Podcasts about Montreal

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  • 9,602PODCASTS
  • 30,518EPISODES
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  • Jul 7, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Montreal

Show all podcasts related to montreal

Latest podcast episodes about Montreal

Corner Of The Galaxy
Brugman in. Is Lingard next? Rumors, a 4-4-2, and an El Trafico for the Galaxy.

Corner Of The Galaxy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 123:38


- 2022 COG T-SHIRTS! BUY NOW! http://www.cornerofthegalaxy.com/SHOP - SUBSCRIBE TO OUR PODCAST: http://cornerofthegalaxy.com/subscribe/ - COG LA GALAXY DISCORD: https://discord.gg/drr9HFZY2P COG STUDIOS, Calif. -- Did you expect an emphatic win over Montreal on Monday night? And did the two-forward set do everything and more for the LA Galaxy? On today's show, we've got a packed schedule. Hosts Josh Guesman and Eric Vieira have 120 minutes of Galaxy-talk on the way for you because there was only one show this week, thanks to some weird game schedules. So on a Wednesday night, we bring you all the hectic Galaxy news you need to know. The guys will start by talking to TheStriker.com's Managing Editor Phil West about how that subscription-based service is coming to Los Angeles. And why they think LA is the perfect place to expand their coverage outside of Texas. Then Josh and Eric want to break down the 4-4-2 and talk about the 4-0 win over Montreal. How did Javier Hernandez and Dejan Joveljic play together? And why will Greg Vanney use that formation sparingly? Plus, did a meeting with Efrain Alvarez point the youngster in the right direction? Will his aggressive game against Montreal be the stepping stone to a longer MLS career? Then the guys want to talk about the transfer rumors that saw Uruguayan defensive midfielder Gaston Brugman sign with the team on Wednesday and why Jesse Lingard rumors aren't fake. But can the Galaxy get him over the line? And is this simply a reaction to LAFC signing Gareth Bale? And Josh will kill some other rumors that have been hanging around while passing down some of the conversations that were had with Vanney over a long sit-down on Saturday afternoon. Finally, Josh and Eric will get you ready for El Trafico on Friday night and tell you why the Galaxy have the least amount of pressure they've had going into one of these games in a while. Can the "mental midgets" finally pressure the Galaxy in a game this year?

Economist Radio
Send out the clown: Boris agrees to go

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 20:18


Boris Johnson is standing down as Britain's prime minister. We consider his legacy and impact on British politics. Public attitudes on LGBT rights in South-East Asia are changing fast—and its laws are at last changing, too. And at this week's Montreal's Jazz Festival, the pioneering pianist and local hero Oscar Peterson remains the patron saint. Additional music courtesy of Urban Saint.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Intelligence
Send out the clown: Boris agrees to go

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 20:18


Boris Johnson is standing down as Britain's prime minister. We consider his legacy and impact on British politics. Public attitudes on LGBT rights in South-East Asia are changing fast—and its laws are at last changing, too. And at this week's Montreal's Jazz Festival, the pioneering pianist and local hero Oscar Peterson remains the patron saint. Additional music courtesy of Urban Saint.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

CanesCast
Episode 217: Fit Us Into Your Schedule

CanesCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 59:00


It's already been a busy week for the NHL, with the regular season schedule being released and the draft taking place Thursday and Friday in Montreal. Mike Maniscalco and Shane Willis have you covered on both topics in the latest edition of the show!

DK Pittsburgh Sports Radio
DK's Daily Shot of Penguins: What's next here in Montreal?

DK Pittsburgh Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 19:14


What's next for Ron Hextall, management here in Montreal? Hear award-winning columnist Dejan Kovacevic's Daily Shots of Steelers, Penguins and Pirates -- three separate podcasts -- every weekday morning on the DK Pittsburgh Sports podcasting network, available on all platforms: https://linktr.ee/dkpghsports Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KINGS OF THE PODCAST
KOTP Ep. 131 - Kevin Fiala Trade and Draft Preview

KINGS OF THE PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 73:23 Very Popular


The guys discuss the big Kevin Fiala to LA trade, what's next for the defense and preview the Draft in Montreal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Athletic Hockey Show: A show about the NHL
Juraj Slafkovsky vs. Shane Wright: NHL Draft preview, Corey's final mock draft, listener questions, and more

The Athletic Hockey Show: A show about the NHL

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 46:39


On the last episode before the NHL Draft, Max and Corey sit down together in Montreal to discuss who the Montreal Canadiens will take with the No. 1 pick, and how that decision will impact the rest of the players chosen in the first round. Then, the guys dig into Corey's final mock draft, including the potential for Marco Kasper to get picked in the top-10, if decision-makers will shy away from Russian prospects Danila Yurov and Ivan Miroshnichenko, final thoughts on Shane Wright, and more. Plus, to close things, the guys open up the mailbag and answer listener questions about which first-rounder could move into the top-6, whether centers get extra points from scouts or not, Logan Cooley's upside, why Rutger McGroarty is so polarizing, and many more. And, right now, you can get a 6 month subscription to The Athletic for just $1 a month when you visit http://theathletic.com/hockeyshow Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Web DM Talks
Nightcap with Jim Davis 07 - Kid Maze Inspiration!

Web DM Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 53:32


Fresh back from his trip to Montreal, Jim discusses the inspiration you can take from real life for your D&D games.Watch the show live on Sunday nights at 8 PM EST at www.twitch.tv/webdmshow!Get our book! The Weird Wastelands Pre-Order Store is now Open! https://weird-wastelands.backerkit.com/hosted_preorders Backer surveys out now! GET MORE WEB DM! https://www.patreon.com/webdm We've got a bonus podcast that you can get every single week where we go into way more topics! Over 200 episodes available now. Plus ad-free show audio, and discord and live hangouts for select tiers! #dnd #dungeonsanddragons #ttrpg Facebook - http://bit.ly/2oGKLOgTwitter - https://twitter.com/WebDMshowInstagram - web_dm

Locked On Stars - Daily Podcast On The Dallas Stars
Potential 2022 NHL Draft Picks for the Dallas Stars (Part 1)

Locked On Stars - Daily Podcast On The Dallas Stars

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 27:47


The 2022 NHL Draft is upon us, and it's time to start speculating about who the Dallas Stars will select in Montreal. Today, we examine three defensemen who could be the newest additions to the Texas hockey family. Lian Bichsel is a massive player with a ton defensive upside. Could he step in as a younger Jani Hakanpaa? Owen Pickering is a skilled d-man who can move the puck with a lot of efficiency. Could help improve the Stars game in the neutral zone? Lane Hutson is one of the smallest players in the draft, but he may also be one of the hardest workers. Could he be a great fit for the organization and be a mid-round steal for Dallas? Subscribe to Locked on Stars on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LockedOnStars Follow Dane on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dane__Lewis Follow the show on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LockedOnStars Find Locked on Stars on you Favorite Podcast Platform: Apple: https://tinyurl.com/3wjnbvp2 Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/2p9yx4ur Google: https://tinyurl.com/2yc492b7 Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

FriendsLikeUs
A Patreon Episode With Shauna Lane

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 58:40


This week's episode is to promote our fans only Patreon Page. Plus everyone is away this holiday! Listen to close friends Shauna Lane and I  talking about things women are too afraid to say out loud... and more.  Shauna Lane is a New York City based actor and comedian known for her goofy, lovable characters and comedy.  As an actor she has been in several national commercials and is in the feature film Creedmoria on Netflix.  As a comedian she has appeared on Comedy Central, MTV, and Sirius XM. Shauna studied acting with the legendary Wynn Handman and has graced the stages of the New York Comedy Festival, The 10,000 Laughs Festival in Minneapolis, The Ct. Comedy Festival and the Just For Laughs Festival in Montreal.  She was the co-host of The Gone Girls Podcast (free on iTunes) from 2016-2020 and ran a monthly comedy show at New York Comedy Club called "We Share A Void."  Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), TBS's The Last O.G, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf  

The Guitar Knobs
273-Interview With Montreal Assembly Pedals

The Guitar Knobs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 89:46


The Knobs welcome Scott Monk founder of Montreal Assembly Pedals aka mtl.asm. Scott designed one of the most talked about pedals of the last several years called the Count To Five delay-sampler. We discuss how he came to create that pedal and what is so special about it, his very interesting background, as well as several of his other endeavors. Hosted by Todd Novak and Tony Dudzik #guitarpodcast #electricguitar #pedaleffects #pedalfx #theguitarknobs #guitarknobs #guitarinterview #guitaramplifier #guitarpickups #guitarsetup #fuzz #overdrive #reverb #distortion #guitartips  Visit us at theguitarknobs.com Support our show on Patreon.com/theguitarknobs

Mark Madden
07.06.22 The Mark Madden Show HR 1

Mark Madden

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 41:06


Afternoons 3-6 on 105.9 The X Opening Monologue Mark talks Buccos beating the ass of the Yankees last night and some Penguins thoughts to start off his return show. He then delivers the bucco roundup and welcomes Mike DeFabo onto the show to give us his thoughts on the Penguins and look at the Draft which is tomorrow night in Montreal. No Quarter

OverDrive
OverDrive - Hour 3 - July 6th, 2022

OverDrive

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 45:11


Final hour for the day on OverDrive with Bryan Hayes, Frank Corrado & Dave Feschuk as the guys are joined by John Hollinger of The Athletic to chat about Kevin Durant trade scenarios. As well TSN Hockey Insider Darren Dreger from Montreal on Kyle Dubas' media avail, JT Miller & where he's expecting Jack Campbell to land. Plus our FanDuel Best Bets!

Locked On Canadiens - Daily Podcast on the Montreal Canadiens
Episode 651 - Montreal Canadiens sign agreement with new scouting service and Jeff Petry trade thoughts

Locked On Canadiens - Daily Podcast on the Montreal Canadiens

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 32:28


On the eve of the NHL Draft in Montreal where the Canadiens have the first overall pick, we break down some takeaways from the press conference held by Habs GM Kent Hughes and Special Advisor to Hockey Operations Vincent Lecavalier. We discuss: our opinion on who the pick will be, what we learned about the direction the Montreal Canadiens are going in based on their hiring of Team 33, what other teams around the league are doing to exploit market inefficiencies, and what we think may happen with Jeff Petry's request to be traded. Find and follow Locked on Canadiens on your favourite podcast platforms: Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/locked-on-canadiens-daily-podcast-on-the-montreal/id1481087511 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0DUBvqUjDFSfWSFnogXOoU?si=BknvfKB8QF-eXiiomysuZw&nd=1 Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/locked-on-canadiens-daily-podcast-on-the-montreal-canadiens Also make sure to follow Locked on Canadiens and their hosts on Twitter! Locked on Canadiens: https://twitter.com/LO_Canadiens Find Scott on Twitter: https://twitter.com/scottmatla Find Laura on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theactivestick Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. #NHLHockey #MontrealCanadiens #Habs Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Territory Talk
Territory Talk: Chatting NHL Draft with Chris Peters

Territory Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 44:51


With the 2022 NHL Draft scheduled to take place on Thursday and Friday in Montreal, draft and prospect analyst Chris Peters joined this week's episode of the Territory Talk podcast to discuss the theme of this year's draft class, what the Cats might do with their six picks, and much more.Highlights of the episode include:The Panthers will try to find more diamonds in this year's draft. (3:00)NHL Draft and prospects analyst Chris Peters joins the show! (9:15)Peters talks about approaching a draft with no high picks. (12:00)Peters shares his thoughts on Florida's last two draft classes. (18:00)Doug and Jameson try to predict some late-round picks for the Cats. (27:00)

Island Ice podcast
Island Ice Ep. 136: On the road to Montreal for the NHL Draft

Island Ice podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 51:41


Andrew Gross and Colin Stephenson talk about the Islanders' draft and free agency plans as they drive up to Montreal to cover the 2022 NHL Draft.

The Instigators
07-06 Sabres Live with Brian Duff and Martin Biron

The Instigators

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 44:56


07-06 Sabres Live with Brian Duff and Martin Biron - Brian and Marty talk about the upcoming NHL draft from Montreal one day ahead of the event. 

The DFO Rundown
Coming to you live from Montreal!

The DFO Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 56:32


We have a fresh episode of the podcast and for the first time in a long time, Jason and Frank are in the same room to record it! They're both in Montreal for the NHL Draft and sat down today to break down not just the news we've seen from around the league recently, but also some rumours from around the NHL.They kicked off the show by talking about the first-overall pick and if the Canadiens will step up and take Shane Wright or if they'll stun the hometown crowd and go in a different direction. They ran through the hypothetical of what could happen if Wright doesn't go first and how that could affect the trade value of the second-overall pick.From there, they got into some of the other big offseason storylines like the goalie market2:30 - The first-overall pick, Shane Wright, and the Devils10:10 - The goalie market13:15 - Puljujarvi, Evander Kane & the Oilers18:05 - JT Miller21:30 - Tarasenko and Krug on the block28:50 - Forsberg & Gaudreau ahead of free agency36:30 - Jakob Chychrun39:00 - Fill in the Blank (Grier and more) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Real Kyper & Bourne
First Overall Fascination with Renaud Lavoie

Real Kyper & Bourne

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 48:25


Nick Kypreos, Justin Bourne and Producer Sammy discuss a recent social media poll deeming the Maple Leafs fans the most annoying fan base, before sorting through the new front office faces promoted in Toronto's organization and the crop of free agent goalies on the market. Next up, TVA Sports' Renaud Lavoie focuses in on Montreal to discuss the Canadiens' strategy with the first overall pick in Thursday's NHL Draft, if prospect Shane Wright is still atop of the list, the uncertainty within the organization and potential trade pieces on the roster (22:33) To wrap up, the fellas look towards Columbus to chat about Patrik Laine's future with the Blue Jackets (45:03). The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates.

LA Soccer Hub
LA Galaxy Gain Momentum Ahead Of El Trafico

LA Soccer Hub

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 36:08


The third addition of El Trafico is up next LA Galaxy come into the match after defeating Montreal 4-0 at home and now have momentum into the much anticipated matchup.

Money, Mindset & Manifestation

For the 100th episode Marley sits down with her Mom and asks her all the deep questions. Her Mom talks about her experience meeting her birth parents, overcoming trauma, how she met Marley's father, moving from Montreal to Toronto at the age of 18 and so much more. This episode is very special and guaranteed to make you smile. Apply to Join Freedom Club Margaret's Links Amama's Website Amama's Instagram Want to get a FREE money Hypnosis? Add an honest review to Apple, what you think about the podcast and if it's helped you in any way Screenshot your review right away and send it to hello@marleyrose.ca Wait for the magic to arrive in your inbox! In case you missed her last episode! Follow along with Marley at @marleyroseharris or send her an email to Hello@marleyrose.ca!

Part Of The Problem
Independence Day 2.0

Part Of The Problem

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 57:49 Very Popular


Dave Smith and Robbie The Fire Bernstein bring you the latest in politics! On this episode of Part Of The Problem, Dave and Robbie discuss America's founding, and the idea of a national divorce. We hear about America's pharmaceutical problem, and finally we take a look at a clip from Morning Joe where they say the quiet part out loud once again.This Episode Was Recorded On 7.4.22Support Our SponsorsSheath - https://sheathunderwear.com use promo code PROBLEM20Yo Kratom - https://yokratom.comTruebill - https://www.truebill.com/potpLIVE DATESAug 26-28 (ROCHESTER) - https://ci.ovationtix.com/35843/production/1061862Aug 8 (DC) Stand up Show - https://www.dccomedyloft.com/events/46841Podcast - https://www.dccomedyloft.com/events/46842Nashville Aug 14 - https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rym-summer-porch-tour-robbie-the-fire-bk-chris-nashville-tickets-161576013205Part Of The Problem Airs every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 6pm ET on the GaS Digital Network! The newest 20 episodes are always free, but if you want access to all the archives, watch live, chat live, access to the forums, and get the show five days before it comes out everywhere else - you can subscribe now at gasdigitalnetwork.com and use the code POTP to save 15% on the entire network. Follow the show on social media:Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComicDaveSmithhttps://twitter.com/RobbieTheFirehttps://www.instagram.com/bmackayisrightInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theproblemdavesmith/https://www.instagram.com/robbiethefire/https://www.instagram.com/bmackayisrightSubscribe On YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/DSmithcomicBuy Daves Album : Dave Smith Libertas - https://bit.ly/2Nq5seMDave Smith and Robbie The Fire Bernstein bring you the latest in Politics three times a week, with the promise of bonus episodes! Libertarian Philosophy mixed with a sense of humor, POTP is one of the leading voices in libertarianism.Dave Smith is a New York based stand-up comedian, radio personality, and political commentator. Dave can be seen regularly on “The Greg Gutfeld Show” and “Red Eye” on Fox News, as well as “Kennedy” on Fox Business Network. In 2013 Dave was featured as one of the New Faces at the prestigious Just For Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal. He was also a featured performer on the New York Comedy Festival's “New York's Funniest” showcase in 2014 and 2015. Dave's outlet for his social commentary is his podcast, “Part of the Problem,” which is available on iTunes. Dave is also co-host of “The Legion of Skanks” podcast, available on the GaS Digital Network.**************at 40 min there is a slate for morning joeSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

31 Thoughts: The Podcast
Rumours Rumours Everywhere

31 Thoughts: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 36:52 Very Popular


So much is happening! Jeff and Elliotte go over a lot in a short amount of time including Mike Grier in San Jose as their next GM (00:30), Alex DeBrincat (3:25), Matt Murray (5:25), Marc-André Fleury (6:40), Darcy Kuemper (8:35), Semyon Varlamov (9:35), Mason Marchment (10:45), what's Tampa Bay doing (11:45), Ryan McDonough (13:00), Toronto goalie situation (13:40), Edmonton (17:55), Calgary (19:20), Vancouver (20:15), Winnipeg hires Rick Bowness (23:30), Detroit (28:05), and things they are looking at ahead of the NHL Draft in Montreal (31:10).Story by Iain MacIntyre on Brock Boeser mentioned in the podcastCheck out the limited edition 32 Thoughts merchandise line HEREMusic Outro: Kevin Morby - This Is A PhotographListen to all of Kevin's music including this track on SpotifyThis podcast was produced and mixed by Amil Delic, and hosted by Jeff Marek and Elliotte Friedman. Production support by Mike Rogerson.The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates.

The Athletic Hockey Show: A show about the NHL
NHL Draft 22 preview with Sam Cosentino, Ryan McDonagh devastated to leave Tampa Bay Lightning

The Athletic Hockey Show: A show about the NHL

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 57:55 Very Popular


Ian Mendes and Arpon Basu welcome Sportsnet draft analyst Sam Cosentino, ahead of the 2022 NHL draft in Montreal. Sam discusses who he thinks will be selected in the first round of the draft on Thursday night and if the Habs will take Shane Wright or Juraj Slafkovsky with the number one selection. Plus, the guys take a look at the salary cap dump that Tampa Bay made this weekend, sending top 4 defender Ryan McDonagh to Nashville, and how Bolts GM Julien BriseBois time and time again makes excellent hockey deals for his club. Mendes and Basu also touch on the Winnipeg Jets hiring Rick Bowness and the San Jose Sharks firing Bob Boughner and the curious case of Flyers prospect Ivan Fedotov who was planing to evade military service in Russia, and what that might mean for Russian born prospects at the draft, and established Russian NHL players coming into next season. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Real Kyper & Bourne
Finger on the Pulse with Kevin Weekes

Real Kyper & Bourne

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 49:12 Very Popular


Nick Kypreos, Justin Bourne and Producer Sammy start off discussing the possibility of the Leafs staying internal in goal next season, a potential offer sheet situation for Rasmus Sandin, and what's on tap for the team during the off-season. Later on, hockey's #1 news-breaker Kevin Weekes stops by to weigh in on Mike Grier's hiring as GM in San Jose, the off-season rumours surrounding the Toronto Maple Leafs, and breaks down the latest rumblings around the league including what's next for J.T. Miller (23:52). To wrap up today, the fellas look ahead to the NHL Draft to ask who Montreal will choose with the first overall pick (41:54). The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates.

Vox&Hops
Taking a Step Back with Kathrine Shepard of Sylvaine

Vox&Hops

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 67:14


Kathrine Shepard of Sylvaine & I have a conversation about how she coped with 2020/2021, the soundtrack of her youth, her first shows, discovering her voice, creating "Nova", Mental Health, being a vocal coach, a Sylvaine Collab & the silver lining of her pandemic. Throughout this chat, Kathrine drank some water while I enjoyed 5e Baron's "L'été sans fin" `the 7.5% mixed fermentation Saison that was aged in a Sauvignon Blanc barrel with pineapples. This is a Heavy Montreal presents Vox&Hops episode! Heavy Montreal is Montreal's premier metal promoter. They host one of North America's best Metal Festivals & present countless amazing events during the rest of the year. I am truly honored & extremely excited to have them involved in the podcast. Get your tickets to Heavy Montreal presents Vox&Hops Brewtal Montreal 2022 featuring Deicide, Kataklysm, Inhuman Condition & Undeath: https://bit.ly/brewtal2022 Make sure to check out Vox&Hops' Brewtal Awakenings Playlist which has been curated by the Metal Architect Jerry Monk himself on either Spotify or Apple Music. This playlist is packed with all the freshest, sickest & most extreme albums each week!!! Photo Credit: Andy Julia Episode Links: Website: https://www.voxandhops.com/ Join The Vox&Hops Mailing List: http://eepurl.com/hpu9F1 Join The Vox&Hops Thirsty Thursday Gang: https://www.facebook.com/groups/162615188480022 Sylvaine: https://www.sylvainemusic.com/ 5e Baron: https://www.5ebaron.com/ Heavy Montreal: https://www.heavymontreal.com/ Vox&Hops Brewtal Awakenings Playlist: https://www.voxandhops.com/p/brewtal-awakenings-metal-playlist/ Sound Talent Media: https://soundtalentmedia.com/  Evergreen Podcasts: https://evergreenpodcasts.com/ Vox&Hops Metal Podcast Merchandise: https://www.indiemerchstore.com/collections/vendors?q=Vox%26Hops

Best in Fest
From Distribution to Producing with Jonathan Hlibka and Ryan Keller - Ep #68

Best in Fest

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 45:26


Want to understand what it takes to understand the film industry? Listen to this episode!  A distributor and a lawyer get together to create an independent film production company.  Leslie talks with Jonathan Hlibka and Ryan Keller about the transition into production and the high-wire act it takes to get a film made.Jonathan Hibka & Ryan KellerSeeing the world change so quickly on 911, I took a step back and focused ondeveloping music and writing for film. Around that time is actually when I met Ryan Keller. Ihad seen how hard it was to get projects made so I quite literally jumped into producing musicvideos, short films and selling clients commercials - while working full time. Quite literallygrinding every day. When we originally conceived of what is now Other Animal, Ryan and Ihad been reading reams scripts. We were both looking for a raw story that we could get madeon a slim budget, in the hope that it could attract exceptional talent to support our vision.Somewhere in the first 6 months, after countless scripts read and forgotten, I was on aMegabus to Montreal going to get a smoked meat sandwich at Schwartz's. Laptop open andphone in hand, Ryan calls me and says “you need to read this script.” It was a draft of whatwould become our first feature, Poor Agnes. The lead character Agnes, that Lora Burke wenton to play, tore her way through the pages with no mercy or remorse. I think I called him back in like 20 min of reading it and saying, ‘Fuck, I'll put the money up, let's get this made.”I pulled the financing for the film from the commissions I'd retained in my indiedistribution company. I was selling indies to TV, VOD, and Theatrical, which in Canada meansbegging 3 broadcasters to ‘just watch it' and traveling from cinema to cinema convincing thereluctant owners to book amazing films. When we premiered Poor Agnes, I remember distinctly the silences and gasps of the audience. Then the eruption of applause, the audience was completely taken. Going into Happy FKIN Sunshine, we weren't looking to re-create Agnes, our goal was building on our vision. We were seeking out truly raw and authentic talent who could pour them selves into the story.

The Oil Stream
OIL STREAM "Claude Giroux and Draft Week!"

The Oil Stream

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 15:47


Welcome to another episode of The Oil Stream with Dustin Nielson and Tom Gazzola, presented by Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen! Nielson & Gazzola take a look at all the speculation surrounding the Oilers and Claude Giroux. Would Giroux be a fit and how much should the Oilers be willing to pay him? What is Edmonton going to accomplish in Montreal this week at the draft? Why is Duncan Keith taking so long to make a decision? Gazzola also gives you the best jersey update you are going to find.

Her Brilliant Health Radio
How To Protect Your Brain And Prevent And Reverse Dementia

Her Brilliant Health Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 50:03


Do you have a loved one suffering from dementia? Are you worried about your own cognitive health as you age? If so, this episode of The Hormone Prescription Podcast is for you!   Our guest, Dr. Heather Sandison, the founder of Solcere Health Clinic, and Marama, the first residential care facility for the elderly of its kind, and a leading expert in the field of integrative medicine, shares her insights on how to protect your brain and prevent or reverse dementia.   In this episode you will learn: The role that hormones play in brain health The benefits of lifestyle changes, including diet and exercise, for cognitive health The genetic determinism of Alzheimer's disease and what you can do to mitigate your risk The tests and treatments available to prevent and treat dementia The complex system science approach versus the reduction approach to brain health And much more!   If you are interested in learning more about how to protect your brain and prevent or reverse dementia, this episode is a must-listen!   (00:00): Do you think that dementia is a done deal and that once you get it, you'll always have it. Well, you need to listen up because that's actually a lie.   (00:12): So the big question is how do women over 40, like us, keep weight off, have great energy balance. Our hormones in our moods feel sexy and confident and master midlife. If you're like most of us, you are not getting the answers you need and remain confused and pretty hopeless to ever feel like yourself. Again. As an OB GYN, I had to discover for myself the truth about what creates a rock, solid metabolism, lasting weight loss, and supercharged energy. After 40 in order to lose a hundred pounds and fix my fatigue. Now I'm on a mission. This podcast is designed to share the natural tools you need for impactful results. And to give you clarity on the answers to your midlife metabolism challenges, join me for tangible natural strategies to crush the hormone imbalances you are facing and help you get unstuck from the sidelines of life. My name is Dr. Kyrin Dunston welcome to the hormone prescription podcast.   (01:05): Hi, everybody. Welcome back to another episode of the hormone prescription with Dr. Kyrin. Thank you so much for joining me today. If you believe that dementia is a done deal in that, once you have it, you will always have it. It will progress and get worse. Then you need to listen up because that is just not true anymore. The truth is that you can prevent and reverse cognitive decline and Alzheimer's and other types of dementia. When you take a root cause all systems approach. And my guest today is an expert on this. She is going to break it down for you. She's also hosting a wonderful summit that is coming up on Alzheimer's and cognitive functioning and dementia and how to prevent and reverse it. So I definitely want you to attend that. We'll have the link in the show notes, because this is for everyone.   (02:00): You know, don't hear this title and think, oh, uh, my brain is fine, right? It takes decades to develop cognitive decline and dementia. And so if you have a brain, and you're a human, and you're getting older, which is just about every one of us, then you need to listen up, cuz you need to be doing things, taking steps to protect your precious brain, your mainframe computer. Now. So we'll dive into talking to Heather. She gave a masterclass today about all the things that you need to be doing for your brain. Don't be overwhelmed though, because in her summit she's going to go into with experts like me, way more detail. And of course I'm the hormone expert and hormones. You definitely need a prescription for hormones. If you want to protect your brain, you cannot have optimized brain function without it. So we'll dive into that, but I'll tell you a little bit about Dr.   (02:56): Heather and we'll get started. She's really rather remarkable. Dr. Heather Sandison is the founder of SOCE health clinic and MIMA the first residential care facility for the elderly of its kind at SOCE Dr. Sandison and her team of doctors and health coaches focused primarily on supporting patients, looking to optimize cognitive function, prevent mental decline and reverse dementia by addressing root causes of imbalance in the brain and body. This is something all of you should be doing. She was awarded a grant to study an individualized integrative approach to reversing dementia and is a primary investigator on the it H N C L R clinical trial at Marama. Dr. Sandison has created an immersive residential experience in the lifestyle proven to best support brain health. She understands that changing her diet, adding nutrients, creating community and optimizing a healing environment are all challenging. Even for those with full cognitive capacity at Marama, she's done the work for you, all you or your loved one need to do is show up. She is also the host of the reverse Alzheimer's summit and collective insights podcast, where she works to share what is possible for those suffering with dementia. Welcome Dr. Heather Sandison.   (04:23): Thanks. It's so exciting to be here with you.   (04:25): Yeah, I am so excited about your summit coming up. Many of my listeners know that my mom suffers with advanced Alzheimer's and I really I'm so passionate about helping others to know how to prevent and reverse cognitive decline. Cuz personally, I think it is the most devastating disease someone could be diagnosed with. How did you come to be so passionate about preserving cognitive capacity and preventing and reversing Alzheimer's?   (04:59): Well, as you know, it's an absolutely torturous disease, not only for the person experiencing it, but for all of their loved ones who have to watch this slow painful demise. And the reason I became so passionate was because there's a bit of injustice in this, right? I was told that there was nothing you could do for dementia by very well meaning very well educated instructors when I was in school just 10, 12 years ago, right? Like this is very recent history I was told. There's nothing you could do to suggest otherwise is to give someone false hope and that's just cruel. Right? So don't do that. And then fast forward a few years I saw Dr. Bison speak at a conference and I was really intrigued because his approach, he was saying, you could reverse dementia. You could reverse cognitive decline. And his approach made a lot of common sense.   (05:54): It just wasn't common practice to kind of put all of functional medicine together and apply it to someone with dementia. So what he was describing was BA essentially complex system science approach, the opposite of the reductionistic approach that conventional medicine has been taking for decades, where they try to create one pill or one IV formula that's gonna cure Alzheimer's right. And then everybody's gonna get on it and nobody's gonna have it again. Well, this is really a false premise. It doesn't work because it's based on this idea that beta amyloid plaques or tell proteins these pathological or, or histological really physiological changes. They're almost like scar tissue in the brain that they are the ones that cause dementia or, or Alzheimer's when in fact it's what causes that scar tissue is what causes dementia. And so what I saw after seeing Dr Bison speak was that I was intrigued, right.   (06:55): I, I was skeptical, but I was curious. And so like when I had and did his training, I came back to my office still skeptical, but my first patient Linda came into my office after I was on Dr. Bison's website. Right. I was on the list of people who had been trained by him. And so I had patients showing up asking, uh, because there weren't other people in San Diego who had been trained by him at that point. And so Linda came in with her husband, very enthusiastic, totally committed to doing everything she could. Now for your listeners who aren't familiar with a mocha score, this is the Montreal cognitive assessment. And it's a score out of 30. So 30 is perfect. We really wanna get over 26, especially as we're aging. And when we start to be able to measure cognitive decline. So this can be sometimes you hear this called mild cognitive impairment.   (07:46): And I won't go on the tangent about how I feel about that use of language . But as you get down into the teens, lower teens, this is Alzheimer's disease. This is relatively severe dementia, where you're having trouble taking, having a conversation. Maybe you get lost in familiar places. You aren't nonverbal. Like you can still have a conversation, but often you're repeating yourself. Unable to work is very typical at this stage. Now, by the time you get to a two, a three, a four, this person is, is answering with yes or no statements, right? They're they can't hold complex concepts in their mind. They can't hold questions for very long. And this is where Linda was. Linda was at a two out of 30. So she could answer with yes or no. Her handwriting had been affected. So it was a bit shaky. It was at a very severe slant.   (08:35): It was very, very small letters. Her relationship with her husband of course, was severely affected. They couldn't hold a conversation and he loved her so much. I mean, it was so inspiring to watch how committed he was to her and how much he wanted to work hard to get her back. And I could see in Linda, she had this big, bright smile, and she was in there. She wore these loud, amazing clothes, you know, lots of mismatch and lots of color and hats and accessories. It was just great. And you could see who she had been and these little remnants personality that were peaking through. Well, her and her husband went home and they got out of a moldy bedroom. She got hers removed from her mouth. She got on biodentical hormones. She started all of the supplements. They went fully keto. They started ballroom dancing three to four times a week.   (09:28): And they started walking like vigorous walking exercise every day of the week and low and behold, six, seven weeks later, she came back and her mocha was a seven. Her life had been transformed. So she was now bickering with her husband about something that had happened on the ride to the clinic, which I was just like in disbelief. I could, I thought, you know, I was looking at her mocha scores, her worksheets and going, did we do it wrong? Like, did we miss anything? Like I just, my brain couldn't process that this was possible because I had been told the old refrain that people are still told that, that you couldn't do this. That this was impossible that I started crying because I was like, wait, what? This really works. And especially, I didn't have the confidence that it would work with someone with such severe disease.   (10:18): So when I saw in that moment, when I saw what was possible for Linda, I mean, how could anyone not commit themselves to this for the rest of their lives, right? Like this is possible for Linda. Then what's possible for everyone else who is younger. Who's just noticing those first signs that their brain isn't working the way it used to 10 or five years ago. What's possible for people who know their genetic risk, if they can prevent it from ever even starting. We know that dementia, the changes in the brain, the inflammation, the toxic assaults, the, the infections, the imbalances that cause dementia, the trigger that scar tissue formation, those imbalances start decades before anyone notices changes in their cognitive function, in their memory. And so if we can intervene sooner, we can make Alzheimer's optional. People do not have to go down the torturous path that your mom has.   (11:19): You could be scared. Your children could be spar. The torture of having to watch that of having to put someone in a home because they don't feel like they have the capacity to both raise their own children, work their full-time job, manage their house and care for the, their debilitated loved one with dementia. My life's purpose is changing the narrative around this, which is why I was so grateful that you joined me on the reverse Alzheimer's summit to help me in this crusade around telling people that I'm sorry, respectfully. I disagree with your neurologist who told you here's acept and Meda. It doesn't work very well. Get your affairs in order. There's nothing else that can be done. There's actually an overwhelming amount that can be done to support someone who's noticing their memory fading.   (12:07): Oh my gosh. She said so much in there. And when you told Linda's story and how she and her husband just went and made radical changes in seven weeks had marked improvement. I cried because it's just such demonstrative of what is possible when people really take this seriously and they do all the things and they radically reevaluate and change their lifestyle. What is possible? It's sad to me that it requires us to have such pain in order to do it. We have to go so far that people aren't willing to do it, but I love that they did it. Oh my gosh. You've said so many things. all right. So let's dive into this, but I, I think this idea of complex systems science approach versus reduction approach really is the whole shift in paradigm in medicine that is about antiaging, metabolic, functional medicine.   (13:06): It is the healthcare revolution. It is the next frontier. There's so many areas where we take this reductionist approach. Like it's just a disease, it's just symptom management and you have to deal with it and you have to control it, particularly not only with dementia. I think dementia is where this shows up as just this hopeless attitude of, oh, this is it. Get your affairs in order here, take these medicines. They don't really help. So let's dive a little into all the things that you've got to do, but I wanna start by talking, you mentioned genetic risk and I know people have heard there's Alzheimer's gene. They can't, most people readily access this, or maybe they can maybe, you know, of a place that people can get this, unless their doctor orders it. Can you talk a little bit about the genetics? What is the genetic determinism level with Alzheimer's and what's available? Mm-hmm   (14:04): yeah, there's a lot of agency here, right? Like, so even if you have the worst genetics, there's still a chance that you'll be in the camp that doesn't get dementia. Right. So there it's much more about epigenetics than it is about genetics. Right? So that, that, the way I describe it to patients is it's as if an architect has written the, has drawn the plans for a house and that's your genetic, so that's the plan. And then where you build that house, if it's by the beach, or if it's up in the mountains or it's in the desert, if there's carpet or tile, or, you know, if it's facing east or west, if there's a happy family or a sad family in it, right? Like all of these epigenetic effects determine what that house ends up looking like. And, and if it's a great house to live in or not, and that's essentially your body, right?   (14:50): So there's this genetic plan. And then there's the phenotype or what actually gets expressed, which is the actual house that gets built. Right? And so what we put into that house, what we put into that house that, you know, houses our soul that is so critically important to how that plan gets manifested. And so when we look at genetics, there are a few things and we are now, uh, you do have to get it through a doctor, but we are now offering the Alzheimer's risk test. And this takes not only APO E for genetics. So APO E genetics, let me describe APO E real quick, because this is kind the one that people know the most about and is the most indicative of late onset Alzheimer's. So there are a very rare form of early onset Alzheimer's and this would be your AP P your amyloid precursor protein and your Priscilla one and two.   (15:41): We do not test for that. So for that, we have people go to a geneticist and, and understand their risk there. Now, even if they do have that risk, that elevated risk, we wanna be as proactive as possible, right? This just means you need to work a little harder than your neighbor or your spouse to do all of the things on the bison protocol and prevent this risk for manifesting. There is still a way this genetics are not determination, right? You, you, it's not black and white that you are destined to have, uh Alzheimer's if you have these genes. So, but what we wanna do is we wanna get on top of it faster. So then APO E APO E our ancestors all had APO E four, four, APO E basically predisposes you to create amyloid plaques earlier, quick, more quickly, when you are exposed to something that's causing inflammation in the brain.   (16:34): So amyloid and tell proteins that they're antimicrobial, they're there to protect us. So they've been vilified and conventional medicine as the cause of Alzheimer's, but they're actually there in response to a trigger in the brain. And so, if you are creating these quicker, you do have a higher risk of dementia. And what we see this also APOE also affects fat metabolism, particularly saturated fat metabolism. So if you have a co you have a copy from mom, a copy from dad, and if you have an APOE four from mom and an APOE four from dad, you have a 50% chance of developing dementia. So my job is to make sure you're in the 50% that never gets any sign of cognitive decline. Now, the general population has about a 13% risk of developing dementia. So this is a highly increased risk. Now, if you have an APO E there's two, three, and four, two is pretty rare, but a three, four, it happens.   (17:30): And this means you've got one, a three from mom or dad, and then a four from mom or dad. You have about a one in three risk of getting dementia. So again, I wanna keep you in that 66% that never gets dementia. Then if you have a, a two, three or a three, three or 2, 2, 1 of the other combinations without a four from mom or dad, then you have about a 9% risk of developing dementia. There's a little bit of protection actually from having an APOE two. So we use the Alzheimer's risk test, which takes another 112,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, and takes them through an algorithm that was developed in the UK, and then gives someone a score. A very it's easy to look at, right? It's not a lot of snips. It's not one of these kind of through the internet, you get your raw data things.   (18:16): This is a, this gives you a score that has a, a lot of very sophisticated data. That's been compiled and then analyzed. And it gives you a score out of one. So one being very high risk, zero being very low risk, and it includes a O E four, but also other genetic snips, single nucleotide polymorphisms. So if I'm talking to someone who is, say the daughter of someone with dementia, or the son of someone with dementia, maybe even the sibling or cousin of someone with dementia, this is a great test to take because there are people with a O E four who actually have relatively low genetic risk. There are people without a O E force positive alleles who have relatively high risk. And so we don't wanna oversimplify. Uh, and this test is the most accurate in determining whether or not someone will develop dementia. It's even more accurate than looking at amyloid in say, imaging or cerebral spinal fluid, or however, they're they find, um, ways to do that. Now, uh, I think they might even have a blood test that's available for research.   (19:22): Okay. I know everybody's listening and, and really, I have never met a person who's not concerned about this. Although most women are most concerned about breast cancer. They're I think this is really where they should focus, because if you do get breast cancer in this day and age, you're most likely not going to diet from it, but an Alzheimer's dementia will certainly pause significant disability and premature death. So people can get this from your clinic. Can they get this from any doctor? Cuz I know there are women listening who are like, okay, I hear you, Dr. Heather, I need this test. Where do I get it?   (19:58): So anyone in the us can get it through our clinic. What we do is we have a doctor who will review it with you and then they can help you find a BR trained provider near you. If you have high risk, we're gonna wanna do that quick. But if you have low risk, you know what a relief. So we have a doctor who can help you get that test. It's it's a pretty new test. It's clear. So it it's not reimbursed by insurance yet. So it's on the cutting edge. It's used most commonly actually in the pharmaceutical industry so that the scientists there can determine who's at higher risk and then target those people for drug discovery and for, and for the, the science that they're doing. Now, we wanna apply this so that we can get people preventing dementia. And so that's why I've really done my best to make it as widely available as possible, even though not many doctors in the us are offering it. So through my clinic, anywhere in the us, you can get this test done. And then we'll, you'll talk to a doctor here at Ary who will talk you through the implications and, and the interpretation of that, and then help get you supported by the bison train provider who can take it from there.   (21:05): Okay. Awesome. And we will have the links and the show notes for all of this. So you can go there and get the links. And Dr. Heather has a great download for you, which will come to before we wrap up. So, okay. So we've got our risk, everybody. I think everyone should get checked now do not wait. And then let's talk about this complex system science approach versus reduction approach. You mentioned my favorite topic, hormone therapy. My mom was without hormones for, you know, over three decades. And that really was the only risk factor she had for dementia. And I am a huge proponent of the benefits of hormone replacement therapy. Not only for cognitive function, I mean, se what is it? 77 or 79% reduction in getting Alzheimer's if a woman is on hormone replacement therapy, I mean, that's just insane. It should be criminal not to give it   (22:05): Well, you, you mentioned the breast cancer risk, right? This is I think what, yeah, a lot of people from pulling the trigger on a hormone replacement and I think what you said was perfect, right? Like, no, of course we don't want anyone to get breast cancer. However, there's been a lot of data that was misconstrued by the media that was misinterpreted. You know, they've gone back to the women's health initiative study and put some caveats on this whole idea that there was an increased risk of breast cancer. That was with oral estrogens. That was when non-bio identical estrogens. So we're not talking apples to apples when we consider bio identical hormone replacement now. And when you think about aging and what's going to be the most torturous, the most debilitating, the most expensive breast cancer is highly treatable. We are so lucky that we live in a time when breast cancer is really highly treatable. Mm-hmm . So even if there is this like a little bit of increased risk, which my understanding of the data.   (23:05): Actually it's reduction, there's a reduction in risk of getting breast cancer. If you're on biodentical hormones. So you have a reduction in risk of breast CA of cancers. It all cause mortality, the, any reason for death, you have a reduction in risk for, and then the two things that affect women as they age, the most that are the most debilitating are gonna be a fall or dementia. These are gonna be the things that end you up in, in skilled nursing for too long, and then result in death and a torturous death where you're separated from your family, because you have to be in, in, in, you know, some kind of high acuity care and then dementia. I mean, this is torturous. Not only because just in and of itself, it's absolutely demoralizing. You lose all of your, of course cognitive capacity over time, but you also, you lose your dignity more than anything.   (23:54): And this can last for a decade or more. No one knows when the torture is going to end it also it's financially bankrupting, right? Not only is it emotionally bankrupting and exhausting for any caregiver, it is financially bankrupting as well. And so if we can prevent falls and we can prevent dementia by getting on hormones, particularly if someone already has say osteoporosis or risk of bone disease or has risk of dementia, either genetically or they're starting to notice changes, particularly as they go through menopause, then the risks are far outweighed by the benefits when we consider hormone replacement therapy, if it's bio identical and the estrogen is used topically.   (24:39): Yeah. So, so well said, thank you for sharing all of that. I agree. And wouldn't you say that the causes, uh, the factors that contribute to the creation of dementia are, are similar same factors to what contribute to bone thinning and osteoporosis.   (24:59): Absolutely. Well, that's one of the amazing things about this co this complex system science approach, right? Is that instead of saying, what's that one thing that causes dementia, what we say is, Hey, how can we get every cell in the body working and functioning better? And when we do that, well, low and behold, the side effects are that your blood pressure normalizes, your hemoglobin A1C goes back to normal. You no longer have diabetes, your osteoporosis starts to improve. Yeah. The, the kind of the four part approach to like my formula for osteoporosis is estrogen replacement with, of course with progesterone and testosterone got nice and balanced and help with muscle building. So biodentical hormone replacement with estrogen being most important there, vitamin D with K minerals and then, uh, weight bearing exercise. And with those four things, I also like to check osteocalcin and beta cross ops and the blood every six months and then a DEXA scan every two years. And with that kind of plan, that basic simple plan. I see the majority of my patients, their bones get stronger on Dexus year, uh, every other year when we check.   (26:07): Yes. Awesome. So I hope everybody's listening and taking care of these things. And I know in the summit that you're hosting, I'm super excited about it. You have experts that are gonna go in way more detail into all of these. So everybody listening needs to click the link in the show notes and sign up for that now, because you know, hopefully you're getting the, the message loud and clear that dementia is preventable and you can do things and you need, need to get on this early and often and take care of it. Or if you're already walking down that lane that you need to get out of it. So definitely wanna check that out, but briefly, what are some of the other factors I know you've touched on them. We've D we've talked about genetics in a little more detail, bioidentical hormones. What are some other factors that need to be addressed?   (27:02): Yeah, well, we're giving away the keto diet guide. So I wanna talk a little bit about the fuel that brain runs on. So the vast majority of us live our days in glycolysis burning sugar for fuel. So ATP is that fuel it's like that gasoline that gets our cells going. It gives them all the energy to make new memories, to make those connections in the brain. We've all had that feeling of being kind of tired and it's a heavy lift to do something mentally. Well, if we are on our burning sugar for fuel that over time as we age, our brains are less sensitive to both sugar and to insulin that allows the sugar into the cells from the blood into the cells to be turned into fuel. So this doesn't work as efficiently. Now this is regardless of if you have diabetes or insulin resistance, anyone as we age, if we have been on a sugar, uh, burning carbohydrates for fuel.   (27:55): And when I say sugar, I also be pasta bread, corn, you know, tortilla chips, all of the carbs, even squash and fruit. When we have been having consuming that every day for our entire lives, we don't get an opportunity to go into ketosis and burn fat for fuel. And so the brain starts to become less sensitive. It no longer efficiently burns sugar. And what we can do, this is the magic of the ketogenic diet is that we can flip the switch. We can turn our energy production from turning sugar into fuel, to turning fat into fuel and just switching the fuel. I mean, this is I, this is just divine design. It makes me I would get chills. When I think about how intelligent the body is and how is able to change out the fuel and burn it really efficiently. And so what people notice is that after getting on a ketogenic diet, they sleep better. They wake up with more energy, they lose weight. If that's the goal, cuz it's, it's very modulating for weight, their blood sugar improves and their memory comes back. They feel sharper cognitively. So I don't know if Kyrin you've ever been asked like, yo, is there a way that you can get more hours in my day? I just feel like there's not enough time   (29:16): For everything,   (29:17): Especially women, right? We're like doing so much constantly juggling and a ketogenic diet in my personal experience is the way to get another for me. I get another hour and a half in my day because instead of dragging myself out of bed at six 30 or seven, I'm up at five and I'm ready to go. This is certainly for me. I personally find it magic. And for so many of my patients, there was actually a, so many of my patients also report this. Now there was a, a trial done. It was a small feasibility trial of just nine participants. It was done in Florida and it was published in January of 2022 where they took nine again, nine participants with some co measurable cognitive decline. And they put them on a ketogenic diet for just six weeks. And they had statistically significant changes in cognitive functions. Six weeks later, if you were struggling with cognitive issues, this is the first spot. This is the first place to go. This does a lot of the heavy lifting. And I would say, this is about if I were to weight all of the interventions, cuz there's a lot, right? This can start to feel overwhelming and complex. But if I were to weight them, I would say the ketogenic diet does about half of the lifting.   (30:28): I love that you really put it into perspective. So it's not about weight. I think people hear keto diet and they think it's only about weight. And a lot of people don't have a weight problem, completely dismiss it, but you really highlight the importance of it and this metabolic flexibility and theology that you get with it. It's like the diet that keeps on giving. But do you think people should do it all the time?   (30:56): Yeah. Such a great point. I'm so glad you said that because no, it's just as bad to always be burning sugar for fuel as it would be to always be burning fat for fuel. So that term metabolic flexibility is really the goal. Our ancestors, our hunter gather ancestors did not have sugar available all the time. They did not have fat available all the time. They had periods of fasting. And so again, our divine design, the way we are, our design is to go back and forth between ketosis burning fat for fuel and glycolysis burning sugar for fuel. And when we, if our body, the chance to do that, the way our hunter gather ancestors did our body works better. It's almost, it's a bit of a stressor. This concept is called the hormetic effect or hormesis where we ask the body to be under a little bit of stress, just like exercise does this. Some calorie restriction or intermittent fasting can do this. And then the ketogenic diet is a fasting mimicking diet where we stress the body a little bit in order to get it to be more resilient. And so as we do that, we, we have, we also get, as you mentioned, auto, we senescent cells are kicked out of the system. We recycle them. We get rid of them. So that the cells that, that replace them are new and more efficient, more optimally functioning.   (32:17): Yes. Awesome. What other factors? So you, you laid it out keto diet as big does 50% of the heavy lifting. I love that. What are some other factors though that people might be alerted that they might need to attend to in   (32:31): Our practice at SOCE? And certainly through the medicine protocol, we wanna be comprehensive about how we do this. So there are two big things that increase my confidence that this approach is going to work one you're early on in the disease process. So you've just started noticing changes. If you even have it all the best is prevention, right, where you've never even noticed changes. So first thing that increases confidence is that we aren't waiting until the disease is severe. The second thing that increases my confidence is how comprehensive you can be about applying the treatment plan. So if you can do all of it, then my confidence goes through the roof. This is a lot like Linda. They did it all and they did it all right out of the gate and they got the benefits. So I get it. Not everybody's able to do that.   (33:15): And even small changes you will get benefit from. But as we stack them on top of each other, you get, you get this kind of virtuous cycle. They all work better when they work together. Okay. So we wanna be systematic about how we approach this and Dr. Bren trains providers this way. And certainly at Ary, we aim to be, uh, systematic and have check boxes, right? Because it can be a lot and feel overwhelming. So the way I think about it is we want to address there's five primary things that cause complex chronic disease. In my model, that it's toxicity, which have three flavors of toxicity microtoxins or biotoxins that come from the indoor air environment, most commonly heavy metals and then chemical toxins. These are things like petrochemicals. If you live near the freeway, this can be parabens, PCBs, SS, pesticides, herbicides, things that are in groundwater that contaminate groundwater, uh, those can come from lots of areas in the environment, but we can measure all three flavors of those toxins and then we can get them out and check that box that hopefully becomes something that you complete.   (34:21): So you get rid of all the mycotoxins get rid of all the metals, change up your environment at home or the personal care products or the cleaning products you use. And then we don't have to worry about that anymore, unless there's a new exposure. So toxins, I start there because that's a nice way to kind of check that box and move on. Now your cells can work better, cuz they're not defending you from toxicity or they're not, they're not trying to, uh, the way that Dr Renison puts it. It's great. Um, he says, imagine your brain is like a country. My brain is St right? You're focused on fighting off invaders like infections or defending from things like toxins. You're not building the infrastructure of new memories of roads and schools, right? In this analogy, you're not creating new memories. You're too busy defending, right?   (35:06): All of your resources are going in that direction. So we wanna get rid of toxins. We wanna have enough nutrients, right? We've gotta have the resources. We've gotta have the building blocks. We need those amino acids. We need those fats. We need those minerals to make all of these biochemical reactions that are necessary for memory building for quick thinking, we need all of those present. If we're depleted, then that's not going to happen efficiently. And then third, we wanna address stressors on the system. So this could be things like sleep deprivation. This could be as stress from, you know, psychosocial stressors, ort S D caregivers are very high risk of developing dementia. They have two and a half times the risk of the population, just because you're a caregiver for someone with dementia, because we often right caregivers wanna put the person they're caring for first.   (35:57): So they're not getting their own exercise. They're not getting enough sleep. It's highly stressful situation. So I really encourage caregivers to listen closely and prevent this disease. Managing stressors. I often will recommend meditation. Meditation is personally something I benefit from having a regular daily practice of mindfulness, meditation, prayer, whatever feels best for you. So managing stressors is another one. Then structure is another one. So we have toxins, nutrients, stressors, structures, structure is gonna be, is your airway open? Are you getting, are you getting oxygen to your brain at night? If you have sleep AP, even if it's mild sleep apnea, you wanna treat this aggressively. I don't care what sleep medicine says. If you are having apnea events at night, that is basically mild brain damage. And I am not okay with that. We have to treat. So whether that means going to your dentist and getting an oral appliance that keeps your airway open.   (36:59): Some people use the mouth tape. I know that sounds a little bit counterintuitive, but you can tape your mouth closed at night so that it forces you to breathe through your nose. Some people will get the nasal strips that, and I like the breathe, right? If you get the generics, they don't work as well. There's of course, the C a P the, the, which has forces pressure into the airway. The other thing that you can do is get the a, a P, and this is the Cadillac. What, from what my patients tell me, this is the Cadillac of C P much more Cadillac.   (37:30): Why is that? Why did they say that?   (37:33): The con, so the AAP is alternating pressure. So the C a P is continuous pressure. And so it doesn't matter what your body's doing. There's no feedback in the system. It just blows, you know, pressure in air I interior system. And when you use the AAP, it adjusts as you're sleeping as, and as you go into different events and then getting the mask that fits right or getting the pillow, whatever, I know that it can take effort going back and forth with sleep medicine, and it can be costly, but this is worth it. Find what works for you. And I've had patients say, oh, I feel like I'm gonna die when I have that mask on. And then it, I push them like, no, no, you've gotta figure this out and do something. Whatever works for you. And then, sure enough, a couple weeks later, they're like, I can't sleep without it.   (38:21): I it's changed my life because now I wake up feeling rested for the first time in a decade or more. So treating sleep apnea, excuse me, very, very important, getting enough, sleep enough rest. And then of course, you know, structurally traumatic brain injuries put people at risk for dementia. So again, the falls, you know, if a woman has a fall regularly and she's hitting her head, this is a really big deal. I'll also say here, the research on women and traumatic brain injuries is lagging behind because a lot of this is done on professional athletes and combat veterans, where there is an epidemic of untreated brain traumatic brain injuries that happens in women who are victims of domestic abuse. And I really hope that in the next couple of years, we see a lot more resources going into this because it's just such a tragedy.   (39:14): Just the way I think about our seniors, right? Who are unnecessarily suffering with dementia is that this it's the squandered resource. They are these people at the height of their wisdom and experience who are, are leaving society. And my job is to help bring them back into the fabric of society so they can be contributing to their families while women who are victims of domestic violence is a very similar thing, but almost just more awful to think about that. We don't know what the combination of asphyxiation. So if someone's being, this gets so graphic and Ugh makes me shutter, but someone who is being both strangled and having, getting traumatic brain injuries at the same time is really having severe detrimental effects on their brain. And we don't know what if progesterone is high. What if she's at a place in her cycle where progesterone is high or low or estrogen is high or low, and these things are happening at the same time and it's happening repeatedly, right?   (40:09): If this is something that ha occurs over and over again, what we see is that these women don't get the help that they need. We don't have the science going into what's going on. And then, because they have essentially a form of dementia, their social worker, who, whoever is there to help them, doesn't realize that maybe they're not working the plan. They're not following the instructions just because they're so overwhelmed and their brain isn't working any as well as it used to because of these injuries. So I really hope that, you know, as speaking to a female audience, there needs to be more compass. There needs to be more support for those who are suffering with dome domestic abuse. And we basically need to understand that they have a form of dementia. Structurally traumatic brain injuries are a very big deal, right? If you get hit over the head with a baseball bat, if you were in a car accident, if you've slipped and fall and hit your head and lose consciousness, even if you don't lose your con lose consciousness, if you have headaches or some sort of recovery time after this is a sign that you have inflammation in your brain, and there are things that we can do right away.   (41:17): Afterwards, we use IV N a D S choline, PSAL serum, high dose fish oils, high dose meth B12, and the sooner we can treat a traumatic brain injury, the better the, the potential that there will be significant recovery. So we talked about toxins, nutrients structure, and now infections. So therefore infections that really stand out here, what is herpes? So herpes. If you ever get outbreaks, whether they're cold sores on your mouth or genital herpes, you wanna treat this relatively aggressively. So I'm a naturopathic doctor, right? I got a big med per medication person, but when it comes to herpes and, and chronic herpes outbreaks, you wanna be treating that aggressively because that can trigger inflammation in the brain, right? We know that herpes kind of stays dormant in the nervous system. Well, whenever it gets retried, that is causing more inflammation in the brain. And this comes out of studies in Taiwan where there's big epidemiological data that showed that people who were treated aggressively with like a, an antiviral, a medication, a prescription antiviral had a lower incidence of dementia than those who had herpes, but were not aggressively treated with, with the pharmaceuticals.   (42:25): So we wanna be getting ahead of that, basically, making sure that those outbreaks are not happening regularly and work with your doctor, of course, on that. So herpes is one PGE GVAs is another. So this is oral health, making sure that there aren't infections in the mouth part of this is just geography, right? You, your mouth is pretty close to your brain. The other thing is that when you get, uh, many people will know that in dentistry, if you've had a knee replacement or a hip replacement, before you go in for a cleaning, you take an antibiotic. Well, the reason is because when you get that cleaning, it introduces those bacteria into your blood and it, that bacteria can then get onto that artificial joint and not be detected and create a, a big problem. It can also create heart disease. It can create cardiac inflammation, can lead to strokes and to cardiac events, and it can trigger the inflammation associated with dementia.   (43:20): So we want to make sure that our oral health, you health starts in the gut and the gut starts in the mouth. So this is really critical that we ha see, I think, a biological dentist we're getting cone being x-rays so that we're catching any insidious small infections in there, early on and effectively treating them. So we have herpes P and GVAs and Lyme disease. So neuro Lyme can be very debilitating. There's a lot of controversy in the field around Lyme, but my opinion is that that there's ly or co-infections present for anyone exhibiting symptoms of dementia, or Alzheimer's that you wanna aggressively treat that with a Lyme literate doctor and get rid of that once. And for all, a neuro Lyme can be very debilitating and also confusing because Lyme is the great imitator. So it looks like a lot of other things and will often go undetected.   (44:13): So anyone with dementia, I do screen them for Lyme and Lyme coinfections. And then the fourth one, many people are familiar with is COVID 19, right? So I know there are a lot of people who would not associate themselves with having dementia at all, but they've suffered with the brain fog following COVID and these viruses. And I think COVID was such a great illustration that it's really these foundations. And I would say it's stressors, structure, nutrients, and, and toxic burden that create whether or not we have balance in those, right? If we have balance the right amounts in the right places at the right times, we have the right amounts of things, then our immune system functions. Well, right. And these are the people who got COVID, but never had a single symptom. And then if we have a lot of imbalance in the system, these are gonna be the people who got COVID in either passed away, right.   (45:03): Unfortunately, or who suffered with long haul COVID right. There's alway already some sort of inflammation, some sort of imbalance. And then that virus comes in and the host that body, that house, that we're in succumbs to the perpetuating cytokine storms or whatever is next in terms of signaling that comes after that virus. And so we want to make sure we're getting that house in order those foundational pieces set. And also looking at that, you know, going back and reassessing, if somebody is struggling with long haul COVID, how can we optimize this? The function of every cell in the body, get those cytokines out. Plasmapheresis is something that's been looked at for dementia, as well as for long haul. COVID so DNRs or the Gupta program. I'm, I'm a fan of the Gupta program for retraining, the limbic system and helping with long haul. COVID there's a lot that we can do. But again, this is, this is part of that landscape of things that lead to dementia over time, that triggering of inflammation of that cytokine storm, that then trigger the production of beta amyloid plaques Andal proteins, which cause are related to, um, Alzheimer's dementia.   (46:18): Woo. Okay. Everybody take a deep breath. I know some people are hyperventilating right now, cuz they were with you on the keto diet and now they're like, oh, I have to do what. Okay. Just breathe. Y'all you're gonna go to the summit. Number one. And you're gonna get way more detail on everything. Dr. Heather has talked to you about today. So you're gonna know exactly what to do after you go to the summit. Exactly. So don't hyperventilate. You don't have to learn it all today and you're gonna go download her keto guide. Number one, we're gonna have the link in the show notes. Um, but I'll, I'll speak it out. It's SOCE right. S O L C E R e.com.   (46:59): Yeah. SOCE solutions for the Cerebra soul or soul shining light. Uh, like sun on the brain. SOCE   (47:06): There we go. Okay. So we'll have that in the show notes, we will have the link to join the summit in the show notes. So you definitely wanna go there. If you're driving, don't click it now, but wherever you're going, when you get there, click it and sign up. You will have experts. There are gonna tell you exactly what to do, including me. We'll talk about biodentical hormones. Of course, my favorite topic, Dr. Heather, thank you so much for this very insightful and inspiring. Look at dementia and Alzheimer's and how we don't have to go down that road. Have, you know, that story that the person's walking down the road and every time they walk down the street, they fall into the same hole. And then even though they try and go, the next time they try to walk around it, they end up falling in it and sometimes they walk past it, but then they end up falling in the hole and sometimes you, the person eventually learns that they can just go down a different street. So it kind of reminds me of that story. You can just go down a different street. People, you don't have to go down the street that most people in, in developed countries are going down towards, uh, dementia or cancer. All the things we're talking about also reduce your risk of cancer. Oh, by the way,   (48:21): All those scary diseases of aging. They are complex chronic diseases and conventional medicine, unfortunately does not shine in that space. Right? If you're in a car accident, if you have a bacterial infection, get to the ER, get to urgent care. But when we talk about diabetes, dementias cancers, this is really where we need to take a step back and take this more comprehensive complex system science approach and get all of those cells working optimally.   (48:50): Yes. Awesome. Well, thank you so much, Dr. Heather, we will see you at the summit. Thank you for joining us.   (48:55): Thank you so much. It's been such a pleasure to be here   (48:58): And thank you all for joining us for another episode of the hormone prescription podcast with Dr. Kirin. I know that you learned something that you can start implementing today in your life to improve your health and go down a different street. I look forward to hearing what that is. Join me on Facebook or Instagram at Kirin Dunston MD, and we will have a conversation about it. And until next week, peace, love and hormones y'all.   (49:25): Thank you so much for listening. I know that incredible vitality occurs for women over 40. When we learn to speak hormone and balance these vital regulators to create the health and the life that we deserve. If you're enjoying this podcast, I'd love it. If you give me a review and subscribe, it really does help this podcast out so much. You can visit the hormone prescription.com, where we have some free gifts for you, and you can sign up to have a hormone evaluation with me on the podcast to gain clarity into your personal situation until next time, remember, take small steps each day to balance your hormones and watch the wonderful changes in your health that begin to unfold for you. Talk to you soon.   Learn how to begin Keto, get food lists, how-tos, tips, and checklists from Dr. Heather Sandison's free Keto Diet Guide. Get it here: https://www.solcere.com/   Reverse Alzheimer's Summit 2022 How This One Diet Is Reversing Dementia... Plus 50+ Other Secrets for Protecting Your Brain From Alzheimer's Disease. We're breaking down the latest advancements in science, medicine, technology, neurology, nutrition, and more to help you reclaim your memories and your life at The Reverse Alzheimer's Summit 2.0   CLICK HERE to register.   Feeling tired? Can't seem to lose weight, no matter how hard you try? It might be time to check your hormones.   Most people don't even know that their hormones could be the culprit behind their problems. But at The Hormone Club, we specialize in hormone testing and treatment. We can help you figure out what's going on with your hormones and get you back on track.   We offer advanced hormone testing and treatment from Board Certified Practitioners, so you can feel confident that you're getting the best possible care. Plus, our convenient online consultation process makes it easy to get started.   Try The Hormone Club for 30 days and see how it can help you feel better than before.   CLICK HERE to sign up: https://www.thehormoneclub.com/home-page-essential  

The Suitcase And The Scribe
Joined by Chris Johnston from TSN

The Suitcase And The Scribe

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 58:11


The play on the ice may be all wrapped up, but the chaos off the ice is just beginning. Scott Burnside returned to the show this week as he and Mike McKenna welcomed Chris Johnston from TSN. Chris is in Montreal for the NHL Entry Draft, which gets going on Thursday night. He talked about the vibes around the draft being in person for the first time in a few years; however, while it may be in person now in a couple of years, that may be changing.He also spoke about the big trade over the weekend, which saw Ryan McDonagh move to Nashville from Tampa Bay. Along with that, he briefly dove into the free agency talk. After Mike and Scott's conversation with Chris, the two of them dove into the other news around the NHL, and there was a lot of it. Many new head coaches are hired, with announcements coming in Detroit, Boston and Winnipeg. On top of that, San Jose brought in the first black general manager in NHL history. Then finally, of course, free agency starts next week, so they had to talk about that too.You can hear all that and more in episode 42 of The Suitcase and The Scribe. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

DK Pittsburgh Sports Radio
DK's Daily Shot of Penguins: Don't drag this to Montreal!

DK Pittsburgh Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 18:03


Don't drag this Evgeni Malkin, Kris Letang negotiation to Montreal's draft floor! Hear award-winning columnist Dejan Kovacevic's Daily Shots of Steelers, Penguins and Pirates -- three separate podcasts -- every weekday morning on the DK Pittsburgh Sports podcasting network, available on all platforms: https://linktr.ee/dkpghsports Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Motorsport101
Episode #375: 2022 Formula 1 Canadian Grand Prix Report

Motorsport101

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 46:03


Well, this was a dramatic one. Formula 1's next move as the travelling circus was Montreal for the first Canadian Grand Prix in 3 years, and in it, we had a classic late Safety Car sprint finish from Max Verstappen and... "checks notes"... Carlos Sainz? Yep, with Charles Leclerc starting from the back with a fresh power unit, it was up to Carlos to try and restore some pride for Maranello... even if he just came up short. We break it down here! We also talk about judgement day for the porposing issue. The FIA did indeed step in and issue a technical directive about how the issue will be managed going forward. Floors will be monitored and discussions will be held about a maximum force of bounce allowed. Is this the right move going forward? And we also talk about a loaded midfield, with Fernando Alonso, Zhou Guanyu, Valtteri Bottas and more all involved as "El Plan" nearly came to pass for the man starting from the front row for the first time in nearly a decade. All of that and more on a loaded Motorsport101!

Locked On Canadiens - Daily Podcast on the Montreal Canadiens
Episode 650 - Last minute NHL Draft thoughts and can the Canadiens trade for Jesse Puljujärvi?

Locked On Canadiens - Daily Podcast on the Montreal Canadiens

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 30:57


Inside today's Locked on Canadiens: The NHL Draft is just 48 hours away, and the hosts have some final thoughts as the Canadiens picking first overall draws near. Scott gives his final thoughts on the overwhelmingly large debate surrounding Juraj Slafkovsky, and both hosts agree on one fact, they don't dislike Slafkovsky the player. They do both also agree that picking him isn't the proper overall fit for what the Montreal Canadiens need at this exact moment. Then, in a special Tuesday Mailbag, the hosts answer a ton of listener questions like: What is a realistic trade up opportunity if the second overall pick isn't available? Is there a way for Montreal to trade for the suddenly available Jesse Puljujärvi? What if Montreal is trading up for a defencemen instead of a winger, and who is our greatest wish if they were to trade up between 10th and 20th overall? Also, which bird is our host's favourite? Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Control The Room
Episode 103: The Energy Of Collective Moments

Control The Room

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 38:43


“The main objective is to drive economic impact for our city, for our province, for our country. So, we need to give a platform to entrepreneurs to have their brand shine, but we also need to architect them meeting people. So, how do we source the audience? How do we create moments of connection throughout the experience? How do we hype people before the event to come and discover these talents? That's really kind of what's driving the whole vision. That's how we're thinking about designing our stages, our content. That's how we're thinking about having a lot of collaboration and all the activities that we're doing because we want to multiply the number of times people will collaborate and will meet humans." - Anick Beaulieu In this episode of Control the Room, I had the pleasure of speaking with Anick Beaulieu about her experience designing impactful collective moments for C2 in Montreal.  She shares how having the right questions lead to a creative vision.  Later, Anick explains why intention is the key to collective moments and conversation.  We then discuss fostering tan health and connection in times of crises.  Listen in for more inspiration in using flagship events and collaboration to drive economic development in your region.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 161 Part 2: Modern Marvels: Why Collectors Are Connecting with Modernist Jewelry

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 26:42


What you'll learn in this episode: Why the best modernist pieces are fetching record prices at auction today How “Messengers of Modernism” helped legitimize modernist jewelry as an art form The difference between modern jewelry and modernist jewelry Who the most influential modernist jewelers were and where they drew their inspiration from Why modernist jewelry was a source of empowerment for women About Toni Greenbaum Toni Greenbaum is a New York-based art historian specializing in twentieth and twenty-first century jewelry and metalwork. She wrote Messengers of Modernism: American Studio Jewelry 1940-1960 (Montréal: Musée des Arts Décoratifs and Flammarion, 1996), Sam Kramer: Jeweler on the Edge (Stuttgart: Arnoldsche Art Publishers, 2019) and “Jewelers in Wonderland,” an essay on Sam Kramer and Karl Fritsch for Jewelry Stories: Highlights from the Collection 1947-2019 (New York: Museum of Arts and Design and Arnoldsche, 2021), along with numerous book chapters, exhibition catalogues, and essays for arts publications. Greenbaum has lectured internationally at institutions such as the Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich; Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague; Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven; Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum and Museum of Arts and Design, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and Savannah College of Art and Design Museum of Art, Savannah. She has worked on exhibitions for several museums, including the Victoria and Albert in London, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, and Bard Graduate Center Gallery, New York. Additional Resources: Link to Purchase Books Toni's Instagram The Jewelry Library  Photos Available on TheJewelryJourney.com Transcript: Once misunderstood as an illegitimate art form, modernist jewelry has come into its own, now fetching five and six-figure prices at auction. Modernist jewelry likely wouldn't have come this far without the work of Toni Greenbaum, an art historian, professor and author of “Messengers of Modernism: American Studio Jewelry, 1940 to 1960.” She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the history of modernist jewelry; why it sets the women who wear it apart; and where collectors should start if they want to add modernist pieces to their collections. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Please make sure you subscribe so you can hear part two as soon as it comes out later this week.    Today my guest is art historian, professor and author Toni Greenbaum. She is the author of the iconic tome, “Messengers of Modernism: American Studio Jewelry, 1940 to 1960,” which analyzes the output of America's modernist jewelers. Most recently, she authored “Sam Kramer: Jeweler on the Edge,” a biography of the jeweler Sam Kramer. Every time I say jeweler I think I'm using the world a little loosely, but we're so glad to have you here today. Thank you so much.   Toni: I am so glad to be here, Sharon. Thank you so much for inviting me. It's been many years coming.   Sharon: I'm glad we connected. Tell me about your jewelry journey. It sounds very interesting.   Toni: Well, there's a lot you don't know about my jewelry journey. My jewelry journey began when I was a preteen. I just became fascinated with Native American, particularly Navajo, jewelry that I would see in museum gift shops. I started to buy it when I was a teenager, what I could afford. In those days, I have to say museum gift shops were fabulous, particularly the Museum of Natural History gift shop, the Brooklyn Museum gift shop. They had a lot of ethnographic material of very high quality. So, I continued to buy Native American jewelry. My mother used to love handcrafted jewelry, and she would buy it in whatever craft shops or galleries she could find.    Then eventually in my 20s and 30s, I got outpriced. Native American jewelry was becoming very, very fashionable, particularly in the late 60s, 1970s. I started to see something that looked, to me, very much like Native American jewelry, but it was signed. It had names on it, and some of them sounded kind of Mexican—in fact, they were Mexican. So, I started to buy Mexican jewelry because I could afford it. Then that became very popular when names like William Spratling and Los Castillo and Hector Aguilar became known. I saw something that looked like Mexican jewelry and Navajo jewelry, but it wasn't; it was made by Americans. In fact, it would come to be known as modernist jewelry. Then I got outpriced with that, but that's the start of my jewelry journey.   Sharon: So, you liked jewelry from when you were a youth.    Toni: Oh, from when I was a child. I was one of these little three, four-year-olds that was all decked out. My mother loved jewelry. I was an only child, and I was, at that time, the only grandchild. My grandparents spoiled me, and my parents spoiled me, and I loved jewelry, so I got a lot of jewelry. That and Frankie Avalon records.   Sharon: Do you still collect modernist? You said you were getting outpriced. You write about it. Do you still collect it?   Toni: Not really. The best of the modernist jewelry is extraordinarily expensive, and unfortunately, I want the best. If I see something when my husband and I are antiquing or at a flea market or at a show that has style and that's affordable, occasionally I'll buy it, but I would not say that I can buy the kind of jewelry I want in the modernist category any longer. I did buy several pieces in the early 1980s from Fifty/50 Gallery, when they were first putting modernist jewelry on the map in the commercial aspect. I was writing about it; they were selling it. They were always and still are. Mark McDonald still is so generous with me as far as getting images and aiding my research immeasurably. Back then, the modernist jewelry was affordable, and luckily I did buy some major pieces for a tenth of what they would get today.   Sharon: Wow! When you say the best of modernist jewelry today, Calder was just astronomical. We'll put that aside.   Toni: Even more astronomical: there's a Harry Bertoia necklace that somebody called my attention to that is coming up at an auction at Christie's. If they don't put that in their jewelry auctions, they'll put it in their design auctions. I think it's coming up at the end of June; I forget the exact day. The estimate on the Harry Bertoia necklace is $200,000 to $300,000—and this is a Harry Bertoia necklace. I'm just chomping at the bit to find out what it, in fact, is going to bring, but that's the estimate they put, at $200,000 to $300,000.   Sharon: That's a lot of money. What holds your interest in modernist jewelry?   Toni: The incredible but very subtle design aspect of it. Actually, tomorrow I'm going to be giving a talk on Art Smith for GemEx. Because my background is art history, one of the things I always do when I talk about these objects is to show how they were inspired by the modern art movements. This is, I think, what sets modernist jewelry apart from other categories of modern and contemporary jewelry. There are many inspirations, but it is that they are very much inspired by Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Biomorphism, etc., depending on the artist. Some are influenced by all of the above, and I think I saw that. I saw it implicitly before I began to analyze it in the jewelry.    This jewelry is extraordinarily well-conceived. A lot of the craftsmanship is not pristine, but I have never been one for pristine craftsmanship. I love rough surfaces, and I love the process to show in the jewelry. Much of the modernist jewelry is irreverent—I use the word irreverent instead of sloppy—as far as the process is concerned. It was that hands-on, very direct approach, in addition to this wonderful design sense, which, again, came from the modern art movements. Most of the jewelers—not all of them, but most of them—lived either in New York or in Northern or Southern California and had access to museums, and these people were aesthetes. They would go to museums. They would see Miro's work; they would see Picasso's work, and they would definitely infuse their designs with that sensibility.   Sharon: Do you think that jumped out at you, the fact that they were inspired by different art movements, because you studied art history? You teach it, or you did teach it at one time?    Toni: No, just history of jewelry. I majored in art history, but I've never taught art history. I've taught history of jewelry. We can argue about whether jewelry is art or not, but history of jewelry is what I've taught.   Sharon: I've taken basic art history, but I couldn't tell you some of the movements you're talking about. I can't identify the different movements. Do you think it jumped out at you because you're knowledgeable?   Toni: Yes, definitely, because I would look at Art Smith and I would say, “That's Biomorphism.” I would see it. It was obvious. I would look at Sam Kramer and I would say, “This is Surrealism.” He was called a surrealist jeweler back in his day, when he was practicing and when he had his shop on 8th Street. I would look at Rebajes and I would see Cubism. Of course, it was because I was well-versed in those movements, because what I was always most interested in when I was studying art history were the more modern movements.   Sharon: Did you think you would segue to jewelry in general? Was that something on your radar?   Toni: That's a very interesting question because when I was in college, I had a nucleus of professors who happened to have come from Cranbrook.   Sharon: I'm sorry, from where?   Toni: Cranbrook School of Art.   Sharon: O.K., Cranbrook.   Toni: I actually took a metalsmithing class as an elective, just to see what it was because I was so interested in jewelry, although I was studying what I call legitimate art history. I was so interested in jewelry that I wanted to see what the process was. I probably was the worst jeweler that ever tried to make jewelry, but I learned what it is to make. I will tell you something else, Sharon, it is what has given me such respect for the jewelers, because when you try to do it yourself and you see how challenging it is, you really respect the people who do it miraculously even more.    So, I took this class just to see what it was, and the teacher—I still remember his name. His name was Cunningham; I don't remember his first name. He was from Cranbrook, and he sent the class to a retail store in New York on 53rd Street, right opposite MOMA, called America House.   Sharon: Called American House?   Toni: America House. America House was the retail enterprise of the American Craft Council. They had the museum, which was then called the Museum of Contemporary Crafts; now it's called MAD, Museum of Arts and Design. They had the museum, and they had a magazine, Craft Horizons, which then became American Craft, and then they had this retail store. I went into America House—and this was the late 1960s—and I knew I had found my calling. I looked at this jewelry, which was really fine studio jewelry. It was done by Ronald Pearson; it was done by Jack Kripp. These were the people that America House carried. I couldn't afford to buy it. I did buy some of the jewelry when they went out of business and had a big sale in the early 1970s. At that time I couldn't, but I looked at the jewelry and the holloware, and I had never seen anything like it. Yes, I had seen Native American that I loved, and I had seen Mexican that I loved. I hadn't yet seen modernist; that wasn't going to come until the early 1980s. But here I saw this second generation of studio jewelers, and I said, “I don't know what I'm going to do with this professionally, but I know I've got to do something with it because this is who I am. This is what I love.”    Back in the late 1960s, it was called applied arts. Anything that was not painting and sculpture was applied art. Ceramics was applied art; furniture was applied art; textiles, jewelry, any kind of metalwork was applied art. Nobody took it seriously as an academic discipline in America, here in this country. Then I went on to graduate school, still in art history. I was specializing in what was then contemporary art, particularly color field painting, but I just loved what was called the crafts, particularly the metalwork. I started to go to the library and research books on jewelry. I found books on jewelry, but they were all published in Europe, mostly England. There were things in other languages other than French, which I could read with a dictionary. There were books on jewelry history, but they were not written in America; everything was in Europe. So, I started to read voraciously about the history of jewelry, mostly the books that came out of the Victoria & Albert Museum. I read all about ancient jewelry and medieval jewelry and Renaissance jewelry. Graham Hughes, who was then the director of the V&A, had written a book, “Modern Jewelry,” and it had jewelry by artists, designed by Picasso and Max Ernst and Brach, including things that were handmade in England and all over Europe. I think even some of the early jewelers in our discipline were in that book. If I remember correctly, I think Friedrich Becker, for example, might have been in Graham Hughes' “Modern Jewelry,” because that was published, I believe, in the late 1960s.    So, I saw there was a literature in studio jewelry; it just wasn't in America. Then I found a book on William Spratling, this Mexican jeweler whose work I had collected. It was not a book about his jewelry; it was an autobiography about himself that obviously he had written, but it was so rich in talking about the metalsmithing community in Taxco, Mexico, which is where he, as an American, went to study the colonial architecture. He wound up staying and renovating the silver mines that had been dormant since the 18th century. It was such a great story, and I said, “There's something here,” but no graduate advisor at that time, in the early 70s, was going to support you in wanting to do a thesis on applied art, no matter what the medium. But in the back of my mind, I always said, “I'm going to do something with this at some point.”    Honestly, Sharon, I never thought I would live to see the day that this discipline is as rich as it is, with so much literature, with our publishers publishing all of these fantastic jewelry books, and other publishers, like Flammarion in Paris, which published “Messengers of Modernism.” Then there's the interest in Montreal at the Museum of Fine Arts, which is the museum that has the “Messengers of Modernism” collection. It has filtered into the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, Dallas, obviously MAD. So many museums are welcoming. I never thought I would live to see the day. It really is so heartening. I don't have words to express how important this is, but I just started to do it. In the early 1970s or mid-1970s—I don't think my daughter was born yet. My son was a toddler. I would sit in my free moments and write an article about William Spratling, because he was American. He went to Mexico, but he was American. He was the only American I knew of that I could write about. Not that that article was published at that time, but I was doing the research and I was writing it.   Sharon: That's interesting. If there had been a discipline of jewelry history or something in the applied arts, if an advisor had said, “Yes, I'll support you,” or “Why don't you go ahead and get your doctorate or your master's,” that's something you would have done?   Toni: Totally, without even a thought, yes. Because when I was studying art history, I would look at Hans Holbein's paintings of Henry VIII and Sir Thomas More, and all I would do was look at the jewelry they were wearing, the chains and the badges on their berets. I said, “Oh my god, that is so spectacular.” Then I learned that Holbein actually designed the jewelry, which a lot of people don't know. I said, “There is something to this.” I would look at 18th century paintings with women, with their pearls and rings and bracelets, and all I would do was look at the jewelry. I would have in a heartbeat. If I could have had a graduate advisor, I would have definitely pursued that.   Sharon: When you say you never thought you'd live to see the day when modernist jewelry is so popular—not that it's so surprising, but you are one of the leaders of the movement. When I mentioned to somebody, “Oh, I like modernist jewelry,” the first thing they said was, “Well, have you read ‘Messengers of Modernism?'” As soon as I came home—I was on a trip—I got it. So, you are one of the leaders.   Toni: Well, it is interesting. It is sort of the standard text, but people will say, “Well, why isn't Claire Falkenstein in the book? She's so important,” and I say, “It's looked upon as a standard text, but the fact is it's a catalogue to an exhibition. That was the collection.” Fifty/50 Gallery had a private collection. As I said before, they were at the forefront of promoting and selling modernist jewelry, but they did have a private collection. That collection went to Montreal in the 1990s because at that time, there wasn't an American museum that was interested in taking that collection. That book is the catalogue of that finite collection. So, there are people who are major modernist jewelers—Claire Falkenstein is one that comes to mind—that are not in that collection, so they're not in the book. There's a lot more to be said and written about that movement.   Sharon: I'm sure you've been asked this a million times: What's the difference between modern and modernist jewelry?   Toni: Modern is something that's up to date at a point in time, but modernist jewelry is—this is a word we adopted. The word existed, but we adopted it to define the mid-20th century studio jewelry, the post-war jewelry. It really goes from 1940 to the 1960s. That's it; that's the time limit of modernist jewelry. Again, it's a word we appropriated. We took that word and said, “We're going to call this category modernist jewelry because we have to call it something, so that's the term.” Modern means up to date. That's just a general word.   Sharon: When you go to a show and see things that are in the modernist style, it's not truly modernist if it was done today, it wasn't done before 1960.   Toni: Right, no. Modernist jewelry is work that's done in that particular timeframe and that also subscribes to what I was saying, this appropriation of motifs from the modern art movement. There was plenty of costume jewelry and fine jewelry being done post-war, and that is jewelry that is mid-20th century. You can call it mid-20th century modern, which confuses the issue even more, but it's not modernist jewelry. Modernist jewelry is jewelry that was done in the studio by a silversmith and was inspired by the great movements in modern art and some other inspirations. Art Smith was extremely motivated by African motifs, but also by Calder and by Biomorphism. It's not religious. There are certainly gray areas, but in general, that's modernist jewelry.    Sharon: I feel envious when you talk about everything that was going in on New York. I have a passion, but there's no place on the West Coast that I would go to look at some of this stuff.   Toni: I'll tell you one of the ironies, Sharon. Post-war, definitely through the 1950s and early 1960s, there must have been 13 to 15 studio shops by modernist jewelers. You had Sam Kramer on 8th Street and Art Smith on 4th Street and Polo Bell, who was on 4th Street and then he was on 8th Street, and Bill Tendler, and you had Jules Brenner, and Henry Steig was Uptown. Ed Wiener was all over the place. There were so many jewelers in New York, and I never knew about them. I never went to any of their shops. I used to hang out in the Village when I was a young teenager, walked on 4th Street; never saw Art Smith's shop. He was there from 1949 until 1977. I used to walk on 8th Street, and Sam Kramer was on the second floor. I never looked up, and I didn't know this kind of jewelry existed. In those days, like I said, I was still collecting Navajo.

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style
333: What I Do to Lessen Jet Lag (flying from the West Coast to Western Europe)

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 43:29 Very Popular


"When it comes to jet lag, there ain't — I report from the window seat of a bustling café in Montreal, hence this paraphrasing of Leonard Cohen — no cure." —Mark VanHoenacker, a Boeing 787 pilot for British Airways and the author of Imagine A City: A Pilot's Journey Across the Urban World  The first time I flew abroad from Oregon to Europe (in my case France), concerns about jet lag were far from my mind; in fact, because I had so many other questions to answer and unknowns dancing in my mind, I didn't think about. I was 20 and planning to study abroad during my junior summer of college in Angers, France. I saved up for the $800 round-trip economy-class ticket (2000) by working three part-time jobs, took the necessary prerequisite courses, conferenced with my professor de Français, and along with not knowing I would need an adapter and converter to at the very least blow-out my hair and curled it, I also didn't think to investigate what jet lag was. Being the first member of my immediate family to travel abroad to Europe, I was figuring it all out for the first time on my own, and jet lag was never a word that popped up in conversations. Fast forward to 2012 and my second trip to France that included England as well. Thankfully I had a close friend who having lived in England for a time and thus traveled back and forth from the west coast to England often, had a few suggestions for combatting jet lag. Nothing worked superbly, but none of the advice hindered my thorough enjoyment of visiting London for the first time, and then returning to Paris. Jet lag persisted, but if it meant I would be able to be in the two countries I loved, it didn't matter a bit. Each trip following the two shared above, 2013, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2022, I have gradually tried to tweak, adjust and determine what works best to mitigate jet lag's effects, and while I have come to the same conclusion as the British Airways pilot above, as he too shares in his recent article in The Financial Times, there are ways to lessen the discomfort and the prolonged effects. But first, it is important to note what jet lag is — any time you travel quickly across two or more time zones and is caused when rapid travel throws off our circadian rhythm - the biological clock that helps control when we wake and fall asleep (source)  The more readers I hear from and fellow travelers I meet, the more I realize that where you are traveling from (home departure city), thus the amount of time difference you are undergoing, makes a difference, and so I decided to write specifically from my experience as a traveler from the west coast of the United States venturing to Western Europe where most of my excursions take me. With that said, as many readers/listeners of TSLL blog/The Simple Sophisticate podcast are Francophiles and/or Anglophiles and our destinations are the same even if our departure city is different, it is my hope that some of the tips shared today may be applicable when tailored to your flying itinerary. ~Note to readers: More details are discussed in the audio version of this episode than are shared below, so be sure to tune in. 1.Depart in the early afternoon When scheduling past trips, excluding my most recent trip in 2022, I selected early morning flights to give myself more time at my desired destination. As well, often earlier flights in the day were a bit less expensive (I have not noticed this to be the case as of late, but in the past). However, when taking the most direct flight possible, leaving in the afternoon on the west coast has the arrival time in France or England in the early evening the following day which lends itself well to having a nice meal before exhaustedly going to sleep in a comfortable bed. As well, leaving in the afternoon gives you time to gradually begin the day, go through your regular routines, partake in a healthy 30-minute or hour-long exercise routine, and generally, prepare to sit for a very long time. When I am able to exercise and not feel rushed, the rest of the day and any unknowns that pop up are easier to navigate, and I can more easily relax since my body has had the opportunity to fully move, stretch and receive what it needs. 2. Arrive in the late evening in Europe If leaving in the early afternoon is not an option, at least try to schedule your arrival time in Europe in the early evening for the reasons shared above. Whether you were able to catch some sleep on the plane or not, your mind as well as your body is tired and after being fed well in your destination city, wants to stretch out and relax. Rather than fight trying to stay awake until night arrives should you arrive in the morning or early afternoon, when you arrive in the evening, you don't have to fight your body and just let it do what it yearns for. 3. The fewer connecting flights the better If at all possible, scheduling-wise and/or budget-wise, choose a direct flight, or the closest thing to it (I have to take a short hop from Redmond to an international airport, typically Seattle, Portland or San Fran, and then my international flight departs to Europe from there). Not only do you save time, but it is less stressful, thus it doesn't exhaust your mind unnecessarily which is already going to be confused when you arrive due to the time change. Mind exhaustion on top of jet lag prolongs your ability to adjust, and the shorter the hop, the less stress incurred. The many farms seen in the countryside in Normandy. 4. Try to sleep on the flight Even if for only a few hours, do your best to find a way to experience real sleep. Real sleep where the hours invisibly whisk by and you wake up feeling somewhat, if not quite a bit, rested and energized. In my experience, the fewer hours I am able to sleep on the trip, the harder/longer jet lag is to recover from on that particular end of the trip. 5. Invest in Business Class if/when possible In episode #329 I shared my experience flying Business Class on British Airways during my recent trip in April 2022 to Britain and France. Needless to say, even if it takes a bit longer to save up for each subsequent trip abroad in order to fly in such comfort, I will do it. It is worth it, largely because of the reduction of stress and my ability to sleep well. And as I shared in #4 above, when you sleep well during the flight, you reduce (not eliminate) jet lag. My flight to Europe in Business Class provided more than 4 hours of sleep, and while I did feel the effects of jet lagged for about two days upon arrival, this was far better than it has been in the past. No doubt my excitement being back in Paris helped to overcome some of the feeling, but as I assessed what else may have contributed to an easing of this expected feeling of exhaustion, confusion, malaise and inability to sleep naturally, the one primary variable that was different was the flight I chose and the amount of sleep and quality of sleep I received. My seat in Business Class on British Airways, bedding products from The White Company 6. Hydrate as much as possible while flying While toasting with sparkling wine as the journey begins is tempting and certainly something I enjoy doing as well, refrain from too much alcohol as it dehydrates you. Instead, seek out as much water as you can, and even the multiple bathroom-runs are good for you as it gets you up and out of your seat which is an activity that sets your circadian rhythm. The more you can do to set your circadian rhythm to knowing when it needs to be awake and when it needs to rest (the reason why airlines dim the cabin light uniformly for everyone and set the meals as they do), the more quickly your mind will be able to settle into the new sleep schedule. 7. Take a hot bath before bed Whether at your travel destination or when you arrive home, just before you want to go to bed, take a hot bath as this helps to relax the body and interestingly enough, drop the body temperature which helps you fall asleep. A deep soak of a bath at The Savoy while staying in London. Take the tour of our stay in this detailed post. 8. Begin to simulate, ever so slightly and gradually, the new time zone before you leave While a subtle shift at home may not seem beneficial, for me, this is actually quite possible as I like to go to bed early, and an excuse to go to bed one hour sooner, wake up one hour earlier is not a detriment. Of course, this will depend on your work and home schedule, but if you can, it may reduce jet lag a bit so it won't last as long when you arrive. 9. Be gentle and patient with yourself, gradually shift into the new time schedule Our brains are wonderful tools, but it takes time to change them, and that includes its sleep schedule. When our sleep schedule becomes disrupted, our mind is confused as to what it is supposed to do, so be gentle and patient with it. When I returned home this past April, it took about 7-10 days to get over my jet lag. Finding myself falling asleep on the sofa at 5pm with eyelids I could not bribe to stay open at any cost, I let myself fall asleep, and pushed myself to stay awake an hour later each night until I was finally back to my regular bedtime routine. With all of that said . . . 10. Understand there are many jet lag remedies, but honor what works for you I won't list the suggestions I have received over the years I haven't found helpful for me, or the beliefs from other travelers about what is most difficult (direction of flight) because what is true for them is true for them. However, sharing what has worked and why I have discovered it does work, had I been able to understand these truths, is something I would have loved to have known earlier in my travels but likely could not have known. Knowing that I needed to, for want of a better phrase, 'feel my way' through jet lag to figure out what happens and how I respond to it gave me the tools to figure out how to reduce its effects that most negatively affected me. Self-awareness not only helps you live a life you love living in a general over-arching way; it also affords you helpful insights in how to work well with jet lag to best fit your needs to ensure the best trip and experience possible. For example, as an HSP, sleep is especially important, whereas for non-HSPs being able to function well on 5-7 hours of sleep may be no problem. Not so in my case, so now that I know the value of sleep for my well-being, I invest in ensuring I receive a good night of sleep when I travel as I want to enjoy my trip as much as possible, and that includes on the flight. When we have the fortunate opportunity to travel abroad and cross many time zones, the price of jet lag is a small price to expense, but being aware of how it affects our minds and physical well-being is helpful so that we don't blame our mental lag on the destination but rather our mind's gradual settling in to the new time zone we have taken it to. Wishing you many wonderful trips and stamps in your passport! Bon Voyage! Petit Plaisir ~Herbed Salmon ~click here for the full recipe. ~Top image: arriving in London, looking out over Kensington, Royal Albert Hall

The VANcast with JPat and Drancer - A show about the Vancouver Canucks

Thomas and Farhan recap the three year extension for Brock Boeser, what the term and money means for the player and the organization and what J.T. Miller's future is with the Canucks, who should deal the star forward if a new deal isn't reached by training camp. Plus the guys discuss the additions to the Canucks coaching staff, including Mike Yeo and Trent Cull with the big club, and former Hawks head coach Jeremy Colliton who will coach the farm team in Abbotsford and Farhan and Thomas look at possible first round selections for the Canucks who select 15 on Thursday night in Montreal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Toronto Maple Leafs Podcast
Offside Draft Special With Peter Harling

Toronto Maple Leafs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 44:38


Offside brings you our second draft special with Peter Harling of Dobber Prospects and more. - Talk who may Montreal take first overall - Will Hughes make a blockbuster deal and get the 2nd overall as well - The Russian factor and how it will play out - Players moving up and down the draft board - Brad Lambret what happens here - The Leafs and what they may do in this draft and who is there guy - Goalies int eh draft of lack there of - Leafs prospects no one is talking about like Ty Voit - Robertson if healthy can be a weapon - Knies is special

The Corona Diaries
Chapter 113. Navel poking is a definite no-no

The Corona Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 56:30


There is always a slight sense of apprehension when Ant & I reconvene to record a new episode of TCD and I am overseas. This week I am in Montreal so we were at the mercy of hotel wi-fi and a strong Nor' easter, and as a consequence there are a few bits of mid-atlantic turbulence baked into the conversation - but I think we just about got away with it. It is some testament to the power of Zoom that we even manage to cobble TCD together at all in these moments, especially when you consider that the original plan was for Ant & I to get together once a month and batch-record. How things have changed. Anyway, here it is and Happy Canada Day! Love'n'skiving off h

The Mike Herrera Podcast
#417 Professional Procrastination

The Mike Herrera Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 52:45


Your Voicemails, Procrastinating my latest Bass guitar tech project, MxPx booking and playing festivals, Creative hustle lifestyle and more!! This is a good one. Happy 4th of July and Happy 30th anniversary to MXPX on July 6! MxPx.com for our show info starting September 17 - Music 4 Cancer Fest in Montreal, Quebec Canada ------------ Leave a message with your question or topic on the Mike Herrera Podcast voicemail. (some could be aired on future episodes of the podcast) 1-360-830-6660 (US number) 3 min limit per message. TEXT LIST - Join our Text list by texting MXPX to 31996 MUSIC -LISTENER CHALLENGE- Listen to MXPX Self Titled Deluxe Album at least once a day. Use hashtag #mxpx or #mxpxsuperchallenge The MXPX Super Challenge Playlist MXPX - Self Titled Deluxe Edition   I now have an Artist Series Music Man Stingray from Ernie Ball! You can order straight from the shop on the Music Man website.  A portion of proceeds goes to MusicCares!  MIKE HERRERA SIGNATURE SERIES BASS If you like the podcast- Subscribe, rate and review on Apple. Support what I do at MXPX.com  Producing and editing by Bob McKnight. @bobandkatieshow

The Tom Schimmer Podcast
Tales from MTL | Tyrone McNeil | Assessment Analogies

The Tom Schimmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 83:25


In Don't @ Me (2:53), Tom recounts his trip to Montreal with his son to see their first-ever Formula 1 race. Then, Tom is joined by FNESC President Tyrone McNeil (19:46) to discuss the state of indigenous education. Finally, in "Assess THAT with Tom & Nat" (1:04:56), Tom and special guest Natalie Vardabasso talk about some effective analogies that help clarify some complex assessment topics. Tyrone on Twitter: @STCTye Tyrone on LinkedIn: Tyrone McNeil   NEW BOOK BY TOM: "Concise Answers to FAQs about Assessment & Grading"     UPCOMING PROFESSIONAL LEARNING   Annual Conference on Assessment & Grading  Austin, TX (July 18-20, 2022) Register Here     Grading from the Inside Out (2-Day Workshop)  Long Beach, CA (September 21-22, 2022) Register Here Minneapolis, MN (December 1-2, 2022) Register Here     Teach Better Conference (CODE: Schimmer22) Akron, OH (October 14-15, 2022) Register Here     CONNECT WITH NATALIE VARDABASSO Nat on Twitter: @natabasso EduCrush on Twitter: @educrushpod EduCrush Podcast: #EduCrush on Apple   CONNECT WITH TOM SCHIMMER Email: tomschimmerpod@gmail.com Twitter: @TomSchimmerPod Twitter: @TomSchimmer Instagram: @tomschimmerpodcast TikTok: @tomschimmerpodcast Facebook: Schimmer Education Website: www.tomschimmer.com  

The Book Pile
The Return of the King by J.R.R. Tolkien

The Book Pile

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 29:22


You know those guys who wear wedding rings made out of rubber so they don't accidentally get a fracture? I can't help thinking if Frodo wore one of those he would still have all his fingers. Today's book concludes the epic Lord of the Rings saga. (It also concludes our running joke of never actually finishing a book series.) Plus, Dave thinks the ring would reveal troubling things about his personal character, and Kellen probably tells his kids Gollum is alive enjoying a happy life somewhere.*TheBookPilePodcast@gmail.com*Kellen Erskine has appeared on Conan, Comedy Central, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, NBC's America's Got Talent, and the Amazon Original Series Inside Jokes. He has garnered over 50 million views with his clips on Dry Bar Comedy. In 2018 he was selected to perform on the “New Faces” showcase at the Just For Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal, Quebec. Kellen was named one of TBS's Top Ten Comics to Watch in 2017. He currently tours the country www.KellenErskine.com*David Vance's videos have garnered over 1 billion views. He has written viral ads for companies like Squatty Potty, Chatbooks, and Lumē, and sketches for the comedy show Studio C. His work has received two Webby Awards, and appeared on Conan. He currently works as a writer on the sitcom Freelancers.

Oilers NOW with Bob Stauffer
Oilers Director of Amateur Scouting Tyler Wright (7/4/22)

Oilers NOW with Bob Stauffer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 19:51


Hear from Tyler Wright, who's in Montreal ahead of this week's NHL Draft, in which Edmonton holds first, fifth, sixth and seventh round pick. Plus, a look back at Wright's playing career as a former NHL first-rounder himself.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Rod Pedersen Show
TSN's John Lu Joins Us from Montreal on NHL Draft Week, to Talk Habs Draft Plans, Carey Price, and More! Plus: Jets Hire Rick Bowness and CFL Week 4 Recap! | Hour 1 07/04

The Rod Pedersen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 46:10


Hope you enjoyed Canada Day Weekend and HAPPY JULY 4th TO OUR FRIENDS IN THE US! We have so much to cover including a wrap on Week 4 of the CFL, huge NHL news as we head into Draft Week, and so much more. Tune in! We are LIVE from the Grey Eagle Resort and Casino in Calgary, Alberta with special guest: TSN Montreal Reporter John Lu! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Is This Anything?
Ep 99 George Carlin! Pythagoras!

Is This Anything?

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 72:19


This week's eps is one of the most fun catchups we've had in a while. Lots of great stories and bits before we even get to the bits! We hear about the end of Jarret's tour, jury duty, and his family party, we hear about Rob and Leedy's most recent show in Montreal, and we hear about Brett's latest run in with cancel culture. We also discuss the collective trauma of generation Z, contemporary horror houses, and the best way to diss a magician. Jarret - 43:10 Rob - 55:45 Brett - 1:03:40 Leedy - 1:07:20 Give a like and a subscribe, share the show with a friend, let us know your favorite moments in the comments. PATREON - https://www.patreon.com/itapod "Is This Anything?" a show where a group of professional comics take turns pitching each other their new stand-up joke ideas. Top notch or total duds, each idea gets tagged, punched up, and riffed on until eventually it's something. https://jarretberenstein.com http://robryanrocks.com/ http://www.brettdruck.com/index.html https://www.instagram.com/leedycorbin/

The Clydesdale, Fitness & Friends
CF&F Jeffrey Adler & Caroline Lambray | 4X Time CrossFit Games Athlete

The Clydesdale, Fitness & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 61:15


Jeff and Caroline are going back to the CrossFit Games for the 4th time as Coach and Athlete. They have put the work in this offseason and it has shown at offseason events and Semifinals... What is next? We talk Atlas Games and beating Pat Velner, and was that significant? We talk to Caroline about being a female coach and minority in the CrossFit space, is it significant and should we think about these things? We finish up with the Canadian surge to the Games and how does that feel.

American Conservative University
Evidence of the Afterlife: The Science of Near-Death Experiences by Jeffrey Long. ACU Sunday Series.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 39:35


Evidence of the Afterlife: The Science of Near-Death Experiences by Jeffrey Long This short Audiobook excerpt serves as an introduction to this fine book. In the opinion of ACU this is the best book on the NDE experience. If you have to choose  one book on the subject, this is the one. Highly recommended by ACU. Purchase the book at your favorite book seller or at- https://www.amazon.com/Evidence-Afterlife-Science-Near-Death-Experiences/dp/0061452572 NDERF Website- https://nderf.org/   About the book- Evidence of the Afterlife: The Science of Near-Death Experiences by Jeffrey Long and Paul Perry.  January 4, 2011 “There is currently more scientific evidence to the reality of near death experience (NDE) than there is for how to effectively treat certain forms of cancer,” states radiation oncologist Dr. Jeffrey Long is his groundbreaking new book Evidence of the Afterlife. In 1998 Dr. Long and his wife, Jody, began the Near Death Experience Research Foundation with the goal of creating a forum for near death “experiencers” to share their stories. Grounded in first-hand evidence culled from over 1,600 verified NDE accounts, Evidence of the Afterlife presents the strongest argument yet for the underlying truth of those who have died and returned to share their tales.   Editorial Reviews Review “Dr. Jeff Long and journalist Paul Perry have done a phenomenal job in clarifying current events in the study of near-death experiences. Dr. Long's work is leading us closer to a rational solution of the afterlife mystery.” — Raymond Moody, M.D., Ph.D., author of Life after Life “This important book about near-death experiences provides compelling evidence that mind and consciousness cannot be reduced to brain activity.” — Mario Beauregard, Ph.D., Neuroscientist at the University of Montreal and co-author of The Spiritual Brain “If someone asked for proof that life after death exists, refer them to this book. Dr. Long and Paul Perry have gone way beyond faith and into science, providing us with well-documented proof of what we have known absolutely for 35 years - there is life after death.” — Dannion and Kathryn Brinkley, authors of Saved by the Light and Secrets of the Light “Is there life after death? ...Radiation oncologist Dr. Jeffrey Long argues that if you look at the scientific evidence, the answer is unequivocally yes. Drawing on a decade's worth of research on near-death experiences... he makes the case for that controversial conclusion.” — Time.com “Long answers skeptics . . . does a fine job of summarizing some of the transformative changes from NDEs.... The end result of all this testimony, according to Long, is ‘there is life after death.'” — Spirituality and Practice   From the Back Cover The Most Compelling Scientific Evidence for Life Beyond Death Ever Compiled Evidence of the Afterlife shares the firsthand accounts of people who have died and lived to tell about it. Through their work at the Near Death Experience Research Foundation, radiation oncologist Jeffrey Long and his wife, Jody, have gathered thousands of accounts of near-death experiences (NDEs) from all over the world. In addition to sharing the personal narrative of their experiences, visitors to the website are asked to fill out a one hundred–item questionnaire designed to isolate specific elements of the experience and to flag counterfeit accounts. The website has become the largest NDE research database in the world, containing over 1,600 NDE accounts. The people whose stories are captured in the database span all age groups, races, and religious affiliations and come from all over the world, yet the similarities in their stories are as awe-inspiring as they are revealing. Using this treasure trove of data, Dr. Long explains how medical evidence fails to explain these reports and why there is only one plausible explanation—that people have survived death and traveled to another dimension.   About the Author Jeffrey Long, M.D., is a radiation oncologist in Houma, Louisiana, and has appeared on NBC's Today Show, ABC's World News Tonight with Peter Jennings, FOX's The O'Reilly Factor, and The Learning Channel. Long has also served on the board of directors of the International Association for Near-Death Studies and established the nonprofit Near Death Experience Research Foundation and the NDERF website.  

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel
SPOS #834 - Ron Carucci On How To Lead With Truth, Justice And Purpose

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 58:19


Welcome to episode #834 of Six Pixels of Separation. Here it is: Six Pixels of Separation - Episode #834 - Host: Mitch Joel. Under what conditions will people tell the truth, behave fairly and act with purpose at work? And when will they lie, cheat and be selfish? Based on 15 years of research, Ron Carucci's latest book, To Be Honest, looks at four factors and how they foster the right (or wrong) culture. Ron has a thirty-year track record helping executives tackle challenges of strategy, organization, and leadership — from start-ups to Fortune 10s, non-profits to heads-of-state, turn-arounds to new markets and strategies, overhauling leadership and culture to re-designing for growth. With experience in more than 25 countries on four continents, he helps organizations articulate strategies that lead to accelerated growth, and then designs programs to execute those strategies. The author of eight books, Ron shares the stories of leaders who have acted with purpose, honesty and justice even when it was difficult to do so, and how they came out on top. Enjoy the conversation... Running time: 58:19. Hello from beautiful Montreal. Subscribe over at Apple Podcasts. Please visit and leave comments on the blog - Six Pixels of Separation. Feel free to connect to me directly on Facebook here: Mitch Joel on Facebook. or you can connect on LinkedIn. ...or on Twitter. Here is my conversation with Ron Carucci. To Be Honest. Navalent. Follow Ron on LinkedIn. Follow Ron on Twitter. This week's music: David Usher 'St. Lawrence River'.

Part Of The Problem
Throwing Biden Under The Bus

Part Of The Problem

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 49:28 Very Popular


Dave Smith and Robbie The Fire Bernstein bring you the latest in politics! Onthis episode of Part Of The Problem Dave and Robbie take a look at a white house staffer say the quiet part out loud when speaking about the war in Ukraine, while A.O.C. gives some hints to her future on Colbert.This Episode Was Recorded on 7/1/22Support Our SponsorsBLUBLOX - https://www.Blublox.com/Problem for 15% offTrust Capital - https://www.itrustcapital.com use promo code POTP for a free month and gold/ crypto investors guideYo Kratom - https://yokratom.comSummer Porch Tour Ticketshttps://www.eventbrite.com/o/robbiethefire-33551841277Run Your Mouth Podcast:Full Video: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkfzjJt0KWYWuHOa9JdZdsgItunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/run-your-mouth/id1549622417Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4ka50RAKTxFTxbtyPP8AHmFollow the show on social media:Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComicDaveSmithhttps://twitter.com/RobbieTheFirehttps://www.instagram.com/bmackayisrightInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theproblemdavesmith/https://www.instagram.com/robbiethefire/https://www.instagram.com/bmackayisrightSubscribe On YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/DSmithcomicBuy Daves Album : Dave Smith Libertas - https://bit.ly/2Nq5seMDave Smith and Robbie The Fire Bernstein bring you the latest in Politics three times a week, with the promise of bonus episodes! Libertarian Philosophy mixed with a sense of humor, POTP is one of the leading voices in libertarianism.Dave Smith is a New York based stand-up comedian, radio personality, and political commentator. Dave can be seen regularly on “The Greg Gutfeld Show” and “Red Eye” on Fox News, as well as “Kennedy” on Fox Business Network. In 2013 Dave was featured as one of the New Faces at the prestigious Just For Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal. He was also a featured performer on the New York Comedy Festival's “New York's Funniest” showcase in 2014 and 2015. Dave's outlet for his social commentary is his podcast, “Part of the Problem,” which is available on iTunes. Dave is also co-host of “The Legion of Skanks” podcast, available on the GaS Digital Network.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.