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Chairman of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China

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  • Aug 12, 2022LATEST
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Speak LOUD
Trauma Informed Care through Ayahuasca with MICHAEL THORNHILL

Speak LOUD

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 36:35


Today I'm talking with Michael Thornhill, co-founder of Casa Galactica, an ayahuasca healing and evolutionary retreat based in Peru. He's a traditionally-trained plant spirit healer and professional advocate for trauma-informed care. With Casa Galactica, Michael and his wife blend Eastern medicines with Western mindsets to transform years of suffering into an empowered state of mind. Michael's journey with plant medicine began with his journey in healing from addiction, trauma, and abuse. His struggle with substances began young and continued into his late 20s when he started to explore meditation and sound healing. From there, he was drawn to ayahuasca. For Michael, ayahuasca was able to address the root cause of his addiction, alerting him to the fact that the life he lived was out of line with his deeper self. Following the medicine to Peru, Michael learned with indigenous teachers and found a deeper calling in guiding others to the same freedom and liberation he experienced. “There's more to your life than just healing trauma,” Michael says. “It's waiting for you.” Ayahuasca refers to the ayahuasca vine and the leaves of the chacruna plant. The plant has a high concentration of DMT, while the vine acts as an MAO inhibitor. allowing for a deeper journey with the medicine. Journeys can last from 3-6 hours, in which the “veil of illusion dissolves,” allowing you to dive deeper, reframe repressed trauma, and heal past events. Ayahuasca ceremonies are part of the national heritage of Peru, stemming from a long history of plant medicine wisdom. Ayahuasca is not only legal in Peru, but encouraged and protected as a form of healing. Other indigenous cultures throughout the world have lost their practices with plant medicine. Michael explains that ayahuasca is not a ‘drug,' but a plant medicine, as it is something that helps you heal. Drugs are to escape. Plant medicines let you look closer,  Casa Galactica advocates for trauma-informed plant medicine journeys, sharing shamanic wisdom in a context that's empowering and accessible for Western mindsets. Michael and his wife's 10-day retreats consist of 4 ceremonies, which they found was enough time to get the most out of the plant's healing. 10 days at Casa Galactica can catalyze life for the next 10 years, in Michael's opinion. Sitting with ayahuasca can be a difficult experience, especially when repressed trauma is surfacing. That's why Michael and his wife focus on holding a safe space and being with their clients every step of the way. They pride themselves on transparency and intention, providing as much information and preparation as they can leading up to and throughout the retreat. Despite the difficulty, Michael says that sitting with the medicine “has always been worth it.” Even after ‘bad' ceremonies, he himself came out feeling like a different person. Michael hopes listeners learn that there are different options for healing and that while plant medicines are less known or understood in the western world, they are an option. “It's all going to be okay,” he says as something he knows for certain. Listen in to learn more about the medical and diet guidelines for ayahuasca journeys, the cost of Casa Galactica's 10-day retreats, and how to book a free 30-minute consultation with Michael and his wife. Resources MentionedJoin Me on Speak Loud PlatformSpeak Loud Podcast on the webLearn more about Casa Galactica Spread the message of Speak Loudly Podcast andshare this episode

The Secret Teachings
The Secret Teachings 8/10/22 - New World Order 666

The Secret Teachings

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 120:01


It's becoming more difficult to follow what we call conspiracies and conspiracy theories. A ‘New World Order' was once thought of as a fringe theory of dystopian global government, denied until the World Economic Forum unveiled their Great Reset - a revamping of Mao's Great Leap Forward. The theory blossomed originally with the ‘great financial reset', which later dropped the word ‘financial'. Now the NWO is being transformed into a positive conspiracy about a plan to erase all debt from society, something conspiracy theorists are actually advocating for instead of against. A great financial reset and cryptocurrency transitions society from one form of debt with partially owned property to a new social debt with no property. A court case in Canada brought this idea back into the news when Karen Lew told a B.C. judge that her mortgage debt was forgiven because of the NWO, NESARA and GESARA. For some reason big banks and international monetary groups are expected to simply eliminate all debt overnight and even deposit new currency in our bank accounts. But it makes near zero sense, and if there were any truth to the theory it would certainly be nightmarish - ‘you'll own nothing and be happy' might sound like the end of all debt and money, but it also includes property and freedom. It's all in the statement - government takes your property and wealth and you become a serf forced to smile and be happy about it. Environmental, Social, and Corporate, Governance (ESG) takes it further as an extension of this ‘reset' by only giving money to companies and governments willing to destroy culture, customs, habits, and ideas.

SmashBoxxTV's Disc Golf Podcast
MAO recap & Nikko update - Episode 415

SmashBoxxTV's Disc Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 91:12 Very Popular


MAO recap & Nikko update - Episode 415

WJ Live by The Western Journal
Ep. 288: Watch: Special Guest Spills ‘Chilling' New Details About Trump's Mar-a-Lago Raid

WJ Live by The Western Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 37:15


Le Film
August in the Water (1995)

Le Film

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 107:43


When two meteorites simultaneously land in the mountains near the town of Fukuoka, a strange set of cosmic events unfold amidst a deadly endemic brought on by drought, where the organs of townsfolk are petrified – causing them to drop dead at a moment's notice. Izumi, a teenage diving prodigy, transfers to a local high school, where she quickly earns the adoration of classmates and the infatuation of two boys, Mao and Ukiya.   What follows is a hallucinogenic and dreamlike exploration into the unseen universe that envelops us all in the guise of a coming-of-age film, weaving and connecting the various dots that make up our existence. With a score resembling the depths of Atlantis and metaphysical imagery to match, Gakuryū Ishii delivers a meditative and transcendental experience unlike no other.   As always, thank you for listening and we hope you enjoy the discussion.   Where to watch: YouTube (Thanks to the small audience who keeps reuploading this film for free since it's not readily available anywhere else) Also available on the internet archive via the link below while it lasts: https://archive.org/details/august.in.the.water.1995   Here's to hoping this gem gets a restoration and new lease on life soon!   Instagram: @lefilmpodcast Twitter: @lefilmpod Send us questions, feedback, and film recommendations at: lefilmpodcast@gmail.com

The Book Review
Poems in Practice and in Theory

The Book Review

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 43:26 Very Popular


Elisa Gabbert, the Book Review's On Poetry columnist, visits the podcast this week to discuss writing about poetry and her own forthcoming collection of poems, her fourth, “Normal Distance.”“When I'm writing what I would call nonfiction or an essay or just pure prose, I'm really trying to be accurate,” Gabbert says. “I'm not lying, I'm really telling you what I think. There's very minimal distance between my persona on the page and who I really am. And then when I'm writing poetry, that persona really takes on more weight. I'm definitely creating more distance, and it really feels more like fiction or even more like theater, I might say. I'm really more creating a character that's going to be speaking this monologue I'm writing.”Ian Johnson visits the podcast to talk about his review of “Golden Age,” a novel by Wang Xiaobo recently translated by Yan Yan. The novel, set against Mao's Cultural Revolution, made waves in China when it was originally published there in the 1990s.“It was controversial primarily because of sex, there's a lot of sex in the novel,” Johnson says. “The sex is not really described in graphic detail; this isn't Henry Miller or something like that. It's more like they're having sex to make a point: that they're independent people and they're not going to be trampled by the state. And it's very humorous — he talks about sex using all kinds of euphemisms, like ‘commit great friendship,' stuff like that. It's meant to be a sort of parody, a somewhat absurd version of a romance.”Also on this week's episode, Elisabeth Egan and Dave Kim talk about what people are reading. John Williams is the host.Here are the books discussed in this week's “What We're Reading”:“Time Shelter” by Georgi Gospodinov, translated by Angela Rodel“The Displacements” by Bruce Holsinger“The Annotated Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum, edited by Michael Patrick HearnWe would love to hear your thoughts about this episode, and about the Book Review's podcast in general. You can send them to books@nytimes.com.

The Secret Teachings
The Secret Teachings 8/4/22 - Hickory, Dickory, Dock: The Maos Set Up TikTok

The Secret Teachings

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 120:01


Social Media has long been known to cause anxiety, depression, eating disorders, and feelings of isolation and loneliness. TikTok in particular, a short-video app, is responsible for the development of nervous tics, Tourette's syndrome, and emotional, sometimes violent, outbursts. TikTok is furthermore known to collect and store mass amounts of intimate data. Considering the app is run by a hostile foreign government, it is certainly a direct threat to national security, and the mental and physical development of those who use it obsessively. TikTok has its largest base in the U.S. where young girls in particular are being programmed and brain damaged by hostile anti-human propaganda.

FlatOut Brasil Podcast: notícias automotivas, car culture, automobilismo e mais!
Leo e MAO respondem as perguntas dos FlatOuters | FlatOut Podcast 82

FlatOut Brasil Podcast: notícias automotivas, car culture, automobilismo e mais!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 95:25


Quais nossos motores favoritos? Que Alfa Romeo comprar? Quanto gastamos em Project Cars? Que temas mais atraem os leitores? Nesta edição 82 do FlatOut Podcast, o Leo Contesini e o Marco Antônio Oliveira (o MAO) respondem estas e várias outras perguntas feitas pelos FlatOuters em nosso Grupo Secreto. Além, claro, de trazermos as matérias de destaque da semana, o desafio do ronco e a Rádio FlatOut!

The Castle Report
What Does Standing With Taiwan Really Mean?

The Castle Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 10:49


Darrell Castle talks about the island known to the West as Taiwan and offers a few thoughts on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's recent visit there. Transcription / Notes: WHAT DOES STANDING WITH TAIWAN REALLY MEAN? Hello this is Darrell Castle with today's Castle Report. This is Friday the 5th day of August in the year of our Lord 2022 and on today's report I will be talking about the Island known as Taiwan except to China where it is known as China. Specifically, I will offer a few thoughts on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's recent visit to Taiwan. Why is Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan such a big deal? After all she is not the first member of congress to visit that nation. She is, however, a duly elected, official of the United States as well as second behind Vice President Kamala Harris, in line for the presidency of the United States. I suppose that makes her visit very important to the Chinese. It is akin to a state visit to what they consider to be part of their sovereign territory. All that was well know to the speaker of the house of representatives before she planned her trip, but she did it anyway. The president said he thought it was not a good idea and so did the secretary of defense, but she went anyway. Why, what did the trip accomplish, and how did it properly represent her constituents in San Francisco? The U.S. claims that since the speaker represents the legislative branch, and the executive branch handles diplomacy and is empowered to determine U.S. foreign policy that her trip was therefore insignificant. I'm pretty sure the Chinese don't understand or accept such distinctions. They probably don't accept the idea that the trip was not endorsed by the president and I'm certain that to them its all part of a pre-arranged plan. China's outrage, either genuine or also concocted, was made very clear. Some in the Chinese military threatened to shoot down her plane, but fortunately cooler heads prevailed. It seems that the Chinese do not want to provoke a full-scale war with the United States, at least not yet. The history of this conflict goes back to the end of World War ll when the forces of Mao chased Chiang Kai-Shek to what was then called Formosa. Chiang established a Chinese government in exile While Mao ran China and claimed the island of Taiwan as sovereign Chinese territory. War clouds have appeared over the island ever since and it constantly threatens the world with war today. The U.S. has always walked a line between recognition of Taiwan independence and admitting it is part of China. The diplomacy was worked out between Nixon, Kissinger, and the Chinese when Nixon “opened” China with his visit in 1974. Basically, both sides agreed to coexist and ignore the elephant in the room. The U.S. would not recognize Taiwan independence and the Chinese would not attempt to take Taiwan by force. The position of the U.S. regarding an attempted invasion by China would remain deliberately unclear and obscure so that they would never know until it happened. Would the U.S. defend Taiwan militarily or not, no one knew for sure? All that changed with a recent trip by President Biden to Japan. When asked by a reporter if the U.S. would defend Taiwan he said yes, that's our commitment. That, of Course, has never been our commitment, but such gaffes or deliberate statements sometimes lead toward world war. The Chinese were probably amazed at the statement, and it undoubtedly accounted for some of the fiery rhetoric and threats about the trip. The Chinese military strength continues to grow and with that growth comes increasingly aggressive threats and efforts to expand in the Pacific. So far, the disputes have involved fishing rights, coastal islands, and disputed territorial waters but it remains a very dangerous situation and that's why this trip was ill conceived in my mind. Once she announced the trip she had to go despite the Chinese threats, but more importantly because of them.

Franck Ferrand raconte...
Kissinger en Chine

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 24:39


La figure omnisciente de Henry Kissinger a marqué la présidence Nixon. Jamais le conseiller ne brilla davantage que lors du rapprochement avec la Chine de Mao. Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

Guidelines For Living Devotional
This Is Why Love Is Powerful

Guidelines For Living Devotional

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 4:50


Mao Zedong, who died in 1976, began his Selected Works by asking two important questions: "Who are our enemies?" and "Who are our friends?"  Mao was concerned not just with political entities that had to be faced, such as the United States and Russia.  He was even more interested in ideologies that represented power.

Grand Theft Life
#154 - Leo's Are Manifesting A Recession

Grand Theft Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 63:43


Listen in podcast appInstagram Caves Into Kardashian ShameApple and Amazon EarningsRecessions are Self fulfilling Prophecies WE NEED MORE IMMIGRATIONBoomers Lose the Work From Home BattleJustin Trudeau Cancels Farmers The case for traveling before RetirementListen on Apple, Spotify, or Google Podcasts.If you aren’t in the Reformed Millennials Facebook Group join us for daily updates, discussions, and deep dives into the investable trends Millennials should be paying attention to.👉 For specific investment questions or advice contact Joel @ Gold Investment Management.📈📊Market Update💵📉"no one panic until her (Nancy Pelosi) husband starts buying Lockheed and Raytheon.”There was lots of talk last week of a ‘bottom’.If we have bottomed…fantastic. There will be lot’s of gains in the future.What I do not want to do is chase stocks when the indexes are below the 200 days moving averages.We see more stocks from various sectors setting up. This earnings quarter, the market reaction to earnings has been predominantly positive – many names didn’t sell off after missing estimates and cutting guidance; many broke out after stronger than expected earnings. This is a notable change in sentiment compared to the previous two earnings quarters.Other than Facebook (META), all mega caps had positive reactions to their earnings this season – TSLA, GOOGL, MSFT, AAPL, AMZN. Why does it matter? Those stocks can only be moved by institutional money.Two new Bills in the making have given a significant boost to two groups of stocks – semiconductors and clean energy. Those are shaping up to be among the current market leaders.The Fed has given signs that interest rate increases will slow down if the economic data requires it. They are paying attention to inflation and jobs data primarily. GDP was negative in the past two Qs, so the US is basically in a recession. The market reads this as a reason for the Fed’s tightening to become a lot less aggressive.Crazy how things change.Last month, the market felt absolutely despondent…. with most indices up almost 10% in July (the S&P was up ~9%; the Russell was up ~10.5%) and having their best month since November 2020 (when COVID vaccines came out), things certainly aren’t as fearful…. but I feel like there’s still a lot of value out there.RM’s Thoughts on Taiwan:I'm against the forever wars and generally am skeptical about the use of military.But defending Taiwan makes sense for Americans' concrete economic interests, freedoms, and sovereignty.First and foremost, China's ambitions are almost certainly not limited to Taiwan. Rather, they appear to seek first hegemony over Asia and global preeminence from there. How do we know? Well, they say it pretty openly now. Plus they're building a power projection military.If China achieves this goal, you can be very confident that Americans' prosperity and liberties will suffer. Why? China will have a controlling influence over more than 50% of global GDP. It will be the gatekeeper and the center of the global economy.To simplify a bit: Everybody, every company will have to dance to their tune. If you don't, they'll block you from trading there. The yuan will be the dominant currency. Chinese regulations will be the baseline. Chinese companies and universities will be the world's best.In that context, you can bet Europe, the Middle East, Latin America, Africa will orient toward Beijing. They need growth! They'll need to play ball. So America and its allies will have a choice: Play ball or go it alone.But China will have a strong incentive to push us down. The USA is the only country that can challenge their ascendancy. So China will have strong reason to demote us down the value chain, if only to weaken the only plausible counter to Beijing's preeminence.Certain US elites and favored interest groups would prosper under this model, but not the society as a whole. The US and Canadas economic security would be subject to Beijing's diktat, and our freedoms would clearly suffer as a result. Economic power is political power.To take just one example: Many Americans have big concerns about the social media companies (I do!). But our debate assumes that we can change things in Washington or state capitals. Not if PRC is hegemon. Then the social media companies will be Chinese or subsidiaries.Or we could try to go it alone. But then we'll be what, at most 20% of global GDP. But with China as the determinant of the rest, it'll try to isolate us and bring us down as the challenger. Autarky will be a much, much more pinched life for Americans. We'll be a lot poorer.Why does Taiwan matter for this? Well, it's critical to the defense of Japan, the Philippines, South Korea. And it's a reasonable bellwether for them of how much they can rely on the US. If Taiwan falls, it will be much harder to prevent China from dominating Asia.And preventing China from dominating Asia is manifestly in Americans' very concrete interests.People might want to help Taiwan for other reasons: democracy, shared values, sympathy. But those are not the bottom line for Americans. It's in our own interests.The issue is that Taiwan is a very important but not genuinely existential interest. It's something we should do, but it's not worth fighting to the last man. So we should act to avoid that choice. We can do so by having a military that can defend Taiwan at a tolerable cost.But we're not doing that right now. Instead we're frittering away our focus and resources on other things instead of laser-focusing. This is profoundly ill-advised and irresponsible.Success would be laser-focusing on being able to defend Taiwan, China seeing that, and never trying to attack the island because they realize they'd fail. This is possible. Mao wanted to conquer Taiwan but never tried because he knew he'd fail.If we could convince Beijing they'd fail now, they'd be unlikely to try. Then our anti-hegemonic coalition in Asia would stand up and survive. Then we'd have a good power balance. Then we'd have a strong basis for our economy to prosper: market share, a strong dollar, etc.Work From HomeLike it or not, it seems that remote work is a trend that is here to stay.The numbers are telling. As of this spring, only 38% of NYC office workers were in their office on a given day based on this survey  by the Partnership For NYC (a leading business group in NYC). The numbers are similar in the Bay Area and Los Angeles. Some cities around the US have much higher numbers but I have not seen any city higher than 70% on this score.Remote work is here to stay, with 78% of employers indicating a hybrid office model will be their predominant post-pandemic policy, up from just 6% pre-pandemic.**https://pfnyc.org/research/return-to-office-survey-results-may-2022/**We all know that people are nicer to each other in person. Email and slack and zoom don’t bring out the best in people. Having a meal together does.So what should we do about this quandry?💸Reformed Millennials - Post of The WeekApple Q2 22' Earnings - This tells an important story about how the upper middle class economy is performing and where big is shifting their businesses.From the Wall Street Journal:Apple Inc. reported an almost 11% decline in profit after weathering supply constraints and shutdowns in China, although iPhone sales continued to grow, remaining resilient despite economic challenges. The better-than-expected results for the quarter ended in June followed a pattern of tech companies that posted a drop in profits but managed to assuage investor concerns about their strength in uncertain economic times.This was, under the circumstances, a very impressive quarter from Apple. There were also lots of interesting tidbits to pick up across their business lines.iPhone: This comment from Tim Cook on the earnings call really said it all as far as the iPhone business is concerned:From an aggregate point of view, looking at it worldwide, looking at the data on iPhone for the June quarter, there’s not obvious evidence in there that there’s a macroeconomic headwind. I’m not saying that there’s not one, I’m saying that the data doesn’t show it. Where we can clearly see that in the Wearables, Home and Accessories area. And so I would differentiate those two.Two factors shield the iPhone from an economic slowdown:first is the fact that Apple primarily sells to more affluent customers, who may be less likely to feel economic pain in a slowdown, or suffer acute impacts from inflation;the second is that a smartphone is, for nearly everyone, the most important device in their life. .The other factor that appeared to be driving iPhone strength was the easing of silicon (semiconductors) shortages; Cook said up-front that “Our supply constraints were less than we anticipated at the beginning of the quarter, coming in slightly below the range we discussed during our last call.” This tracks with other earnings which point towards an imminent chip glut.Mac: The Mac was down 10% year-over-year and 29% sequentially; that the largest sequential drop in my earnings spreadsheet, which goes back to 2013. The reason is the Shanghai lockdowns; from Cook:For last quarter, what we saw was when the COVID restrictions hit in the Shanghai corridor, we lost the primary source of supply for Mac units. And that was either running at a reduced rate or down completely for the majority of the quarter. And so it was a very big impact to the Mac business. We felt good, frankly, that we were able to, by the end of the quarter, get this back to where we were down 10 points. But the negative 10, I would classify as being driven by supply. And of course, FX feeds into this as well because of the translation issues around the world. There’s also some impact because of the business in Russia, but those are the three kind of reasons that I would tell you. In terms of testing the demand, you can’t really test the demand unless you have the supply. And we were so far from that last quarter that, you know, we have an estimate of what we believe demand was, but it is an estimate. We recognize how the industry is doing. We think that we’ve got a great story with the Mac, getting M1 out and now M2 out, we have a very, very strong offering for the back to school season. And we’ll see how we do this quarter. We’ll report back in October.This specific quarterly result for this specific business is, by a substantial margin, the most pain that Apple has ever felt for its dependence on China. As I understand it Apple has two primary Mac suppliers, but both make the Mac in the Shanghai area; that means that when the entire metropolitan area was locked down earlier this year Apple had nowhere else to make Macs.Services: This is the one area of the company that benefited from the Shanghai lockdown; from a question at the end of the call:A quick follow up on the lockdown in China during the June quarter. did you actually see any noticeable negative effects on your App Store revenue for the region or any positive effects? Like maybe more gaming downloads?Tim Cook: China had very good results on services last quarter. So they grew strong double digit, better than the company average. And they set a new June quarter revenue record during the quarter.What was more interesting was Apple’s advertising business; while the company doesn’t break out the numbers in its results, Cook said in response to a question:When you then look at services, there were some services that were impacted, for example, like digital advertising was clearly impacted by the macroeconomic environment.Both Cook and CFO Luca Maestri brought this up several times in the call, and I was initially a bit surprised; after all, you would expect some portion of the advertising money that, post App Tracking Transparency (ATT), is not going to Facebook et al would go to Apple instead. And that, to be clear, might have happened: Services was up 12% year-over-year, and neither Apple executive actually said that advertising was down (and Apple, I would add, is very incentivized to talk down their advertising business).APPLE’S NEW ADVERTISING SLOTSApple is introducing two new App Store ad slots, one of which addresses this issue; from 9to5Mac:Apple is expanding its advertising business and adding two new ad slots to the App Store. Currently, the App Store has two ad slots: one on the main ‘Search’ tab and one in the Search results. The two new App Store ads announced today will bring advertisements to the App Store ‘Today’ homepage, as well as to individual app pages.It’s not yet clear how finely targeted the ‘Today’ ad can be; even that ad placement, though, depends on consumers opening the App Store. The hole in Apple’s advertising offering remains demand generation, and the most obvious way to do that is through ads in other apps (Apple would likely claim that all ads it served on the iPhone are first-party data, just like all purchases are). This is also the type of ad that most benefits from data about what a consumer has previously purchased.This is context for a curious presentation Apple released in May; again from 9to5Mac:Apple’s Search Ads business is becoming an increasingly important part of its Services revenue. In a presentation to advertising clients today, obtained by 9to5Mac, the company emphasizes that even as Search Ads continue to grow, the vast majority of users are opting for an experience that doesn’t rely on personalized advertising…Apple’s emphasis in today’s presentation, according to a slide deck obtained by 9to5Mac, is that Search Ads rely very little on personalized targeting, and conversion rates are virtually unaffected.With iOS 15, Apple added a new prompt when a user opens the App Store for the first time. The prompt explains personalized ads “help you discover apps, products, and services that are relevant to you.” The prompt gives users the ability to turn on personalized ads or to turn them off. According to data aggregated by Apple, 78% of iOS search volume on the App Store came from devices with personalized ads turned off. This effectively means that 78% of users are opting to “Turn Off Personalized Ads” when they see the prompt for the first time in the App Store. Furthermore, additional data from Apple indicates that the average conversion rate between users with personalized ads enabled and personalized ads disabled is nearly identical. For customers who opted in to personalized ads, advertisers see a 62.1% conversion rate. Among users with personalized ads disabled, that conversion rate is 62.5%.This isn’t a complete surprise: the reason why search advertising is so effective is because instead of having to discern what the user wants the users themselves go to the trouble of telling you explicitly with their search term.I continue to believe we haven’t seen the end of Apple introducing new ad inventory, and I don’t think it will remain limited to Apple’s apps for too long.🐦 Twitter Thread of The Week 🐦Leveraging Brand through Equity Ownership. A master class from Lebron as he hunts a NBA franchise in Las Vegas from Joe Pompliano🔮Best Links of The Week🔮✍️ Dario Perkins on the nightmare scenario for Central Banks.✍️ Benn Eifert on bullsh*t in investing. - Noah Opinion✍️ Written Q&A with Michael Mauboussin on the investing process.📺 Howard Marks discusses the current market environment and how it compares to past bear markets. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.reformedmillennials.com

Magic Morning Wood
Ychyfus! The Kung Fu Podcast # 26: HAP KI DO and THE TOURNAMENT and THE HIMALAYAN

Magic Morning Wood

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 98:19


All hail Angela Mao! And that Wong Fung's alright too. Also throw in Sammo, Carter, the great mayonnaise vs. salad cream debate and Ian from accounting, and you've got yourself another fine podcast from Darren and Clive. Musical breaks include: Mao by Don Sornrabeab, Short Shorts by The Royal Teens, Flesh Balloons of Tibet by Sun City Girls and Mayonnaise by Jack Ruby.

Talk Ten Tuesdays
Sabotaging Your Coding and CDI Reporting

Talk Ten Tuesdays

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 29:40


Coders, clinical documentation integrity specialist and revenue cycle professionals will be the beneficiaries next Tuesday during the live edition of Talk Ten Tuesdays when healthcare attorney and litigator Brianna J. Santolli returns to the broadcast and cuts through the legal jargon to warn of tactics deployed by some Medicare Advantage Organizations (MAO) to preserve profits by inappropriately denying prior authorizations. Using a recent case conducted by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Inspector General, Santolli, a litigator at the law firm Kelley Drye & Warren LLP, will explain in clear and simple terms how even though, the coding and documentation was correctly reported for the services provided, MAO will often deny or delay services for medically necessary care. Other segments during the live broadcast include the following:Coding Report: Laurie Johnson, senior healthcare consultant with Revenue Cycle Solutions, LLC will report on the latest coding news.News Desk: Timothy Powell, CPA will anchor the Talk Ten Tuesdays News Desk.Journaling John: John Zelem, MD, FACS, founder and CEO for Streamline Solutions Consulting, will continue with his second journal entry in this, new segment.Mental Health Report: Award-winning author and internationally recognized psychiatrist H. Steven Moffic, will report on America's mental health against the recent announcement the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to make 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline available nationwide.TalkBack: Erica Remer,MD, founder and president of Erica Remer, MD, Inc. and Talk Ten Tuesdays co-host, will report on a subject that has caught her attention during her popular segment.  

Red Menace
AMA July '22: Freedom & Responsibility (...and Dialectical Materialism)

Red Menace

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 95:38


Alyson and Breht respond to questions from our patrons. Topics discussed include: how to properly evaluate uprisings abroad, important virtues for communists to try and cultivate, and finding hope and solidarity in the face of tragedy and despair... Mao on Dialectics as mentioned by Alyson: https://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/mao/selected-works/volume-8/mswv8_48.htm Support Red Menace and get access to bonus monthly content on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/TheRedMenace

People's History of Ideas Podcast
The August Defeat (Part 2): The Communists Strike Back (August to November 1928)

People's History of Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 24:08


The Communists fight to regain lost territory, and ethnic tensions explode among the peasants in the base area.Further reading:Stephen Averill, Revolution in the Highlands: China's Jinggangshan Base AreaStuart Schram, ed., Mao's Road to Power, vol. 3: From the Jinggangshan to the Establishment of the Jiangxi Soviets, July 1927-December 1930Pang Xianzhi and Jin Chongji, Mao Zedong: A Biography, vol. 1: 1893-1949Some names from this episode:Du Xiujing, Inspector sent to the Jinggangshan by the Hunan Provincial Committee in May 1928 and who returned in JuneGong Chu, Political commissar for the 29th regimentChen Yi, Political commissar for the 28th regimentKang Keqing, Peasant guerrilla fighter from Wan'an CountyYuan Wencai, Leader of the 32nd regimentSupport the show

Hebrew Nation Online
“Come out of her, My people” Show ~ Mark Call weekly

Hebrew Nation Online

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 49:46


The once 'united States of America' was never intended to have a king. George Washington made the point by refusing to stand for re-election after two terms. Now, elections are pretty clearly superfluous. And so is the 'oath' taken before a God of the Bible that those who stole the election not only don't believe, but openly hate. Mark begins by asking a question that will hopefully put a LOT of 'current events' -- and what we need to be thinking and praying about -- into perspective: Did the Russians know just how evil Stalin was? (Whether they could say so out loud, or not.) How about the Chinese under Mao? And yes, AmeriKa today under the Imposter-in-Chief. And even in ancient Israel. What did the people who lived under an evil, Baal-worshiping pagan king like Ahab think? Why does the Bible really not say much at all about what they thought, or did. The answers speak volumes.

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast
Beyond Evil: Lenin, Stalin, and Putin

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 50:42


Professor Brandon Gauthier uses Lenin, Stalin, and Putin as case studies to try to help us understand the reasons why certain political leaders become monsters. By looking further into their pasts and noting the important changes in their attitudes towards other human beings, Gauthier shows how radical ideologies coupled with the erasure of any sense of empathy for other people created some of the worst people in world history. Episode 465.

New Books in East Asian Studies
Cole Roskam, "Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992" (Yale UP, 2021)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 64:23


China's urban landscapes are full of radically different architectural styles which memorialise different eras in the country's political past, from the remains of imperial palaces or city walls, to Republican-era shophouses, early-PRC medium-rise apartments, and soaring glass buildings of twenty-first-century vintage. But lodged – both temporally and physically – between these latter two are constructions from a time that is only now beginning to receive more attention, namely the early reform period of the 1970s-90s. This is exactly the timespan covered in Cole Roskam's excellent new book Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992 (Yale UP, 2021) which shows that architecture had a key place in the emerging political, social and cultural developments of China's pivotal post-Mao years. Examining stylistic, institutional, sociological and aesthetic aspects to Chinese architecture and its cross-border entanglements, this is a book which – as we transition deeper into Xi Jinping's ‘new era' – has much to say about an intriguing and occluded period of recent history which is not just Chinese but truly global. Ed Pulford is an Anthropologist and Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in Chinese Studies
Cole Roskam, "Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992" (Yale UP, 2021)

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 64:23


China's urban landscapes are full of radically different architectural styles which memorialise different eras in the country's political past, from the remains of imperial palaces or city walls, to Republican-era shophouses, early-PRC medium-rise apartments, and soaring glass buildings of twenty-first-century vintage. But lodged – both temporally and physically – between these latter two are constructions from a time that is only now beginning to receive more attention, namely the early reform period of the 1970s-90s. This is exactly the timespan covered in Cole Roskam's excellent new book Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992 (Yale UP, 2021) which shows that architecture had a key place in the emerging political, social and cultural developments of China's pivotal post-Mao years. Examining stylistic, institutional, sociological and aesthetic aspects to Chinese architecture and its cross-border entanglements, this is a book which – as we transition deeper into Xi Jinping's ‘new era' – has much to say about an intriguing and occluded period of recent history which is not just Chinese but truly global. Ed Pulford is an Anthropologist and Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

NBN Book of the Day
Cole Roskam, "Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992" (Yale UP, 2021)

NBN Book of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 64:23


China's urban landscapes are full of radically different architectural styles which memorialise different eras in the country's political past, from the remains of imperial palaces or city walls, to Republican-era shophouses, early-PRC medium-rise apartments, and soaring glass buildings of twenty-first-century vintage. But lodged – both temporally and physically – between these latter two are constructions from a time that is only now beginning to receive more attention, namely the early reform period of the 1970s-90s. This is exactly the timespan covered in Cole Roskam's excellent new book Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992 (Yale UP, 2021) which shows that architecture had a key place in the emerging political, social and cultural developments of China's pivotal post-Mao years. Examining stylistic, institutional, sociological and aesthetic aspects to Chinese architecture and its cross-border entanglements, this is a book which – as we transition deeper into Xi Jinping's ‘new era' – has much to say about an intriguing and occluded period of recent history which is not just Chinese but truly global. Ed Pulford is an Anthropologist and Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/book-of-the-day

New Books in History
Cole Roskam, "Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992" (Yale UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 64:23


China's urban landscapes are full of radically different architectural styles which memorialise different eras in the country's political past, from the remains of imperial palaces or city walls, to Republican-era shophouses, early-PRC medium-rise apartments, and soaring glass buildings of twenty-first-century vintage. But lodged – both temporally and physically – between these latter two are constructions from a time that is only now beginning to receive more attention, namely the early reform period of the 1970s-90s. This is exactly the timespan covered in Cole Roskam's excellent new book Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992 (Yale UP, 2021) which shows that architecture had a key place in the emerging political, social and cultural developments of China's pivotal post-Mao years. Examining stylistic, institutional, sociological and aesthetic aspects to Chinese architecture and its cross-border entanglements, this is a book which – as we transition deeper into Xi Jinping's ‘new era' – has much to say about an intriguing and occluded period of recent history which is not just Chinese but truly global. Ed Pulford is an Anthropologist and Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Cole Roskam, "Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992" (Yale UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 64:23


China's urban landscapes are full of radically different architectural styles which memorialise different eras in the country's political past, from the remains of imperial palaces or city walls, to Republican-era shophouses, early-PRC medium-rise apartments, and soaring glass buildings of twenty-first-century vintage. But lodged – both temporally and physically – between these latter two are constructions from a time that is only now beginning to receive more attention, namely the early reform period of the 1970s-90s. This is exactly the timespan covered in Cole Roskam's excellent new book Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992 (Yale UP, 2021) which shows that architecture had a key place in the emerging political, social and cultural developments of China's pivotal post-Mao years. Examining stylistic, institutional, sociological and aesthetic aspects to Chinese architecture and its cross-border entanglements, this is a book which – as we transition deeper into Xi Jinping's ‘new era' – has much to say about an intriguing and occluded period of recent history which is not just Chinese but truly global. Ed Pulford is an Anthropologist and Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Architecture
Cole Roskam, "Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992" (Yale UP, 2021)

New Books in Architecture

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 64:23


China's urban landscapes are full of radically different architectural styles which memorialise different eras in the country's political past, from the remains of imperial palaces or city walls, to Republican-era shophouses, early-PRC medium-rise apartments, and soaring glass buildings of twenty-first-century vintage. But lodged – both temporally and physically – between these latter two are constructions from a time that is only now beginning to receive more attention, namely the early reform period of the 1970s-90s. This is exactly the timespan covered in Cole Roskam's excellent new book Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992 (Yale UP, 2021) which shows that architecture had a key place in the emerging political, social and cultural developments of China's pivotal post-Mao years. Examining stylistic, institutional, sociological and aesthetic aspects to Chinese architecture and its cross-border entanglements, this is a book which – as we transition deeper into Xi Jinping's ‘new era' – has much to say about an intriguing and occluded period of recent history which is not just Chinese but truly global. Ed Pulford is an Anthropologist and Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/architecture

New Books in Art
Cole Roskam, "Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992" (Yale UP, 2021)

New Books in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 64:23


China's urban landscapes are full of radically different architectural styles which memorialise different eras in the country's political past, from the remains of imperial palaces or city walls, to Republican-era shophouses, early-PRC medium-rise apartments, and soaring glass buildings of twenty-first-century vintage. But lodged – both temporally and physically – between these latter two are constructions from a time that is only now beginning to receive more attention, namely the early reform period of the 1970s-90s. This is exactly the timespan covered in Cole Roskam's excellent new book Designing Reform: Architecture in the People's Republic of China, 1970-1992 (Yale UP, 2021) which shows that architecture had a key place in the emerging political, social and cultural developments of China's pivotal post-Mao years. Examining stylistic, institutional, sociological and aesthetic aspects to Chinese architecture and its cross-border entanglements, this is a book which – as we transition deeper into Xi Jinping's ‘new era' – has much to say about an intriguing and occluded period of recent history which is not just Chinese but truly global. Ed Pulford is an Anthropologist and Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/art

People's History of Ideas Podcast
The August Defeat (Part 1)

People's History of Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 21:54


The 29th Regiment goes against Mao's orders and decides to stay in Hunan, with disastrous results for the Communists.Further reading:Stephen Averill, Revolution in the Highlands: China's Jinggangshan Base AreaAgnes Smedley, The Great Road: The Life and Times of Chu Teh [Zhu De]Jurgen Domes, Peng Te-huai: The Man and the ImageStuart Schram, ed., Mao's Road to Power, vol. 3: From the Jinggangshan to the Establishment of the Jiangxi Soviets, July 1927-December 1930Pang Xianzhi and Jin Chongji, Mao Zedong: A Biography, vol. 1: 1893-1949Some names from this episode:Wang Zuo, Bandit leader who joined with Mao ZedongYuan Wencai, Bandit leader who joined with Mao ZedongHu Shaohai, Commander of the 29th regiment of the 4th Red ArmyDu Xiujing, Inspector sent to the Jinggangshan by the Hunan Provincial Committee in May 1928 and who returned in JuneFan Shisheng, Guomindang general and old friend of Zhu DeYuan Chongquan, 28th Regiment battalion commander who mutiniedYuan Desheng, Representative of the Hunan Provincial CommitteePeng Dehuai, Guomindang colonel who was secretly a Communist and who launched an uprising in July 1928Support the show

Real Leaders Podcast
Ep. 255 Eastern vs. Western Business Philosophy and What We Can Learn || Chris Marquis, Sinyi Professor of Chinese Management at the University of Cambridge - Judge School of Business

Real Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 43:23


Chris Marquis is the Sinyi Professor of Chinese Management at the University of Cambridge - Judge School of Business, Author of Better Business: How the B Corp Movement is Remaking Capitalism, and his new book titled Mao and Markets: The Communist Roots of Chinese Enterprise. In this episode, Chris shares the culture of the Chinese Business people, comparison's to the modern day B Corp Movement, and what leaders can learn from different cultural philosophies. If you found this episode helpful, please leave a review!

ChinaTalk
Elite Power Struggles in the CCP and USSR

ChinaTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 80:55


I HAVE A NEWSLETTER! Check it out! Joseph Torigian's “Prestige, Manipulation and Coercion, Elite Power Struggles in The Soviet Union and China After Stalin and Mao” is in pole position for my best China book of 2022. Books that deeply engage with both Soviet and CCP primary sources around elite politics basically never come out nowadays. I for one am deeply grateful that Joe, one of the few folks on the planet with the training, language skills, and motivation to this sort of work, was able to produce this book. Joe puts forward convincing revisionist interpretations of Khrushchev's triumph after Stalin's death, had me reconsider my conception of the Gang of 4 after Mao's death, and made me feel for Hua Guofeng getting done dirty by Deng. His new model of how power transitions really work in authoritarian countries with weak institutions left me more scared than hopeful for whatever happens once Xi exits stage left. Cohosting with me is Lizzi, a video journalist at Wall Street TV, a New York-based independent Chinese language media outlet focusing on Chinese politics and economics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

ChinaEconTalk
Elite Power Struggles in the CCP and USSR

ChinaEconTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 80:55


I HAVE A NEWSLETTER! Check it out! Joseph Torigian's “Prestige, Manipulation and Coercion, Elite Power Struggles in The Soviet Union and China After Stalin and Mao” is in pole position for my best China book of 2022. Books that deeply engage with both Soviet and CCP primary sources around elite politics basically never come out nowadays. I for one am deeply grateful that Joe, one of the few folks on the planet with the training, language skills, and motivation to this sort of work, was able to produce this book. Joe puts forward convincing revisionist interpretations of Khrushchev's triumph after Stalin's death, had me reconsider my conception of the Gang of 4 after Mao's death, and made me feel for Hua Guofeng getting done dirty by Deng. His new model of how power transitions really work in authoritarian countries with weak institutions left me more scared than hopeful for whatever happens once Xi exits stage left. Cohosting with me is Lizzi, a video journalist at Wall Street TV, a New York-based independent Chinese language media outlet focusing on Chinese politics and economics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

How To Academy
Daniel Pick - a New History of Thought Control

How To Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 39:55


In 1953, a group of prisoners of war who had fought against the communist invasion of South Korea were released. They chose - apparently freely - to move to Mao's China. Among those refusing repatriation were twenty-one American GIs. Their decision sparked alarm in the West: why didn't they want to come home? What was going on? Soon, people were saying that the POWs' had been 'brainwashed'. Was this something new or a phenomenon that has been around for centuries? Today, brainwashing is almost taken for granted - built into our psychological and political language, rooted in the way we think about minds and societies. Historian of science Daniel Pick joins the podcast to reveal how we got to this point, and why. Find out more about the Hidden Persuaders research group at Birkbeck here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Chris Plante Show
7-19 Hour 1 - Heat Apocalypse in Europe

The Chris Plante Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 38:13


In hour 1, Chris talks about the heat in Europe, which the news is calling an apocalypse, and how it ties to Climate Change and Mao.  Also an arrest is made in the MD church burnings. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you download the WMAL app, visit WMAL.com or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 9:00am-12:00pm Monday-Friday. To join the conversation, check us out on twitter @WMAL and @ChrisPlanteShow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bob Harden Show
Chinese Philosophical Heritage at Odds with the CCP

The Bob Harden Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 60:20


Thank you so much for listening to the Bob Harden Show. On Monday's show, we discuss current world events including Biden's visit to the Middle East and developments in Iran, Ukraine, Italy and China with Marc Schulman, Founder and Publisher of HistoryCentral.com. We visit with President Emeritus of the Foundation for Economic Education, Larry Reed, about China's great philosophers, who would be horrified by Mao and the Communist Chinese party. We also visit with author Jim McTague about Democrat infighting and lack of compelling messaging. We have great guests lined up for Tuesday's show including our State Senator Kathleen Passidomo, the Founder and President of Less Government Seton Motley, author of “Greetings from Paradise,” Linda Harden, and entertaining local guest commentator, Boo Mortenson. Please access this or any past show show at your convenience on my web site, social media platforms or podcast platforms.

Le Nouvel Esprit Public
Thématique : Dans la tête de Xi Jinping, avec François Bougon / n°254 / 17 juillet 2022

Le Nouvel Esprit Public

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 57:32


Connaissez-vous notre site ? www.lenouvelespritpublic.frUne émission de Philippe Meyer, enregistrée au studio l'Arrière-boutique le 29 avril 2022.Avec cette semaine :François Bougon, journaliste spécialiste de la Chine, auteur de Dans la tête de Xi Jinping.Nicolas Baverez, essayiste et avocat.Lucile Schmid, membre du comité de rédaction de la revue Esprit. François Bougon, vous êtes journaliste et spécialiste de la Chine, vous avez été correspondant de l'AFP à Pékin entre 2005 et 2010 et vous êtes désormais responsable du service international de Mediapart. Vous avez publié en 2017 Dans la tête de Xi Jinping, aux éditions Solin et Actes Sud. Dans ce livre, vous ambitionnez de dresser un panorama des influences intellectuelles du président chinois et vous expliquez l'idéologie et la vision de l'histoire sur lesquelles s'appuie celui qui est devenu secrétaire général du Parti Communiste Chinois (PCC) en 2012 puis président de la République populaire de Chine en 2013.Xi Jinping a des sources d'inspiration variées qui englobent l'ensemble de la tradition chinoise. Il ne rejette pas l'héritage maoïste en dépit du rapport ambivalent de sa famille avec le Grand Timonier et sa politique. Le père de Xi Jinping a combattu aux côtés de Mao avant d'être exclu du Parti en 1962, et Xi Jinping lui-même a fait partie des cohortes de « jeunes instruits » envoyés à la campagne pendant la Révolution culturelle pour y être rééduqué par les paysans. Vous expliquez, François Bougon, que le président chinois n'en a pas moins conscience du rôle fondateur de Mao dans l'histoire de la République populaire de Chine et qu'il estime que toute critique à l'égard du Grand Timonier risque d'affaiblir le régime.Le président chinois se distingue de ses prédécesseurs en accordant une place importante dans sa pensée à l'histoire longue de la Chine. Là où les dirigeants communistes insistaient sur la rupture qu'a représentée la révolution de 1949, Xi Jinping exalte une civilisation chinoise millénaire. Cela se traduit dans les références mobilisées par le régime : les Entretiens de Confucius ont supplanté le Petit livre rougeet Xi Jinping convoque volontiers des écoles de pensée des IVe et IIIe siècles avant notre ère, comme le taoïsme et le légisme.Pour asseoir le pouvoir du Parti communiste, son secrétaire général promeut un « rêve chinois » qui, contrairement au rêve américain, repose sur plus de 2000 ans d'histoire. Il réconcilie ainsi ce que vous appelez le roman national maoïste avec l'histoire impériale de la Chine. Cette lecture de l'histoire est strictement encadrée contre les tenants de ce que Xi Jinping appelle le « nihilisme historique ».Ce récit qui insiste sur le particularisme chinois permet aussi à Xi Jinping de marquer l'opposition de la Chine à l'Occident : il répudie la « démocratie constitutionnelle occidentale », les « valeurs universelles », la « société civile », le « néolibéralisme » ou encore le « journalisme à l'occidentale » et parle désormais de « solution chinoise » face aux défis de la globalisation et aux défauts du système démocratique.Votre livre, paru en 2017, se concluait par une interrogation sur l'émergence d'un éventuel « Xi-isme », soit une pensée propre de Xi Jinping qui donnerait une nouvelle orientation au régime. Depuis, Xi Jinping, comme tous ses prédécesseurs, a inscrit sa pensée « sur le socialisme à la chinoise de la nouvelle ère » dans la charte du Parti. Pour introduire notre conversation je voudrais donc vous demander, François Bougon, quelle réponse vous apporteriez aujourd'hui à cette question de l'émergence d'une pensée propre de Xi Jinping.Vous pouvez consulter notre politique de confidentialité sur https://art19.com/privacy ainsi que la notice de confidentialité de la Californie sur https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

People's History of Ideas Podcast
The Yongxin Joint Conference and Mao's July 4, 1928 Report to the Hunan Provincial Committee

People's History of Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 27:30


Mao explains his refusal to comply with orders from the Hunan Provincial Committee.Further reading:Stephen Averill, Revolution in the Highlands: China's Jinggangshan Base AreaStuart Schram, ed., Mao's Road to Power, vol. 3: From the Jinggangshan to the Establishment of the Jiangxi Soviets, July 1927-December 1930Pang Xianzhi and Jin Chongji, Mao Zedong: A Biography, vol. 1: 1893-1949Some names from this episode:Du Xiujing, Inspector sent to the Jinggangshan by the Hunan Provincial Committee in May 1928 and who returned in JuneYuan Desheng, Representative of the Hunan Provincial Committee in the JinggangshanYang Chisheng, Guomindang commander defeated by the Communists in June 1928Wang Zuo, Bandit leader who joined with Mao ZedongYuan Wencai, Bandit leader who joined with Mao ZedongWang Jun, Guomindang military commander in JiangxiShang Chengjie, Guomindang military commander in HunanXu Kexiang, Guomindang military commander in HunanWu Shang, Guomindang military commander in HunanSupport the show

New Books in Political Science
Vivian Jing Zhan, "China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 47:19


Contrary to intuition, many countries have found that having abundant natural resources such as petroleum or diamonds may be a curse as much as a blessing. Broad-based economic development may be stunted as resource extraction dominates the economy, and politics may be corrupted as different interest groups focus on controlling and redistributing resource rents instead of on governing well. In the worst cases, the fight for control over this wealth breaks into armed conflict. China is not usually considered in this light, since at the national level it has become a manufacturing powerhouse with natural resources only playing a minor economics role. However, the picture is different at the local level.  China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations (Cambridge UP, 2022), by Jing Vivian Zhan, explores how mineral booms have affected business, the state, and ordinary people in China's mineral-rich regions. Her book combines econometric analysis with an in-depth understanding developed over ten years of fieldwork and interviewing with key players. Zhan finds that many of the classic resource-curse pathologies occur at the local level in China. Businesspeople collude with or pressure the government to gain mining rights and avoid close inspection of labor standards. Local people see little benefit from the economic development as few jobs are created and other forms of development are largely crowded out. If they benefit from any revenue windfalls it is in the form of short-term government handouts aimed to keep the peace, rather than long-term investments in healthcare, education, and other social services. Meanwhile, the central government in Beijing is only slowly putting together a national regulatory framework that might enable a more sustainable and equitable development path, and has limited capacity to ensure that its policies are carried out at the local level. Vivian Zhan is an Associate Professor of the Department of Government and Public Administration at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She received her BA in English and International Studies from Foreign Affairs College of China, and her PhD in political science from University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests span comparative political economy, contemporary Chinese politics, and research methodology, with a focus on post-Mao reforms, intergovernmental relations and local governance. She is also interested in informal institutions and their impact on political and economic behaviours. Host Peter Lorentzen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of San Francisco, where he leads a new Master's program in Applied Economics focused on the digital economy. His own research focus is the political economy of governance in China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Public Policy
Vivian Jing Zhan, "China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Public Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 47:19


Contrary to intuition, many countries have found that having abundant natural resources such as petroleum or diamonds may be a curse as much as a blessing. Broad-based economic development may be stunted as resource extraction dominates the economy, and politics may be corrupted as different interest groups focus on controlling and redistributing resource rents instead of on governing well. In the worst cases, the fight for control over this wealth breaks into armed conflict. China is not usually considered in this light, since at the national level it has become a manufacturing powerhouse with natural resources only playing a minor economics role. However, the picture is different at the local level.  China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations (Cambridge UP, 2022), by Jing Vivian Zhan, explores how mineral booms have affected business, the state, and ordinary people in China's mineral-rich regions. Her book combines econometric analysis with an in-depth understanding developed over ten years of fieldwork and interviewing with key players. Zhan finds that many of the classic resource-curse pathologies occur at the local level in China. Businesspeople collude with or pressure the government to gain mining rights and avoid close inspection of labor standards. Local people see little benefit from the economic development as few jobs are created and other forms of development are largely crowded out. If they benefit from any revenue windfalls it is in the form of short-term government handouts aimed to keep the peace, rather than long-term investments in healthcare, education, and other social services. Meanwhile, the central government in Beijing is only slowly putting together a national regulatory framework that might enable a more sustainable and equitable development path, and has limited capacity to ensure that its policies are carried out at the local level. Vivian Zhan is an Associate Professor of the Department of Government and Public Administration at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She received her BA in English and International Studies from Foreign Affairs College of China, and her PhD in political science from University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests span comparative political economy, contemporary Chinese politics, and research methodology, with a focus on post-Mao reforms, intergovernmental relations and local governance. She is also interested in informal institutions and their impact on political and economic behaviours. Host Peter Lorentzen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of San Francisco, where he leads a new Master's program in Applied Economics focused on the digital economy. His own research focus is the political economy of governance in China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/public-policy

New Books Network
Vivian Jing Zhan, "China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 47:19


Contrary to intuition, many countries have found that having abundant natural resources such as petroleum or diamonds may be a curse as much as a blessing. Broad-based economic development may be stunted as resource extraction dominates the economy, and politics may be corrupted as different interest groups focus on controlling and redistributing resource rents instead of on governing well. In the worst cases, the fight for control over this wealth breaks into armed conflict. China is not usually considered in this light, since at the national level it has become a manufacturing powerhouse with natural resources only playing a minor economics role. However, the picture is different at the local level.  China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations (Cambridge UP, 2022), by Jing Vivian Zhan, explores how mineral booms have affected business, the state, and ordinary people in China's mineral-rich regions. Her book combines econometric analysis with an in-depth understanding developed over ten years of fieldwork and interviewing with key players. Zhan finds that many of the classic resource-curse pathologies occur at the local level in China. Businesspeople collude with or pressure the government to gain mining rights and avoid close inspection of labor standards. Local people see little benefit from the economic development as few jobs are created and other forms of development are largely crowded out. If they benefit from any revenue windfalls it is in the form of short-term government handouts aimed to keep the peace, rather than long-term investments in healthcare, education, and other social services. Meanwhile, the central government in Beijing is only slowly putting together a national regulatory framework that might enable a more sustainable and equitable development path, and has limited capacity to ensure that its policies are carried out at the local level. Vivian Zhan is an Associate Professor of the Department of Government and Public Administration at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She received her BA in English and International Studies from Foreign Affairs College of China, and her PhD in political science from University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests span comparative political economy, contemporary Chinese politics, and research methodology, with a focus on post-Mao reforms, intergovernmental relations and local governance. She is also interested in informal institutions and their impact on political and economic behaviours. Host Peter Lorentzen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of San Francisco, where he leads a new Master's program in Applied Economics focused on the digital economy. His own research focus is the political economy of governance in China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Chinese Studies
Vivian Jing Zhan, "China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 47:19


Contrary to intuition, many countries have found that having abundant natural resources such as petroleum or diamonds may be a curse as much as a blessing. Broad-based economic development may be stunted as resource extraction dominates the economy, and politics may be corrupted as different interest groups focus on controlling and redistributing resource rents instead of on governing well. In the worst cases, the fight for control over this wealth breaks into armed conflict. China is not usually considered in this light, since at the national level it has become a manufacturing powerhouse with natural resources only playing a minor economics role. However, the picture is different at the local level.  China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations (Cambridge UP, 2022), by Jing Vivian Zhan, explores how mineral booms have affected business, the state, and ordinary people in China's mineral-rich regions. Her book combines econometric analysis with an in-depth understanding developed over ten years of fieldwork and interviewing with key players. Zhan finds that many of the classic resource-curse pathologies occur at the local level in China. Businesspeople collude with or pressure the government to gain mining rights and avoid close inspection of labor standards. Local people see little benefit from the economic development as few jobs are created and other forms of development are largely crowded out. If they benefit from any revenue windfalls it is in the form of short-term government handouts aimed to keep the peace, rather than long-term investments in healthcare, education, and other social services. Meanwhile, the central government in Beijing is only slowly putting together a national regulatory framework that might enable a more sustainable and equitable development path, and has limited capacity to ensure that its policies are carried out at the local level. Vivian Zhan is an Associate Professor of the Department of Government and Public Administration at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She received her BA in English and International Studies from Foreign Affairs College of China, and her PhD in political science from University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests span comparative political economy, contemporary Chinese politics, and research methodology, with a focus on post-Mao reforms, intergovernmental relations and local governance. She is also interested in informal institutions and their impact on political and economic behaviours. Host Peter Lorentzen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of San Francisco, where he leads a new Master's program in Applied Economics focused on the digital economy. His own research focus is the political economy of governance in China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

New Books in East Asian Studies
Vivian Jing Zhan, "China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 47:19


Contrary to intuition, many countries have found that having abundant natural resources such as petroleum or diamonds may be a curse as much as a blessing. Broad-based economic development may be stunted as resource extraction dominates the economy, and politics may be corrupted as different interest groups focus on controlling and redistributing resource rents instead of on governing well. In the worst cases, the fight for control over this wealth breaks into armed conflict. China is not usually considered in this light, since at the national level it has become a manufacturing powerhouse with natural resources only playing a minor economics role. However, the picture is different at the local level.  China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations (Cambridge UP, 2022), by Jing Vivian Zhan, explores how mineral booms have affected business, the state, and ordinary people in China's mineral-rich regions. Her book combines econometric analysis with an in-depth understanding developed over ten years of fieldwork and interviewing with key players. Zhan finds that many of the classic resource-curse pathologies occur at the local level in China. Businesspeople collude with or pressure the government to gain mining rights and avoid close inspection of labor standards. Local people see little benefit from the economic development as few jobs are created and other forms of development are largely crowded out. If they benefit from any revenue windfalls it is in the form of short-term government handouts aimed to keep the peace, rather than long-term investments in healthcare, education, and other social services. Meanwhile, the central government in Beijing is only slowly putting together a national regulatory framework that might enable a more sustainable and equitable development path, and has limited capacity to ensure that its policies are carried out at the local level. Vivian Zhan is an Associate Professor of the Department of Government and Public Administration at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She received her BA in English and International Studies from Foreign Affairs College of China, and her PhD in political science from University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests span comparative political economy, contemporary Chinese politics, and research methodology, with a focus on post-Mao reforms, intergovernmental relations and local governance. She is also interested in informal institutions and their impact on political and economic behaviours. Host Peter Lorentzen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of San Francisco, where he leads a new Master's program in Applied Economics focused on the digital economy. His own research focus is the political economy of governance in China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in Economics
Vivian Jing Zhan, "China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Economics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 47:19


Contrary to intuition, many countries have found that having abundant natural resources such as petroleum or diamonds may be a curse as much as a blessing. Broad-based economic development may be stunted as resource extraction dominates the economy, and politics may be corrupted as different interest groups focus on controlling and redistributing resource rents instead of on governing well. In the worst cases, the fight for control over this wealth breaks into armed conflict. China is not usually considered in this light, since at the national level it has become a manufacturing powerhouse with natural resources only playing a minor economics role. However, the picture is different at the local level.  China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations (Cambridge UP, 2022), by Jing Vivian Zhan, explores how mineral booms have affected business, the state, and ordinary people in China's mineral-rich regions. Her book combines econometric analysis with an in-depth understanding developed over ten years of fieldwork and interviewing with key players. Zhan finds that many of the classic resource-curse pathologies occur at the local level in China. Businesspeople collude with or pressure the government to gain mining rights and avoid close inspection of labor standards. Local people see little benefit from the economic development as few jobs are created and other forms of development are largely crowded out. If they benefit from any revenue windfalls it is in the form of short-term government handouts aimed to keep the peace, rather than long-term investments in healthcare, education, and other social services. Meanwhile, the central government in Beijing is only slowly putting together a national regulatory framework that might enable a more sustainable and equitable development path, and has limited capacity to ensure that its policies are carried out at the local level. Vivian Zhan is an Associate Professor of the Department of Government and Public Administration at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She received her BA in English and International Studies from Foreign Affairs College of China, and her PhD in political science from University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests span comparative political economy, contemporary Chinese politics, and research methodology, with a focus on post-Mao reforms, intergovernmental relations and local governance. She is also interested in informal institutions and their impact on political and economic behaviours. Host Peter Lorentzen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of San Francisco, where he leads a new Master's program in Applied Economics focused on the digital economy. His own research focus is the political economy of governance in China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/economics

EMPIRE LIFESTYLE
I QUIT! The Profitable Exit | Wholesale Real Estate

EMPIRE LIFESTYLE

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 8:20


OTA2022.1-I QUIT! The Profitable Exit | Wholesale Real Estate I QUIT! The Profitable Exit | Wholesale Real Estate   This is OLA coming to you live from myEmpirePRO studios and we are back to the basics of wholesale real estate.   Isn't it?   --> READ THE BLOG POST HERE https://myempirepro.com/blog/quitprofitable-exit-wholesale-real-estate/ --> WATCH VIDEO VERSION HERE https://youtu.be/Wd0keEKYFoU   Listen… it was a much needed spike and hype… but may be more so natural.    I've seen this happen quite a few times since I launched my career as an entrepreneur with wholesaling and short-saling real estate back in 2005.   The ups and the downs… both big and small… in fact, my first successful business was wiped out completely with the 2008 recession.  So, I've seen this a few times since then but we are still standing.   As you know I teach smart real estate wholesaling here with the most affordable training and coaching platform.  A big part of the idea behind that is to be able to thrive in any market.   Some of the most successful wholesalers in recent times are about to go broke because they were plugged in on non-evergreen “good times” types of systems.   What do I mean by “good times”?   You see every business type is cyclical in nature.  The same is true for all 5 stages of the wholesale real estate business model.   There are times when every aspect of it is super easy and there are times when it is super hard…. but also every in-between possibilities.   What is Wholesale Real Estate?   Wholesale real estate is the art and science of finding a deeply discounted property leveraging digital age marketing skills, locking the property up in a purchase contract…    …and finally selling the equitable rights to purchase the property to an end buyer investor who will typically fix up and resell.   You can make any where from $0 to $82,000 net profit per deal based on my personal experience. I've averaged between $15,000 and $30,000 per deal in my experience.   Here are the 5 stages of the wholesale real estate business model.   STAGE 1 - Data   For obvious reasons, this is the most important stage of all five.  I personally use the tool at www.EmpireBIGData.com for this.   STAGE 2 - Contact   This is the state where you set up marketing campaigns to contact or attract motivated sellers to initiate contact with you.  You can use the same tool.   STAGE 3 - Lead   Once a contact is initiated with an able and willing motivated seller, it is now in a lead stage.   STAGE 4 - Contract   After successful negotiations, a contract is drawn up and executed with agreed terms between you as a buyer and the seller.  The contract creates equitable rights for you.  There are specific strategies to make the equitable rights transferable for a fee.   STAGE 5 - Deal   At the final stage, a profitable exit is facilitated when you sell the equitable rights to purchase the property to an end buyer investor.   This is where I quit or EXIT the deal and walk away with $15,000 - $30,000 just to repeat the whole process.   So in recent times, the business became so attractive that hedge funds started buying a tons of rights to these deals in bulk.   They were buying them as much as up to 90% of the property ARV.   What is ARV?   ARV is the after repair value of a piece of property. We simply pull up 6 months old or less comparable or comp recent sales within one mile radius proximity to the subject property and perform a weighted average.   That's tells us the ARV or after repair value of the subject property. Again, my favorite tool for this business, www.EmpireBIGData.com does this seamlessly in less than one minute.    Traditionally and more sustainably, our maximum allowable offer (MAO) for any property is 65% of the ARV.   As I was saying, the influx of the hedge fund buyers allowed many to be able to pay up to 90% of the ARV. Many wholesalers have made stupid insane amount of money damn near almost printing money until recently.   They would close a few deals and in less than one year, start selling courses in upwards of $45,000 for coaching and become overnight millionaires.   Well… the party is over. Back to basics and evergreen methods which I never stopped teaching.   Good times create weak business people and lucky you… I experienced my first recession in 2008 and I only share sustainable business models.   When you are plugged in on an evergreen system like our 11 days challenge, you can't go wrong because it's built to thrive during bad times and laugh at everyone else during good times because you can see where it's going.   If you are listening to this, there is a good chance you are already going through the 11 days challenge. If not, first of all download my book for free at www.smartrealestatewholesaling.com to understand the system.   Then you will get an invitation to join the 11 days challenge. You will not be spending $45,000 on coaching. God forbid! If you hurry, we have a promo for $1.   You heard me… One Dollar!   The only downside to getting started extremely affordably is that people who don't pay tend not to pay attention. I just want you to be aware of that massive risk.   So it's about to get interesting.  Many of the gurus are about to panic and go broke because the hedge funds are panicking right now and pulling out of deals.   Many regular consumers who overpaid for houses during the last upward trends are also about to end in an avalanche of pre-foreclosures in many counties around the United States.   Right now, you can position to capitalize on this massive opportunity. Traditional cash buyers are standing by ready to pay you handsomely for finding these deals.   All the big sharks who entered the business will tens of millions of dollars are disappearing overnight for breaking our traditional rules in wholesaling.   But humans still need shelter right?   Misfortunes still happen right? Sadly!   Pre-foreclosure list and departments are still being maintained at the county government house right?   The business is not going anywhere. Regulations may adjust and optimize to accommodate safe environment for consumers.     Real entrepreneurs know how to pivot accordingly. I have been doing exactly that for about 18 years now.   Let me teach you how to find me deals all from home… even if you do not leave in the United States and I will pay you $10,000 for finding me a United States deal all digitally.   Come on in and let's make money together.

New Books in Geography
Vivian Jing Zhan, "China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Geography

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 47:19


Contrary to intuition, many countries have found that having abundant natural resources such as petroleum or diamonds may be a curse as much as a blessing. Broad-based economic development may be stunted as resource extraction dominates the economy, and politics may be corrupted as different interest groups focus on controlling and redistributing resource rents instead of on governing well. In the worst cases, the fight for control over this wealth breaks into armed conflict. China is not usually considered in this light, since at the national level it has become a manufacturing powerhouse with natural resources only playing a minor economics role. However, the picture is different at the local level.  China's Contained Resource Curse: How Minerals Shape State Capital Labor Relations (Cambridge UP, 2022), by Jing Vivian Zhan, explores how mineral booms have affected business, the state, and ordinary people in China's mineral-rich regions. Her book combines econometric analysis with an in-depth understanding developed over ten years of fieldwork and interviewing with key players. Zhan finds that many of the classic resource-curse pathologies occur at the local level in China. Businesspeople collude with or pressure the government to gain mining rights and avoid close inspection of labor standards. Local people see little benefit from the economic development as few jobs are created and other forms of development are largely crowded out. If they benefit from any revenue windfalls it is in the form of short-term government handouts aimed to keep the peace, rather than long-term investments in healthcare, education, and other social services. Meanwhile, the central government in Beijing is only slowly putting together a national regulatory framework that might enable a more sustainable and equitable development path, and has limited capacity to ensure that its policies are carried out at the local level. Vivian Zhan is an Associate Professor of the Department of Government and Public Administration at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She received her BA in English and International Studies from Foreign Affairs College of China, and her PhD in political science from University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests span comparative political economy, contemporary Chinese politics, and research methodology, with a focus on post-Mao reforms, intergovernmental relations and local governance. She is also interested in informal institutions and their impact on political and economic behaviours. Host Peter Lorentzen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of San Francisco, where he leads a new Master's program in Applied Economics focused on the digital economy. His own research focus is the political economy of governance in China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography