Podcasts about perennial

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Plant that lives for more than two years

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  • May 12, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about perennial

Latest podcast episodes about perennial

Conscious Marketer
How to Produce Perennial Content With Richard Taubinger and Kylie Slavik

Conscious Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 28:24


The constant chase to churn out an Instagram post or a TikTok video for your business can get exhausting. If your goal is to create as much impact as possible with your marketing, consider making perennial content – a book, a podcast, or a YouTube video. It's not urgent and takes more time to produce, but the results and benefits can boost your business to reach more customers and partnerships. Tune in to this new episode of The Conscious Marketer podcast — How to Produce Perennial Content with Richard Taubinger and Kylie Slavik. Key points covered in this episode: ✔️ Richard Taubinger differentiates perennial content and expiring content. Kylie Slavik emphasizes the importance of a universal approach to storytelling. ✔️ Write a book with a timeless message. It doesn't have to be a bestseller, but it should impact people beyond your lifetime and resonate with the general public. ✔️ Tell your origin story. What lessons or experiences can you give back to the world? What's something that your kids and their grandkids can benefit from?  ✔️ Upload a niche podcast on every major platform. It expands distribution to a larger audience. Your listeners and guests will promote it on their social media – free of charge. ✔️ Podcasts are a networking tool. When you invite like-minded experts to speak on your show: everyone gets to learn something new, and more doors open. [00:22:31] Create YouTube content and repurpose it. You can break them down into video and audio snippets and blog articles. Videos can be left alone and gain traction over time. Topics can be about the core questions that people ask you about in your field or business. ✔️ Highly searchable businesses thrive on YouTube. From animal whisperers, practicing massage therapists, to shamanism – even people outside these fields can be curious enough to click on anything that piques their interest. ———————————— The Conscious Business Movement is all about building a community of conscious leaders, creators, and entrepreneurs.  CONNECT WITH US Join Richard and Kyle in their Facebook group so you can learn how to use conscious marketing in your business. The Marketers Path Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/themarketerspath Website: https://consciousmarketer.com/ SUBSCRIBE TO THE CONSCIOUS MARKETERS PODCAST New Episodes Released Every Thursday

Stop Me Project
Airey Bros. Radio / Jim Gale / Ep 158 / Food Forest Abundance / Permaculture / Self-Reliant / Off Grid Living / Perennial Gardening

Stop Me Project

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 66:09


Jim Gale from Food Forest Abundance makes his return to ABR to for an epic conversation on self reliance, permaculture gardening and how we can change the world by growing our own food. Now more than ever having the ability to provide your own food is the most important that can lead to freedom by not having to rely on the system. Stay Connected!!! https://foodforestabundance.com/ https://www.instagram.com/foodforestabundance/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdXQQCQJsuNqKT1UI2st15Q https://www.pinterest.com/FoodForestAbundance/_created/ The Airey Bros. IG @aireybros / https://www.instagram.com/aireybros/ https://www.blacksheependurance.com/podcast Premium Content : AB/DC Programming / B-Role & Mix Tapes / Accountability Coaching https://www.patreon.com/AireyBros Value for Value https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=BHCAKFGH6TNF2 Alt Media United ://: https://altmediaunited.com/ Actual Activist ://: http://actualactivists.com/

Mayday Plays
Doomed to Repeat: Ep. 21 - "Where the Dice Lay"

Mayday Plays

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 163:28


With no time to spare the agents race to the hospital to save Tuck and Boomer from Marlene. Win or lose the agents of PERENNIAL will never be the same. Special thanks to our patrons who send us endless love and support and to all of our listeners. We hope you enjoy the final episode of Arc 2 of Doomed to Repeat! TRIGGER AND CONTENT WARNINGS: Violence, blood and gore, mutilation, death, body horror, mental illness, Dissociative Identity Disorder, PTSD, manipulation, gaslighting, religious trauma, infighting, the topic of Covid-19 including conspiracy theorists, drug and alcohol use, gun and knife violence, Eldritch Horror sexual situations specifically under the influence (but not in a hentai way), surgery discussions, legal proceedings, mentions of racially dicy folk tales Published by arrangement with the Delta Green Partnership. The intellectual property known as Delta Green is a trademark and copyright owned by the Delta Green Partnership, who has licensed its use here. The contents of this podcast are © Mayday Roleplay, excepting those elements that are components of the Delta Green intellectual property. CAST OF CHARACTERS • Aaron - Agent Samael • Allegra - Agent Tuck • Amanda - Agent Boomer • Caleb - Agent Merit • Eli - Agent Hyde • Zakiya - Agent Warp • Sergio - The Handler MUSIC & SOUND EFFECTS • Post Sound Supervision: Sergio Crego, Eli Hauschel • Mixed: Eli Hauschel • Original Music: Aaron A. Pabst, Joe Sanders • Soundstripe (soundstripe.com) • Glitch Machines (glitchmachines.com/) • Soundly (getsoundly.com/) DELTA GREEN LINKS • Delta Green (http://deltagreen.com/) MAYDAY ROLEPLAY LINKS • Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/maydayrp/) • Patreon (https://patreon.com/maydayrp) • Twitter (https://twitter.com/maydayroleplay7) • Mayday website (https://www.maydayroleplay.com/) • Twitch (https://twitch.tv/maydayroleplay)

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
SaskSoil offers incentive for seeding perennial forage on select acres

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 7:36


Saskatchewan farmers who convert at least 40 acres to perennial forage could qualify for a cash payout through the Marginal Areas Rehabilitation in Saskatchewan (MARS) program. Administered by Saskatchewan Soil Conservation Association (SaskSoil), with some support by Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC), the MARS program will connect producers with an agrologist to help identify problem areas of... Read More

Pot and Cloche Garden Podcasts
#19 Garden Press Event 2022

Pot and Cloche Garden Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 34:04


In this episode sponsored by the amazing Genus Performance Gardenwear Joff travels to the old horticultural halls in Islington, London, where he talks to the charities and businesses who attend the event. His first visit is to David Wyndham-Lewis of the horticultural charity Perennial who offer suppoert to those in the industry who may find themselves in financial difficulty for a number of reasons. He then talks to Richard Pennock of Haws watering cans, the words oldest watering can manufacturer who still make their product in the UK.  Tom Willday of Willsow writes and publishes gardening  books for children with pages made of handmade paper  embeded with seeds that can be planted!!  Chris Holden from Nemasys discusses the range of organic nematode based pest control products that the company offers. Dealing with vine weevil, slugs, and leatherjackets has never been easier. Mark Pitman is from Wildlife World who have just released a range of sustainable seed trays, root trainers, and cell trays in natural rubber that will finally enable us to rid our sheds of all those dissintegrating plastic products we've amassed over the years.  Vanessa Easley is from the WFGA (Working for Gardeners Association) She tells us about the networking, support, and training opportunites they provide.

Biodynamic Guild
Ep 15, Stewart Lundy: Alchemical Agriculture at Perennial Roots Farm

Biodynamic Guild

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 74:11


Stewart Lundy, along with his partner and wife, Natalie, farms 50 acres of land on a tiny peninsula in rural Virginia. For the past decade he has practiced biodynamics, and for the past eight years he has made and applied the biodynamic preparations. Stewart also works for The Josephine Porter Institute for Applied Bio-Dynamics. In his free time he is an active esoteric researcher, amateur alchemist, and practicing herbalist, experimenting with a wide range of innovations on the farm. He consults with farmers and gardeners across the world.You can find Stewart and his work at PerennialRoots.com

Driving Forces on WBAI
Driving Forces 04212022 New York And Perennial Political Corruption

Driving Forces on WBAI

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 56:50


Celeste Katz Marston looks at New York's long and painful history of political scandal and corruption with special guests Michael Gormley of Newsday and Blair Horner of NYPIRG. Original air date: April 21, 2022

The Thomistic Institute
The Perennial Importance of Plato | Prof. John Rist

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 54:11


This lecture was given on March 3, 2022 at Trinity College Dublin. For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: John M. Rist was educated in classics at Trinity College, Cambridge. He taught Greek at University College in the University of Toronto from 1959 to 1969 and from 1969 to 1980 was a professor of classics at the University of Toronto. He taught from 1980 to 1983 as Regius Professor of Classics at the University of Aberdeen, and returned to the University of Toronto, where he was professor of classics and philosophy from 1983 to 1996, with a cross-appointment to St. Michael's College from 1983 to 1990. In 1997, Rist became professor emeritus of the University of Toronto in 1997. He has been part-time visiting professor at the Institutum Patristicum Augustinianum in Rome since 1998. In 1976 Rist was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and in 1991 he was elected a life member of Clare Hall, Cambridge. In 1995 he was the Lady Davis Visiting Professor in Philosophy at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Professor Rist has written more than 100 scholarly works, including the following books: Man, Soul and Body: Essays in Ancient Thought from Plato to Dionysius (1996), Augustine: Ancient Thought Baptized (1994), The Mind of Aristotle (1989), Platonism and Its Christian Heritage (1985), Human Value: A Study of Ancient Philosophical Ethics (1982), On the Independence of Matthew and Mark (1978), The Stoics (1978), Epicurus: An Introduction (1972), Stoic Philosophy (1969), Plotinus: The Road to Reality (1967), and Eros and Psyche: Studies in Plato, Plotinus and Origen (1964). He is the author of more than 80 articles on ancient Greek philosophy, Hellenistic philosophy, Plotinus and Neoplatonism, Patristics, and medieval philosophy.

Kerkhoven Evangelical Free Church Sermons Podcast
Redemption Testimony - Paul - The Perennial Prodigal

Kerkhoven Evangelical Free Church Sermons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 66:39


Meet Paul, the Perennial Prodigal. Listen to Paul's unique testimony, struggles with worldy sin, depression, and loss; and how his personal relationship with Jesus is the foundation of his (eternal) future.  Please note, the content of Paul's testimony may not be suitable for all ages.If you'd like to get in touch with us, email us at: kerkefree@gmail.comDon't miss an episode by subscribing or following.

The Forest Garden
Propaganda By The Seed: Breeding Perennial Kale with Chris Homanics (Guest Episode)

The Forest Garden

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 116:42


It's our first ever guest episode! We're pleased to host an episode from a podcast that is very similar to our own, Propaganda by the Seed. Tune in to learn about how Brassica breeder extraordinaire Chris Homanics developed the Homesteader's Kaleidoscopic Perennial Kale Grex. Not sure what a grex is? Well stay tuned to find out! Today's episode is jam packed with information on the topic of breeding new kale varieties, and much more. Be sure to check out the rest of Propaganda by the Seed's podcast library, available on all major streaming platforms! Relevant links from today's episode: https://store.experimentalfarmnetwork.org/products/kaleidescope-perennial-kale-grex https://edgewood-nursery.com/podcast https://propagandabytheseed.libsyn.com/ http://www.soleone.org/

Deer University
Episode 059 - Effective Warm-Season Food Plots for Deer

Deer University

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 55:15


Summer can be a nutritionally stressful period for deer. When bucks are growing antlers and does are gestating or lactating, there should be abundant high-quality food for them. In this episode we visit with Dr. Craig Harper from the University of Tennessee and discuss the important role of habitat and warm-season food plots during summer. Craig talks about the best summer food plot forages, and strategies to ensure their success. He also discusses his recent research on the effects of mowing perennial plots during summer.

NatConTalk
Juan Ángel Soto Gómez: Waking up to Perennial Threats - Brussels National Conservatism Conference

NatConTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 9:24


Juan Ángel Soto Gómez's address at the Brussels National Conservatism Conference on March 24, 2022.

Mayday Plays
Doomed to Repeat, Ep. 20 - “The Ones We Leave Behind”

Mayday Plays

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 154:12


As the only agents still operational in Lansing, Boomer and Warp convince Detective Emille Browne to join the cause. Meanwhile, Merit gets up close and personal with Marlene. Agent Tuck and Hyde put aside a long-standing grudge. With Merit's life on the line, the agents race to track him while playing keep-away with Marlene's ceremonial dagger. Phenomen-X finally acts out their bloody revolution and an agent of PERENNIAL is caught in the crossfire. TRIGGER AND CONTENT WARNINGS: Violence, blood and gore, death, body horror, mental illness, Dissociative Identity Disorder, PTSD, manipulation, gaslighting, religious trauma, infighting, the topic of Covid-19 including conspiracy theorists, drug and alcohol use, gun and knife violence Published by arrangement with the Delta Green Partnership. The intellectual property known as Delta Green is a trademark and copyright owned by the Delta Green Partnership, who has licensed its use here. The contents of this podcast are © Mayday Roleplay, excepting those elements that are components of the Delta Green intellectual property. CAST OF CHARACTERS • Aaron - Agent Samael • Allegra - Agent Tuck • Amanda - Agent Boomer • Caleb - Agent Merit • Eli - Agent Hyde • Zakiya - Agent Warp • Sergio - The Handler MUSIC & SOUND EFFECTS • Post Sound Supervision: Sergio Crego, Eli Hauschel • Mixed: Eli Hauschel • Original Music: Aaron A. Pabst, Joe Sanders • Soundstripe (soundstripe.com) • Glitch Machines (glitchmachines.com/) • Soundly (getsoundly.com/) DELTA GREEN LINKS • Delta Green (http://deltagreen.com/) MAY DAY ROLEPLAY LINKS • Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/maydayrp/) • Patreon (https://patreon.com/maydayrp) • Twitter (https://twitter.com/maydayroleplay7) • Mayday website (https://www.maydayroleplay.com/) • Twitch (https://twitch.tv/maydayroleplay)

Mayday Plays
Doomed to Repeat, Ep. TWENTY - "The Ones We Leave Behind”

Mayday Plays

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 126:37


As the only agents still operational in Lansing, Boomer and Warp convince Detective Emille Browne to join the cause. Meanwhile, Merit gets up close and personal with Marlene. Agent Tuck and Hyde put aside a long-standing grudge. With Merit's life on the line, the agents race to track him while playing keep-away with Marlene's ceremonial dagger. Phenomen-X finally acts out their bloody revolution and an agent of PERENNIAL is caught in the crossfire. TRIGGER AND CONTENT WARNINGS: Violence, blood and gore, death, body horror, mental illness, Dissociative Identity Disorder, PTSD, manipulation, gaslighting, religious trauma, infighting, the topic of Covid-19 including conspiracy theorists, drug and alcohol use, gun and knife violence Published by arrangement with the Delta Green Partnership. The intellectual property known as Delta Green is a trademark and copyright owned by the Delta Green Partnership, who has licensed its use here. The contents of this podcast are © Mayday Roleplay, excepting those elements that are components of the Delta Green intellectual property. CAST OF CHARACTERS • Aaron - Agent Samael • Allegra - Agent Tuck • Amanda - Agent Boomer • Caleb - Agent Merit • Eli - Agent Hyde • Zakiya - Agent Warp • Sergio - The Handler MUSIC & SOUND EFFECTS • Post Sound Supervision: Sergio Crego, Eli Hauschel • Mixed: Eli Hauschel • Original Music: Aaron A. Pabst, Joe Sanders • Soundstripe (soundstripe.com) • Glitch Machines (glitchmachines.com/) • Soundly (getsoundly.com/) DELTA GREEN LINKS • Delta Green (http://deltagreen.com/) MAY DAY ROLEPLAY LINKS • Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/maydayrp/) • Patreon (https://patreon.com/maydayrp) • Twitter (https://twitter.com/maydayroleplay7) • Mayday website (https://www.maydayroleplay.com/) • Twitch (https://twitch.tv/maydayroleplay) Ǎ̸̲̜̤̗͎͐ͅp̶̡̛̻̦̣͉͈̹̒̅͆͛̓͗̅͠ř̴̢̡̥̯̱͉̬̮̮̼̠̉͑͊̎̀͌̔͝ĭ̷̧̢̜̘͖̪̬̭̐́̈̿̍̋̋̈́̕̚l̴̨̨̤̗̰͇̟̫̽̆̑̈́͛̀͑͑ ̴̢̫͙̠̯̰̖̜̔̈́̊̚F̷̣̱̟̘̻̰̻͆̍͜o̴̙̠̿͝͝͝͝o̵̧͍̻̩̩͓̳̩͍̊l̸̳̲̳̖͓̭̦͇͍̽̀͛̉͜s̵̗̪͈̰̻͈͋̐̇̍̚ͅ!̵̥͇̙̫͓̳͎͔̒̕

Beer Busters
238: Stickman Brews (or Ethan's Grievances as it Relates to Lagers)

Beer Busters

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 93:14


Perennial podcast pontificator Ethan Buckman, proprietor of Pennsylvania's own Stickman Brews, joins us this episode to…well, here are his own words: “I've got a lot to say and I'm hoping you will let me once again take this lovely thing you have made and co-opt it entirely for my own.” Those lots of things to say were about lagers, including addressing some comments made on our past lager-centric episodes. This one gets pretty deep in the weeds on the technical aspects of brewing, Ethan and Steph touch upon several insightful topics and Wayne and Dan try to keep up. With varying levels of success. But, it's not all pH and Plato, we of course play a Happy Fun Time Game, one that is appropriate for a much beloved and oft-appearing guest, the much-beloved and oft appearing Libation or Fabrication. Also, Dan and Wayne accidentally drank a barleywine. It was Tuesday. Do you love Beer Busters? Of course you do! Why not leave us a rating and review on your podcast platform of choice and consider supporting us on Patreon.

Brand Retro with Cyberdogz
Perennial Pride with Tom Suvansri

Brand Retro with Cyberdogz

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 22:12


Tom Suvansri, a client and the founder of Perennial Pride, is welcomed by Mike! Tom is a wonderful person and an even better client, and he now has a brand to be proud of! Mike and Tom discuss Mike's path of creating his brand, including how he used his individuality to establish a business that is all about him, his approach to money management, and how he finally celebrates his authenticity. Highlights Who is Tom Suvansri? - 0:00 Mindset on brand cultivation - 1:08 Peeling back the layers of Perennial Pride - 02:48 The evolution and soul searching process - 03:27 Pusing new brands in the market with authenticity - 06:00 What is Perennial Pride all about? - 08:18 Tactically using an abstract process: interaction, tools, and infinite ways - 11:56 Advice on the importance of brand - 14:26 Finance your life and your family's future - 20:00 Episode Resources Connect with Mike Brevik: http://www.cyberdogzmarketing.com/ mike@cyberdogzmarketing.com Connect with Tom Suvansri https://perennialpride.com/ 

Your Gardening Questions
Is Lantana an annual or a perennial?

Your Gardening Questions

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 2:13


Fred answers the question: Is Lantana an annual or a perennial?

The Forest Garden
Perennial Tree Collards & Kales with Sequoiah of Project Tree Collard

The Forest Garden

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 48:09


Spring is here podcast listeners! It's time to dust off ye olde gardening cap to prune those trees, get those bare root plants in the ground, and start planning that summer vegetable garden you've always dreamed of. In today's episode, prepare to delve into the world of perennial tree collards. Most people are familiar with collards that grow in your vegetable garden in the summer, but did you know there are perennial relatives that can grow to the size of small trees and live eight years or longer? Sequoiah from Project Tree Collard joins us today to tell us all about it. Whether you're a forest gardener in chilly Zone 6 or enjoy the year-round warmth of Zones 9+, Perennial Tree Collards are a highly adaptable family of plants that can provide you with a bounty of highly nutritious food. Listen in to today's episode to learn all about them. Follow Sequoiah via her links below:  https://www.projecttreecollard.org/ https://www.instagram.com/projecttreecollard/ https://www.facebook.com/ProjectTreeCollard/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSti61Hw1btrsuB_10Z71hQ

Future of KYC Compliance
EP 19 - Davis Polk & Wardwell's Dan Stipano: Why Financial Crime is A Perennial Issue

Future of KYC Compliance

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 24:56


Technology is a double edged sword. On the one hand it gives compliance professionals better tools to catch the bad actors, but it also empowers criminals to perpetrate their actions successfully.  Today we are joined by Dan Stipano, Partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell, who has extensive regulatory and enforcement experience including more than 30 years at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC).  Dan helped us understand how our anti-money laundering frameworks have been struggling mightily to keep up with developments and we reflect on the challenges to improve in our fight against financial crime. Topics discussed in this episode: The dual effect technology has over financial crime  Why information sharing is critical to combat financial crime How regulatory expectations are much higher today How anti money laundering frameworks are outdated on a global scale How sanctions can shape AML compliance programs How sanctions are not political agnostic The real obstacles for information sharing and what we can do to overcome them 3 Pieces of practical advice for compliance officers looking to combat financial crime

Mayday Plays
Doomed to Repeat, Ep. 19 - "Catch and Release"

Mayday Plays

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 109:33


Ep. 19: Doomed to Repeat - “Catch and Release” Having finally learned Marlene's secrets and how to stop her the agents of PERENNIAL decide they must split up again to complete their mission. Merit, Warp, and Boomer stay in Lansing to plot the demise of Phenomen-X and get more than they bargained for when they finally meet with the radicalized members. Hyde, Tuck, and Samael pay a visit to a familiar incarcerated face who might be the only person who can show them the ritual needed to banish Marlene. Make sure to listen all the way to the end on this one! TRIGGER AND CONTENT WARNINGS: Violence, blood and gore, death, body horror, mental illness, Dissociative Identity Disorder, PTSD, manipulation, religious trauma, mentions of snakes, workplace and sexual harassment mentions, infighting, the topic of Covid-19 including conspiracy theorists, drug and alcohol use, attempted abduction Published by arrangement with the Delta Green Partnership. The intellectual property known as Delta Green is a trademark and copyright owned by the Delta Green Partnership, who has licensed its use here. The contents of this podcast are © Mayday Roleplay, excepting those elements that are components of the Delta Green intellectual property. CAST OF CHARACTERS • Aaron - Agent Samael • Allegra - Agent Tuck • Amanda - Agent Boomer • Caleb - Agent Merit • Eli - Agent Hyde • Zakiya - Agent Warp • Sergio - The Handler MUSIC & SOUND EFFECTS • Post Sound Supervision: Sergio Crego, Eli Hauschel • Mixed: Eli Hauschel • Original Music: Aaron A. Pabst, Joe Sanders • Soundstripe (soundstripe.com) • Glitch Machines (glitchmachines.com/) • Soundly (getsoundly.com/) DELTA GREEN LINKS • Delta Green (http://deltagreen.com/) MAY DAY ROLEPLAY LINKS • Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/maydayrp/) • Patreon (https://patreon.com/maydayrp) • Twitter (https://twitter.com/maydayroleplay7) • Mayday website (https://www.maydayroleplay.com/) • Twitch (https://twitch.tv/maydayroleplay)

Better Than Human
Dandelions: A Flower By Any Other Name

Better Than Human

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 55:03


Have you ever wished upon a dandelion?  Those little puffballs that grow in your front yard, and if you blow away all the seeds you get a wish? By blowing away the seeds, you've actually granted the dandelion's wish of seed dispersal and helped one of the earth's most abundant flowering species. Dandelions, also known as blowballs,  are tap-rooted, perennial, herbaceous plants native to temperate areas of the Northern Hemisphere. These plants, which many humans often call weeds, are actually an important part of the ecosystem and are incredibly useful to many creatures, including humans. Our ancestors grew dandelions for food and medicine since the beginning of farming.In The Good, The Bad, The NewsJust because it's called “natural” doesn't mean it's good. “Black salves”, used to treat moles and cancer, are dangerous and can be life-threatening. So don't use them.Mosquitoes learn to avoid pesticides after just one exposure, which means the pesticides we currently use may not be effective forever. Mosquitoes may be one thing that is not Better Than Human. Old wind turbine blades are being used for bridge construction after they're retired, which is good news because the blades are not biodegradable. Humpback whales have been removed from the Australian Threatened Species List following an incredible recovery in numbers.Because Dandelions are one of the first flowers in early spring, their nectar is important for a wide hosts of pollinators, including bees and butterflies. Raw dandelion greens are a healthy food for humans, and contain phytochemicals. Phytochemicals are chemicals produced by plants, generally to help them resist infection. The term is used to  used to describe plant compounds that are under research. While many supplement companies make outlandish claims about phytochemicals, like they can cure cancer, phytochemicals may or may not actually be useful to humans when consumed.  Either way, dandelions don't cure cancer. But they may be good in your salad and are great for the environment. So let's all go blow on some blowballs. Listen now to learn more about dandelions Follow us on Twitter @betterthanhuma1on Facebook @betterthanhumanpodcaston Instagram @betterthanhumanpodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@betterthanhumanpodcastor Email us at betterthanhumanpodcast@gmail.comWe look forward to hearing from you, and we look forward to you joining our cult of weirdness!#betterthanhuman #cultofweirdnes

No-Till Farmer Podcast
Plant Once, Harvest For Years With Perennial Kernza

No-Till Farmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 31:43


For this episode of the No-Till Farmer podcast, brought to you by Yetter Farm Equipment, Contributing Editor Dan Crummett speaks with plant biologist Lee DeHaan of The Land Institute where the breeding of Kernza and other perennial crops has been underway since 2003. Listen in as Dan and Lee discuss the characteristics of Kernza, how to grow it, the potential of the developing markets and more.

HOMESTEADucation
Introduction to Permaculture

HOMESTEADucation

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 34:30


Introduction to PermaculturePermaculture directly means “permanent agriculture.” But in its truest form, permaculture is a way of planting crops, keeping animals and sustaining the farm or homestead in a way that mimics the intertwined growing systems found in nature. We can imitate and initiate these natural ecosystems to create healthier crops, less pests, increase crop yields and absorb more carbon into the soil. Where to startIncrease reliance on perennial plantsWhy perennials? Perennials have more plant matter (woody stems, strong plant tissue and large root systems). These plants absorb more carbon dioxide as a result as they have more room to store them within their plant fibers.Perennials do not need to be planted year after year which means less work!Perennials offer shelter to beneficial insects, birds and wildlife. This helps to control pests within the garden.Perennial plants help soil structure. Their expansive roots loosen compacted soil, aid in the prevention of erosion and some mine different nutrients from deep under the soil's surface to help feed their surrounding companions.Think in terms of “layering plants” with companions when planting anythingGive both annuals and perennials supporting partners to attract pollinators, deter bad bugs, mine nutrients from deep within the soil, mulch and suppress weeds with low-growing groundcovers, fix nitrogen into the soil, and retain moisture with living mulches.Large scale permaculture plantings may include an overstory tree (large tree like chestnut or oak), a lower fruiting tree (apple), caneberries (elder or raspberries), flowering bulbs and herbs (daffodils, garlic, comfrey, etc.), and a groundcover (such as strawberries).An annual bed may include tomatoes, carrots, lettuce and radishes.Resources:Carrots Love TomatoesRestoration AgricultureSolve problems with plants and animals and begin weaving an ecosystemToo many ticks: Add guinea fowlToo many aphids: Employ ladybugsCabbage moth larvae eating brassicas? Interplant garlic.All animals must contribute to the whole and serve more than one purpose (such as just eggs and meat providers, etc.). Horses: Manure for compost, grazing circuit, plowing, parasite control for sheepCows: Manure for compost, grazing circuitSheep and Goats: Fleece which can be used as garden mulch, grazing circuit, clearing grassy brush, parasite control for horses, fertilizerGuinea Fowl: eat ticks and pests without scratching at lawns and gardens, spread manure in pastures looking for insects, fertilizerDucks: snail and slug control, fertilizer, clear garden and crop debrisChickens: insect and pest control (especially in vineyards), fertilizer, clear garden and crop debrisGeese: Snake, rat, mouse control, insects, weeding and pasture management, leave fertilizer behind, eat fallen orchard fruit, clear garden and crop debrisIntroduce pasture rotation systems to reduce hay and feed costs, promote faste

Paul VanderKlay's Podcast
JBP, Second Coming, Ukraine, Preterist vs Perennial Readings in Revelation, Friday BoM Q/A Feb 25

Paul VanderKlay's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 127:49


Master My Garden Podcast
EP112- Growing Perennial Vegetables With Patrick Hunt

Master My Garden Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 36:14


Perennial vegetables or vegetables that you plant once and they provide year after year sounds great doesn't it? Well that's the topic of this weeks episode of Master My Garden podcast with Patrick Hunt. I personally have not grown perennial vegetables before so Patrick tells us about what he grows and the best performing ones in his garden. We also discuss some ornamental plants which are also edible and some that may surprise you. You can find Patrick here https://www.patrickhuntgardening.comDid you know you can now support the podcast on "Buy me a coffee"  you can support the podcast on a one off or monthly member basis here all support greatly appreciated https://www.buymeacoffee.com/MastermygardenThere will be a blog post on this episode very soon on my website. This blog and previous blogs along with all podcast episodes are be available on my Website :https://mastermygarden.com/If there is any topic you would like covered in future episodes please let me know. Please like and follow Master My Garden on the following channels  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mastermygarden/Instagram @Mastermygarden https://www.instagram.com/mastermygarden/Twitter:https://twitter.com/tweetsbyMMGor email info@mastermygarden.comUntil next weekHappy gardeningJohn Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/Mastermygarden)

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices
7000 Year old Siva Temple Bangalore? Perennial Water Flows From Bull's / Nandi's Mouth

Hinduism In Ancient World Documented, Practices

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 2:34


Many associate Bangalore as an IT hub and a city founded by Kempe Gowda.Other researches say it is ,   An inscription, dating back to 890 AD, shows Bengaluru is over 1,000 years old. But it stands neglected at the Parvathi Nageshwara Temple in Begur near the city … written inhale Kannada (old Kannada) of the 9th Century, the epigraph refers to a Bengaluru war in 890 AD in which Buttanachetty, a servant of Nagatta, died.”   But the fact, according to latest reports is that Bangalore is at least 7000 years Old! ancient nandeeshwara temple at malleswaram 17th cross was discovered only three years ago, but it has stood for 7,000 years on that spot. being buried over the years hasn't diminished its aura at all. it still draws huge crowds all day.  According to residents living nearby, the temple was completely buried and the land above it was a flat stretch. “three years ago, a politician tried to sell this plot. but people objected on the grounds that the land should first be dug through to see if they could find something,” says the priest, ravi shankar bhatt. and so when they started digging up the land, they found buried underneath, this temple. it was in perfect condition, preserved by the thick layers of soil.  this underground temple was enclosed within a stone cut courtyard supported by ancient stone pillars. at the far end of the courtyard, a nandi was carved out of a black stone with eyes painted in gold. from its mouth a clear stream of water flowed directly on to a shivalinga made out of the same black stone at a lower level. there were steps that led to a small pool in the centre of the courtyard where the water flowed and collected. the pool's centre had a 15 feet deep whirlpool.  everything remains the same today. nobody knows where the water comes from and how it passes from the mouth of the nandi idol on to the shivalinga. nobody knows how the whirlpool came into being. the source of water, the sculptor, even the time when it was built remains a mystery.  “there has been no scientific explanation for the source of water till date,” says resident shivalingaiah. “some say it was built by shivaji maharaj. some say it's older. but of one thing we were sure, the temple has remained untouched over the years. we found it exactly as it might have been before it was covered by soil,” he adds. “ https://ramanisblog-in.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/ramanisblog.in/2014/04/29/7000-years-old-temple-in-bangalore/amp/?usqp=mq331AQKKAFQArABIIACAw%3D%3D&_js_v=a8&_gsa=1#referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com&csi=0&share=https%3A%2F%2Framanisblog.in%2F2014%2F04%2F29%2F7000-years-old-temple-in-bangalore%2F --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ramanispodcast/message

The Westerly Sun
Michael Stefanik, Dr. G and The Believers, and Cynthia "Cindy" Berg

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2022 2:36


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now for some trivia. Did you know that Rhode Island resident, Michael Stefanik was an American professional stock car racing driver? He competed mainly in the NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour, but also made appearances in the Busch Grand National series and the Craftsman Truck Series. A seven-time champion in the Modified series, Stefanik was named the second greatest NASCAR Modified driver of all-time in 2003. His nine total championships tie him with Richie Evans for the most in NASCAR history. Stefanik is a member of the 2022 NASCAR Hall of Fame class. Next, a fun event this week.. Tonight, Dr. G and The Believers will be playing at the Knickerbocker Music Center on Railroad Avenue in Westerly starting at 7:30 PM. They'll be playing high energy, blues and upbeat music. Bring your dancing shoes. We'll see you there! Today we're remembering the life of Cynthia "Cindy" Berg, of Pawcatuck Born in New London, she was a lifelong resident of Stonington, attending local schools and was a graduate of Stonington High School class of 1975. Cindy was most recently employed by the Stonington Community Center as the Thrift Shop Manager for 24 years, until her retirement in 2020. She always enjoyed seeing her regular customers and volunteers, many of whom she got to know very well over the years. Cindy loved all things Stonington, living by the water and enjoyed reminiscing about her Portuguese heritage and growing up in "the Village". She was an avid New York Yankees and UCONN women's basketball fan. She leaves her daughter, her husband, her son, her brother, her sister, a granddaughter, several nieces and nephews and her beloved dog, Scout. She was predeceased in 2008 by her first husband. Cindy's family would like to thank Hartford Health Care at Home for their care during her final months. Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate Cindy's life. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Westerly Sun
Sean Soriano, Rejected teachers' contract, Robert Brochu

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 5:33


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now for some trivia. Did you know that Rhode Island native, Sean Soriano is an American mixed martial artist who competes in the lightweight division of the UFC. He made his professional debut in 2009 competing primarily in regional promotions across New England before moving to South Florida in 2011 where he began training at Blackzilians. He compiled a record of 8–0, before signing with the UFC near the end of 2013. He currently has a record of 14 wins and 8 losses. Now, for our feature story: The longest-tenured teachers, a group that makes up the vast majority of those employed at the town's public schools, would have received a one-time bonus or payout in the first year and 2% pay increases in each of the next two years under the contract proposal rejected by the teachers union in November. Newer teachers would have received pay increases in line with a previously established system that rewards length of service and the attainment of new academic degrees with raises. The proposed three-year deal also would have changed how the cost of health insurance is shared by the district and the teachers. Those choosing to move to the high-deductible plan would have had their deductible covered 100% in 2022, 50% in 2023 and 25% in 2024, with 20% co-insurance each year. Those choosing to remain on the preferred provider plan would have had a 30% co-insurance in 2022 and 2023 with a move to the high-deductible plan required in 2024. The one-time payout would have been $1,725.80 per qualified teacher. In Fiscal Year 2022, three deans of students would have received  $1,600 stipends to match stipends received by other deans. Details of the contract proposal are contained in a fiscal impact statement that was recently acquired by The Sun. The contract carried a fiscal impact of $861,000 in 2022, $1.6mm in 2023 and $2.1mm in 2024, for a total fiscal impact of $4.6 million over the length of the deal. The Westerly Teachers Association, which represents the school district's teachers, has 216 top-step teachers and 49 teachers below top step as of Aug. 13. The union previously rejected a contract offered by the School Committee in August and is currently working under a contract that expired Aug. 31. The proposed contract rejected in November would have established the teacher work day as 6 hours and 55 minutes from the current 6 hours and 40 minutes. The additional 15 minutes was to be used as a cushion before the start and after the end of the school day. As a concession, the School Committee agreed to reduce the teacher calendar by one day from the current 185 days by eliminating one professional development day. The contract also called for increasing the number of evening meetings each year for parent-teacher conferences and programs from two to three meetings. As a retirement perk, the contract would have allowed teachers to accrue an additional 40 sick days beyond the 120 maximum to be paid at a rate of $50/day at retirement, provided that teachers had maintained a minimum of 100 days in their sick-time account. The 40 days would not have been available to be discharged as sick leave during teachers' employment. The contract also would have provided an incentive for retirement in the form of a $10,000 retirement bonus for teachers who provided notification no later than Dec. 1. The contract also would have introduced new provisions constraining teachers from conducting personal business during their planning and preparation period by requiring them to notify principals and to sign in and out. The language also would have precluded teachers from seeking permission to be out of the building during unassigned periods. For more information on jobs and employment, check out this story and more at thewesterlysun.com Today we're remembering the life of Robert Brochu of Westerly, formerly of Misquamicut and Bradenton, FL. He was the beloved husband of Nancy. Born in Norwich, he graduated from Boston University, and then the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1967. After a residency at Saginaw Osteopathic Hospital, he moved his family to Scituate where he opened his own practice caring for people of all ages, even making house calls when necessary. In addition, Dr. Broch u was also an assistant to the RI State Medical Examiner for over 20 years, a long-term member and president of the RI Society of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons. After moving to Florida, Dr. Brochu served as Chief of Medicine for Manatee County Rural Health Services for over 15 years, continuing to work until his retirement in 2018. "Dr. Bob" will always be remembered for his passion, for his love of life and his unbelievable caring for his patients, family, friends and co-workers. Besides his wife Nancy, he leaves five children, three stepsons, sixteen grandchildren; five step-grandchildren; two great-grandchildren, many nieces and nephews, and his loyal Frenchie "Beau". Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate Bob's life. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Clare FM - Podcasts
In The Garden - 5 Easy Ways To Grow Perennial Plants

Clare FM - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 18:23


On Monday's Morning Focus, Alan Morrissey was joined by Tom Stewart, Keanes Garden Centre to discuss 5 easy ways to grow perennial plants in your garden! Picture (c) Keane's Garden Centre

World Radio Gardening
Rescuing perennial geraniums

World Radio Gardening

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 2:17


Perennial geraniums can form a beautiful part of a herbaceous border, but at this time of year they look a little sorry for themselves. However, these plants can be rescued and used elsewhere in your garden as Ken explains.

Fly On The Call - Candid Conversations on Music
Episode One Hundred Five - Perennial returns

Fly On The Call - Candid Conversations on Music

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 41:40


Perennial returns - both musically and to the podcast! After a grueling wait their sophomore album, In The MIdnight Hour, has finally seen the light of day (or should I say the dark of night?). The episodes delves into how the album has changed since fall of 2019, building their own world, and making a record that isn't limited by any one genre. Perennial: Bandcamp | Twitter | Instagram | Spotify Fly On The Call is brought to you by Sound Talent Media in partnership with Evergreen Podcasts and promoted in conjunction with The Alternative. Artwork by Mikaela Jane. Theme song by Jhariah. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Epic Gardening: Daily Growing Tips and Advice

Buy Birdies Garden Beds Use code EPICPODCAST for 5% off your first order of Birdies metal raised garden beds, the best metal raised beds in the world. They last 5-10x longer than wooden beds, come in multiple heights and dimensions, and look absolutely amazing. Click here to shop Birdies Garden Beds Buy My Book My book, Field Guide to Urban Gardening, is a beginners guide to growing food in small spaces, covering 6 different methods and offering rock-solid fundamental gardening knowledge: Order on Amazon Order a signed copy Follow Epic Gardening YouTube Instagram Pinterest Facebook Facebook Group

The Westerly Sun
Andre Soukhamthath, Friday by the Fire at Riverwood, and Theresa Anne Church

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 2:14


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now, some trivia. Did you know that Rhode Island native, Andre Soukhamthath is a mixed martial artist who competes in the Bantamweight division of CES MMA. A professional mixed martial artist since 2011, he has also competed in the Ultimate Fighting Championship. His current record is 14 wins and 9 losses. He is the first Lao-American fighter signed to the UFC. Next, an event that you should know about… The Westerly Land Trust is hosting Friday by the Fire at Riverwood from 3pm to 5:30. Come walk, talk, and eat s'mores while we embrace the cold. Bring warm layers, a flashlight, and get ready to experience winter in the woods. Email mdoherty@westerlylandtrust.org with the subject Friday by the Fire with attendees names and to ask for more information. We'll see you there! Today we're remembering the life of Theresa Anne Church, of Bradford. Born in Alaska, she lived most of her life in Ashaway.  Ms. Church worked for many years as a food server at Amanda's Pantry for Davis Standard. She also previously worked at Foxwoods Resort Casino. Ms. Church was a kind-hearted and generous soul who would do anything for her friends and family. She also had a great love for animals, travel, and swimming. She is survived by her brother, her niece, and nephew. She is also survived by her companion, Phil Baril, many loving cousins and friends, and her beloved dog Rosie. Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate Theresa's life. Lastly, remember that reporting the local news is an important part of what it means to live here. Head over to Westerlysun.com and help us tell the stories of our community each and every day. Digital access starts at just 50 cents a day and makes all the difference in the world. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bloomers in the Garden
February, 12 2022 - Tim Blocksom, Centerton Nursery, Perennial Powerhouse, Brands, Whats to Come?

Bloomers in the Garden

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2022 57:47


Today we have a special guest from Centerton Nursery, Tim Blocksom. Through three generations of dedication and innovations, Centerton is one of the best nurseries, making selecting plants easy for the homeowner. Learn how Tim got started and what he witnessed through the growth if this family nursery. From Blue Label Shrubs to Caterpillar Caterpillar Candy, Centerton Launched some widely renounced brands. Learn how Centerton became so innovative in their techniques.

Mayday Plays
Doomed to Repeat, Ep. 18 - “I Buried Marlene in Lansing”

Mayday Plays

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2022 113:08


The agents of PERENNIAL come face to face with the entity that lured them back to Lansing. Their situation becomes increasingly desperate as they fight sleep and each other to survive. A chaotic night leaves Samael unconscious, Tuck wounded, Merit exposed, Boomer paranoid, Warp held hostage, and Hyde in handcuffs. Can the agents figure out how to stop Marlene before their cover is blown? TRIGGER AND CONTENT WARNINGS: Violence, blood and gore, death, body horror, mental illness including references to DID, PTSD, manipulation, infighting, the topic of Covid-19 including conspiracy theorists, drug and alcohol use, dissociation, friendly fire, car accidents. Published by arrangement with the Delta Green Partnership. The intellectual property known as Delta Green is a trademark and copyright owned by the Delta Green Partnership, who has licensed its use here. The contents of this podcast are © Mayday Roleplay, excepting those elements that are components of the Delta Green intellectual property. CAST OF CHARACTERS • Aaron - Agent Samael • Allegra - Agent Tuck • Amanda - Agent Boomer • Caleb - Agent Merit • Eli - Agent Hyde • Zakiya - Agent Warp • Sergio - The Handler MUSIC & SOUND EFFECTS • Post Sound Supervision: Sergio Crego, Eli Hauschel • Mixed: Eli Hauschel • Original Music: Aaron A. Pabst, Joe Sanders • Soundstripe (soundstripe.com) • Glitch Machines (glitchmachines.com/) • Soundly (getsoundly.com/) DELTA GREEN LINKS • Delta Green (http://deltagreen.com/) MAY DAY ROLEPLAY LINKS • Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/maydayrp/) • Patreon (https://patreon.com/maydayrp) • Twitter (https://twitter.com/maydayroleplay7) • Mayday website (https://www.maydayroleplay.com/) • Twitch (https://twitch.tv/maydayroleplay)

Something to Chew On - Global Food Systems at Kansas State University
Diversity is the key to Sustainability: Challenges and opportunities in the field of Weed Science

Something to Chew On - Global Food Systems at Kansas State University

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 55:15


Listen to our first podcast of 2022, where we discuss weed management techniques, old and new, and the tools being developed to achieve food crop yield optimization with Vipan Kumar, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the Department of Agronomy at Kansas State University. Weeds can reduce food crop yields by more than 30%.  In this podcast, Kumar discusses the ways in which this problem might be solved when the need for food production will continue to increase, and the challenges caused by climate change create a moving target.   Transcript: “Diversity is the key to Sustainability; Challenges and opportunities in the field of Weed Science”.      Diversity is the key for sustainability. You keep doing one thing again and again you will see a problem that we have seen in our herbicide based methods or weed control.   Something to chew on is a podcast devoted to the exploration and discussion of global food systems. It's produced by the Office of Research Development at Kansas State University. I'm Maureen Olewnik, coordinator of Global Food Systems. We welcome back co host Dr. Jim Stack Professor of Plant Pathology, weeds can reduce food crop yields by more than 30%. These interlopers compete for resources including soil nutrients and water. We attempt to control weed growth through chemistry, but over time they manage to mutate, overcome, thrive, and adjust to given management techniques. So how is this problem solved when the need for food production will continue to increase and the challenges caused by climate change create a moving target. Today, we will hear more about weed management techniques old and new. And the tools being developed to achieve food crop yield optimization with Dr. Vipan Kumar, Assistant Professor in the Department of Agronomy at Kansas State University, I want to welcome you Vipan would like to before we get started in the technical side of things, just get a little background and understanding of who you are and how you got to the place that you are today as far as your professional interests go.   Sure, So my name is Vipin Kumar, I'm originally from India. I did my bachelor in crop science, but finished in 2008 from Punjab Agricultural University back in India, in the state of Punjab, it's a Northwestern State in India, mainly known for wheat production and rice production. And it's very big in ag, Punjab state. So, my original goal was to help communities there, especially the farming communities to management practices they are doing so I did my bachelor there. And then I started my master actually mastering Weed Science in Pau 2008, fall 2008. But somehow I was also interested to come abroad and expand my education here in the States. So I was looking through some programs and during that time, I got to know there is a master positions open in Louisiana State. So I I applied there and I got invited and came over 2009 That was summer 2009 started my graduate research assistant with LSU, Louisiana State, Louisiana State University. So that program was specifically looking for someone who can help growers in terms of managing their irrigation water irrigation scheduling, developing some crop coefficients for the cotton prop in North East side of Louisiana. So I was based in actually a research center. It was in North East Louisiana, about five, four or five hours from the main campus Baton Rouge. So my whole research was on resource center and I got to know very few people there but I had a very excellent project to work with. So during that time, I was doing a master I got interested in Weed Science because wonderful. One of my committee member was a weed scientist. He was the superintendent with the research center and he was on my committee and glyphosate resistant Palmer Amaranth was kinda getting a lot of attention during that time in codon. So during that conversation and meeting with his students, I got interested in wheat science. So finishing master and then I started applying for PhD program. So I think during that time, there was not a whole lot of opportunity because of the economic constraints, but I found one position in Montana State University 2011 So I started my PhD 2011 in Montana State University, Bozeman, the whole my dissertation research was focused on herbicide resistant weeds, mainly Tumbleweed Kosha, looking at, you know, characterizing herbicide resistance evolution, how we can manage in terms of what strategies growers can use to control herbicide resistant Kosha in Different cropping systems. So, that was for four years I spent there and then just immediately after finishing my PhD, I started my postdoc there and two year postdoc in the same program in Montana State. So 2017 I got here at K State got this position, where I am in his as an assistant professor in Weed Science. Part of my responsibilities. I am 100% researcher. All the focus is on developing integrative weed management strategies for western Kansas. Looking at herbicide resistance evolution in weeds, what are the novel and innovative strategies we can come up for our dry land are no till dryland growers in western Kansas. So that's I have been doing last for more than 40 years in Hays, Kansas. And a little bit history on this tradition. My predecessor, Dr. Phil Stallman, he had spent 42 years on this role. He was kind of He's like one of the pioneer in herbicide resistance management in High Plains specially in dryland cropping system in Kansas. So right now leading a statewide program, research program and little bit outreach program because I've been involved with a lot of growers here are the my appointment is not extension or no extension tents, but the been doing some extension as well. So that's kind of in the nutshell, what I'm doing here.    That's great. Okay, well, thank you so much for that overview. That's helpful in me understanding a little bit more about what it is you're doing in reading through some of the information I found on your website about what you do, there was a lot of discussion on no till and the impact of no till on managing weeds and that type of thing. Can you tell me a bit more about what that term means and how it impacts the growing period?   Sure, since the dustbowl period, the soil conservation practices have been you know, taken place among growers in the main reason was those soil conservation practices were to conserve the soil and other resources for longer term because soil erosion in these areas, especially the Great Plains area, or High Plains area was pretty obvious. And because we control it was generally achieved by tillage. So folks still the ground and control the weeds in history, if you see that's like number one method it used to be and then USDA NRCS folks came up with this idea of conserving the soil not to till the ground just to preserve the soil from erosion as well as not to blow the surface soil where we have fertile soil. So, so no till is basically a concept brought up after the Dust Bowl period and got adopted by growers throughout the Great Plains. And no tillage equipments also got, you know, into the market after that like no till drills, no till planters, that growers don't have to till the ground to make the seed bed they can directly go and plant or drill their crops. And this idea or concept was achieved with the chemical weed control. So if you look at after 1940s, when the this chemical era started, like the two four D came into the market, or any other cleaning herbicide came into the market, one of those early products came into the market grower started using those and they found very convenient to kill those weeds and not till the ground. So this chemical era helped to adopt that concept of no tillage in High Plains as well as in throughout the Great Plains. So mostly what growers been doing is they don't tell the grounds they clean their fields before planting and after planting and in season crop by using chemicals and by using herbicides, so it's kind of serving to purpose they're controlling the weeds and they are also conserving the soil. Another aspect of doing no tillage is to conserve the moisture. We are in semi-arid regions our annual precip is not that great. If you look at historically we are between somewhere between 12 to 24 inches, you know depending on the place where you are in the Great Plains so doing a no tillage practice also helped conserving the moisture throughout the winters time. So whatever the snow or the moisture comes, if you don't do the ground, you know it stays there for the subsequent crop to plan and have the crop in place. There are two things basically conserving the soil and conserving the moisture that no till practice came into existence. But however, I would I also like to emphasize over the last 1015 years, what has happened is because we have relied too much on chemicals, too much on herbicides, and we are seeing evolution in weeds, they are developing or evolved resistance to these chemistries, what folks have been using in our systems. So herbicide resistant weeds have really, really become a threat to this Nortel production system and chemical industries are struggling in terms of bringing new chemistries into the market, because there is not a whole lot of investment going into bringing a new motor factions, especially from herbicide standpoint. So the dilemma is to control those herbicide resistant weeds, we need alternate strategies, alternate methods of weed control. So that's where my role kind of come into that where that fit is how we can combine different methods of weed control, including chemical or non chemical, and come up with some sort of sustainable system that can go in longer term.   Yeah, if I could follow up with a question. How prevalent is this problem globally?    Herbicide resistance globally, it's, it is the number one problem for Weed Science communities as well as the grower community. Wherever folks have been using herbicides, we have been seeing increasing trend after 1980s, we have been seeing exponential increase in a number of cases of herbicide resistant weed population being reported, there is a website called Weed Science dot O R G, that documents every single case been reported to the world. And if you go to that website, you will see after 1980s, that graph has just jumped to the highest level. And it's not only one herbicide, it's basically, you know, all the available herbicide motor factions, we have reported case of resistance somewhere in the world. In the US, we are leading in that graph, country wise, in terms of herbicide resistance, the complicated issue is okay, one time a herbicide fails, for example, glyphosate. So folks start using other herbicides or other mode of action, but now been doing those things, we have been seeing multiple resistance in our weed populations. So resistance not only to one herbicide mode of action, but 23456, even six herbicide mode of action resistance in those weed species. So that's the challenge that we are having a limited options in terms of chemicals.   One of the quality parameters for seed, like the grains and things like that is the number of weed seeds that are also in with the grains. Is that a significant way of moving herbicide resistant genotypes around?   Yes, recently, what happened has most of our soybean, you know, most of our corn, we export to other countries. And there has been international standards in those products. And there's inert material and weed seeds are one of those standards. And recently, we have got email from our society, as well as USDA that come up with the plans how we can minimize those weed seeds in the crop seeds. Because some of the Chinese importer, they have stopped taking some of our soybean because of the big weed seeds present in those crop seeds. So it's a function of what is escaping in those crops, what is leaving in those crops at the time of harvest what you're harvesting with. And that's ultimately making those crop quality lower and making those export important difficult. And it's not only that they have they have also raised concern that hey, we don't have this, let's say big weed in China, you are sending herbicide resistant pigweed in our ways. So that's the hurdle with the growers how to sell those because the quality is lower in terms of having weed seeds in those. Those greens.   Yeah, so you mentioned some, weed genotypes with resistance to five, six or more chemistries. What's the strategy then? How do you get on top of this?   Yeah, I feel fortunate and excited some time that I'm in the field that where there is a lot of growth, there's a lot to do. I don't know if you have probably noticed that recently, a Weed Science area we have so many openings, so many positions coming up in industry as well as in academia and public sectors. And the reason is that we are struggling with these issues of resistance and crop weed competition in different scenarios. So, you know, considering that we are getting, you know, way back in terms of herbicide options. Industry is not coping up with the new molecules in the market. And we have more and more cases of resistance. So the shift of the research or read science research has gone to looking at non chemical strategies, what are the non chemical strategies we can bring into our system? So historically, as I said, folks used to do tillage. But in our system in Great Plains, High Plains, that's probably not a good recommendation, if you want to give folks will not like that, because we've been promoting that no till system for decades. And that is number one challenge. But in other areas, tillage is helping and it's helping those folks controlling those herbicide resistant weeds or multiple system weeds. Another approach we are looking at, what are the ecological tactics? How about the crop weed competition, how we can make our crops so competitive against weeds, that we don't have to rely too much on chemicals. One example I can give that is ecological method we are testing here is cover crops, how the cover crops can come into the system, and helps pressing those weed populations and reduce the seed bank. Again, these are not these ecological tactics don't work like chemicals, but they have a fit in our system. If we can, let's say suppress our weeds from 100 100 weeds to 70 weeds, there are still benefit having that. And you can add with the chemicals method of weed control. So that's just one example than other methods, we are looking as a non chemical methods or harvest weed seed control, that new thing is kind of getting a lot of interest among growers and researchers throughout the globe. So when I say harvest weed seed control is basically a technique when you're harvesting the crop, you have weeds in that crop, so you are harvesting the crop and you're also collecting those weed seeds. And then either you are destroying those weeds by crushing them when they're coming out of the Combine that's called harvest wheat seed destruction or you can put them as a CEF as a narrow line called chaff lining behind the combine. So this concept was brought up or discovered by a grower actually in Western Australia in a dryland wheat grower actually, just similar to what we have in western Kansas, he was struggling with the rigid ryegrass, multiple resistance to the rye grass. So what he did is he started destroying those rye grass seeds when he was harvesting wheat. So over the two, three years when he did that, he found that he reduced the seed bank, he didn't have to deal with that problem with the chemicals. So but in US or in North America, that technology has just arrived. And we are the first one in classes we have bought that destructor and Jeff minor. And we have got some USDA wants to test here in High Plains, how that's going to work in our system. I'm just giving example that those are the kind of approaches we are looking at it from the future work. Third thing which I really like to touch base is the proceeds. And that's the coming future of the Ag digital agriculture or Smart Agriculture. You can name it differently, but that's happening. So from a weed control research or weed control perspective, precision agriculture is another way to look at these problems or herbicide resistant weed problems.   So how specifically does the Precision Ag is it about applying chemical where it's needed when it's needed? Is that the strategy there? Or?   Yes, that there are different aspects there preseason agriculture or preseason technology is what we are, but I can envision is, you know, it can help us at least doing field mapping with to start with if we can detect early detection of herbicide resistant weed population in a farm. And then we can develop strategies accordingly. And again, then the next level of proceeds and that could be a variable rates of herbicide application or spot treatment. We don't need to spray the whole farm maybe, but just a little patch where we have herbicide resistant weeds growing. So that's where we can, you know, have precision ag tools helping us in the future if we have a good set of data, especially if you have good algorithms and good database, we can identify our pig weeds or Kosha or any other weeds in our crops, I think that can help making making your decisions or plans for weed control.   Yeah, thank you. Sorry, Maureen I've been dominating.    No, that's okay. It was you know, as he was talking about some of the methods that they're looking at it. It took me back to my previous life. Were working in the food safety area, we focus heavily on integrated pest management, it sounds to me like the directions that you're heading now that the chemicals are not doing what they're supposed to necessarily be doing. You're looking at these integrated systems of trying to control those weed productions from a whole variety of different areas. And it may be that there are packages or approaches  that can be taken based on location based on crop type based on a variety of other things. But you will have that group of tools in your toolbox. Is that am I interpreting that correctly?    Yes, yes, you're right, you're on the same page. The things are like with this herbicide resistance management, it's all economic aspects. Economy drives these things, the farmer economy, when they are going to make their weed control decision, they're going to look at what herbicide how much it takes, what is the rate? What is the cost. And if you see, like with the roundup resistant weeds, folks have been switching to other chemistries which are more expensive, and having more other issues as well as like drift to other crops or drift to other organisms from environmental standpoint. Also, chemical control is kind of getting ahead. In terms of some folks, they don't like some chemicals because they are hitting their other organism or other crops sensitive crops. And the second is, economically Is it viable to use that chemistries, for example, you know, most of the folks most of the industry, you might notice these days, they're giving a talk having a true two or three different herbicide mode of action in a tank, they have a pre mixes available two to three actives in those pre mixes. But those are very, very expensive. Those are not cheap products to use. So the idea with the growers with the lower commodity prices, they don't want to put those high expensive herbicides at especially when you are doing in a fallow weed management, you're not getting any output or any return in those fallow fields. So to make the system more economical, you need to think about where my money is going in terms of inputs, those herbicide applications and in fallow systems grower used to spray like three, four times in the season. It's not like one application, and they're done. They used to spray three times four times. And you can imagine like 5000 acres spraying three times $10 an acre, that can multiply pretty quick. So that's where I think the folks or the weed science community is thinking to bring some of those cost effective programs or cost effective management strategies in our system that not only helps pressing this problem or suppressing these weeds, but also give benefit to the growers, and the environment and ecology or agro ecology, like a cover crops. So we are not just thinking integrating cover crops for weed suppression. But we are thinking that cover crops can help suppressing weeds. It can help you know fixing nitrogen, it can help improving the soil quality soil health. And it can also be used for grazing purpose to the animals. So there is a livestock integration as well. So we have we are thinking from a system standpoint that can help folks to be more economically viable.   This next question is kind of out there as it's taking us probably outside of your major focus at this point. But I've done a little bit read a bit of reading recently on the land institute and some of the work they're doing in Salina on perennial grains. Have you looked at that at all or have any thoughts on perennial brains? And if there's any value to that and what impact it would have on what you work on?   Definitely, I have not personally looked at that system yet. But I've been hearing that quite a bit. And we have a cropping system specialist here in his he's been talking one other day was giving a presentation on that side of it. But I think again, I would like to emphasize that Perennial system or perennial grain springing into our system is basically improving you know, our our ecosystem and also increasing the economic value of the products as well as the farm profitability overall. And some of the work being led by cropping system specialist here or agronomist here. Also looking at those forage species or forage annual forages or biennial forages or perennial forages as a part of the system that can integrate into our system. So, from Weed weed management side of it, I think that would be a win win situation that if that species or if those grains or perennial grains can provide that kind of weed suppression benefits what we are getting from other cover crops. I think that's what we need.   So one of the reasons we care about weeds as the as we do the other pests as their impact on production and grow the crops for to feed people, we grow the crops to feed the animals that become the food that they feed people. Are there reasonable estimates of the economic impact or the yield impacts that you know, general rules of thumb? I know there, there are no exact numbers, but what what are we talking about in terms of scale of impact that we have on food production, but then also, what having herbicide resistant weeds contributes to that?   Definitely, there has been several reports in different crops. And I will just highlight some of the examples here for Kosha or, or Palmer Amaranth. Those are the prevalent species here in western Kansas or central part of state, if you like, look at some of the reports on Kosha. previous reports from my previous predecessor and other colleagues in other other states, they have found Kosha is quite competitive. Irrespective of resistance, let's say there's no resistance in these species. These weed species are very, very aggressive, very invasive. They have good traits, good biological traits, to compete very well with the crops. First, you need to understand that the biology behind those weeds, that's why they're becoming more and more troublesome problem for the folks here. So in terms of yield impact, I would say Kosha, let's say you know, you leave the kosher season long infestation in a crop like that the sugar bee does the least competitive crop in among all those crops, we grow in the northern or central Great Plains by up to 95% reduction in those sucrose yield as well as the beat heels we have reported. We have seen in the literature since 1970s 1980s. Wheat 20 to 30%. Yield reduction, going to be the kosher season long infestation, when I'm saying the Kosha is like moderate densities 40 to 50 plants per square meter, if they are present, they can do that 20-30% of damage to the yield big waves, they can choke our our sorghum. So one of the worst fields I have seen in my lifetime here in western Kansas is sorghum because the folks they don't have option, there's not not a single effective option that can go with for controlling pigweed controlling Palmer Amaranth in sorghum, especially when the sorghum is above certain stage, like 30 inch tall, there's no label chemistry to go with controlling pigweed. And that's the time I start getting calls from growers, hey, our pigweed is this much our Milo is already two feet tall, can I spray Dicamba that's the off label you cannot and if you do it, you will hurt you leave you will that will cause a crop injuries that will cause reducing the grain quality. So yeah, really impact. I mean, there's a huge impact. And you can imagine now if those species are resistant, and you are putting the chemical, and they are surviving 70% of those ceilings are surviving. And you know, going up to the seed production, you can imagine that you have put the cost to control it. Plus you still have a problem, and there is a double hit there.   Right. That's the double insult with resistance.   Right. So yeah, that's I think that's where we need to be more proactive. And we need to think more in longer term. The growers don't think in a longer term, they think on an annual basis because their budget is running annual basis. They have like let's say 5000 acres, they have a plan for 5000 acre for one year, they don't have a plan for three year or five years. That's where the problem starts. And as I said, economy drives all these things that resistance management. And that's become really, really challenging for researcher as well as extension person to convince folks to do things they're not doing.   You're talking about the aggressive nature of some of those weeds and thought just came into my mind on the genetics of those materials as any work being done at K State on the genetics of some of these weeds.   Yes, yes, we have a weed physiologist, weed physiology lab in in Manhattan. There has been quite a bit of work been done. And yeah, there's all kinds of different genetic mechanisms they have found in these weed species, why they are adapting to these kinds of situations herbicide applications. One example I can give here is Kosha and Palmer Amaranth. They have developed resistance to glyphosate commonly used chemistry or herbicide in our system in Roundup Ready crops. We have seen both species Palmer and Kosha. What they do is they multiply that target gene so they have more copies of that gene with the glyphosate go and target. So what it does is instead of one copy, single gene in they have Kosha has like 10-15-20 copies of that gene. So that Are those number of copies of that gene produce more enzyme, so the chemical cannot inhibit that much enzyme. So the those plants survive those treatments. That's how they are kinda adapting to that glyphosate treatments or other mechanism recently, weed physiology lab in Manhattan, they have found these multiple resistant pigweeds, what they are doing is they have enhanced metabolism. So some of the genes involved in metabolism in those plants, they got activated, and they are just metabolizing, whatever you're spraying. So no matter what, even a new chemistries is not even existing, it can just metabolic metabolite because it's not reaching to the target gene and hitting those targets side. So that is a more fearful thing happening in the nature, that metabolism based mechanism is also evolving in weed species. And as I said, it's a function of the biology of the species like palmer amaranth, very, very diverse genetic background Kosha. Same with very diverse genetic background, a lot of gene pools, they're sitting in those, you know, individuals and they can, they can adapt, and they can evolve to any of those stresses. Among other biological feature if you read about kosher Palmer, both are highly prolific seed producers, a single kosher plant can produce hundreds of 1000s of seeds. A one female Palmer Amaranth can produce millions of seeds. So that many seed production, it has potential to infest more areas, more lands, and keep going if you don't manage them properly.   Is dissemination and equipment. Problematic locally, though, going from one field to the next?   Yes, yes, big weed or Palmer Amaranth. We had a meeting North Central wheat science meeting, talking with the folks from North Dakota, and South Dakota, they have started seeing palmer amaranth, it was not the case, five years back. And that's happening because of movement of equipment, movement of products, like hay movement, or even animal feed, people take the animal feed and take to the other states, and those farmer seeds go with that. And, and infest those areas. So that's kind of tricky, you know, managing those moments is very, very difficult. That's where we kind of emphasize that control those weeds in the field, so that you don't have to deal with in the products. Okay, or, or green or or equipments. For weeds like Kosha, it's a tumbleweed and doesn't need that many it can tumble miles and miles when the wind is blowing. And that's the kind of beauty of that weed species that finds new areas of infestations with the high winds, especially in the high plains, it can tumble, it's very hard to kind of contain that.   How is the contaminated seeds physically removed from the grain itself? I'm sitting here trying to get in my mind if we're going to be selling to other countries, and they've got obviously a lower limit that's allowed in there. Is there some kind of assuming practice or an air movement as the heavier seed goes through? How's that done?   Yeah, I don't know exactly how that will happen. Because this year, we are talking like a bulk export. And folks just take the produce from the field and sell it to the coop cooperative marketing places and I don't know how much storage they have, and it gets pretty big pretty quickly. So that's where we try to emphasize to the grower Hey, you know, if you can manage in the field, that's the best you can do. You don't let it go to the produce or to the greens I see that's where this harvest we'd see destruction is going to have a fared very well that can destroy the weed seeds don't don't don't let it go into the grains and escape folks to get the contaminated grains. And it's not only that in crops like wheat, we have a problem we have a central Kansas growers they've been dealing with awry federal MRI or CT or MRI issues. So those dry what it does is it contaminate it has allergen, so it contaminate the grains when you export to the you know, Asian country, they don't take that because they are allergic to that allergens in CRI. So the idea there is and it's very difficult there's no inseason chemical you can try and control in wheat unless you have herbicide resistant weed like waxy and wheat or Learfield weed where you can spray some of the herbicide and get rid of those grass species. So in those situation against this see destruction can really really help folks not letting those weeds eat grains in the in the crop grains.   Is there a limit in the seed size? Or? I think that new technology sounds excellent for being able to destroy the seed in the field, or the limit that in terms of which species would be vulnerable.   Yeah, yeah, those are all questions we are trying to address here as a future research in Australia, they have destroyed these rigid ryegrass that's quite a bigger size like a wheat grain size of the wheat seeds we are talking. But the things we are talking here like big weeds, very tiny small black color seed and waterhemp or Kosha. They're very tiny, tiny seeds, very small seed seed weeds. As per my experience. I have gotten the unit last Wolsey last fall September and we put together there was a technical team came and put on a combine and let's try that one of the grower field, we took it by miles south of Hayes and run on a grower farm was heavily infested with the Palmer Amaranth. I couldn't see even a sorghum plant, as all Palmer Amaranth. And I was trying to do that. The idea was how that goes, I was very curious how much destruction it can do especially in crop like sorghum, when it's green, and you know, high material, you're going through the combine what kind of destruction it can do, I was very, very curious. But somehow I found that we collected some of the samples out of the combine, and behind the Combine of that destructor I was always amazed to see like 85-90% of destruction is was doing on those Palmer Amaranth seed, those tiny, tiny seed was kind of pulverized. It was like powder form after that. So I was pretty amazed. So I was telling my team of folks from Iowa State and University of Arkansas, we're gonna run this in soybean, corn, as well as sorghum plots in the coming season to see if what it does and what how the crop species or the how the crop varieties also matters, using this technology, not only weed species, and then how the environment impact those results in high plane versus Midwest versus mid south, how things change from region to region, crop to crop, weeds to weeds. And with this, this grant, we have also a Ag Econ person on the team. So I'm going to look at the economic side of it. Because as I said, economy drives everything. And if you're gonna promote this technology, where we stand in terms of economy, is it cost effective? Is it sustainable? So I think I'm telling more future research here. But that's, that's going to happen.   Good. Good. Sounds promising. Yeah.   Pretty interesting, pretty exciting. And along with that, we are also not looking at one tool at a time. Our main mission with this project, which we got funded by NIFA, based on our TFS grant was to having bringing all the tools together, it's like bringing little hammers together. So we have a cover crops early in the season, we have herbicides applied. And then at the end of the season, we're gonna do see destruction versus Jeff lining, and comparing with what growers are normally doing conventional harvest. So there are three different approaches, we are trying to bring in one growing season, to say, hey, early season management with the cover crop, herbicides, late season management, or weed seed management, with this destructor or outlining how they come together as a system, and help growers if they're struggling with some of these multiple resistant pigweeds.   I appreciate your mentioning the seed grant and appreciate you having come to Manhattan to present the results of that work recently. And that information will be up on our website in the near future. We'll have all of those and have those available for anyone to listen to, as well. I'm glad to hear that it panned out into a larger grant. So that's great.   Yes. And that was really, really good support to get that kind of grant and reach out to the folks what they're really looking for the survey we did me and Sarah, we learn a lot. And some of that information. We just plug in our proposal. And it sold out pretty quickly. And to your surprise, and to my surprise, that proposal was ranked number one in CPPM in the country was in that program, NIFA CPPM program and the Secretary with agriculture wrote a letter to the PI. That was excellent proposal to put together for such kind of strategies to look in the soybean system.   Congratulations on that. That's great.    Yeah, that's, yeah, that was really, really a great help from the TFs good Add money in that we could create some data to supplement data for the proposal.   But you know, the phenomenon of resistance is just creeping through agriculture. So it's the herbicide resistant weeds. It's the fungicide resistant pathogens. It's the antibiotic resistant bacterial. And we really need to get a handle on it, if we're going to continue to produce at the levels we've been producing. So I'm wondering if the strategies you're looking at it, if there are some general principles that you think will be helpful in, in the other arenas, as well, not just the herbicide resistance, but in the others?   Yeah, the basic principles, we are looking at the diversity in our system, I think, diversity is the key for sustainability, you keep doing one thing again, and again, you will see a problem that we have seen in our herbicide based methods of weed control, you've been doing same chemistries over and over, we have seen resistance issues, diversity, could be anything diverse cropping systems and diverse, you know, diverse methods of weed control, doing different things, you don't give same thing to that we don't do that best again and again, that that test start adapting to that matters or that strategy. So every year you change that strategies and give something new to the past and head those past with a different approach. So diversity, I think, is the key, what we are trying to achieve with this eating greater weed management system or ITM systems that you bring diversity in crop diversity in your herbicide diversity in your read species, overall system wide. I think that's the key principle we are looking at it. And that can be translated easily to the other disciplines, like, as you mentioned, plant pathology or entomology, not to look at one strategy or one thing at a time, but looking at the system level, where things can be bring and can bring that diversity into the system.   I love this area. You mentioned that there are a lot of opportunities right now for weed scientists. And I look at the agronomy department here at K State. It's been really strong in terms of the scope of capabilities, the expertise that's in that department. It's pretty impressive what they've got within one department. So what if there are students that listen to this the either graduates or undergraduate students listening to this? What skill sets? Would you recommend chemistry? I mean, ecology, what skill sets would you recommend if they want to help tackle this problem?   Yeah, that's a great question. As I mentioned, a lot of opportunities coming for fresh graduates and a lot of weed science positions recently opening up in academia, industry and other public sectors and private sectors. What I see as the weed scientists in this position, the four most important skill sets I can see is the knowledge of field based research, field based Weed Science Research, every fresh graduates they need. And then training of all the plants, science, biochemistry, physiology, genetics are those are specialized area already there. If you can take little bit of that have some expertise, you don't need to be doing five different projects in that area. But if you have little, little component of those areas, that really, really help understanding the problem, you know, from the root stand point of view, but applied Weed Science, statistical skills, how to handle the data, because the future is all about the data. With all this digital agriculture, you're going to tackle with the big data set, how to look at the data, there is a lot of data but what you make of out of the data. So statistical analysis, or analytical skills are also very, very important. And then you can also look at the mysteries in Weed Science, especially herbicide you need to know what you're doing and what you're tackling with. Because again, 70%, more than 70% of the calls the growers give me is they asked me the option herbicide option. They don't ask me, Hey, should I try this cover crop? They simply asked Hey, can I spray they can buy glyphosate is not working? How expensive? Is there a generic one? Is there a lower price one what is the formulation? All kinds of chemistry related question will come if you are going to go to those real world situations like applied weed sign, you know Precision Ag or engineering side of it. If you can learn some of the skills. I think that's the benefit as well, because that's happening right now. Preseason agriculture tools, a lot of weed science folks, they have started really using it and implementing into their programs. And that's going to be the future. A lot of the industry investment is going into that digital agriculture, especially from pest management, especially from weed management perspective. So those are some of the skills I just listed is applied Weed Science, applied field based research, chemistry knowledge, little bit of those physiology, genetics, biochemistry is knowledge, statistical analytical approaches. And procedure neck, I think, if you have little bit of all of those, and you can sell yourself, you will get the job, I'm sure. But for the weed scientists, as far as I know, yeah.   Thank you. Thanks.   Great question. And great, good bit of information for the students here on campus to file away as they think about what they want to work on. Yes.   And I think I would also encourage undergraduate students if they are interested in in ag and if they are specifically interested in in weeds or any other pairs, they should do some project, they should contact folks on Main Campus or research center to get involved and to get learn how to handle the project or what to do in terms of research and how the research is conducted and how the data is handled. That's pretty basic. But there's quite a bit of learning before you get into your graduate schools, or Masters or PhD. If you can do a little project in undergrad that'd be really, really helpful.   I enjoyed this conversation quite a great. One other big challenge on the horizon is, of course, climate change. And a number of studies done on how it's impacting the migration of plant populations and impacting fertility of some plant species, things like that it does that come into play here in terms of weed management?   Yes, exactly. If you talk about climate change, or drastic changes in environmental conditions, weaves are one of those first pieces who will adapt to these changes, because they have highly diverse genetic background. And they have already been doing that molecular weight science program in Colorado State has been looking at Kosha from different angle. So they're trying to sequence the whole genome, they're trying to characterize some of the genes, good genes, they call it good genes, which are helping this Kosha to adapt cold treatments, or frost or drought, or heat, or salt, or even herbicide resistance, how those genes can be incorporated into our crops to make them more resilient for the future. Okay, so that's kind of angle to look at these weed species, we have that gene pool in those species, why don't we characterize and understand then how, and what they can do when we incorporate those gene in our crops for the future crops that can be resilient to the, to the these changes in climate environment. But as I said, changing climate changing environment, adaptation is going to be happen, evolution is going to happen in those weed species. Along with that, what's going to happen is interaction of the chemistry with the plant and the environment is going to change. And that's very critical to understand the efficacy of some of the chemicals we are seeing now probably will not be there into that future environmental future climate. Just because plant adapt, and they adapt differently, they have TIG cuticle, for example, the chemical may not penetrate that cuticle in the future, and cannot give you 90 95% control versus less than 70% control. So the efficacy is going to change or with increasing temperature or increasing carbon dioxide, C three C four species who's going to win and depending on those weeds species are those C three or C four, the shift will happen. And there'll be lot to play with climate and the principles of precipitation, how the precipitation change globally, some of these root shifts, also gonna share some some of the prediction has been done. Okay, if Great Plains start getting more rain, for example, we start going to see waterhemp coming this way, in Great Plains, if it's going to get more drier. Kosha is going to start going towards Midwest. There are predictions happening. And I think that's true, based on the biology of those weed species and based on the history of those species, how they have infested, and they have line ated themselves in those geography based on the climate.    Vipan, you had talked about when you were first over in the US you were working in Louisiana State working on cotton. And with climate change, I'm sure that that impacts this we're seeing cotton work its way into Kansas cropping Are you seeing? I mean, I know your focus is on the weed side of things. But are you seeing some of those other types of crops moving in more and more into these areas, some of the crops that we're used to moving Further north and having some new impacts of weed stress and that type of thing coming in with these new prompts.   Definitely, with changing things with the changing environment and climate, these things are happening. And we need to be very resilient in terms of adopting those things, changing things like we were doing this faculty meeting other day and prioritizing our missions for the unit other days. So one of the priority we have have for next 1015 20 years is to look at alternative crops, new crops, basically what folks need, provided that our conditions get changed, our environment gets changed, we get less peace, we get more dry land, what are the alternative crops, things like barley, millet is number one can be adapted to in the West, that has not been expanded. There's a lot of potential for that crop. There's a lot of potential for canola in the southwest Kansas. That has been happening already happening expanding. In as you mentioned, cotton, yes, it has gone up. It was not the case five, six years ago, but it has gone up 300,000 acres of cotton in Kansas, can you imagine. And then over the top of that you can see the changes, the commodity Commission's have started funding some of the positions for those areas as well, they are looking for a pattern specialist in Kansas, they can support this. So things have been changing with the climate change with environmental change, as well as you know, other changes. And one thing I can I can say for sure, from a read science perspective, you bring new things, new crops, for example, that has long term impacts on our weed population. Some of the previous studies, long term studies, 1020 years long term studies have shown that the crop rotation in competitive crops and what kind of crop you're growing, will have ultimate impact on those wheat population. If you are growing, for example, let's say highly competitive crop like corn, or could be any cereal grains, that grows pretty aggressively, it can shift some of those wheat population over the time, a study done in Nebraska has shown that you keep doing this corn soybean rotation, you will see more and more issues weather resistant Kosha and resistant big weed, but you will bring cereal into the system, you will lower down some of those resistance issues is because the crop competition expressed those cycles of those weed species and don't let them produce seeds. So weight shift is going to happen when these crop change is going to come into play in our system. But as again, I said we have to be very resilient and proactive, like things are happening. And it's going to happen, especially from climate change standpoint. So we need to be resilient, or what alternative crops we can grow. And we can still make these folks or the growers more profitable in the future. Considering all these constraints, weeds and other pests we will have.   Yeah, I'm hoping for mango and oranges.   I'm not sure on that. One more. Yes, really,   This has been a really a fun and interesting discussion. Well, thank you so much for your time. And thank you, Jim, for joining us as well. Do you have any final remarks, or any questions you might have for us before we sign off?   Well, I would like to thank you both for your time. And also I like to reiterate that the support I got through the GFS Grant was pretty timely, and very supportive. And I could develop that project based on that information. So I would keep looking at future opportunities from GFS folks that I can come up with and collaborate with folks from other disciplines. And I would encourage young faculty at K State to look for those opportunities. And to come up with ideas there where they can collaborate with folks like me sitting in Hays versus in you know, in Manhattan and we come to know each other. That's a great opportunity and really appreciate all the support you guys have.   So glad it worked out well. And thank you for your efforts. They're very much.   Thank you.   If you have any questions or comments you would like to share check out our website at https://www.k-state.edu/research/global-food/ and drop us an email. Our music was adapted from Dr. Wayne Goins's album Chronicles of Carmela. Special thanks to him for providing that to us. Something to Chew On is produced by the Office of Research Development at Kansas State University.     

Tune Junkies Podcast
#162 Perennial

Tune Junkies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2022 80:17


Articuno used Blizzard! It was super effective! We hope you all were relatively unscathed by the weather this week! Staying in AGAIN this week put Chris in a reflective mindset, reminiscing about his last trip to Chicago. Also the lineup for Michigan Metal Fest was announced! But enough about that. This week's guest coming in all the way from the EM AY (MA= Massachusetts) it's Chelsey and Chad of Perennial! Listen in as we discuss the power of a great album name, their new record "The Midnight Hour", and the hope that the only listener of this podcast, Award Winning Actor Tim Curry, will invent a dance for us. Oh, and we play a game. All this and more on your weekly fix of the Tune Junkies Podcast! Stay tuned after for the Title track "The Midnight Hour"   Perennial's Tunes: perennialtheband.bandcamp.com Instagram: instagram.com/perennialtheband   Follow Us: instagram.com/tunejunkiespodcast facebook.com/tunejunkiespodcast  

My Ag Life Daily News Report
Episode 263 | February 4, 2022 | Perennial Almond Pests and Avian Foodborne Risk Study

My Ag Life Daily News Report

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2022 30:34


On today's episode, hear from UCCE's Franz Niederholzer on what he's heard from growers about perennial almond pests this winter. Additionally, hear UC Davis' Daniel Karp discuss new findings from a recent avian foodborne risk study.   Supporting the People who Support Agriculture Thank you to our sponsors who make it possible to get you your daily news. Please feel free to visit their websites. Musco Family Olive Co. –www.olives.com/milliontrees The California Walnut Board – https://walnuts.org/ Soil and Crop – https://mysoilandcrop.com/  TriCal, Inc. – https://www.trical.com/ Phycoterra -https://phycoterra.com/

Sips, Suds, & Smokes
They all started with a P

Sips, Suds, & Smokes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2022 62:25


They all started with a P Co hosts : Good ol Boy Mike , Good ol Boy Dave, Good ol Gal Julieanna, and Good ol Boy Kendall.   SUDS Episode – This show is a Brewery Takeover Episode. We will be talking about beer from one brewery today and that is going to be Perennial Artisan Ales.   The Perennial beers we are going to discuss today are: Hereafter Regalia The Last Word Saison de Lis Aria Peace Offering Woodside   Sips, Suds, & Smokes info@sipssudsandsmokes.com @sipssudssmoke Hosted online at Spreaker and available on iTunes, PRX, TuneIn, Stitcher, Soundcloud, and YouTube. Catch more great beer news with Kendall on Beer Makes Three. www.beermakesthree.com

Mayday Plays
Doomed to Repeat Ep. 17 - “Taste of Decay”

Mayday Plays

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2022 141:21


The bitch is BACK and the agents of PERENNIAL must return to Lansing, MI to finish what they started. It seems “that which was Marlene” has been busy subverting an old Delta Green disinformation source (Phenomen-X) and transformed it into a cabal of deranged locals who may threaten to derail the agent's plans. Merit and Tuck try to contain an active investigation with unmistakable unnatural elements. Meanwhile, Warp splits from the group to retrieve the items found at Baughman's cabin in the hopes of finding a clue to stopping Marlene. Boomer seeks forgiveness from Samael and Hyde straddles her breaking point. TRIGGER AND CONTENT WARNINGS: Violence, blood and gore, death, body horror, mental illness, PTSD, manipulation, infighting, the topic of Covid-19 including conspiracy theorists, drug and alcohol use, harassment of hospital staff, allegations of child trafficing/pedophilia, use of lesbian d-slur. Published by arrangement with the Delta Green Partnership. The intellectual property known as Delta Green is a trademark and copyright owned by the Delta Green Partnership, who has licensed its use here. The contents of this podcast are © Mayday Roleplay, excepting those elements that are components of the Delta Green intellectual property. CAST OF CHARACTERS • Aaron - Agent Samael • Allegra - Agent Tuck • Amanda - Agent Boomer • Caleb - Agent Merit • Eli - Agent Hyde • Zakiya - Agent Warp • Sergio - The Handler MUSIC & SOUND EFFECTS • Post Sound Supervision: Sergio Crego, Eli Hauschel • Mixed: Eli Hauschel • Original Music: Aaron A. Pabst, Joe Sanders • Soundstripe (soundstripe.com) • Glitch Machines (glitchmachines.com/) • Soundly (getsoundly.com/) DELTA GREEN LINKS • Delta Green (http://deltagreen.com/) MAY DAY ROLEPLAY LINKS • Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/maydayrp/) • Patreon (https://patreon.com/maydayrp) • Twitter (https://twitter.com/maydayroleplay7) • Mayday website (https://www.maydayroleplay.com/) • Twitch (https://twitch.tv/maydayroleplay)

The Athletic Fantasy Baseball Podcast
MLB Mega Draft, Jazz Chisholm Jr., Jo Adell & Beating a Perennial Winner

The Athletic Fantasy Baseball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 61:32


Nando, Ian & DVR discuss Nando's approach to The Athletic's MLB Mega Draft before examining the short and long-term value of Jazz Chisholm Jr., their varying interest in Jo Adell, and how they try to close the gap on dominant managers in the leagues. Follow Nando on Twitter: @nandodifino Follow Ian on Twitter: @IanKahn4 Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Balling In The 6ix
Ten Days That Shook The Raptors Season - and showed why Toronto are a perennial .500 team

Balling In The 6ix

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 31:48


KJ and Vural talk a 2-4 week in which the Toronto Raptors hung in there with the league's best, stopped Giannis and got their quarterly whooping by Dwane Casey.

DH Radio
BENGALURU'S SURPLUS WATER! Solving its perennial water crisis

DH Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 17:36


BENGALURU'S SURPLUS WATER! Solving its perennial water crisis Dr T V Ramachandra explains how exactly to do this Hello and welcome to DH Radio. Bengaluru city's annual water requirement is 18 TMCft. Harvesting rain and storing the rainwater in rejuvenated lakes will conserve 15 TMCft. Add another 16 TMCft of treated waste water and you get 31 TMCft. Yes, Bengaluru can have surplus water! To explain this in more detail, DH Radio's Rasheed Kappan speaks to Dr T V Ramachandra from the Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science. Listen in.

Garden Bite with Teri Knight
Perennial of the Year 2022

Garden Bite with Teri Knight

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 2:00


The Perennial Plant Association announced their winner for Perennial of the Year 2022. It's Little Bluestem! A native with plenty of lovely cultivars. I share some beauties and one that was developed at the University of Minnesota Department of Horticulture and has become a standard! Listen up and take a look on Garden Bite.

The Strong Stoic Podcast
#131 - Josh Bertolotti: The Perennial Leader Project

The Strong Stoic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 86:07


Joshua  is the host of he podcasts In Search of Wisdom  and Philosopher, Monk, & Mystic where he engages in meaningful conversations on how to live in a complex world. In addition to the podcasts, he also writes articles on wisdom, has a weekly email called PATH, and offers coaching and consulting. All of his work is captured under "The Perennial Leader Project", which can all be found at the links below:https://www.perennialleader.comhttps://www.instagram.com/searchofwisdompodcast/?hl=en

The Growing Season
The Growing Season, Oct. 9, 2021 - Fall Colour 2021

The Growing Season

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 53:34


Lets dive into one of the most stunningly colourful times of the year.  The McFarlands steer The Growing Season into Fall Colour 2021. While they do talk about the why's and how's of the subject they also dive into some plants that are rarely chatted about when it comes to fall colour. Perennial geranium, barrenwort, blueberries, chokecherry and many more are all touched on. How does frost effect fall colour?  How about water?  All that and more. Need a visual?  The visual accompaniment to The Growing Season is here to help.  CLICK HERE. What is a TGS Tiny Garden? CLICK HERE. Subscribe to The Growing Season podcast.  CLICK HERE. Watch "The Land Line," our LIVE streaming show.  CLICK HERE.  

Garden Bite with Teri Knight
October perennial care

Garden Bite with Teri Knight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 1:59


Time flies! It's October 1st and time to collect seeds of coneflowers and rudbeckia with instructions on today's Garden Bite. You'll also want to decide how you want your "winter" garden to look and I've got the options on today's Garden Bite.

Garden Bite with Teri Knight
Perennial grasses

Garden Bite with Teri Knight

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 2:00


Perennial grasses are one of my favorite plants. There are tall grasses, small grasses, green grasses, blue grasses! Grasses for the prairie, grasses for the shoreline, grasses for sun, grasses for part shade and then the grasses that make you just say WOW! Take a listen to today's Garden Bite and find more info on my website, gardenbite.com.

Garden Bite with Teri Knight
Perennial (as in long lasting) planting tips

Garden Bite with Teri Knight

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 2:00


Gardening is a lot of trial by error! Unless you get a few tips from those of us who've gardened for a while! On today's Bite, I give you some of the nuances of planting.

The Catalyst Effect with Rich Keller
Brittany Fleck: Developing “PERENNIAL” utilizing her ‘One Word' personal brand!

The Catalyst Effect with Rich Keller

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2021 124:05


Episodes will include conversations with thought-leading entrepreneurs, emotionally intelligent business leaders and college and high school trailblazers who have accepted my challenge, discovered their ‘One Word' personal brand and are sharing it with the world in ways that are helping them Stand-out Conquer Obstacles and Reach Excellence, in other words, SCORE.   Here are the 5 things you need to know about today's guest, Brittany Fleck:   Number 1: Brittany is a graduate of the University of Southern California with a degree in Human Development and Aging.   Number 2: In this episode, Brittany share excerpts from the book Untamed, by Glennon Doyle, and the profound effects it had on both of our lives.    Number 3: Brittany is the Founder of Perennial, a full-service end-of-life event production company and ritual consultation specializing in celebrations of life and creative death planning.   Number 4: In this episode, Brittany tells us how to bring all-of-life to the end-of-life by putting the "FUN" in funeral...or as she likes to say...a FUNeral. This opened my eyes to the many ways we can die with dignity.    AND   Number 5: Brittany's ‘One Word' Personal Brand…Take a listen to this episode to hear her answer.   Let's meet Brittany Fleck.