check out Disco and try their incredible skincare products for 30% off your first order with promo code LIZ: https://letsdisco.com.