Podcasts about American Library Association

American library association and professional society

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Best podcasts about American Library Association

Latest podcast episodes about American Library Association

Night Dreams Talk Radio
Scary Shape Shifters Are They Real? With John Kachuba 12/2/22

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 94:16


John Kachuba is the award-winning author of twelve books and numerous articles, short-stories and poems. Shapeshifters: A History was published in June 2019 and was a finalist in the Horror Writers Association's Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in Nonfiction. Dark Entry is his most recent novel. John teaches Creative Writing at Ohio University and the Gotham Writers Workshop. He is a member of the Historical Novel Society, the Horror Writers Association, and the American Library Association's Authors for Libraries. He is a frequent speaker at conferences, universities and libraries and on podcasts, radio and TV. His website is www.johnkachuba.com.

Fearless Authenticity with Jeanne Sparrow
Don't Underestimate the Power of Spite with Acclaimed Crime Writer Tracy Clark

Fearless Authenticity with Jeanne Sparrow

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 49:56


At one point Tracy Clark had a three-inch thick file of rejection notices. But she never gave up on her dream of being a mystery writer. She now has one crime series under her belt – about P.I. Cass Raines - and is starting a second about Chicago P.D. Homicide Detective Harriet Foster; the first book in the series - Hide - will be released January 1, 2023. She credits much of her success to stubbornness and spite. In her second conversation with Jeanne (our first repeat guest!), Tracy shares with her the reasons those two feelings propel her forward; how good it felt when she got her revenge; why she loves mess and all the layers of life a character has to deal with; how she views constructive criticism, and how her part of her motivation for writing her books stemmed from the Huggy Bear character in the ‘70s TV show “Starsky and Hutch.”About Tracy:Tracy Clark is the two-time Sue Grafton Memorial Award-winning author of the highly acclaimed Chicago Mystery Series featuring ex-homicide cop turned PI Cassandra Raines. She received Anthony Award and Lefty Award nominations for her series debut, Broken Places, which was also shortlisted for the American Library Association's RUSA Reading List, named a CrimeReads Best New PI Book of 2018, a Midwest Connections Pick, and a Library Journal Best Books of the Year. She works as an editor in the newspaper industry in Chicago and is a board member-at-large of Sisters in Crime, Chicagoland, a member of International Thriller Writers, and a Mystery Writers of America Midwest board member. Twitter: @tracypc6161Facebook: @tracyclarkbooksWebsite: https://tracyclarkbooks.com/

Better Known
Dean Jobb

Better Known

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 29:32


True crime writer Dean Jobb discusses with Ivan six things which should be better known. Dean Jobb is award-winning true crime writer and a professor in the School of Journalism, Writing & Publishing at the University of King's College in Halifax, where he teaches in the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Nonfiction program. His latest book, The Case of the Murderous Dr. Cream: The Hunt for a Victorian Era Serial Killer (Algonquin Books), won the inaugural CrimeCon Clue Award for True Crime Book of the Year in 2022 and was longlisted for the American Library Association's Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction. His previous book, Empire of Deception (Algonquin Books), was the Chicago Writers Association Book of the Year, won the Crime Writers of Canada Award for best true crime book, and was a finalist for Canada's Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for nonfiction. Learn more about his work at https://www.deanjobb.com. Jakob Dylan https://www.smh.com.au/culture/music/a-wounded-jakob-dylan-bares-his-scars-in-a-new-album-20210718-p58any.html How to pronounce Newfoundland https://www.elleryqueenmysterymagazine.com/the-crime-scene/stranger-than-fiction-september-2022/ Joseph Bell https://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usbiography/b/josephbell.html Where the Cajuns came from https://www.nps.gov/jela/learn/historyculture/from-acadian-to-cajun.htm How to tell a pearl is fake https://www.worldsultimate.net/arthur-barry.htm The first Ponzi https://www.chicagotribune.com/history/ct-opinion-flashback-leo-koretz-ponzi-scheme-20210305-bsqzjlztlrbg5afozquk6ccksm-story.html This podcast is powered by ZenCast.fm

AWM Author Talks
Episode 119: Imani Perry

AWM Author Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 48:56


This week, Imani Perry, recent recipient of the 2022 National Book Award for nonfiction, discusses her book South to America: A Journey Below the Mason-Dixon to Understand the Soul of a Nation. Perry is joined by Dawn Turner. This episode is presented in conjunction with our special exhibit Dark Testament: A Century of Black Writers on Justice, in which Perry and her work is featured. Explore Dark Testament today at the American Writers Museum. The following conversation originally took place May 15th, 2022 at the American Writers Festival and was recorded live. AWM PODCAST NETWORK HOME Imani Perry is the Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University and a faculty associate with the Programs in Law and Public Affairs, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Jazz Studies. She is the author of 6 books, including Looking for Lorraine: The Radiant and Radical Life of Lorraine Hansberry, which received the Pen Bograd-Weld Award for Biography, The Phi Beta Kappa Christian Gauss Award for outstanding work in literary scholarship, the Lambda Literary Award for LGBTQ Nonfiction and the Shilts-Grahn Award for nonfiction from the Publishing Triangle. Looking for Lorraine was also named a 2018 notable book by the New York Times, and a honor book by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association. It was a finalist for the African American Intellectual History Society Pauli Murray Book Prize. Her book May We Forever Stand: A History of the Black National Anthem, winner of the 2019 American Studies Association John Hope Franklin Book Award for the best book in American Studies, the Hurston Wright Award for Nonfiction, and finalist for an NAACP Image Award in Nonfiction. Her most recent book is: Breathe: A Letter to My Sons (Beacon Press, 2019) which was a finalist for the 2020 Chautauqua Prize and a finalist for the NAACP Image Award for Excellence in Nonfiction. Dawn Turner is an award-winning author and journalist. Her most recent book, Three Girls from Bronzeville: A Uniquely American Memoir of Race, Fate, and Sisterhood, was named a Notable book of 2021 by The New York Times and The Washington Post, among others. A former columnist for the Chicago Tribune, Turner spent a decade and a half writing about race, politics and people whose stories are often dismissed and ignored. Turner, who served as a 2017 and 2018 juror for the Pulitzer Prize in commentary, has written commentary for The Washington Post, PBS NewsHour, CBS Sunday Morning News show, NPR's Morning Edition show, the Chicago Tonight show, and elsewhere. She has covered national presidential conventions, as well as Barack Obama's 2008 presidential election and inauguration. Turner has been a regular commentator for several national and international news programs, and has reported from around the world in countries such as Australia, China, France, and Ghana. She spent the 2014–2015 school year as a Nieman Journalism fellow at Harvard University. In 2018, she served as a fellow and journalist-in-residence at the University of Chicago Institute of Politics. Turner is the author of two novels, Only Twice I've Wished for Heaven (Crown, Random House) and An Eighth of August (Crown, Random House). In 2018, she established the Dawn M. Turner and Kim D. Turner Endowed Scholarship in Media at her alma mater, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Courage: To Leap To Lead
CB LIVE! Courage to Leap and Lead with Dianna Booher, Episode 107

Courage: To Leap To Lead

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 64:49


Dianna Booher helps organizations to communicate clearly and leaders to increase their influence by a strong executive presence- and sometimes with a published book. She's the bestselling author of 49 books, published in 62 foreign-language editions, with nearly 4 million copies sold. Her latest books include: • Faster, Fewer, Better Emails: Manage the Volume, Reduce the Stress, Love the Results • Communicate Like a Leader: Connecting Strategically to Coach, Inspire, and Get Things Done • What MORE Can I Say? Why Communication Fails and What to Do About It • Creating Personal Presence: Look, Talk, Think, and Act Like a Leader • Communicate With Confidence: How to Say It Right the First Time and Every Time She's the CEO of Booher Research, a communication consulting firm. Clients have included more than one-third of the Fortune 500, plus more than a dozen governmental agencies. Dianna has earned some of the highest recognitions in her industry as Richtopia's "Top 200 Most Influential Authors in the World", American Library Association's "Best YA Nonfiction of the Year", Executive Soundview Summaries: "25 Best Business Books of the Decade", Speaker Hall of Fame (induction by the National Speakers Association), "21 Top Speakers for the 21 st Century" by Successful Meetings magazine, "Top 30 Global Communication Gurus", and "Top 100 Thought Leaders in America" by Leadership Excellence magazine   Don't forget to follow CB, comment, rate, review, and subscribe to the show on your preferred platform! Rating/reviews: Rating/reviews: https://lovethepodcast.com/courage Apple Podcast: https://apple.co/34Q2dcI iHeart Radio: https://ihr.fm/3sKaUgM Amazon: https://amzn.to/36j2DZz Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3I6jXzc   WEBSITES: Courage Consulting: https://courage-consultant.com/ KeynoteSpeaking: https://www.cbbowman.com/ Coaching Association: https://www.acec-association.org/ Master Corporate Executive Coach Certification: https://www.meeco-institute.org/ SOCIAL MEDIA: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cbbowman/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/CbOttomanelli Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CB.BowmanMBA/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjZU3KqucXRXDsrHLvj8UIw Newsletter: https://www.linkedin.com/newsletters/courage-c-suite-challenges-6874133122783469568 #CBBowmanLive #courage #courageleadership #cbbowman #courageous #courageconsultant #leadership

On the Media
Infinite Scroll

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 50:14


Across the county, librarians are fighting to keep libraries open and books on the shelves. On this week's show, hear what the American Library Association is doing to stand up to unprecedented challenges, and what a suit against the Internet Archive could mean for the future of e-books. Plus, how the legend of the ancient Library of Alexandria continues to inspire utopian projects today. 1. Emily Drabinski [@edrabinski], incoming President of the American Library Association, on the greatest threats to libraries today, and how to fight them. Listen. 2. Nitish Pahwa [@pahwa_nitish], web editor at Slate, on how a lawsuit against the Internet Archive could affect how libraries lend out e-books for good. Listen. 2. Molly Schwartz [@mollyfication], OTM producer, takes us inside the quest for a "universal library," from the Library of Alexandria to today. Listen.  

New Books in Children's Literature
Annette Bay Pimentel, "Before Music: Where Instruments Come From" (Abrams, 2022)

New Books in Children's Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 50:40


Today I speak with Annette Bay Pimentel about her writing career, and celebrate her new book, Before Music: Where Instruments Come From (Abrams, 2023). Annette grew up mostly in Utah in a large, boisterous family. She graduated with an undergraduate degree from University of California Berkeley and a graduate degree from Brandeis University in English literature. She and her husband raised six musical-instrument-playing children. Annette's books are often on state young reader's lists and have been Junior Library Guild Selections. All the Way to the Top won a Schneider Honor from the American Library Association. Pura's Cuentos won the Goddard/Riverside Social Justice Award. Mountain Chef won the Carter G. Woodson Award. She is also the author of Girl Running. She is represented by Kathleen Rushall of Andrea Brown Literary. Mel Rosenberg is a professor emeritus of microbiology (Tel Aviv University, emeritus) who fell in love with children's books as a small child and now writes his own. He is co-founder of Ourboox, a web platform with some 240,000 ebooks that allows anyone to create and share flipbooks comprising text, pictures and videos. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network
Annette Bay Pimentel, "Before Music: Where Instruments Come From" (Abrams, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 50:40


Today I speak with Annette Bay Pimentel about her writing career, and celebrate her new book, Before Music: Where Instruments Come From (Abrams, 2023). Annette grew up mostly in Utah in a large, boisterous family. She graduated with an undergraduate degree from University of California Berkeley and a graduate degree from Brandeis University in English literature. She and her husband raised six musical-instrument-playing children. Annette's books are often on state young reader's lists and have been Junior Library Guild Selections. All the Way to the Top won a Schneider Honor from the American Library Association. Pura's Cuentos won the Goddard/Riverside Social Justice Award. Mountain Chef won the Carter G. Woodson Award. She is also the author of Girl Running. She is represented by Kathleen Rushall of Andrea Brown Literary. Mel Rosenberg is a professor emeritus of microbiology (Tel Aviv University, emeritus) who fell in love with children's books as a small child and now writes his own. He is co-founder of Ourboox, a web platform with some 240,000 ebooks that allows anyone to create and share flipbooks comprising text, pictures and videos. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

About Your Mother
021 Aftermath: Life in Post-Roe America | Elizabeth Hines

About Your Mother

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 34:32


The subject of reproductive rights has taken center stage in our society. Still, many people don't understand the tentacles those rights have in every corner of society or within most families. On this episode of About Your Mother is my conversation with writer and editor Elizabeth Hines, who spearheaded the recent anthology Aftermath: Life in Post-Roe America. Our discussion touches on motherhood, activism, and what it takes to bring important stories to the forefront. Shocked and motivated by the Dobbs decision, Elizabeth Hines channeled her energy to gather essays and interviews from contributors to share the importance of reproductive rights in America. Here is our conversation.   Letting Voices Be Heard The discussion begins with what inspired Elizabeth to put the anthology together. She found herself shocked and outraged when the decision leaked. Soon discovering she was not alone as friends and relatives voiced their disbelief and outrage about the judgment. Then, she had a calling and decided to serve as a vehicle for voices to be heard. "It was really just my anger and outrage over what was, at the time, the leaked draft of Justice Alito and his opinion on the Dobbs case. Then I got emails and text messages from friends, who are also parents who were really just beside themselves with concern about what do we do now."  – Elizabeth Hines   Making a Difference Elizabeth knew that many people were incensed about this issue, even those who are high-profile and have a larger platform to voice their concerns. She also understood the importance of seizing the moment. "I realized that I could do all of the text complaining and social media posting I wanted. But in the end, all of us are faced at a certain point with the question, what skills and tools do I have to actually make a difference? And one of the skills and tools I have as a writer is writing and bringing people together around the written word. And so I simply decided that what I was going to do was call on people I didn't even know and just start putting together an anthology."  – Elizabeth Hines   The Silence That Left Us Vulnerable Contributors bravely share their stories connected to reproductive rights, as well as experiences that influenced their understanding of them. Whether it's a health crisis, activism, health care work, political advocacy, and more, the anthology covers the varying degrees that reproductive rights touch people's lives. However, so many of these stories remain private, known to few. As one contributor, Rebecca Traister, said, "Our silence left us vulnerable." Many women wish to be more vocal on important issues but need help knowing where to begin. How do they reach people outside their own circles? Elizabeth's anthology breaks the familiar silence around the subject and gives the storytellers a platform. There are many brilliant contributors to the collection with varying accounts of reproductive experiences, and some might leave you shocked to understand how Dobbs affects so many lives.   Contributors include: Jessica Valenti Alyssa Milano Soraya Chemaly Michelle Goodwin Ruby Sales Gloria Feldt Linda Villarosa and 31 more. To hear more from Elizabeth Hines and her thoughts on post-Roe America, download and listen to this episode.   Bio Elizabeth Hines is an author, editor, and strategic communications specialist. Her work has appeared in numerous online publications, and along with her mother, Carol Jenkins, she is the co-author of the best-selling biography, Black Titan: A. G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire, winner of a 2004 Non-Fiction Book Honor from the American Library Association. Hines holds a BA from Yale College and conducted her graduate studies at Harvard University. She lives in New York City.   Connect with Elizabeth! Facebook | More about Elizabeth Hines Check out the anthology here: Aftermath: Life in Post-Roe America | Sh...

New Books Network
Kevin Wilson, "Now Is Not the Time to Panic" (Ecco Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 49:40


Today I talked to Kevin Wilson about his new novel Now Is Not the Time to Panic (Ecco Press, 2022). Kevin Wilson is the author of two collections, Tunneling to the Center of the Earth (Ecco/Harper Perennial, 2009), which received an Alex Award from the American Library Association and the Shirley Jackson Award, and Baby You're Gonna Be Mine (Ecco, 2018), and three novels, The Family Fang (Ecco, 2011), Perfect Little World (Ecco, 2017) and Nothing to See Here (Ecco, 2019), a New York Times bestseller and a Read with Jenna book club selection. His fiction has appeared in Ploughshares, Southern Review, One Story, A Public Space, and elsewhere, and has appeared in Best American Short Stories 2020 and 2021, as well as The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2012. He has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, and the KHN Center for the Arts. He lives in Sewanee, Tennessee, with his wife, the poet Leigh Anne Couch, and his sons, Griff and Patch, where he is an Associate Professor in the English Department at Sewanee: The University of the South. Recommended Books: Elizabeth Tan, Rubik Gwendolyn MacEwan, Julian the Magician  Chris Holmes is Chair of Literatures in English and Associate Professor at Ithaca College. He writes criticism on contemporary global literatures. His book, Kazuo Ishiguro as World Literature, is under contract with Bloomsbury Publishing. He is the co-director of The New Voices Festival, a celebration of work in poetry, prose, and playwriting by up-and-coming young writers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Burned By Books
Kevin Wilson, "Now Is Not the Time to Panic" (Ecco Press, 2022)

Burned By Books

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 49:40


Today I talked to Kevin Wilson about his new novel Now Is Not the Time to Panic (Ecco Press, 2022). Kevin Wilson is the author of two collections, Tunneling to the Center of the Earth (Ecco/Harper Perennial, 2009), which received an Alex Award from the American Library Association and the Shirley Jackson Award, and Baby You're Gonna Be Mine (Ecco, 2018), and three novels, The Family Fang (Ecco, 2011), Perfect Little World (Ecco, 2017) and Nothing to See Here (Ecco, 2019), a New York Times bestseller and a Read with Jenna book club selection. His fiction has appeared in Ploughshares, Southern Review, One Story, A Public Space, and elsewhere, and has appeared in Best American Short Stories 2020 and 2021, as well as The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2012. He has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, and the KHN Center for the Arts. He lives in Sewanee, Tennessee, with his wife, the poet Leigh Anne Couch, and his sons, Griff and Patch, where he is an Associate Professor in the English Department at Sewanee: The University of the South. Recommended Books: Elizabeth Tan, Rubik Gwendolyn MacEwan, Julian the Magician  Chris Holmes is Chair of Literatures in English and Associate Professor at Ithaca College. He writes criticism on contemporary global literatures. His book, Kazuo Ishiguro as World Literature, is under contract with Bloomsbury Publishing. He is the co-director of The New Voices Festival, a celebration of work in poetry, prose, and playwriting by up-and-coming young writers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Literature
Kevin Wilson, "Now Is Not the Time to Panic" (Ecco Press, 2022)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 49:40


Today I talked to Kevin Wilson about his new novel Now Is Not the Time to Panic (Ecco Press, 2022). Kevin Wilson is the author of two collections, Tunneling to the Center of the Earth (Ecco/Harper Perennial, 2009), which received an Alex Award from the American Library Association and the Shirley Jackson Award, and Baby You're Gonna Be Mine (Ecco, 2018), and three novels, The Family Fang (Ecco, 2011), Perfect Little World (Ecco, 2017) and Nothing to See Here (Ecco, 2019), a New York Times bestseller and a Read with Jenna book club selection. His fiction has appeared in Ploughshares, Southern Review, One Story, A Public Space, and elsewhere, and has appeared in Best American Short Stories 2020 and 2021, as well as The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2012. He has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, and the KHN Center for the Arts. He lives in Sewanee, Tennessee, with his wife, the poet Leigh Anne Couch, and his sons, Griff and Patch, where he is an Associate Professor in the English Department at Sewanee: The University of the South. Recommended Books: Elizabeth Tan, Rubik Gwendolyn MacEwan, Julian the Magician  Chris Holmes is Chair of Literatures in English and Associate Professor at Ithaca College. He writes criticism on contemporary global literatures. His book, Kazuo Ishiguro as World Literature, is under contract with Bloomsbury Publishing. He is the co-director of The New Voices Festival, a celebration of work in poetry, prose, and playwriting by up-and-coming young writers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books in Literary Studies
Kevin Wilson, "Now Is Not the Time to Panic" (Ecco Press, 2022)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 49:40


Today I talked to Kevin Wilson about his new novel Now Is Not the Time to Panic (Ecco Press, 2022). Kevin Wilson is the author of two collections, Tunneling to the Center of the Earth (Ecco/Harper Perennial, 2009), which received an Alex Award from the American Library Association and the Shirley Jackson Award, and Baby You're Gonna Be Mine (Ecco, 2018), and three novels, The Family Fang (Ecco, 2011), Perfect Little World (Ecco, 2017) and Nothing to See Here (Ecco, 2019), a New York Times bestseller and a Read with Jenna book club selection. His fiction has appeared in Ploughshares, Southern Review, One Story, A Public Space, and elsewhere, and has appeared in Best American Short Stories 2020 and 2021, as well as The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2012. He has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, and the KHN Center for the Arts. He lives in Sewanee, Tennessee, with his wife, the poet Leigh Anne Couch, and his sons, Griff and Patch, where he is an Associate Professor in the English Department at Sewanee: The University of the South. Recommended Books: Elizabeth Tan, Rubik Gwendolyn MacEwan, Julian the Magician  Chris Holmes is Chair of Literatures in English and Associate Professor at Ithaca College. He writes criticism on contemporary global literatures. His book, Kazuo Ishiguro as World Literature, is under contract with Bloomsbury Publishing. He is the co-director of The New Voices Festival, a celebration of work in poetry, prose, and playwriting by up-and-coming young writers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

Thresholds
Kay Ulanday Barrett

Thresholds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 41:32


Jordan talks with poet/performer/advocate Kay Ulanday Barrett about their decision to get top surgery, the intersection of family and food, and writing through health crises. MENTIONED: Grey's Anatomy Swype The Asian American Writers Workshop Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Kay Ulanday Barrett aka @Brownroundboi is a poet, performer, and cultural strategist. Their second book, More Than Organs (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2020) received a 2021 Stonewall Honor Book Award by the American Library Association and is a 2021 Lambda Literary Award Finalist. They have received residencies from Tin House as a 2022 Next Book Winner as well as MacDowell as a 2020 James Baldwin Fellow. Other residencies include: Drunken Boat, VONA Voices, Monson Arts, and The Lambda Literary Review. Barrett is a three-time Pushcart Prize Nominee and two-time Best of the Net Nominee. They have featured at The United Nations, The Lincoln Center, Symphony Space, Brooklyn Museum, Princeton, Harvard, Columbia University, Northwestern, The School of the Art Institute, & more. Their contributions are found in The New York Times, The Huffington Post, Poetry Magazine, them., Colorlines, Al Jazeera, NYLON, Vogue, The Rumpus, to name a few. Currently, they remix their mama's recipes and live in Jersey City with their jowly dog. kaybarrett.net For more Thresholds, visit us at www.thisthresholds.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Stateside from Michigan Radio
Librarians Concerned Over Uptick in Book Challenges

Stateside from Michigan Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 15:01


In Dearborn, community members have been at odds with the school board over the availability of books centered on LGBTQ-positive stories in school libraries. In Jamestown, residents harassed librarians at the city's only public library over young adult books containing LGBTQ-positive themes, accusing them of pedophilia and grooming. Incidents like this have become increasingly common over the past two years. According to the American Library Association, which has been tracking book challenges for the past 20 years, there were a record-breaking 729 book challenges in 2021. This year, the ALA has already recorded 681 book challenges between January and August. Debbie Mikula is the Executive Director of the Michigan Library Association, and she has an op-ed in the Washington Post about why the uptick has been cause for concern among librarians. She joined the Stateside podcast to explain some of the trends she's seen, and what happens when a book is challenged. GUEST: Debbie Mikula, executive director, Michigan Library Association ___ Looking for more conversations from Stateside? Right this way. If you like what you hear on the pod, consider supporting our work. Music in this episode by Blue Dot Sessions.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Queens of the Blues with Gina Coleman
Ain't Nobody's Business

Queens of the Blues with Gina Coleman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 28:05


This podcast celebrates the prolific female blues music from the early 1920's to present times. This show entitled “Ain't Nobody's Business” is curated by my special guest, Peggy Kern. Peggy is the author of the 2015 American Library Association nominated book for Best Fiction For Young Adults, Little Peach, and an author of the wildly popular young adult book collection, the Bluford series.https://www.harpercollins.com/blogs/authors/peggy-kern-201531716297https://www.fantasticfiction.com/k/peggy-kern/https://www.bluford.org/

ROBIN HOOD RADIO INTERVIEWS
Marshall Miles Interviews Darren Winston, The Hotchkiss Library’s Historical Poster Collection – Thursday November 7, 2022

ROBIN HOOD RADIO INTERVIEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 9:30


Postering Sharon: The Library's Historical Poster Collection November 3 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm Postering Sharon A Series of Programs on our newly discovered historical poster collection Thursday, September 22, 7 pm: Leonard Marcus: National Children's Book Week Posters Thursday, October 20, 7 pm: Leonard Marcus: World War I Posters Thursday, November 3, 7 pm: Darren Winston and David Pollack: The Library's Poster Collection and Local History Join the Hotchkiss Library of Sharon this fall in a series of three virtual programs presenting highlights from our recently discovered Historical Poster Collection. On Thursday, November 3, two former Sharon residents, Darren Winston and David Pollack, will discuss the collection as a whole and highlight the particularly interesting local and Connecticut posters issued during World War I and World War II. How did the illustration change between the wars? What is the significance of the collection and what does it tell us about Sharon? Darren Winston is the Head of the Department of Books and Manuscripts at Freeman's auction house in Philadelphia. David Pollack is one of the nation's leading poster experts and runs David Pollack Vintage Posters in Wilmington, Delaware. When the Hotchkiss Library moved out of its Upper Main Street building in July 2021, the movers discovered an unknown drawer in the oak library table from our upstairs Connecticut Room. Inside were 100 posters that had not seen the light of day in decades. We discovered posters from WWI, WWII, several National Children's Book Week posters from the 1940s to 1961, proclamations from the State of Connecticut, some remarkable Connecticut-specific posters from WWII, and an incredible poster announcing the Fourth of July festivities on the Sharon Green in 1918, months before the end of WWI. The Hotchkiss Library of Sharon was selected as one of 200 libraries nationwide to receive a $10,000 grant from the American Library Association's American Rescue Plan: Humanities Grants for Libraries in February 2022. This grant was funded from the National Endowment for the Humanities through the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021. The library has cataloged the posters and is in the process of digitizing the images. Poster conservationists have restored nineteen posters of particular significance and some of these will be on display when we return to our renovated building on the Sharon Green in 2023. These posters offer a glimpse into our nation and town at critical moments in our history. We are thrilled to add them to our special collections and to share more about them with our patrons.

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online
ENCORE - Celebrate National Poetry Month with On the Line

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 29:38


The Rhody Radio team is on a break! Enjoy this blast from the past (our archives!). We'll be back with new episodes on October 25. -- Click here to read a transcript of this episode April is National Poetry Month, and we're celebrating with Zach Berger, adult services librarian at Cranston Public Library. For the past year, Zach has been recording a new poem every week for On the Line - a call-in poetry service that Zach maintains. Each week, Zach records a new poetry reading that patrons can hear simply by dialing 401-900-1090, no Internet or computer required. In this episode, Rhody Radio team member Dave Bartos sits down with Zach to discuss his lifelong love of poetry and how he came to launching this project. Call 401-900-1090 to hear a new poem each week, and to learn more about On the Line visit https://cranstonlibrary.org/ontheline. Thanks for listening! Theme music for this episode is Twilight in Your Head by lemonmusicstudio. Rhody Radio is proud to be a resident partner of the Rhode Island Center for the Book and is brought to you by library staff and community members all around the Ocean State. You can find more from Rhody Radio on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and if you enjoyed today's episode, subscribe to Rhody Radio and give us a review on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or wherever you listen to help us reach more Rhode Islanders. Rhody Radio is funded by a grant from the American Rescue Plan: Humanities Grants for Libraries, an initiative of the American Library Association made possible with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities through the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021. Thanks again for listening and happy National Poetry Month! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rhodyradio/message

The Bamboo Lab Podcast
Sue Harrison: "You Are Worthy of Your Dreams!"

The Bamboo Lab Podcast

Play Episode Play 59 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 57:44


INTERNATIONAL BEST-SELLING AUTHOR!!!https://sueharrison.com/https://www.amazon.com/Midwifes-Touch-Sue-Harrison/dp/1504076257Sue Harrison is the author of six critically acclaimed bestselling novels. Mother Earth Father Sky, My Sister the Moon, and Brother Wind make up The Ivory Carver Trilogy, an epic adventure set in prehistoric Alaska. Song of the River, Cry of the Wind, and Call Down the Stars comprise The Storyteller Trilogy.  Sue has also written a middle readers book, Sisu, released by Thunder Bay Press.Harrison's first novel, Mother Earth Father Sky, was published in 1990 by Doubleday (hardcover) and Avon (paperback) and in 2013 by Open Road Integrated Media (ebook). It was nominated in the states of Michigan and Washington for the Reader's Choice Award among high school students, and was one of ten books chosen for “Battle of the Books,” a statewide student reading competition in Alaska. The novel has had success in both the adult and young adult markets, and received a boxed review in The New York Times Book Review. It has been a national Publishers Weekly bestseller, and recently an Amazon top three paid books bestseller in ebook format. Mother Earth Father Sky was selected by the American Library Association as one of 1991's Best Books for Young Adults.Harrison's books have also been published in Canada, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, The Netherlands, Belgium, Sweden, Germany, Italy, Spain, Iceland, Denmark, Norway, Austria, Portugal, Japan, France, Finland, and South America. Her work has been anthologized by Northwest Books, Wayne State University Press, and Michigan State University Press (And Here, 2017).Sue Harrison's next novel, The Midwife's Touch, is slated for release from Open Road Integrated Media February 7, 2023. Set in New York and the Ozarks in the mid-1800s, the book is a genre blender of historical fiction and fantasy.Thank you to Sue and to all of our Bamboo Pack  Members!Your host, BrianStop Drinking and Start Living Podcast With Expert Holistic Alcohol Coach, Mary WagstaffPractical Tools & Strategies To Get Alcohol Out Of Your Way & Enhance Your LifeListen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Should You Take That Case?The goal of our show is to be a resource for legal professionals who pursue medical...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Make A Move Podcast Make A Move Podcast showcases stories of how people have found creative ways to live...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Where We Live
How the FCC and local libraries are addressing "digital redlining"

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 49:00


Earlier this year, the Federal Communications Commission launched a task force to target digital discrimination and "digital redlining." This hour, FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel joins us to discuss this effort. "Your zip code should not determine access to broadband," the Chairwoman has said. She tells us, "The pandemic made this issue crystal clear for everyone." The Chairwoman explains how digital discrimination is "more nuanced" than urban-rural divides. Plus, during Digital Inclusion Week, we discuss the important role local libraries play in bridging digital or informational divides? American Library Association executive director Tracie D. Hall joins us, along with Connecticut librarians and organizations like East Hartford Works. To learn more about Wednesday's panel discussion featuring Hall and others, hosted by Hartford Public Library, click here. GUESTS: Jessica Rosenworcel: Chairwoman, Federal Communications Commission Tracie D. Hall: Executive Director, American Library Association Melissa Canham-Clyne: Director, Hamden Public Library System Yadira Jeter: Career Navigator, East Hartford Works Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

©hat
Jim Neal on ALA Policy Corps and More!

©hat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022


Also check out the ALA Policy Corps  as well as the ALA Advocacy website Sara:    Welcome to another episode of Copyright Chat. It's been a hot minute sorry about that everybody but today we have a        very special guest. We have Jim, Neil. Hi, Jim! Jim:     Hi!  How are you? Sara: Great! And Jim is the University library in emeritus at Columbia University. He also served as ALA President, and he received 2 awards from the ALA, the highest award on as an honorary             member in 2022, as well as the L. Ray Patterson copyright award. Congratulations Jim! Jim:     Thanks, Sara. Sara: So, Jim, I just wanted to get started. How did you get involved in copyright, as you're not a lawyer by training. But you've been such an advocate in the copyright field and            I'm just curious how you got involved in in the beginning. Jim:     Well, it it actually goes way back to the early 1970s. I graduated from Columbia School of Library Service at the end of 1972 and began working as a librarian the following year, and you'll recall this is when a lot of the discussion and debate began to revolve around the updating and modification            of the US Copyright Law. And so my early professional career was advanced during this period of time, and I participated in many of the early discussions that led up to the 1976 copyright law. And so I was born in the context of fair use and the context of the exceptions, the limitations that define the ability of libraries to serve their communities. I hung out with copyright in a pretty low level way until the late 1980s, and it was at that time when so much of our work had become automated, and we're beginning to see the early publication of the things that we had historically acquired in print were now becoming available electronically, and of course that would explode in the 1990s. It was also the time that two other things happened. one in the mid-1980s, I'd become very interested in national information policy and my initial plunge into that was in the area of government information: Making sure that the information the Government produced was widely and openly available and accessible. But, in 1990s I also became Dean of University Libraries at Indiana University, and that was at that time that I recognized how important it was for up or major research libraries, and by extension all academic libraries, to play a significant role as new thinking about copyright began to evolve. I worked with the Association of College and Research Libraries. I worked with the Board of ARL, of which I was then a member, to really position us as associations that were part of the national debate around copyright. I also worked with Indiana University to create what I think was the first University library-based copyright advisory office at Indiana University based in Indianapolis and we hired Kenny Crews at that time to run that office. And so I began to meet with groups of librarians around the country, with different boards to develop strategic direction and actions around copyright. And when I made to move from Indiana to Johns Hopkins where we created a similar copyright office. I got a call from Washington asking me if I would be willing to join the US delegation that was going to go off to Geneva to participate      in the World Intellectual Property Organization, a diplomatic conference negotiations on copyright, the basic   objective being to update the international copyright law to reflect the digital and network environment in which we were operating. So I went off for 3 weeks to Geneva, was an advisor to the US delegation. I tried to get exceptions, limitations, and fair use into the discussion and the debate and that ultimately, of course, led to the             adoption of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act in the United States. So that sort of explains the early involvement in             participation. Sara:    Sounds like it was an adventure beginning with the change to the Copyright Act in 1976 all the way through the Digital             Millienium Copyright Act, which, of course, is still debated today. And the library exceptions which we're still trying to get      at an international level today, so it's still ongoing. This work never ends, Jim, when is it going to end? Jim:     I think it's perpetual. You know we play a lot of defense in the area of copyright not wanting to open up discussions about aspects of the copyright law that really benefit us and enable us to support our communities, but there's been so much effort to strengthen copyright on behalf of the copyright creators, and therefore we've been active in Washington for the last 20 years, trying to prevent unnecessary, inappropriate, and difficult to work with copyright changes coming out of Washington. We've also had to deal with several important initiatives at the State level during that period as well. And I think we generally have been have done okay. We tried to work with the creator community to update section 108 of the copyright law, which is that section which specifically provides the exceptions and limitations for libraries and artists enabling us to do things like inter library loan, and make preservation copies, and copies for users, and so forth. But we did not come out of that 3-year process. I was on the 108 study group. We did not come out of that process with an acceptable plan of action that would enable all interested parties to reopen 108 and make the necessary changes. And so that was an interesting process. and I learned a lot about how copyright works. And who is involved, and what the relationship is between the publishing industry ,the creator industry, and the copyright office in Washington. So we've done, I think, modestly well representing libraries, but there's so much more work to do. Sara: You mentioned the section 108 study, and I do assign that             discussion document from the US Copyright office that came out of that study to my students and often they say to me, Professor Benson, why hasn't this happened? What's going on? There's a model law at the end. Why has this not happened? My perspective, and I wonder what your perspective is, is that potentially opening up section 108 could be problematic. Given what happened with some other portions of the Copyright Act, such as the TEACH Act that went South. I mean the TEACH Act is good in theory. If you're, unfamiliar with the TEACH Act it provides online opportunities for educational uses of certain works it's supposed to mirror the face-to-face teaching exception under Section 110(1). It's in section 110(2) of the Act, but unfortunately it became so cumbersome to apply that most universities, including mine, don't really exercise it. And I wonder what your perspective is about opening up section if we were to do that today? Jim:     I think it would be very difficult and challenging, and we would put our ability to serve our communities at risk. One of the real important debates within the 3 years of the 108 study group was are digital works covered by exceptions and limitations in copyright? And what is the role and purpose of contracts, licenses that libraries sign with publishers and other creator companies. What rules govern the use of those materials? And I think it's clear from litigation and from legislation that there are really two streams of guidance. One is if it's in print, you're probably going to be able to apply the exceptions and limitations in section 108. If it's in digital form, you're probably going to be mandated to use the provisions of the contract, the license agreement that you sign. The public law of copyright versus the private law of contract. And the problems that I have with that are that it means that I put this in the area of social justice. I always have. If you have good lawyers, if you have a lot of money. If you have influence you have good connections, you're probably going to be able to negotiate a better contract, a more favorable contract, then the smaller instructions that don't have good legal counsel don't have a lot of money, and are gonna just defer to the contract that they sign. To me, that is an issue of social justice and it's on that basis that I fought this from the very beginning. I think we don't want to open one way. It could really create a real risk to our ability to serve our communities. We have seen other initiatives coming out of Washington besides the TEACH Act. We recently went through the crazy CASE Act deliberations, and worked very hard in this provision of creating a small claims court capacity for people to get sued for supposed violations of copyright and making sure that libraries and library staff were exempt from those lawsuits. So I think it's going to be a constant battle, and I think, with a new Congress coming on board in the fall—and we're not quite sure what the political makeup will be of the Congress at this point, but we have we have some thinking about that, will there be new initiatives to upset the balance that we've enjoyed in the copyright arena. We're also seeing more what I would call legal court cases around copyright, than historically, we experienced. And I think what we don't want to happen is that judicial decisions begin to define what copyright is in this country, and I think that's going to be a real challenge going forward. Copyright for most of the American population has been one of those “MEGO” topics—my eyes glaze over. People don't really know what it is or care about it, or know that they should care about it, and we've seen over the last decade or so copyright appearing on the front pages of newspapers and hitting the popular press in the areas of music and film, and art. And so people, I think, are a little bit more aware of copyright. But too often, I think they assume that they're protected because they hear the words fair use, and they think if they're not out there trying to make money and copying stuff willy nilly that somehow they're not subject to the provisions and the protections of copyright. So I think I think court cases could become more important going forward. Sara:    Yeah, that's a really good point and one of those court cases was in Maryland recently, with the e-book legislation, where they attempted to impose reasonable terms for libraries on e-book licensing at the state law level, and it was deemed by the court to be in violation of copyright preemption. And I wonder what your views are on that. I mean. You mentioned licensing earlier, and it really is becoming one of these issues, especially for public libraries. It's a place where you know in order to serve their patrons public libraries really need to have access to these e-books, and yet the licensing terms can be quite expensive and limiting. Where do you see this going? Jim:     Well, I think there's a whole series of issues that are bundled up in digital content and copyright, and we've mentioned two of them. The one you reference of which Maryland is probably the most celebrated. I use that word carefully, celebrated case, but it also has progressed in several other States, not successfully. And it's as you educate it's largely a public library issue because they want to provide a maximum access to their to their communities for the books that people want to read and material that people want to listen to. But if they can't, even buy this stuff if they can't even license the stuff under any terms, then I think it's a real problem. And so the first issue is, will libraries be able to license this stuff and can publishers block libraries from getting these materials? The second is the terms under which they license and onerous terms. A single reader at a time. Issues of cost. I could buy the book for $20 but to license, a copy, $80. Those are onerous financial and use terms. So that's one stream of concern. The second stream of concern is that we over many decades under section 108, have learned what we can do to in terms of supporting our community through inter library loan and preservation and copies for users under an analog, print-based environment. But when the contracts begin to limit what we can do. For example, we had, about 15 years ago, a major hassle when these licenses from major scholarly publishers said we could not loan things on inter-library loan internationally: we could only loan them to people or institutions in the United States. That was a shock and a signal that these license terms would continue to deteriorate and close up. And so, we fought that battle and several of the major publishers backed off. So I think we need to always be vigilant and we need to understand that contract is where we're playing ball today. And therefore we have to negotiate effectively and play hardball in order to get the best terms we can because of those uses of digital materials probably will not be covered under the exceptions of limitations and copyright. Sara: So where do you see opportunities? I mean, there is a really amazing law in Singapore, for instance, that says that you cannot contract away your copyright exceptions and limitations. Could we get that in the United States at least for libraries and archives? Jim: Well, that was our hope. About 2 years ago I convened a meeting in Washington at the ALA Washington Office, and this was the subject of our discussion is what is achievable. What are the domestic—t hat is national—opportunities and limitations, and what is happening internationally. And we had a representative there from the international federation of library associations who updated us on the Singapore Bill and the work that was going on in other countries around the world. It's very difficult. This was an issue that came up under 108. We tried to get a provision that said a contract could never undermine copyright. We could not give away the exceptions. of limitations under copyright and the publishers and the other members of the contact community wouldn't even talk about it. And so, therefore it's going to be not only a process challenge but it's going to be a very difficult political challenge, because, many of the leading legislators in Washington one don't understand the issue and two very often get financial support from the large media and publisher companies. So it's it's gonna be a tough battle. Sara: Just to point out a counterpoint to that I would point to the fact that with physical books we've been successfully using interlibrary Loan for years and years and we have not depleted the publishing market, and I understand the concern of publishers there, right, saying,wWell, now, interlibrary loan is baked into every contract. Fair use would be baked in if you're a really good negotiator. You should have in regardless. That gets to the social justice issue you mentioned earlier. But if everyone had it by default through libraries and archives in my opinion, publishers would still be making profits, and the reason is that inter library loan can never substitute for a subscription to an item right, and we do keep track, and we have to by law keep track of our inter library loan agreements and our lending and pay licensing fees. When we have hit a certain mark where, if we had otherwise just purchased the item we would not be able to loan it. So we could have similar things right in place for digital objects that we do for physical objects. And maybe this all could still operate with everyone on a fair level. I think the issue for me personally is that we like libraries are really not a fair level right, especially public libraries, where you have the demand of the public, and you're trying to serve your population who pays the taxes that puts the books in their hands right? And they have this expectation that not only are physical books available, e-books are going to be available, and with the pandemic and mobility issues, we have more and more instances where folks cannot come into the library in person, and we really should be providing those e-books to our communities. And so I I think we're at a real disadvantage. And this is where we're gonna need some strong advocacy right? And I think this is where you, Jim, have been so much at the forefront here, creating the ALA Policy Corps for that purpose. So I wanted to kind of switch gears and talk about you know why. Why did you create the ALA Policy Corps? What are the goals of that group? Jim:  Let me let me make one other statement about digital lending? We I think, from a published perspective it's a slippery slope, I think, by having to negotiate those terms in a contract it does give publishers some leverage in terms of a price. So I think I think, there's a real interest in preserving that control within the publisher community. We saw we had some recent experience with that under control digital lending where we have tried to build some responsible approaches to digital lending interlock very loan and tried to extend that under the impact of Covid and have to hold back already. if you will post Covid. But we have seen the library community through the Internet Archive end up in court of that issue. So I think libraries and universities and communities are fearful of litigation. And are going to probably take a more conservative approach. Not go out there and fight the battle, which I think has to happen and big basically give in to the publishers on this. But I think court cases hopefully will come along that might help us in this area. Policy Corps. As I mentioned, I started my work, and national information policy in the in the area of government information. In the mid 1990s several universities, including the one where I was, Penn State, was experiencing FBI increase about materials being requested by international students who were studying at our universities. This was my introduction to issues around privacy. And then, after 911 of the U.S.A. Patriot Act introduce a set of controls interventions by legal authorities that, we're severely problematic and difficult for libraries, and I became very active on that issue. Advising libraries, giving workshops, going public, with my opposition, and at that same time I became very involved in the work of the freedom to read Foundation, where I've sort of served on that board for many years and have become involved in national intellectual freedom debates. And so all of this experience, including my work, with copyright demonstrated to me how important it is for the library community to have authoritative expert voices at the table. And historically we've had a few individuals who have been willing to keep up on a particular policy issue, who have been willing to get at the table and fight the battle by testifying before committees at the state the national level developing, op-ed pieces, editorial pieces for publication in the press sitting down with partners to develop political strategies, and any of those individuals have been retiring over the last decade, and so I felt we really need to develop an ongoing cohort of individuals are truly committed to working on behalf of the library communities developing information policy areas. And so we agreed to begin it on an experimental basis, and we recruited, I think, 12 individuals that first year on a competitive basis, and they've been working over the last 3 to 4 years developing their knowledge of their policy interest area. But more importantly, developing the skills and understanding to be an effective advocate. And we have now have 4 more cohorts of Policy Corps people. Next year we'll be looking at how we proceed with the fifth cohort. Covid was a challenging time for us with the policy corps because of the inability to bring people together. we're now beginning to do that again. and so I'm hopeful that we can continue to develop a very strong representation for library leaders in the information policy area. The other thing we worked on in parallel was what I call the National Advocacy Network, to try to get a representative, at least one representative for the library community in each of the 435 Congressional districts. So when something came up in Washington, where we really needed advocacy at the local level, so convince our members of Congress Representatives and our Senators that they needed to support our interests in these debates, we would have be on the ground if you will grassroots capacity to influence their thinking. so I'm hoping that over time, and as we break out from Covid, the combination of the policy core and the national advocacy network will provide benefits to the library community it's wonderful program, and I think we've seen quite a bit of movement there. Sara:    Can you talk about some of the successes we've had through the Policy Corps? I'm a member of the third cohort and I've done quite a few webinars and published updates about the CASE Act. What are some of the other things that we've seen come out of the policy core? Jim:     Well, I think many of the members of the policy core have been very active, educating their colleagues at the local and national level, either through, as you said, webinars, writing for the field, and so forth. But as importantly, if not more importantly, some of the policy corps members have been very active with their with their local Congress people. Their representatives and their senators that's very important. A few have been going to Washington to meet with various groups and committees to try to influence funding and influence legislation that we care about. Several of them very active in writing op-ed pieces for their local newspapers. Several have been testified at the State level before State legislatures. Another area that we have seen a real challenge over the last several years, and I think it's gonna get very difficult going forward is the whole area around banning books in libraries. It's perhaps most active in schools, but also is now beginning to play out in public libraries. And I think that's been another area where the policy corps has been very active and trying to influence understanding and to have impact on some of these really egregious actions on the part of local politicians. So overall I think the policy corps has been successful. We've developed our skills. And now that has to translate into real action at the State and Federal level. Sara:    Yeah, it's a great point. We really have to do more than talk about things. We have to take some action and meet with our representatives. What advice do you have for folks listening to this podcast maybe they're not members of the ALA Policy Corps but they want to take action as well, what could they do? Jim:     Well, I think it's very important to become aware of, and to understand the information policy issues that we're dealing with and the ALA office. That website is a great source of information there are lots of webinars. There's this podcast. There are great sources of information to educate oneself. There's literature, books, and articles that's half the story. The other half is being confident. Knowing what type of actions have impact. How do you influence people's understanding and actions and that's very important. I think, at state level of ALA—the American Library Association—and the library community in general is really strengthened by State chapters. There are, I think, 56 regional chapters. Most of them state-based that provide lots of legislative training. Lots of policy updating, and I think that's a great place for people to begin that work to get involved at the State level to join their committees on legislation to go to their State legislative days and hopefully in the future to go to the national legislative days. But to keep, continue to be educated and open to training, which I think is critical to success. Sara: I agree, and also not to feel that some of these calls for action are not for you. The ALA is often saying, you know, respond to this. Talk to your legislators about this issue, and sometimes people think well someone else will do it right. But getting on the phone, and you know calling up your local congressperson's office, and and saying, you know I work at this library. And this matters to me because of this those kinds of those kinds of outreach efforts do make a difference, and the more you do it the more they're going to be familiar with who you are, and you're gonna create those relationships. So, not being afraid to pick up the phone, write an email message. Write a handwritten letter, you know, whatever the whatever it may be, or sign a petition. Jim:     All of those things can really help and add up yeah there's a couple other things that I really think it's important to do. I think each library should know who the staff people are, in these Congressional offices, both the staff person in Washington and the Staff office at the local level. Know those people. They're the ones who influence the actions of their of their Senators at their representatives. So, get to know the staff.  Secondly, invite the Congressperson to the library. Get them there have an event where they can be visible. They can be seen in a very favorable light by the voters in that community, and they can begin to identify with you library. That's really, really critical and I think those are those are steps that most libraries can take pretty easily, and I  would encourage all libraries to leverage staff to do that. Sara:    Those are great points. And actually the point about staff is so crucial. When I went to the ALA day on the hill, we were speaking with a Congressperson's staff member. And one thing we learned when speaking with this delightful young woman was that she worked in a library in college, and immediately it changed the tone of the conversation because she had firsthand knowledge of how important libraries are, how much we do for our community, and what a wonderful place it is to work right. And so she didn't take much convincing when we're asking for this funding. It's so important to kind of get those stories from people because most folks have connections to libraries. It's not a hard sell when you ask them you know what's, your experience with libraries, because they either went to a local library. I can't tell you, how many times, I take my daughter to the library, and we come home with bushels of books because she's such an avid reader, but as a mom that is an important thing for me and so people have those connections either through, you know, working in a library, going to the library, their university library, all of those different things. So getting to know those making those personal connections is so important. Jim:     Yes, we've talked a lot about policy, issues, but when it really comes down to it. the overriding of legislative matter that most libraries deal with both at the local and State and Federal level is funding And so, having a good understanding of what finding bills are being considered. What the history has been of your representatives support for library funding. Have success stories available. How has you Library made a difference in the quality of research in the University? The quality of education in the school people be able to get jobs in the by working with the public library. All those examples and success stories can be very, very influential, because most Representatives and senators care about the economy. And the degree to which people help, at which the library helps people find jobs helps people connect I think, can be really really powerful. so never, never forget success stories, particularly as it impacts funding debates. Sara:    Great point. And I really have enjoyed this conversation with you today. I hope the listeners have enjoyed it well, and we really encourage you to check out the ALA Policy Information and  information about the Policy Corps if you're interested and want to get involved. We are always happy to chat about that some more. But thanks so much for joining me today, Jim it's been a very fun conversation. Jim:     Thanks, Sarah. It's been a great opportunity to talk about things alright see you next time

Break It Down Show
Jeff Gottesfeld – Twenty-One Steps

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 41:47


Jeff Gottesfeld – Twenty-One Steps - Jeff Gottesfeld is an acclaimed writer whose work has won awards from the American Library Association, the Writers Guild of America, and the National Council for the Social Studies. He has previously written for adult, teen, middle-grade, and picture book audiences. Jeff's new book describes how with every step the Tomb Guards pay homage to America's fallen. Young readers can discover their story, and that of the unknown soldiers they honor, through resonant words and illustrations. Get Jeff's book Twenty-One Steps on Amazon at: Pete A Turner and the Break It Down Show celebrate Veteran's day with a truly special guest...and honor 100 years of the Unkown Soldier. Jeff will be speaking throughout the nation in support of this book. This is Jeff Gottesfeld's first appearance on the show. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku His Twenty-One Steps Is quite a good read, do check! Welcome to the show!   ​Similar episodes: Erik Kleinsmith  Perttu Polonen  Mike Guardia  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

The PurposeGirl Podcast: Empowering women to live their purpose with courage, joy, and fierce self-love.

Every so often we read a book that touches us so deeply, so profoundly, that we find ourselves telling everyone we know that they MUST read this book. This is exactly what happened when I read The Woman They Could Not Silence, a mesmerizing story of a woman in the 1800's whose husband had her unjustly committed to a mental institution, her heartbreaking struggles, and her amazing triumphs. This book made me outraged and inspired and fired up, and I am thrilled to have the author, Kate Moore, on the podcast. In today's episode, Kate and I discuss: The attempts to silence women throughout history The story of Elizabeth Packard, whose husband committed her to an insane asylum simply because she disagreed with him How Packard refused to be silenced, and what she did with her voice to change the world Elizabeth Packard's contributions to women's rights and the rights of the mentally ill The law of coverture that dates back about a thousand years and whose impact reached even into the twentieth century – you will not believe this! Some of the meticulous research that Kate conducted, and her fascinating primary sources How women's voices are still being silenced today About Kate Moore: Kate Moore is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of The Radium Girls, which won the 2017 Goodreads Choice Award for Best History, was voted U.S. librarians' favourite nonfiction book of 2017, and was named a Notable Nonfiction Book of 2018 by the American Library Association. A British writer based near Cambridge, Kate writes across a variety of genres and has had multiple titles on the Sunday Times bestseller list. Her latest book is the critically acclaimed, The Woman They Could Not Silence, which, among other accolades, was named runner-up for Best History in the 2021 Goodreads Choice Awards and a 2021 Booklist Editor's Choice. To learn more about and follow Kate Moore: https://www.kate-moore.com/ https://twitter.com/katebooks https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100067597266110 And you can find her newest book, “The Woman They Could Not Silence,” at Amazon (https://amzn.to/3E9lbdw)! We're changing the world one woman at a time. Go to Apple Podcasts and leave a 5-star review and subscribe so you never miss an episode!

1A
The Strain Of Censorship On Public Libraries

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 29:48


The American Library Association has reported 681 challenges to more than 1,600 titles this year. That puts 2022 on track to see the highest number of book challenges in decades. This summer, a library in Lafayette, Louisiana, was forced to remove a Pride Month display. In Iowa, a proposed bill would give city councils the power to overturn librarians' decisions about what books to buy and where they're displayed. And these are just a couple of examples. We discuss the future of public libraries and library workers in this climate of unprecedented censorship. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Morning Shift Podcast
With Book Banning On The Rise, Libraries Are Creating “Sanctuaries”

Morning Shift Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 14:40


We spoke to learn why people are targeting these books, and what libraries are doing to protect access to challenged titles. GUEST: Deborah Caldwell-Stone, director of the Office for Intellectual Freedom of the American Library Association and executive director of the Freedom to Read Foundation at American Library Association Commissioner Chris Brown, Chicago Public Library

Trina Talk
Consciously Inclusive w/ Dr. Steve Yacovelli - TT 187

Trina Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 36:39


Dr. Steve Yacovelli ("The Gay Leadership Dude®") is the Owner & Principal of TopDog Learning Group (LLC) – a learning and development, leadership, change management, and diversity and inclusion consulting firm based in Orlando, FL, USA, with affiliates across the globe. Steve and TopDog have had the pleasure of working with some great client-partners they consider to be members of their "pack." He's worked with Fortune 500 greats like The Walt Disney Company, and Bayer to amazing not-for-profits like The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and The American Library Association; large universities like The Ohio State University and The University of Central Florida, to small entrepreneurial rock stars like International Training & Development and GovMojo, Inc. Steve and TopDog have thoroughly enjoyed helping their client-partners grow, develop, expand, and be successful with their corporate learning, change management, diversity and inclusion, and leadership consulting goodness. Steve is also an author and speaker. His latest book, "Pride Leadership: Strategies for the LGBTQ+ Leader to be the King or Queen of their Jungle" ‘came out' in June 2019. With over twenty-five years of experience in leadership, strategy, organizational learning, and communication, Steve is a rare breed of professional that understands the power of using academic theory and applying it to the corporate setting to achieve business results. Oh, and he's quite fond of dogs, too.   TopDog Learning Group (LLC) topdoglearning.biz Book: Pride Leadership: Strategies for the LGBTQ+ Leader to be the King or Queen of their Jungle   Show hashtag: #TrinaTalk LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/trina-l-martin Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TrinaTalk Instagram: @trina.l.martin  Twitter: @TrinaLMartin

The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: Ears Edition
​​Why Are So Many Books Being Banned? - Beyond the Scenes

The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 55:04 Very Popular


Books are being banned from schools and public libraries at alarming rates, and stories from LGBTQIA+ and BIPOC authors are disproportionately being pulled from shelves. How do book bans harm learning and access to information? What do these challenges say about the American educational system? Deborah Caldwell-Stone, Director of the American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom and George M. Johnson, author of the widely challenged book “All Boys Aren't Blue'' join host Roy Wood Jr. to break down where these book bans are coming from, the political ideology behind them, and how these banned books can help young readers understand complex issues. Beyond The Scenes is a podcast from The Daily Show with Trevor Noah. Check out more episodes wherever you get your podcasts or YouTube.com/TheDailyShowSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Reason We Learn Podcast
How the ALA Puts the "Lie" in Librarian

The Reason We Learn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 65:57


Last week was “Banned Books Week,” which in itself is predicated on a lie, but it's just one of many lies told by librarians in the United States.Dan Kleinman and I discuss how the American Library Association trains its members to lie to parents, and the public, even if it means violating state law. We also talk specifically about what a book ban “is” and isn't, and what really motivates librarians to engage in this subterfuge (hint: it's not just politics). Dan Kleinman is the owner SafeLibraries® brand library educational services. For over almost a quarter Century he has raised public awareness of crime, sexual harassment in libraries, and inappropriate books and web sites in schools due to American Library Association policy. ⚖️ See SafeLibraries Also follow him on Twitter @SexHarassed or email SafeLibraries@pm.me.Please consider supporting my work with a paid subscription! Your support helps me produce as much free content as possible to help people fight back against woke agendas in schools! Get full access to The Reason We Learn at thereasonwelearn.substack.com/subscribe

The FOX News Rundown
The Debate Over What Books Your Children Should And Shouldn't Read

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 29:06 Very Popular


More and more books are being pulled off school shelves across America thanks to parent advocacy groups who say they are inappropriate for children. Some educators are decrying this trend, however, calling the crackdown on certain literature as harmful censorship.  On the FOX News Rundown this week, host Lisa Brady took a deep dive into this debate by speaking with Moms For Liberty Co-Founder Tina Descovich and the Director of The American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom Deborah Caldwell-Stone. Descovich detailed why she believes some books must be banned to protect children from inappropriate content for their age group and her belief parents must reclaim their rights in their children's education Deborah Caldwell-Stone explained why removing questionable books can be dangerous and could hurt marginalized students. The two also discussed potential compromises and the importance of parents being involved in their children's education.  Due to time limitations, we could not include all of the conversations in our original segment. On the FOX News Rundown Extra, you will hear our complete conversations with both Moms For Liberty Co-Founder Tina Descovich and the Director of The American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom Deborah Caldwell-Stone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

From Washington – FOX News Radio
The Debate Over What Books Your Children Should And Shouldn't Read

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 29:06


More and more books are being pulled off school shelves across America thanks to parent advocacy groups who say they are inappropriate for children. Some educators are decrying this trend, however, calling the crackdown on certain literature as harmful censorship.  On the FOX News Rundown this week, host Lisa Brady took a deep dive into this debate by speaking with Moms For Liberty Co-Founder Tina Descovich and the Director of The American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom Deborah Caldwell-Stone. Descovich detailed why she believes some books must be banned to protect children from inappropriate content for their age group and her belief parents must reclaim their rights in their children's education Deborah Caldwell-Stone explained why removing questionable books can be dangerous and could hurt marginalized students. The two also discussed potential compromises and the importance of parents being involved in their children's education.  Due to time limitations, we could not include all of the conversations in our original segment. On the FOX News Rundown Extra, you will hear our complete conversations with both Moms For Liberty Co-Founder Tina Descovich and the Director of The American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom Deborah Caldwell-Stone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
09.24.22 All Out Law PODCAST - Books that are in our children's classrooms

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 41:12


Good Saturday morning! Kyle Wyatt and Calvin Morrow talk about a variety of topics, including: Banned books across 32 states and The American Library Association "Why books of any type are being banned?" Public school brainwashing and new scary bookclubs Public Libraries VS School Libraries and digital book banning New Jersey is now teaching their middle school students about anal sex

The Christian Post Daily
Evangelicals Say Worshiping Alone Replaces Church, Book Banning by Parents, Vanderbilt's Trans Surgeries on Minors

The Christian Post Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 8:16


For the first time, a biennial survey has found that most Evangelical Christians in the United States believe that worshiping alone or only with one's family can be a valid substitute for going to church, a possible effect of widespread closures during the COVID-19 pandemic.The American Library Association has claimed that efforts to ban or restrict books in school libraries are on the rise amid concerns from parents regarding sexually graphic material depicting child sex and pedophilia.An international coalition of religious freedom advocates and organizations from across the political spectrum are calling on the U.S. State Department to take stronger action on Nigeria.Republican Sen. Marsha Blackburn and Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee are calling for an investigation into Vanderbilt University Medical Center following allegations that it has been performing body mutilating surgeries on teenagers suffering from gender dysphoria.Subscribe to this Podcast Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Overcast Get the Edifi App Download for iPhone Download for Android Subscribe to Our Newsletter Subscribe to the Freedom Post, delivered every Monday and Thursday Click here to get the top headlines delivered to your inbox every morning! Links to the News Most Evangelicals say worshiping alone can replace church: poll | Church & Ministries News Philadelphia names road in honor of first black Episcopal priest | U.S. News Book banning by parents on the rise, library group claims | U.S. News LeAnn Rimes finding way back to God after running away from faith | Entertainment News Matt Hammitt shares journey of son's third heart surgery in film | Entertainment News Religious freedom groups seek stronger US action on Nigeria | Politics News Lawmakers demand investigation into Vanderbilt's trans surgeries | Politics News Penn. Democratic gubernatorial nominee open to school choice | U.S. News

KQED's The California Report
Governor Newsom Signs Legislation Ending Parking Requirements Near Transit

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 17:32


Governor Gavin Newsom has signed a bill that eliminates the state's decades-old parking requirements for new developments near public transit stops. Environmentalists and housing advocates say this will drive down California's dependence on cars, improving the state's chances of meeting its climate goals. We're nearing the end of banned book week, an annual awareness campaign promoted by the American Library Association and Amnesty International. And at the top of the most challenged books list in the United States is "Gender Queer: A Memoir." Guest: Maia Kobabe, Author of the book "Gender Queer: A Memoir"  A bill is sitting on Governor Gavin Newsom's desk that would allow people who receive an unsolicited sexually explicit image on their phone or electronic device, to sue the person who sent it. Reporter: Amanda Stupi, The California Report 

Out d'Coup Podcast
Friday Politics Roundup | NYT sounds alarm on US democracy; QAnon-laced Trump rally in Youngstown; Big Oil gaslighting; Banned Books Week; NASA Artemis I & DART news; Happy Birthday to The Jetsons

Out d'Coup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 87:48


A new long-form article in the New York Times by Pulitzer Prize winning journalist David Leonhardt, takes a deep dive into what he's calling the “twin threats” to American democracy today: First, “a growing movement inside one of the country's two major parties — the Republican Party — to refuse to accept defeat in an election.” Second, “the power to set government policy is becoming increasingly disconnected from public opinion.” Last weekend saw the weirdest - and perhaps the most troubling - Trump rally to date. Closing out his Youngstown, OH rally, Trump got dark about the decline of America as creepy QAnon themed music played over the speakers. As he spoke, people in the audience began raising their arms and pointing a single finger in the air. It felt like a Nazi salute mixed with religious signs of devotion. Even journalists who have been covering Trump and right-wing extremist groups for a long time were baffled.  New internal documents show that Big Oil companies openly admit to gaslighting the public about their commitment to “going green.” Documents also showed that some company officials wished climate activists would get infested with bed bugs.  It's Banned Books Week and public libraries across the Commonwealth and the country are shining bright lights on censorship and attempts by right-wing zealots to remove books from our schools. Bucks County has, of course, been front and center of the book-banning agenda. This year alone has seen 681 attempts to ban or restrict library sources, according to the American Library Association.  As ALA president Lessa Kanani'opua Pelayo-Lozado put it, “The unprecedented number of challenges we're seeing already this year reflects coordinated, national efforts to silence marginalized or historically underrepresented voices and deprive all of us — young people, in particular — of the chance to explore a world beyond the confines of personal experience.”  Saturday, Sept. 24 from 4 to 6 p.m. at State and Main Streets with the first annual Banned Books Parade. Participants will dress up in cardboard box book costumes to bring banned books to life.  The educational website Docuseek was blocked by the Central Bucks School District after “concerned parent” Vonna DeArmond complained at a recent school board meeting that some of the materials available on the site made references to sexually explicit themes and were discriminating against Christians.  Abortion is proving to be a key issue in PA's 1st Congressional district and Brian Fitzpatrick seems to believe that avoid talking to the media and his constituents is his best strategy. A recent WFMZ's 69 News story covering the issue featured Ashley Ehasz speaking out about abortion rights, but as the reporter put it: “69 News wanted to talk more to Fitzpatrick about his views, but several attempts to reach his campaign went unanswered.” Duck and cover, Fitzy. A couple of big things happening in space news. NASA is holding a press briefing today to discuss the status of the Artemis I mission to the Moon following two failed launches. Artemis ! may now launch as soon as September 27. Also, NASA will also be streaming its asteroid-smashing DART mission Monday evening.  And the cartoon The Jetsons, premiered on this date in 1962.

Learning Unleashed: ISTE Radio
Inspiring Tweens and Teens to Love Reading: Overcoming the New and Old Challenges

Learning Unleashed: ISTE Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 10:34


We invest much time, energy, and resources in getting elementary students to read, but that effort often wanes as we approach middle school and high school. Join us as we zero in on the challenges of inspiring teens and tweens to continue to love reading and how school librarians can help. Follow on Twitter: @Amele77 @ISTE @mrhooker @jonHarper70bd @bamradionetwork @shellthief @hyphenatic @ISTEMLN Get the Book: Liven Up Your Library #ISTE20 #ISTEturns40 #edchat #edtech #edtechchat Valerie Tagoe is a high school librarian in Texas. She's a winner of the S. Janice Kee Award from Texas Woman's University, and a past president of the Dallas Association of School Librarians. Valerie has 20 years of experience in education and libraries. She holds a bachelor's in French, with a minor in History, from the University of Oklahoma; a Master's of Bilingual Education from Southern Methodist University; and an MLS from Texas Woman's University. Valerie is also involved in the American Library Association and the Texas Library Association. I am excited to learn more about Data Science through the LEADING Fellowship and plan to apply what I learn to my work as a school librarian. I also plan to share Data Science concepts from the LEADING Fellowship with colleagues through professional development sessions, and with students via instruction in Advanced Placement program classes such as AP Seminar and AP Research. Julia E. Torres is a veteran language arts teacher and librarian in Denver Public schools. As a teacher/activist committed to education as a practice of freedom, her practice is grounded in the work of empowering students to use language arts to fuel resistance and positive social transformation. Julia was awarded the 2020 National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Teacher of Excellence award and currently serves teachers as part of the Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of NCTE board of directors. Julia facilitates workshops and professional conversations about anti-bias/anti-racist education, social justice, and culturally sustaining pedagogies in language arts, as well as digital literacy and librarianship. Her work has been featured in several publications, including NCTE's Council Chronicle, NPR, Al Jazeera's The Stream, PBS Education, KQED's MindShift, New York Times Learning Network, the Chicago Tribune, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development's Education Update, Rethinking Schools, School Library Journal, and many more.

All Of It
Talking Banned Books With The American Library Association's Next President

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 28:48


Headlines about "book bans" have become more and more commonplace over the past months and years, targeting mainly works by Black and Queer authors, which they consider not to be "age appropriate" reading material for youths. Emily Drabinski, president-elect of the American Library Association for 2023-24, joins to discuss.

The FOX News Rundown
The Fight Over Book Bans And What Students Should Read

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 32:00 Very Popular


Book bans have become an increasingly popular trend in schools across America. Ban requests are on the rise due to parent advocacy groups calling for stricter standards, while some educators are decrying the crackdown on certain literature as harmful censorship. First, Moms For Liberty Co-Founder Tina Descovich joins the Rundown to discuss why she believes some books must be banned to protect children from inappropriate content for their age group and her belief parents must reclaim their rights in their children's education. Later, Director of The American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom Deborah Caldwell-Stone joins the podcast to weigh in on the increased demands to censor books, why she believes it could hurt marginalized students, and how schools and parents can find solutions to their disagreements.   The latest FOX News Power Rankings are projecting a Republican House majority, as well as a 51-49 majority in the Senate. In order to accomplish this, the RNC is keeping its focus on topics such as high inflation and crime. Meanwhile, GOP candidates must appeal to both "MAGA" and moderate Republicans. Former Congressman Will Hurd (R-TX) joins the Rundown to discuss his take on how the party can ensure gaining power after the 2022 midterms. He also gives his take on how candidates should approach issues on voters' minds this November.   Plus, commentary by Fox News Contributor Tomi Lahren. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KZYX News
Mendocino libraries and bookstores celebrate Banned Books Week

KZYX News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 6:32


From September 18-24, Mendocino libraries and bookstores celebrate Banned Books Week, an national event sponsored by the American Library Association. Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read by spotlighting efforts of censorship.  The American Library Association tracks a rising trend in book challenges in the United States; eight months into 2022, the number of attempts to ban or restrict library resources in schools, universities and public libraries is on track to exceed record counts from 2021, with over 1,600 targeted titles. In 2022, most of the titles target LGBTQ people and themes. Listen to Ukiah Branch Librarian Melissa Eleftherion  Carr, and bookseller Toni Wheeler, speak about local attempts to censor books and the rather surprising outcomes.

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand
The reason behind the rise in banned books

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022


Deborah Caldwell-Stone, the director of the American Library Association's Office of Intellectual Freedom, joins Lisa Dent on Chicago’s Afternoon News to explain why organized political groups are involved in the rise of banned books across the nation. Follow Your Favorite Chicago’s Afternoon News Personalities on Twitter:Follow @LisaDentSpeaksFollow @SteveBertrand Follow @kpowell720 Follow @maryvandeveldeFollow @LaurenLapka

From Washington – FOX News Radio
The Fight Over Book Bans And What Students Should Read

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 32:00


Book bans have become an increasingly popular trend in schools across America. Ban requests are on the rise due to parent advocacy groups calling for stricter standards, while some educators are decrying the crackdown on certain literature as harmful censorship. First, Moms For Liberty Co-Founder Tina Descovich joins the Rundown to discuss why she believes some books must be banned to protect children from inappropriate content for their age group and her belief parents must reclaim their rights in their children's education. Later, Director of The American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom Deborah Caldwell-Stone joins the podcast to weigh in on the increased demands to censor books, why she believes it could hurt marginalized students, and how schools and parents can find solutions to their disagreements.   The latest FOX News Power Rankings are projecting a Republican House majority, as well as a 51-49 majority in the Senate. In order to accomplish this, the RNC is keeping its focus on topics such as high inflation and crime. Meanwhile, GOP candidates must appeal to both "MAGA" and moderate Republicans. Former Congressman Will Hurd (R-TX) joins the Rundown to discuss his take on how the party can ensure gaining power after the 2022 midterms. He also gives his take on how candidates should approach issues on voters' minds this November.   Plus, commentary by Fox News Contributor Tomi Lahren. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

What I Want to Know with Kevin P. Chavous
68. The Controversy Over Books: What do Parents and Schools Think?

What I Want to Know with Kevin P. Chavous

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 21:01


In 2021, the American Library Association tracked over fifteen-hundred individual book challenges or removals. In addition, our public school system is seeing increasing attempts to ban books from either curriculum or libraries. Many parents are becoming more concerned about the content their children are exposed to at school, whether classroom curriculum or books in the library. Some have been calling to have certain books removed from library shelves for a variety of reasons. What are parents concerned about when it comes to books? What types of books are targeted for banning and why? What is the review process for library books in schools – and does it work? How should administrators respond to calls for pulling books from school libraries? And what role does politics play in the book banning issue? Jennifer Pippin of the Indian River County Moms for Liberty, Martha Hickson of North Hunterdon High School, and Deborah Caldwell-Stone of the American Library Association join Kevin to discuss the books that are being banned, the politics of book banning, and the controversy over books in schools. 

Everyone Loved It But Me
Banned Books: Top 10 most banned books ten years ago

Everyone Loved It But Me

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 24:51


 Banned Books Week starts Sept. 18, to Sept. 24 Publisher's Weekly describes how more books than in recent years are being banned and contested now. Banned Books Week was first launched 40 years ago. In 2021, it was the highest number of books challenged since the American Library Association began tracking books challenged. This article highlights how schools are under pressure.  This CNN article discusses how Brooklyn Public Library has handed out 5,100 digital library cards to young people across the country. In last week's episode, Lisa highlighted the top 10 most banned books of 2021. Here, she discussed the books banned in 2012.  1.     Captain Underpants by Dav Pilkey 2.     The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian by Sherman Alexie3.     Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher4.     Fifty Shades of Grey by E. L. James5.     And Tango Makes Three by Peter Parnell, Justin Richardson and Henry Cole6.     The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini7.     Looking for Alaska by John Green8.     Scary Stories by Alvin Schwartz and Stephen Gammell9.     The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls 10.   Beloved by Toni Morrison * The book titles mentioned include affiliate links. You can support the podcast by purchasing a book with the links because the podcast receives a small commission. For more information, find Lisa on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and her website.

Beyond the Scenes from The Daily Show with Trevor Noah
​​Why Are So Many Books Being Banned?

Beyond the Scenes from The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 54:18


Books are being banned from schools and public libraries at alarming rates, and stories from LGBTQIA+ and BIPOC authors are disproportionately being pulled from shelves. How do book bans harm learning and access to information? What do these challenges say about the American educational system? Deborah Caldwell-Stone, Director of the American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom and George M. Johnson, author of the widely challenged book “All Boys Aren't Blue'' join host Roy Wood Jr. to break down where these book bans are coming from, the political ideology behind them, and how these banned books can help young readers understand complex issues.    More on Banned Books Week: bannedbooksweek.org   Get involved: https://uniteagainstbookbans.org/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Talking Liberties with the ACLU of Illinois
Episode 37: Fighting Against Book Bans

Talking Liberties with the ACLU of Illinois

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 37:39


Efforts to ban books in public and school libraries across the country has more than doubled in the past year. In this episode we were joined by Deborah Stone-Caldwell, director of the Office of Intellectual Freedom at the American Library Association, and Rebecca Glenberg, Senior Supervising Attorney at the ACLU of Illinois to discuss the threats to challenged books across country and in Illinois, and what each of us can do to fight back against these threats in our own communities.