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Chairman of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China

  • 997PODCASTS
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  • Nov 22, 2021LATEST
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Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn
Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn - November 21, 2021 - HR 3

Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 39:53


Man's Inhumanity to Man. What has happened to disappeared Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai? The world wants to know. Chinese dissident Ai Weiwei compares American politics today with that of Mao's Cultural Revolution: "In many ways you're already in the authoritarian state, but you just don't know it." We agree, as we go deeper on last week's analysis of America's Maoist Ruling Class. Ideological Cleansing. Political Correctness. Domestic Terrorism. Meanwhile, rumors that the incredibly unpopular VP Kamala Harris may soon be leaving. Biden says he intends to run again in 2024, but nobody believes him. Let's Go Brandon 2024. RINO Alert as weak Ronna McDaniel says Liz Cheney is still a Republican, even though Wyoming GOP disagrees. Notes from Churchill on why Socialists need a secret police. Right here in Colorado? Indispensable phraseology from the poet Robert Burns. Plus, family vignettes on quoting Shakespeare with a potato. With Listener Calls. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Explaining History (explaininghistory) (explaininghistory)
Richard Nixon and the beginning of the Watergate Scandal 1972-3

Explaining History (explaininghistory) (explaininghistory)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 28:24


When Richard Nixon won his second presidential term in 1972 defeating George McGovern in 1972, he was at the height of his popularity. The previous year he had captured the public mood when he addressed the nation's fears about the growing economic stagnation that America had begun to experience at the end ofthe 1960s. He had successfully negotiated with both Mao and Brezhnev earlier that year and offered many Americans the prospect of a withdrawal from Vietnam without humiliation. The break in at the Watergate hotel had not attracted many headlines by the time of the January 1973 inauguration, but within seventeen months, Nixon's presidency was over and he left the White House in disgrace.Explaining History Podcast listeners are eligible for a 10% discount on all history book orders from Story Tellers Bookshop (email Katie@storytellersinc.co.uk and quote Explaining History) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

SkyWatchTV Podcast
Five in Ten 11/19/21: The Friday Five - FDA Hides Vax Data

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 22:00


The FDA has asked a federal judge for 55 years to review the data it used to authorize Pfizer's COVID vaccine before releasing it to the public—data it considered for just 108 days before approving the jab. YouTube canceled SkyWatchTV! Please follow us on Rumble: www.rumble.com/skywatchtv 5) Xi elevated to the status of Mao in China; 4) FBI deployed against concerned parents; 3) Intimidation tactics threaten to derail justice in Rittenhouse trial; 2) Mainstream media recognizes demonic symbolism, influence at deadly Astroworld concert; 1) FBI, CDC investigate discovery of vials marked “smallpox” at lab near Philadelphia. Also: How you can get the limited edition Defender Family Bible!

New Books in Buddhist Studies
Nicole Willock, "Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Buddhist Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 70:11


What happened to the Buddhist scholars who stayed behind in Tibet and China after the Fourteenth Dalai Lama and thousands of Tibetans fled from the People's Liberation Army in 1959? In Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China (Columbia University Press 2021), Nicole Willock discovers through the stories and writings of the “Three Polymaths” (Tib. mkhas pa mi gsum) of socialist China that contrary to common assumptions, Tibetan Buddhist leaders active in the People's Republic of China were not mere political “collaborators.” Willocks reveals in the book that the three Buddhist polymaths, Tséten Zhabdrung (1910 – 1985), Mugé Samten (1914 – 1993), and Dungkar Rinpoché (1927 – 1997) alternately safeguarded, taught, adapted, celebrated, and discarded religious epistemes, practices, and institutions in a post-Cultural Revolution PRC. The title of the “Three Polymaths” is often used to refer to Mar Shakyamuni, Yo Géjung, and Tsang Rabsel, who according to Tibetan Buddhist historiography, preserved the Buddhist monastic lineage from the tyrannical king Langdarma (d. 842) one millennium ago. Willock points out that since the early 1980s, the title of the “Three Polymaths” has been passed on to the twentieth-century Buddhist scholars Tséten Zhabdrung, Mugé Samten, and Dungkar Rinpoché, who became not only heroes to many Tibetans in China but also cultural icons symbolizing both the survival and the continuance of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. In Lineages of the Literary, Willock explores the Three Polymaths' writings from a wide range of literary genres, including more traditional ones such as autobiographical life writing (Tib. byung ba brjod pa) and Buddhist poetry, as well as modern innovations such as encyclopedia entries (Tib. tshig mdzod) and academic essays (Tib. dpyad rtsom). Willock argues that the writings of the Three Polymaths highlight the way they adapt and disregard religious epistemes for the purposes of revitalizing Tibetan culture in their own fashion. Interestingly, the Three Polymaths' writings do not engage explicitly with the social-political contexts of their lives. What is revealed instead, Willock argues, is how these three Tibetan Buddhist leaders acted as moral agents who strategically deployed Buddhist epistemes to impart varying visions of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. Taking Saba Mahmood's idea of “moral agency,” Willock finds that “[T]he culturally specific disciplines and religious epistemes that [the Three Polymaths] accessed in their unique subject positions as male Géluk Buddhist elites allowed them, unlike many other leaders in post-Mao China, to cross state-imposed divides between secular and religious institutions that might otherwise have been impossible to bridge.” Daigengna Duoer is a Ph.D. student at the Religious Studies Department, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her dissertation is a digital humanities project mapping transnational and transregional Buddhist networks connecting twentieth-century Inner Mongolia, Manchuria, Republican China, Tibet, and the Japanese Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/buddhist-studies

New Books Network
Nicole Willock, "Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 70:11


What happened to the Buddhist scholars who stayed behind in Tibet and China after the Fourteenth Dalai Lama and thousands of Tibetans fled from the People's Liberation Army in 1959? In Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China (Columbia University Press 2021), Nicole Willock discovers through the stories and writings of the “Three Polymaths” (Tib. mkhas pa mi gsum) of socialist China that contrary to common assumptions, Tibetan Buddhist leaders active in the People's Republic of China were not mere political “collaborators.” Willocks reveals in the book that the three Buddhist polymaths, Tséten Zhabdrung (1910 – 1985), Mugé Samten (1914 – 1993), and Dungkar Rinpoché (1927 – 1997) alternately safeguarded, taught, adapted, celebrated, and discarded religious epistemes, practices, and institutions in a post-Cultural Revolution PRC. The title of the “Three Polymaths” is often used to refer to Mar Shakyamuni, Yo Géjung, and Tsang Rabsel, who according to Tibetan Buddhist historiography, preserved the Buddhist monastic lineage from the tyrannical king Langdarma (d. 842) one millennium ago. Willock points out that since the early 1980s, the title of the “Three Polymaths” has been passed on to the twentieth-century Buddhist scholars Tséten Zhabdrung, Mugé Samten, and Dungkar Rinpoché, who became not only heroes to many Tibetans in China but also cultural icons symbolizing both the survival and the continuance of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. In Lineages of the Literary, Willock explores the Three Polymaths' writings from a wide range of literary genres, including more traditional ones such as autobiographical life writing (Tib. byung ba brjod pa) and Buddhist poetry, as well as modern innovations such as encyclopedia entries (Tib. tshig mdzod) and academic essays (Tib. dpyad rtsom). Willock argues that the writings of the Three Polymaths highlight the way they adapt and disregard religious epistemes for the purposes of revitalizing Tibetan culture in their own fashion. Interestingly, the Three Polymaths' writings do not engage explicitly with the social-political contexts of their lives. What is revealed instead, Willock argues, is how these three Tibetan Buddhist leaders acted as moral agents who strategically deployed Buddhist epistemes to impart varying visions of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. Taking Saba Mahmood's idea of “moral agency,” Willock finds that “[T]he culturally specific disciplines and religious epistemes that [the Three Polymaths] accessed in their unique subject positions as male Géluk Buddhist elites allowed them, unlike many other leaders in post-Mao China, to cross state-imposed divides between secular and religious institutions that might otherwise have been impossible to bridge.” Daigengna Duoer is a Ph.D. student at the Religious Studies Department, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her dissertation is a digital humanities project mapping transnational and transregional Buddhist networks connecting twentieth-century Inner Mongolia, Manchuria, Republican China, Tibet, and the Japanese Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in East Asian Studies
Nicole Willock, "Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 70:11


What happened to the Buddhist scholars who stayed behind in Tibet and China after the Fourteenth Dalai Lama and thousands of Tibetans fled from the People's Liberation Army in 1959? In Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China (Columbia University Press 2021), Nicole Willock discovers through the stories and writings of the “Three Polymaths” (Tib. mkhas pa mi gsum) of socialist China that contrary to common assumptions, Tibetan Buddhist leaders active in the People's Republic of China were not mere political “collaborators.” Willocks reveals in the book that the three Buddhist polymaths, Tséten Zhabdrung (1910 – 1985), Mugé Samten (1914 – 1993), and Dungkar Rinpoché (1927 – 1997) alternately safeguarded, taught, adapted, celebrated, and discarded religious epistemes, practices, and institutions in a post-Cultural Revolution PRC. The title of the “Three Polymaths” is often used to refer to Mar Shakyamuni, Yo Géjung, and Tsang Rabsel, who according to Tibetan Buddhist historiography, preserved the Buddhist monastic lineage from the tyrannical king Langdarma (d. 842) one millennium ago. Willock points out that since the early 1980s, the title of the “Three Polymaths” has been passed on to the twentieth-century Buddhist scholars Tséten Zhabdrung, Mugé Samten, and Dungkar Rinpoché, who became not only heroes to many Tibetans in China but also cultural icons symbolizing both the survival and the continuance of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. In Lineages of the Literary, Willock explores the Three Polymaths' writings from a wide range of literary genres, including more traditional ones such as autobiographical life writing (Tib. byung ba brjod pa) and Buddhist poetry, as well as modern innovations such as encyclopedia entries (Tib. tshig mdzod) and academic essays (Tib. dpyad rtsom). Willock argues that the writings of the Three Polymaths highlight the way they adapt and disregard religious epistemes for the purposes of revitalizing Tibetan culture in their own fashion. Interestingly, the Three Polymaths' writings do not engage explicitly with the social-political contexts of their lives. What is revealed instead, Willock argues, is how these three Tibetan Buddhist leaders acted as moral agents who strategically deployed Buddhist epistemes to impart varying visions of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. Taking Saba Mahmood's idea of “moral agency,” Willock finds that “[T]he culturally specific disciplines and religious epistemes that [the Three Polymaths] accessed in their unique subject positions as male Géluk Buddhist elites allowed them, unlike many other leaders in post-Mao China, to cross state-imposed divides between secular and religious institutions that might otherwise have been impossible to bridge.” Daigengna Duoer is a Ph.D. student at the Religious Studies Department, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her dissertation is a digital humanities project mapping transnational and transregional Buddhist networks connecting twentieth-century Inner Mongolia, Manchuria, Republican China, Tibet, and the Japanese Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in History
Nicole Willock, "Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 70:11


What happened to the Buddhist scholars who stayed behind in Tibet and China after the Fourteenth Dalai Lama and thousands of Tibetans fled from the People's Liberation Army in 1959? In Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China (Columbia University Press 2021), Nicole Willock discovers through the stories and writings of the “Three Polymaths” (Tib. mkhas pa mi gsum) of socialist China that contrary to common assumptions, Tibetan Buddhist leaders active in the People's Republic of China were not mere political “collaborators.” Willocks reveals in the book that the three Buddhist polymaths, Tséten Zhabdrung (1910 – 1985), Mugé Samten (1914 – 1993), and Dungkar Rinpoché (1927 – 1997) alternately safeguarded, taught, adapted, celebrated, and discarded religious epistemes, practices, and institutions in a post-Cultural Revolution PRC. The title of the “Three Polymaths” is often used to refer to Mar Shakyamuni, Yo Géjung, and Tsang Rabsel, who according to Tibetan Buddhist historiography, preserved the Buddhist monastic lineage from the tyrannical king Langdarma (d. 842) one millennium ago. Willock points out that since the early 1980s, the title of the “Three Polymaths” has been passed on to the twentieth-century Buddhist scholars Tséten Zhabdrung, Mugé Samten, and Dungkar Rinpoché, who became not only heroes to many Tibetans in China but also cultural icons symbolizing both the survival and the continuance of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. In Lineages of the Literary, Willock explores the Three Polymaths' writings from a wide range of literary genres, including more traditional ones such as autobiographical life writing (Tib. byung ba brjod pa) and Buddhist poetry, as well as modern innovations such as encyclopedia entries (Tib. tshig mdzod) and academic essays (Tib. dpyad rtsom). Willock argues that the writings of the Three Polymaths highlight the way they adapt and disregard religious epistemes for the purposes of revitalizing Tibetan culture in their own fashion. Interestingly, the Three Polymaths' writings do not engage explicitly with the social-political contexts of their lives. What is revealed instead, Willock argues, is how these three Tibetan Buddhist leaders acted as moral agents who strategically deployed Buddhist epistemes to impart varying visions of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. Taking Saba Mahmood's idea of “moral agency,” Willock finds that “[T]he culturally specific disciplines and religious epistemes that [the Three Polymaths] accessed in their unique subject positions as male Géluk Buddhist elites allowed them, unlike many other leaders in post-Mao China, to cross state-imposed divides between secular and religious institutions that might otherwise have been impossible to bridge.” Daigengna Duoer is a Ph.D. student at the Religious Studies Department, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her dissertation is a digital humanities project mapping transnational and transregional Buddhist networks connecting twentieth-century Inner Mongolia, Manchuria, Republican China, Tibet, and the Japanese Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Intellectual History
Nicole Willock, "Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 70:11


What happened to the Buddhist scholars who stayed behind in Tibet and China after the Fourteenth Dalai Lama and thousands of Tibetans fled from the People's Liberation Army in 1959? In Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China (Columbia University Press 2021), Nicole Willock discovers through the stories and writings of the “Three Polymaths” (Tib. mkhas pa mi gsum) of socialist China that contrary to common assumptions, Tibetan Buddhist leaders active in the People's Republic of China were not mere political “collaborators.” Willocks reveals in the book that the three Buddhist polymaths, Tséten Zhabdrung (1910 – 1985), Mugé Samten (1914 – 1993), and Dungkar Rinpoché (1927 – 1997) alternately safeguarded, taught, adapted, celebrated, and discarded religious epistemes, practices, and institutions in a post-Cultural Revolution PRC. The title of the “Three Polymaths” is often used to refer to Mar Shakyamuni, Yo Géjung, and Tsang Rabsel, who according to Tibetan Buddhist historiography, preserved the Buddhist monastic lineage from the tyrannical king Langdarma (d. 842) one millennium ago. Willock points out that since the early 1980s, the title of the “Three Polymaths” has been passed on to the twentieth-century Buddhist scholars Tséten Zhabdrung, Mugé Samten, and Dungkar Rinpoché, who became not only heroes to many Tibetans in China but also cultural icons symbolizing both the survival and the continuance of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. In Lineages of the Literary, Willock explores the Three Polymaths' writings from a wide range of literary genres, including more traditional ones such as autobiographical life writing (Tib. byung ba brjod pa) and Buddhist poetry, as well as modern innovations such as encyclopedia entries (Tib. tshig mdzod) and academic essays (Tib. dpyad rtsom). Willock argues that the writings of the Three Polymaths highlight the way they adapt and disregard religious epistemes for the purposes of revitalizing Tibetan culture in their own fashion. Interestingly, the Three Polymaths' writings do not engage explicitly with the social-political contexts of their lives. What is revealed instead, Willock argues, is how these three Tibetan Buddhist leaders acted as moral agents who strategically deployed Buddhist epistemes to impart varying visions of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. Taking Saba Mahmood's idea of “moral agency,” Willock finds that “[T]he culturally specific disciplines and religious epistemes that [the Three Polymaths] accessed in their unique subject positions as male Géluk Buddhist elites allowed them, unlike many other leaders in post-Mao China, to cross state-imposed divides between secular and religious institutions that might otherwise have been impossible to bridge.” Daigengna Duoer is a Ph.D. student at the Religious Studies Department, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her dissertation is a digital humanities project mapping transnational and transregional Buddhist networks connecting twentieth-century Inner Mongolia, Manchuria, Republican China, Tibet, and the Japanese Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1806: Xi transformed into greater than Mao and Deng. Charles Burton, MacDonald Laurier Institute. @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 10:05


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Xi transformed into greater than Mao and Deng.  Charles Burton, MacDonald Laurier Institute. @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill https://www.cnn.com/2021/11/12/china/xi-jinping-sixth-plenum-biden-mic-intl-hnk/index.html

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist
*第五季*【EP. 253】#654 經濟學人導讀 feat. 國際時事 feat. 新聞評論【全球首富馬斯克撒幣?;美國歡迎 (打過疫苗的) 你/妳;伊拉克不平靜;中國共產黨六中全會 > 捧 LP?】

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 36:38


❗⁠您的一杯咖啡錢 = 我們遠大的目標!捐款支持我們:https://pse.is/3jknpx

Palladium Podcast
Palladium Podcast 66: Geremie Barmé on the Lessons of Chinese Upheaval

Palladium Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 65:10


Geremie Barmé joins Ash Milton to discuss his decades of experience in China and what previous upheavals in its leadership can teach us about the Xi era. Topics include his time studying alongside red guards at Chinese universities during the Cultural Revolution, Mao's return in modern Chinese ideology, and the real heritage of neo-Confucianism. Geremie is an Australian sinologist and author. He currently edits China Heritage and is founder of The Wairarapa Academy for New Sinology.  The first half of the show is available to all our listeners. The full discussion is available to Palladium Members. Members also get to participate in the Palladium Community Salons, which the editorial podcasts are often based on, as well as other benefits like the community chat. To become a Palladium Member, subscribe here.

The Munk Debates Podcast
Munk Members-Only Pod: Episode 45

The Munk Debates Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 23:30


This is a sample of the Munk Members-Only Podcast. The program provides listeners with a focused, half-hour masterclass on the big issues, events and trends driving news and current events. The show features Janice Gross Stein, the founding director of the Munk School of Global Affairs and bestselling author, in conversation with Rudyard Griffiths, Chair and moderator of the Munk Debates. This week's Munk Members podcast focuses on three stories in the news. First, Europe is facing a new border crisis orchestrated by the government of Belarus busing migrants to its borders with Poland and Lithuania. Russia is being blamed for fuelling the crisis as it conducts bomber sorties over Belarus in support of President Lukashenko. What are the origins of this crisis? Why is likely to happen next? And why is Russia seemingly so bent on destabilizing Europe? Second, President Xi's status as China's supreme leader was further burnished this week with the passage of a “historical resolution” praising his “decisive significance” in the rejuvenation of the Chinese nation. This has only happened three other times in the 100 years of the Chinese Communist Party with similar honours conferred on Mao and Deng. What does this mostly ritualistic event signify about Xi's leadership and the future direction of China at home and abroad? And finally, the US government reported the highest monthly inflation in more than thirty years this week. How is higher, sustained inflation likely to play out politically? Who are the political winners and losers in a high inflation world? To access the full length episode consider becoming a Munk Member. Membership is free. Simply log on to www.munkdebates.com/membership to register. Under your membership profile page you will find a link to listen to the full length editions of Munk Members Podcast. If you like what the Munk Debates is all about consider becoming a Supporting Member. For as little as $9.99 monthly you receive unlimited access to our 10+ year library of great debates in HD video, a free Munk Debates book, monthly newsletter, ticketing privileges at our live and online events and a charitable tax receipt (for Canadian residents). To explore you Munk Membership options visit www.munkdebates.com/membership. This podcast is a project of the Munk Debates, a Canadian charitable organization dedicated to fostering civil and substantive public dialogue. More information at www.munkdebates.com.

Blunt Force Truth
They Just Don't Care - an interview with Dr. Bonner Cohen

Blunt Force Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 69:30


Today's show rundown: The left says that America is back so much, that Americans are buying too much. But if you look at the sales figures, we have the same amount of consuming going on at this time last year. But the hallmarks of socialism is - a lack of goods and services, hyperinflation, and the loss of personal freedoms...sound anything like what we have going on here? All CNN can talk about is Trump, and how ineffective he was as a President, and STILL talking about the Insurrection. They aren't covering anything on what the Biden Administration I doing. Chuck talks a bit about how the Biden / Obama administration launched a non-military coup on President Trump. A man who came along, and was concerned about the American people. So what is it that the Left is all about, that they give each other awards every day...what do they actually are about. These people actually despise the American People. Kamala Harris is at a 20 percent approval rating / all time recorded record for being disliked. Her and Biden's approval ratings, in under a year are under 30 Percent. Why is this not being talked about? All we hear is "they aren't Trump". 9 out of 10 Scientists...funded by the government...agree with the government on climate change. Imagine that...people who benefit from agreeing with the government...agree with the government. We meet the show guest Bonner Cohen, who says we accomplished nothing during this Glasgow Climate Change Conference (COP26). The global elites have determined we are experience a "Climate Crisis" that is caused by us. Because it is said that man made emissions, are heat trapping, we are causing the Earth to warm, and that it will be dangerous for life, that we have a human induced climate crisis. The people setting this all up who stand to benefit from all these climate change policies strongly...are all for it. BIO – Bonner R. Cohen is a senior fellow at the National Center for Public Policy Research, where he concentrates on energy, natural resources, and international relations. He also serves as a senior policy adviser with the Heartland Institute, senior policy analyst with the Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow, and as adjunct scholar at the Competitive Enterprise Institute. Articles by Dr. Cohen have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Investor's Business Daily, New York Post, Washington Times, National Review, Philadelphia Inquirer, Detroit News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Miami Herald, and dozens of other newspapers in the U.S. and Canada. He has been interviewed on Fox News, CNN, Fox Business Channel, BBC, BBC Worldwide Television, NBC, NPR, N 24 (German language news channel), Voice of Russia, and scores of radio stations in the U.S. Dr. Cohen has testified before the U.S. Senate committees on Energy & Natural Resources and Environment & Public Works as well as the U.S. House committees on Natural Resources and Judiciary. He has spoken at conferences in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, and Bangladesh. Dr. Cohen is the author of two books, The Green Wave: Environmentalism and its Consequences (Washington: Capital Research Center, 2006) and Marshall, Mao und Chiang: Die amerikanischen Vermittlungsbemuehungen im chinesischen Buergerkrieg (Marshall, Mao and Chiang: The American Mediations Effort in the Chinese Civil War) (Munich: Tuduv Verlag, 1984). Dr. Cohen received his B.A. from the University of Georgia and his Ph.D. – summa cum laude – from the University of Munich. bcohen@nationalcenter.org

Dave Lukas, The Misfit Entrepreneur_Breakthrough Entrepreneurship
275: Lessons for Hannah - Knowing Your Rights

Dave Lukas, The Misfit Entrepreneur_Breakthrough Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 19:26


Hello Misfit Nation! Welcome to another edition of "Lessons for Hannah!" Many years ago, I introduced a new format that alongside our regular episodes called “Lessons for Hannah.” Hannah is my daughter and one of the main inspirations for the Misfit Entrepreneur. I wanted to have a place where she could go and learn from her daddy and his Misfit friends throughout her life….even after I am gone. If you haven't listened to the first episode of "Lessons for Hannah," I urge you to as it gives some more background and tells the amazing story of how Hannah came to be in our lives. Lessons for Hannah are short, very useful, and sometimes comical lessons, that I want to share with you and give to Hannah to help in your lives. Because I want Hannah to have these for her life, I'm going to speak as though I am talking directly to her. These episodes are a lot of fun and if you think there is a lesson that we should include in these episodes, please don't hesitate to send it over to us at support@misfitentrepreneur.com. We'd love to share it. This Weeks' Lesson for Hannah Hannah, Hannah, this lesson is a little more academic, but very important. I want to talk to you about your rights as a citizen of the United States. Most people will never read the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution Including the Bill of Rights during their life – or at least only read some of it. I believe that everyone should study these documents throughout their lives. I know, I know. They were written by people 200+ years ago, so how could they make sense today, right? Well, if you study history, especially that of the human species, you'd find that there are some things that don't really change about us over time. Things like craving power and control or dominating over others never really change. And neither do things like wanting the best for yourself and your family or striving to better your life. And don't forget the urge to be free. These tendencies and many more have been around since beginning of man. And through time they have suppressed or taken away by kings, tyrants, dictators, and warlords to name a few. The last century alone saw this in Hitler, Stalin, Mussolini, Mao, Polpot, and countless others and it goes on around the world today. The genius of the founders is that they knew the tendencies of mankind and they knew that needed to create a way to put a “check” on them so that future generations could truly have a chance to prosper and reach their full potential. That is what they did with the Declaration, Constitution and Bill of Rights. First and foremost, the Declaration of Independence may be the best “break up letter” of all time. It starts out by stating When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. Basically, this says that it is necessary for them to break up with England and to provide for themselves in the way God intended with the rights that are God given. But, out of respect they should state the reasons why they are breaking up. It then goes on to say what the founders believe should be evident to everyone and that is that “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to affect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly, all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.--Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world. The founders were saying that we have the right from God to life, liberty (freedom), and to pursue our happiness and that governments should secure these rights for the citizens to do so. But, when the government doesn't secure these rights and the becomes destructive or outright hostile to them, then the people have the ability to change or get rid of the government so as to put one in that does. But, they go on to say that this should not be done lightly and if possible, it is better to suffer through things than to go this route. And they end with stating that there comes a point where suffering can no longer be tolerated, and it is time to end the King's rule. They then go in the rest of the document to list all of the things the King has done to them to cause this happen. Now fast forward a decade or so and the colonies have won the war of Independence and have tried one way of governing that didn't work, so they have come together to create the United States and form a constitution for governing. The Constitution is an amazing document in that in just a short few pages, it lays out everything needed to govern our country. Contrast that with congress nowadays who passes most bills that are in the thousands of pages. The Constitution is the “check” on the tendencies of mankind that I mentioned before and may be the greatest one ever. But, even when they were done with it, the founders felt it didn't have everything it needed, so they came up with the first set of amendments to the constitution just to make sure. Remember, they had just fought for independence and were very wary of giving government any major power at all. They were smart. They created the first 10 Amendments which are as follows: Amendment I Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. This one, most have heard and allows for freedom of religion and the press as well as the t people peaceable assemble and petition the govern for changes based on the grievances they have with it. It does not mean burning down cities, looting and beating other people in the streets, or cancelling someone because you don't like what they say or stand for or aren't getting your way. Amendment II A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. This gives the right for people to own guns and be armed and states that it shall not infringed which means it shall not be tampered with any way. You'll notice this amendment is the only place that word is used. Another thing that is important to note that in all the instances where dictators took over and/or took control of society in the past century, they did everything they could to abolish the ability for the citizens to own guns in their countries. All of those dictators and tyrants I mentioned earlier did this on their way to slaughtering their citizens by the millions. It is another check on the tendency of mankind. Amendment III No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. This is an interesting one today because we don't put soldiers in homes, but there is debate on what is considered a soldier in today's world. If the government is watching you in your home through your internet searches or phones calls and is using the military to do so, aren't they essentially camped in your home? I think this debate will rage on. Amendment IV The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. This goes with the last one in that the government is not allowed to “Search” without probably cause with a warrant that defines what they are searching for and why. Again, there is major debate about the government's ability to search what you are doing through your devices and a host of other mediums without a warrant – especially under the Patriot Act. There are cases in court all the time around this. Amendment V No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation. This states that someone cannot be tried again for the same crime if found not guilty of it. Additionally, it states that you cannot be compelled to incriminate yourself. This what is happening when you hear someone say they won't answer and “plead the 5th.” It also states that any property taken by the government or law enforcement can only be done with giving just compensation. There are a lot of lawsuits that happen around that every year. Amendment VI In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence. This amendment states that you have a right to trial when accused of a crime and that shall be with an impartial court and jury as well as give you the right to confront those accusing you. This is critical to having a solid justice system. Amendment VII In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law. This just sets the value for going to court in common law cases and having a jury. Amendment VIII Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. This makes sure that the courts can't hold you by imposing a bail sum so high no one could pay it. It also doesn't allow excessive fines or cruel and unusual punishment. A lot of lawsuits are files around this on each year as well. Amendment IX The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. This is a big one as it states that the just because they aren't in the constitution, there are other rights that people have, and they are retained by them. Amendment X The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. The 10th amendment is very important in that it basically says that the powers not stated in the constitution to the Federal Government or prohibited from the states, are given to the states, effectively the people because they make up the states. In other words, the Federal Government can only have the powers in these documents and the states have the all the rest. That was the point of the US. To keep the Federal Government small and let the states govern themselves the way their people wanted to govern. The states were little laboratories of Democracy and Republicanism and if a state did something their citizens didn't like, they could change or move to another state doing the things they liked. It was never intended to have an overarching Federal Government in control of the states and in some ways instituted in some aspect or another of people's every day lives. Along the way, the US drifted from it and that is conversation for another day. But knowing your Declaration, Constitution, and Bill of Rights will help you clearly see where they are being violated and where you can help to get thing back on track as a citizen. The United States became the greatest country ever created because of these simple documents and principles and the more we understand them, even in our world today so many years later, the better our country will be and continue to be the greatest place for everyone on earth to come and pursue their happiness. Hannah, I hope you read these documents and reflect on them often as you go through life to uphold them and teach them to others. I love you, Daddy   Best Quote: The genius of the founders is that they knew the tendencies of mankind and they knew that needed to create a way to put a “check” on them so that future generations could truly have a chance to prosper and reach their full potential.   Misfit 3: Most people will never read the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution Including the Bill of Rights during their life – or at least only read some of it. I believe that everyone should study these documents throughout their lives. The Declaration of Independence may be the best “break up letter” of all time. Basically, this says that it is necessary for them to break up with England and to provide for themselves in the way God intended with the rights that are God given. But, out of respect they should state the reasons why they are breaking up. The United States became the greatest country ever created because of these simple documents and principles and the more we understand them, even in our world today so many years later, the better our country will be and continue to be the greatest place for everyone on earth to come and pursue their happiness.   HeyLaika Go to www.HeyLaika.com/misfit (lower case) to get 20% off! Five Minute Journal www.MisfitEntrepreneur.com/Journal

FT News Briefing
Big investors get tougher with companies over climate change

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 10:35


Read a transcript of this episode on FT.comhttps://www.ft.com/content/5656f24c-a8db-4626-bd6f-c2ab0aa4aa8cGeneral Electric plans to break into three separate companies after years of trying to respond to flaws in its business model exposed by the financial crisis, China's President Xi Jinping is paving the way for his unprecedented bid for a third term in power. Plus, the FT's investment correspondent, Attracta Mooney, explains why a growing number of asset managers are getting tougher on companies in their portfolios to address climate change. 30-day free trial of the Moral Money newsletter: http://www.ft.com/cop26podcastGE to split into healthcare, energy and aviation companies - with Andrew Edgecliff-Johnsonhttps://www.ft.com/content/fb73e702-e885-4c20-8857-ddd29dc623afXi lays groundwork for third term by adopting Mao and Deng's power play - with Tom Mitchell https://www.ft.com/content/71b165a6-052d-4d7d-9006-e2e757f40d98Stay or sell? The $110tn investment industry gets tougher on climate - with Attracta Mooney https://www.ft.com/content/ee08d61d-4c98-4398-9971-93036d67e91eThe FT News Briefing is produced by Fiona Symon and Marc Filippino. The show's editor is Jess Smith. Additional help by Peter Barber, Gavin Kallmann and Michael Bruning. The show's theme song is by Metaphor Music. The FT's global head of audio is Cheryl Brumley. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies
Pandemics and Politics in Mao's China, with Fang Xiaoping

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 61:22


Speaker: Fang Xiaoping, Assistant Professor of History, School of Humanities, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. During the 1961-1965 period, a cholera pandemic ravaged the southeastern coastal areas of Mao's China which was already suffering from lingering starvation, class struggles, political campaigns and geopolitical challenges of the Cold War. This lecture focuses on the first global pandemic that had plagued China after 1949 and the resulting large-scale but clandestine emergency response. Based on rare archival documents and in-depth interviews with the ever-dwindling witnesses of the pandemic, this lecture examines the dynamics between disease and politics when the Communist Party was committed to restructuring society between the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution. The speaker argues that disease and its control were not only affected by the social restructuring that began in the 1950s and strengthened since 1961, but also integral components of this. Quarantine, mass inoculation, epidemic surveillance and information control functionalised social control and political discipline, and therefore significantly contributed to the rise of an emergency disciplinary state, which exerted far-reaching impacts on its sociopolitical system and emergency response since Mao's China, including the COVID-19 pandemic. Xiaoping Fang is an assistant professor of history at the School of Humanities of the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He received his PhD in History from the National University of Singapore (NUS), where he majored in modern China and the history of science, technology and medicine in East Asia from 2002 to 2008. He studied and worked at the Needham Research Institute, Cambridge, UK (2005-2006), the Asia Research Institute of the NUS (2008), the China Research Centre of the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia (2009-2013), and the National Humanities Center, USA (2019-2020). His research interests focus on the history of medicine, health, and disease in twentieth-century China and the socio-political history of Mao's China after 1949. He is the author of Barefoot Doctors and Western Medicine in China (Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press, 2012) and China and the Cholera Pandemic: Restructuring Society under Mao (Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2021). The lecture is part of the Modern China lecture at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University, hosted by Professor Arunabh Ghosh.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1796: Xi declares Mao is the future. Charles Burton @cburton001, MacDonald Laurier Institute; and @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hil

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 12:10


Xi declares Mao is the future. Charles Burton @cburton001, MacDonald Laurier Institute; and @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill https://www.reuters.com/world/china/chinas-xinhua-lauds-xi-ahead-key-communist-party-meeting-2021-11-06/ Charles Burton @cburton001  Senior Fellow at the Centre for Advancing Canada's Interests Abroad at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute; associate professor of Political Science at Brock University.  Charles Burton and Associates consults to governments, educational institutions and businesses to support their programs in China.     

Wholesaling Out of the Box
Episode 118: Wholesaling to the Max (Allowable Offer)!

Wholesaling Out of the Box

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 43:52


Join us this week as Ashley, Shawn, and Cam talk about MAO. And no we aren't going over the pros and cons of the condiments, instead, we're looking at the formula for the Maximum Allowable Offer you can present to a seller! Throughout this episode we discuss what the formula is, why we use it, pros (with fake cons thrown in), and how bad Ashley is at math. This is one episode you shouldn't miss! Further Resources: State of the Region Report 2021: https://www.wholesalingoutofthebox.com/hopportunity/2021-state-of-the-region-report Repair Estimate Sheet: https://www.wholesalingoutofthebox.com/store/p11/Rehab_Estimate_Form.html Free MAO Calculator: https://www.wholesalingoutofthebox.com/store/p56/Maximum_Allowable_Offer_Calculator.html Information on the Sunk/Cost Fallacy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunk_cost Connect with us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wholesalingoutofthebox Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wholesalingoutofthebox Website: https://www.wholesalingoutofthebox.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wholesalingoutofthebox/message

Franck Ferrand raconte...
Kissinger en Chine

Franck Ferrand raconte...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 23:12


La figure omnisciente de Henry Kissinger a marqué la présidence Nixon. Jamais le conseiller ne brilla davantage que lors du rapprochement avec la Chine de Mao. Mention légales : Vos données de connexion, dont votre adresse IP, sont traités par Radio Classique, responsable de traitement, sur la base de son intérêt légitime, par l'intermédiaire de son sous-traitant Ausha, à des fins de réalisation de statistiques agréées et de lutte contre la fraude. Ces données sont supprimées en temps réel pour la finalité statistique et sous cinq mois à compter de la collecte à des fins de lutte contre la fraude. Pour plus d'informations sur les traitements réalisés par Radio Classique et exercer vos droits, consultez notre Politique de confidentialité.

FlatOut Brasil Podcast: notícias automotivas, car culture, automobilismo e mais!
O monstro chamado Corvette Z06, Gandini condena novo Countach, a volta da Placa Preta, o novo Range Rover... | FlatOut Podcast 62

FlatOut Brasil Podcast: notícias automotivas, car culture, automobilismo e mais!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 91:56


Barata, MAO e Leo Contesini se deliciam com as especificações reveladas do novo Corvette Z06 - o V8 aspirado mais potente do mundo é a Ferrari que a Ferrari deixou de fazer? O designer do Lamborghini Countach original descasca suas críticas ao novo Countach e não o reconhece como parte do legado - por que? Concordamos ou discordamos? E a volta da placa preta: entre bonita ou feia, o foco da placa não deveria estar em outra coisa mais importante aos antigomobilistas? E o que a equipe do FlatOut achou do novo Range Rover? Tudo isso e mais os clássicos desafio do ronco, rádio FlatOut e as matérias de destaque da semana!

American Conservative University
Mao‘s Cultural Revolution Here and Now. Also, Legally Compel Big Tech Transparency

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 61:31


Mao's Cultural Revolution Here and Now. Also, Legally Compel Big Tech Transparency Mao's Cultural Revolution: The First Thing They Did Was Indoctrinate the Teachers Kalev Leetaru: Update Section 230 to Legally Compel Big Tech Transparency   Mao's Cultural Revolution: The First Thing They Did Was Indoctrinate the Teachers | CLIP https://youtu.be/NOVRhU3XlkQ American Thought Leaders - The Epoch Times 352K subscribers

American Conservative University
Mao‘s Cultural Revolution Here and Now. Also, Legally Compel Big Tech Transparency

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 61:31


Mao's Cultural Revolution Here and Now. Also, Legally Compel Big Tech Transparency Mao's Cultural Revolution: The First Thing They Did Was Indoctrinate the Teachers Kalev Leetaru: Update Section 230 to Legally Compel Big Tech Transparency   Mao's Cultural Revolution: The First Thing They Did Was Indoctrinate the Teachers | CLIP https://youtu.be/NOVRhU3XlkQ American Thought Leaders - The Epoch Times 352K subscribers

The Megyn Kelly Show
Free Speech Under Fire and Vaccine Mandates, with Michael Knowles and John Kass | Ep. 191

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 90:23


Megyn Kelly is joined by Michael Knowles, host of "The Michael Knowles Show" on The Daily Wire, and John Kass, columnist and co-host of "The Chicago Way" podcast, to talk about how free speech is under fire in 2021, the crackdown on parents speaking out at school board meetings, comparisons of Mao's China to America today, the extremism of the left, the coming push to vaccinate 5-to-11-year-old kids, Chicago's Mayor Lightfoot vs. first responders over vaccine mandates and more, the protection of the American ideals, rise in crime in Chicago, and more.Follow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow

Choses à Savoir
Pourquoi la Chine a-t-elle voulu mettre fin aux “Quatre Vieilleries” ?

Choses à Savoir

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 2:06


Durant la "révolution culturelle", qui dura dix ans, de 1966 à 1976, Mao Zedong s'est mis en tête d'éradiquer le passé. Secondé par les fidèles gardes rouges, le parti communiste a donc ordonné de mettre fin aux "Quatre Vieilleries".Un passé condamnéLa révolution culturelle devait permettre à Mao de consolider son pouvoir en s'attaquant aux catégories sociales qui lui faisaient de l'ombre. Il a ainsi lancé des jeunes fanatisés, devenus des "gardes rouges", contre les fonctionnaires, les propriétaires fonciers ou encore les paysans aisés.Parce que beaucoup d'entre eux restaient attachés à la culture traditionnelle, et en retiraient du prestige, le dirigeant chinois commanda à ses gardes rouges d'abattre ce qu'on appela les "Quatre Vieilleries". Autrement dit, tout ce qui relevait de l'ancienne culture et des vieilles coutumes.Destructions et sévicesGalvanisés par le discours officiel, les gardes rouges prennent leur mission très au sérieux. Ils se répandent dans le pays et entreprennent de vandaliser les monuments du passé et de briser des objets précieux, datant parfois du plus lointain passé.Les peintures traditionnelles sont déchirées et d'anciens manuscrits sont brûlés. Quant aux livres de généalogie, essentiels dans un pays où l'on célèbre le culte des ancêtres, ils n'échappent pas non plus à la destruction.Mais les gardes rouges ne s'en prennent pas seulement aux objets. Ils s'attaquent aussi aux personnes. Les Chinois chez qui l'on trouve des "vieilleries" désormais interdites sont punis et humiliés en public.Mais il y a pire. Des intellectuels, et notamment des artistes, font l'objet de sévices ou sont même assassinés. Les tortures qu'on leur réserve sont fonction de leur art. Ainsi, les gardes rouges crèvent les yeux des peintres ou écrasent les doigts des pianistes.De même, les spectacles "anciens" sont prohibés et la culture doit désormais s'organiser autour de quelques opéras officiels.Cette folie criminelle s'apaise peu à peu après 1976 et, à partir du début des années 1990, le pouvoir communiste entreprend de restaurer les œuvres et les sites endommagés par les gardes rouges. Il n'a d'ailleurs jamais fait état de l'ampleur des dégâts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Functional Medicine Research with Dr. Nikolas Hedberg
How to Follow a Low Histamine Diet

Functional Medicine Research with Dr. Nikolas Hedberg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 17:58


Histamine is often overlooked as a cause of chronic health problems yet the fix for this issue can be quite straightforward. In this article, I cover the details of histamine and how to follow a low histamine diet. Histamine intolerance (HIT) affects approximately 1% of the population. Approximately 80% of those affected are middle-aged.1 Histamine intolerance occurs when an individual has more histamine in their system than they can breakdown. Excess systemic concentrations of histamine can result from overproduction, overconsumption, and/or having a reduced ability to clear out histamine from the body. For those with HIT, eating a diet that results in increased histamine can contribute to chronic inflammation due to the ongoing exposure to histamine. This excess histamine often accumulates as a result of decreased diamine oxidase (DAO) activity.2, 3 The resulting excess histamine contributes to the physical symptoms associated with HIT. Following a low-histamine diet along with supplemental DAO is often recommended to decrease the symptoms associated with HIT. Eating a low-histamine diet involves more than simply eliminating foods that are high in histamine. This article will help to explain the challenges with following a low histamine diet and will highlight the many ways excess histamine can occur in food and in the body. Histamine Synthesis and Degradation Excess histamine concentrations may be exogenously released from food or endogenously produced. Histamine is synthesized by a variety of cells in the body including mast cells, basophils, platelets, histaminergic neurons, and enterochromaffin cells. Endogenous histamine is released in response to a variety of immune and inflammatory related stimuli as well as certain foods, alcohol, or drugs which can activate release.1 Endogenous histamine supplies are also controlled by genes that code for the enzymes that synthesize and degrade histamine. Genetic polymorphisms in histamine receptors and DAO can decrease the rate of DAO activity, reducing the rate of clearance and increasing systemic histamine concentrations.3 Exogenous sources of histamine mainly comes from ingested foods. Several factors in food processing and storage can increase the histamine content of certain foods as well. Histamine is normally metabolized by amine oxidases in healthy individuals. These amine oxidases include monoamine oxidase (MAO), DAO, and histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT), with DAO being the primary enzymes for metabolism of histamine.5 It is thought that low gastrointestinal levels of DAO contributes to an individual being unable to break down histamine in the intestines, resulting in the increased sensitivity to histamine found in common foods. As excess levels accumulate, intolerance symptoms develop.1, 2, 6, 7 Symptoms Associated with Histamine Intolerance There is great heterogeneity in the presentation of symptoms in those with HIT, making it difficult to define a clear clinical picture. Histamine intolerance is generally suspected when symptoms appear after the ingestion of histamine containing food.3 Symptoms may develop immediately or can be delayed as much as three hours following ingestion.5 Histamine receptors are found ubiquitously throughout the body, making different organ systems susceptible to adverse reactions due to excess histamine concentrations. This results in a wide variety of symptoms that may be exhibited by an individual, contributing to the difficulty in diagnosis. These symptoms include gastrointestinal issues such as abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, and constipation. Extraintestinal complaints may affect neurological, respiratory, dermatological, and/or hemodynamic systems.2 Histamine has vasoactive properties that may result in flushing, headaches, and/or hypertension.5 Other common symptoms related to HIT include brain fog, fatigue, dizziness, itching, and difficulty swallowing, low blood pressure, nasal congestion, sneezing,

L'Inaudible de Walter

Beatles : Song Exploder : John Lennon Aretha Franklin : Let it be FL H3 : The very last cowboy Avant l'action Space Exploration Prelude Covers : Arpi Alto : Close to you Ndlovu Youth Choir : Bella Ciao Jadyn Rylee : The sound of silence U/oh Edith : Thriller Sarah Lipstate : Twin Peaks theme Simon Leong & Al Poon : Spirited Away Medley Joe Porter : Musiques célèbres en percussions Sons zarbi : May Tree : The legend of Zelda Aaron Paulsen : Paint it black Swiss covers : Blackbird Trucs en vrac : Bill McClintock : Stayin' a hollaback girl YITT Mashups : Funk in black Rigolitch : Rage against the Youki La +BCdM : Fleetwood Mac : Dreams Version live par Elise Trouw - The Corrs - The Running Mates - Jennel Garcia feat. Sean Daniel - Maurice - Artikal Sound System - Samer Maher - Dianne Reeves - Stevie Nicks - Pomplamoose Professional musicians react Oh well Black magic woman La Playlist de la +BCdM : sur le Tube à Walter sur Spotify (merci John Cytron) sur Deezer (merci MaO de Paris) sur Amazon Music (merci Hellxions) et sur Apple Music (merci Yawourt) Le son mystère (35'27) : C'est quoi Jean-Paul Belmondo ? - Blow-up Avec : Dagguy Aude & Maori David Ward MaO Pat Hogun Fanny Laurent Doucet Grincheux Merci à : Blast Che Averell Pop goes the WZA Stéphane K_Rot LYC Barberouss Nelson Didier Niko Podcasts & liens cités : FLH3 Bandcamp Les Yeux Clos Passion Médiévistes Galaxie Pop Cyclocast Oxymut Le générique de fin est signé Cousbou

FlatOut Brasil Podcast: notícias automotivas, car culture, automobilismo e mais!
A nova onda dos motores aspirados, o novo Porsche Cayman GT4 RS, o futuro do Civic no Brasil | FlatOut Podcast 61

FlatOut Brasil Podcast: notícias automotivas, car culture, automobilismo e mais!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 84:25


Nesta semana tivemos uma série de grandes motores aspirados dando as caras nas principais notícias — do 1.6 do nosso Uno GoodGuys e do flat-6 do Porsche GT40 ao V12 do GMA T.50, passando por um big block GM de 10 litros. Juliano, Leo e MAO debatem sobre estes motores, e também sobre o tempo de volta do inédito Cayman GT4 RS em Nürburgring, e o que vai acontecer com o Civic no Brasil após o fim de sua produção nacional. Além, claro, dos costumeiros desafio do ronco, destaques da semana e a Rádio FlatOut!

History Accounts
4-4. Revolution is an Insurrection

History Accounts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 22:15


By June 1789, what was initially convened as the Estates General had recast itself as the National Assembly.   The King tried to prevent the Assembly Deputies  from meeting.  They defied the attempt and met in the King's Tennis Court.   There they all took the Tennis Court Oath vowing to continue and never disperse.   In July 1789, a Paris mob stormed and took the Bastille.The Chinse Communist Party published the "16 Articles" in August 1966.  The Articles publicly explained the Culture Revolution's purpose and its implementation.  The first iteration of the Student Red Guards, emboldened and supported by Chairman  Mao,  came into existence.  The Red Guards became violent and destructive.

Hospice Insights: The Law and Beyond
Hospice Audit Series: Insights for Winning at Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) Hearings, Part II

Hospice Insights: The Law and Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 28:19


Hospice Audit SeriesAudits are a fact of life for hospices—it's not a matter of “if” a hospice will be audited, but “when.” The alphabet soup of audits has expanded, from UPICs to SMRCs, CPIs, TPEs and more. With the hospice carve-in to Medicare Advantage, MAO audits will join the list. The recent pause in audits as a result of the COVID pandemic hints at increased activity as the pandemic wanes. In this series, Meg Pekarske and Bryan Nowicki of Husch Blackwell's Hospice Audit team deconstruct the most recent developments in hospice audits, providing insight and guidance on the why, when and how of audits and—most importantly—what hospices can do about it.Today's Episode: Hospice Audit Series - Insights for Winning at Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) Hearings, Part IIIn Part II of our two-part series on ALJ hearings, Husch Blackwell's Meg Pekarske unpacks strategies for winning with colleagues Bryan Nowicki, Emily Solum and Erin Burns. They explore what it means to be well-prepared and who should be on your team. They also share tips for overcoming the most common hurdles to winning, and the hidden surprises they have found in ALJ decisions. We hope you enjoy this engaging conversation!

Pat Mayo Experience
2021 Week 7 Spread Picks, Cust Corner Mini, ZOZO Golf Picks

Pat Mayo Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 128:40


Pat Mayo, Geoff Fienberg and Tim Anderson go game-by-game and make their 2021 NFL Week 7 Picks against the Spread while provide their Week 7 NFL game previews. Plus, a mini Cust Corner with Cust's want for someone to do tasks for him and his new found cooking prowess. Then at 1:53:15, Mao and Geoff talk Zozo Championship Bets. Use code MMN at Prize Picks for a deposit match up to $100: https://bit.ly/PrizePicksMMN Free Newsletter: https://mayomedia.substack.com/ You can still get into the MMN props contest by simply making a 5-pick entry (NO MNF PLAYERS) for $7.11. That amount qualifies it for the contest. Even if you don't think you can't catch up (you definitely can), take advantage of the bonus $50 given to anyone who plays an entry for $7.11 and gets all five picks correct. You'd get paid 10x for winning anyway, then another $50 bonus because you played an entry of $7.11. Seems like a good way to get 17s your money for a low investment. Perfect for anyone trying to build a bank roll. Advice Email: thepatmayoexperience@gmail.com MMN Props Leaderboard: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/16G_dcgKRkbEhkqP162gna9ThxPrJbez75b8XngP2c8Y/edit#gid=0 Week 7 DraftKings PME Listener's League: https://bit.ly/21W7PMELL Sub to the Mayo Media Network: https://bit.ly/YTMMN NFL Stats & Tools Code “MAYO” for discount: https://www.runthesims.com/mayo NFL RESEARCH: https://youtu.be/YwfMLloiX1k How to Play NFL DraftKings, Strategy & Tips: https://youtu.be/pXkjPOwv5I4 SHOW INDEX 00:00 Intro 4:28 Recap 17:32 DEN/CLE 23:17 CIN/BAL 28:18 WAS/GB 32:20 ATL/MIA 42:27 NYJ/NE 55:28 CAR/NYG 57:58 KC/TEN 1:04:21 Cust Corner — Cooking and Servants 1:25:29 DET/LAR 1:28:19 PHI/LV 1:31:37 HOU/ARZ 1:35:23 CHI/TB 1:38:02 IND/SF 1:40:40 NO/SEA 1:45:06 SUPERLOCK/SURVIVOR/FREE MONEY 1:53:15 Zozo Championship Picks

TheSpeakUNEazy
CHI-COMMIE HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF & GOD DETERMINES IT, NOT CHARLIE VICTOR!!!

TheSpeakUNEazy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 62:57


Today was a rollercoaster ride of emotions today as I was deep in prayer without knowing why. Gut feeling directed me to pray extra and be very focused when I do it. The first article of review speaks about a mother who lived through Mao's regime in China during the "Cultural Revolution" era. She speaks of similarities happening in America which she experienced in the 60's during Mao's regime. I think it's very important to listen to people who have experienced first hand communism and learn from them. Next, I review an article discussing how it seems that CV is determining who lives and who dies when it is God who determines that. So many people are living in fear with an enemy they can't even see... I don't know about you but, I know who my enemies are and I can see clearly. RANDOM READ: BOOK OF JOHN, CHAPTER 1 VERSES 29-34: BEHOLD THE LAMB OF GOD. TONIGHT'S COCKTAIL: THE MUDSLIDE. INGREDIENTS- 1 OZ. VODKA, 1 OZ. COFFEE LIQUIOR 1.5 OZ. IRISH CREAM, & CHOCOLATE SAUCE. SHAKEN AND SERVED IN A ROCKS GLASS ON THE ROCKS. FOLLOW ME ON THE FOLLOWING SOCIAL MEDIA OUTLETS. PLEASE SHOW SUPPORT BY LIKE, SUBSCRIBE, & SHARING. JOIN MY SUBSCRIBESTAR OR DONATIONS ARE GREATLY APPRECIATED VIA THE LINKS BELOW. HELP ME GROW TO DO MORE EPISODES AND ADD MORE FEATURES TO THE PODCAST. THANK YOU AGAIN & GOD BLESS YOU PATRIOTS. THE COOL MERCHANDISE STORE: https://my-store-11549763.creator-spring.com WEBSITE: https://thespeakuneazy.tv FOXHOLE/PILLED: https://share-link.pilled.net/channel/85046 (Donations can be made via "GOLD PILLS") FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Thespeakuneazy INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/thespeakuneazy/ SUBSCRIBESTAR: https://www.subscribestar.com/thespeakuneazy BIT CHUTE: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/8p211ae6igKP/ YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIunf_jjCWmTq73gl5c-4JA GAB: https://gab.com/TheSpeakUNEazy CLOUTHUB: @TheSpeakUNEazy DLIVE: @TheSpeakUNEazy TWITCH: @TheSpeakUNEazy20 DISCORD: THESPEAKUNEAZY RUMBLE: @TheSpeakUNEazy DONATIONS CAN BE MADE BY: paypal.me/TheSpeakUNEazyLLC https://cash.app/$TheSpeakUNEazy https://venmo.com/TheSpeakUNEazyLLC Title: Soft Jazz Ballad (Piano Trio, Acoustic, Smooth Ambient) - P5 License: Individual License, Commercial, SOCAN Title: I Can't Help But Wonder (Jazz Vocal Ballad) License: Individual License, Commercial, ASCAP, BM --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thespeakuneazy/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thespeakuneazy/support

The Sons Of History
From Liberty to Tyranny: Discussing Revolutions Over the Century with Donald Critchlow

The Sons Of History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 64:06


Lenin. Mao. Castro. Mugabe. Khomeini. Donald Critchlow joins the podcast to discuss his new book "Revolutionary Monsters: Five Men Who Turned Liberation Into Tyranny." The Sons of History talk about how these five dictators came to power across five different regions, but in very similar ways. Dustin Bass and Alan Wakim discuss with Critchlow how the West (whether journalists, politicians, or academics) continued to be enamored we these ruthless tyrants, how academia was a hotbed for revolution each time, what was the ultimate result, and how America and the West is falling into a trap to put themselves in the same situation. The Sons of History highly recommend this book.

The American History Podcast
Chiang and Mao part 2

The American History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 49:01


Today's episode is the last of our two which take a look at the early years of the Chinese Republic and focus on the rise of Chiang and Mao's rise in the communist party. Huge thanks to Podcorn for sponsoring this episode. Explore sponsorship opportunities and start monetizing your podcast by signing up here: https://podcorn.com/podcasters/Today's show is sponsored by Unidragon Wooden puzzles. These awesome and unique puzzles make great gifts. Use coupon code history10 at checkout to receive 10% off on your order. Check out their amazing puzzles here:  Unidragon Puzzles.Fable Beard Company is the official beard products company of the American history podcast. For great oils, beard balms and butters as well as beard wash and conditioner check out the link below. Use the coupon code: Shawn15 at checkout so you can receive 15% off all orders. https://fablebeardco.com/discount/SHAWN15Fable also has AMAZING CBD products, including CBD tinctures, beard butter, beard oil, beard balm and even beard conditioner/wash. You can get them with a 15% discount by following the link down below (or using Shawn15 at checkout!). Fable Beard Company CBD Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/americanhistory)Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/americanhistory)

New Books in Religion
David J. Mozina, "Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice" (U Hawaii Press, 2021)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 72:37


Mozina's Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice (U Hawaii Press, 2021) weaves together ethnography, textual analysis, photography, and film, inviting readers into the religious world of Daoist practice in today's south China by exploring one particular ritual called the Banner Rite to Summon Sire Yin, as practiced in central Hunan province. Performed as the first public ritual by a Daoist apprentice at his own ordination, the Banner Rite seeks to summon Celestial Lord Yin Jiao, the ferocious martial deity who supplies the exorcistic power to protect and heal bodies and spaces from illness and misfortune. A lot is at stake. If the apprentice cannot successfully summon the deity in front of his village community and the pantheon of gods in attendance, he would not be able to be ordained that day and would risk losing the confidence of villagers who might hire him in the future. Through a close reading of the ritual in its social and historical contexts, Mozina shows that the efficacy of rituals like the Banner Rite is driven by the ability of a master to form an intimate relationship with exorcistic deities like Yin Jiao, which is far from guaranteed. Mozina reveals the ways in which such ritual claims are rooted in the great liturgical movements of the Song and Yuan dynasties (960–1368) and how they are performed these days amid the social and economic pressures of rural life in the post-Mao era. Knotting the Banner will be of interest to students and scholars of Daoism and Chinese religion and will also appeal to historians of religion and anthropologists, especially those working on ritual. Noelle Giuffrida is a professor and curator of Asian art at the School of Art and the David Owsley Museum of Art at Ball State University. Her research focuses on Chinese art, particularly the history of collecting and exhibiting premodern works in American museums after World War II and the visual culture of Daoism in late imperial China. Her teaching and curatorial experience extend broadly both temporally—from Neolithic to contemporary—and cross-culturally to China, Korea, and Japan, as well as to South and Southeast Asia. Her book Separating Sheep from Goats: Sherman E. Lee's Collecting of Chinese Art in Postwar America (University of California Press, 2018) uses American curator and museum director Sherman E. Lee (1918–2008) as a lens through which to investigate the history of collecting and exhibiting Chinese art. Email her at ngiuffrida@bsu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

New Books in East Asian Studies
David J. Mozina, "Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice" (U Hawaii Press, 2021)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 72:37


Mozina's Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice (U Hawaii Press, 2021) weaves together ethnography, textual analysis, photography, and film, inviting readers into the religious world of Daoist practice in today's south China by exploring one particular ritual called the Banner Rite to Summon Sire Yin, as practiced in central Hunan province. Performed as the first public ritual by a Daoist apprentice at his own ordination, the Banner Rite seeks to summon Celestial Lord Yin Jiao, the ferocious martial deity who supplies the exorcistic power to protect and heal bodies and spaces from illness and misfortune. A lot is at stake. If the apprentice cannot successfully summon the deity in front of his village community and the pantheon of gods in attendance, he would not be able to be ordained that day and would risk losing the confidence of villagers who might hire him in the future. Through a close reading of the ritual in its social and historical contexts, Mozina shows that the efficacy of rituals like the Banner Rite is driven by the ability of a master to form an intimate relationship with exorcistic deities like Yin Jiao, which is far from guaranteed. Mozina reveals the ways in which such ritual claims are rooted in the great liturgical movements of the Song and Yuan dynasties (960–1368) and how they are performed these days amid the social and economic pressures of rural life in the post-Mao era. Knotting the Banner will be of interest to students and scholars of Daoism and Chinese religion and will also appeal to historians of religion and anthropologists, especially those working on ritual. Noelle Giuffrida is a professor and curator of Asian art at the School of Art and the David Owsley Museum of Art at Ball State University. Her research focuses on Chinese art, particularly the history of collecting and exhibiting premodern works in American museums after World War II and the visual culture of Daoism in late imperial China. Her teaching and curatorial experience extend broadly both temporally—from Neolithic to contemporary—and cross-culturally to China, Korea, and Japan, as well as to South and Southeast Asia. Her book Separating Sheep from Goats: Sherman E. Lee's Collecting of Chinese Art in Postwar America (University of California Press, 2018) uses American curator and museum director Sherman E. Lee (1918–2008) as a lens through which to investigate the history of collecting and exhibiting Chinese art. Email her at ngiuffrida@bsu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in History
David J. Mozina, "Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice" (U Hawaii Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 72:37


Mozina's Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice (U Hawaii Press, 2021) weaves together ethnography, textual analysis, photography, and film, inviting readers into the religious world of Daoist practice in today's south China by exploring one particular ritual called the Banner Rite to Summon Sire Yin, as practiced in central Hunan province. Performed as the first public ritual by a Daoist apprentice at his own ordination, the Banner Rite seeks to summon Celestial Lord Yin Jiao, the ferocious martial deity who supplies the exorcistic power to protect and heal bodies and spaces from illness and misfortune. A lot is at stake. If the apprentice cannot successfully summon the deity in front of his village community and the pantheon of gods in attendance, he would not be able to be ordained that day and would risk losing the confidence of villagers who might hire him in the future. Through a close reading of the ritual in its social and historical contexts, Mozina shows that the efficacy of rituals like the Banner Rite is driven by the ability of a master to form an intimate relationship with exorcistic deities like Yin Jiao, which is far from guaranteed. Mozina reveals the ways in which such ritual claims are rooted in the great liturgical movements of the Song and Yuan dynasties (960–1368) and how they are performed these days amid the social and economic pressures of rural life in the post-Mao era. Knotting the Banner will be of interest to students and scholars of Daoism and Chinese religion and will also appeal to historians of religion and anthropologists, especially those working on ritual. Noelle Giuffrida is a professor and curator of Asian art at the School of Art and the David Owsley Museum of Art at Ball State University. Her research focuses on Chinese art, particularly the history of collecting and exhibiting premodern works in American museums after World War II and the visual culture of Daoism in late imperial China. Her teaching and curatorial experience extend broadly both temporally—from Neolithic to contemporary—and cross-culturally to China, Korea, and Japan, as well as to South and Southeast Asia. Her book Separating Sheep from Goats: Sherman E. Lee's Collecting of Chinese Art in Postwar America (University of California Press, 2018) uses American curator and museum director Sherman E. Lee (1918–2008) as a lens through which to investigate the history of collecting and exhibiting Chinese art. Email her at ngiuffrida@bsu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
David J. Mozina, "Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice" (U Hawaii Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 72:37


Mozina's Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice (U Hawaii Press, 2021) weaves together ethnography, textual analysis, photography, and film, inviting readers into the religious world of Daoist practice in today's south China by exploring one particular ritual called the Banner Rite to Summon Sire Yin, as practiced in central Hunan province. Performed as the first public ritual by a Daoist apprentice at his own ordination, the Banner Rite seeks to summon Celestial Lord Yin Jiao, the ferocious martial deity who supplies the exorcistic power to protect and heal bodies and spaces from illness and misfortune. A lot is at stake. If the apprentice cannot successfully summon the deity in front of his village community and the pantheon of gods in attendance, he would not be able to be ordained that day and would risk losing the confidence of villagers who might hire him in the future. Through a close reading of the ritual in its social and historical contexts, Mozina shows that the efficacy of rituals like the Banner Rite is driven by the ability of a master to form an intimate relationship with exorcistic deities like Yin Jiao, which is far from guaranteed. Mozina reveals the ways in which such ritual claims are rooted in the great liturgical movements of the Song and Yuan dynasties (960–1368) and how they are performed these days amid the social and economic pressures of rural life in the post-Mao era. Knotting the Banner will be of interest to students and scholars of Daoism and Chinese religion and will also appeal to historians of religion and anthropologists, especially those working on ritual. Noelle Giuffrida is a professor and curator of Asian art at the School of Art and the David Owsley Museum of Art at Ball State University. Her research focuses on Chinese art, particularly the history of collecting and exhibiting premodern works in American museums after World War II and the visual culture of Daoism in late imperial China. Her teaching and curatorial experience extend broadly both temporally—from Neolithic to contemporary—and cross-culturally to China, Korea, and Japan, as well as to South and Southeast Asia. Her book Separating Sheep from Goats: Sherman E. Lee's Collecting of Chinese Art in Postwar America (University of California Press, 2018) uses American curator and museum director Sherman E. Lee (1918–2008) as a lens through which to investigate the history of collecting and exhibiting Chinese art. Email her at ngiuffrida@bsu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Undeceptions with John Dickson

Download the transcript for this episode here.COMPETITION!We're celebrating our 500,000th download this month - half a million! And so, with the help of our major sponsor, Zondervan, we are giving away a book pack of five of Zondervan's newest titles. We'll throw in a copy of my new book Bullies and Saints AND an Undeceptions T-Shirt.To WIN, all you have to do is leave us a review on Apple Podcasts (what used to be called iTunes), take a pic of the review and send it to us. Producer Kaley will pick the best-written review on October 25 (and I mean ‘best-written' not necessarily most glowing). So be quick, you've got two weeks! LINKS Get to know our guest, Professor Xi Lian.  Read Professor Lian's book, Blood Letters: The untold story of Lin Zhao, a martyr in Mao's China. You might also like to seek out Professor Lian's other relevant books Redeemed by Fire: The rise of popular Christianity in modern China and also The Conversion of Missionaries: Liberalism in American Protestant Missions in China, 1907–1932. Meet our other guest I'Ching Thomas.  Read I'Ching Thomas' book, Jesus The Path to Human Flourishing : The Gospel for the Cultural Chinese Read more about Daoism (or Taoism). Get a broader background on Chinese religion from National Geographic.  More on the All Souls celebrations around China. Dig deeper into the idea of 'Actionless Action' or 'Wu Wei' here. Read the Analects of Confucius. Find out more about Christianity in communist China in this article from The Gospel Coalition. Winfried Corduan's book Neighbouring  Faiths is referenced by I'Ching Thomas about polytheism vs monotheism (amongst other things). Read more about Christianity in China from this article from 2020 in The Economist.  And this from Time about the imprisonment of a pastor Wang Yi (who led one of China's most well-known underground churches). Here's more about the 'sinicization of religion' in China from the Lausanne Movement. Read this article from the New York Times about China's 12 core socialist values. Christianity's growth in China is hard to predict, but Professor Fenggang Yang from Purdue University has given it a crack, estimating that China will become the largest Christian country in the world by 2030.

Catch The Sky Podcast
Episode 80 - Made in China

Catch The Sky Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 58:30


This week our hosts welcome Dr Chung onto the show to discuss the history and current affairs between China and Taiwan (4:26). She provides us with some behind-the-scenes insight regarding Chinese spies, their Nationalism Day, the rise of Mao and fall of Chiang Kai-shek (7:01). This leads the conversation into communism, ethnic diversity in China, the Uyghur "re-education" camps, and the Taiwanese government (14:02). The hosts get into the Japanese influence in Taiwan and globally (21:01) and how their imperialistic traits are more similar to that of the USA than China, who attempts to spread their influence through trade or infrastructure (29:10). As of late, China has shown more military aggression toward Taiwan, which has led our hosts to have this conversation in the first place (38:34). T and Saif close with a reflection of where the USA is compared to China post-WWII, including the recent influence of Tik Tok, and clarifying for our legal team that Dr Chung is not currently a doctor (48:58). Thank you for tuning in and giving us your continued support. You may interact with us online @CTSTerry on Twitter or by searching Catch The Sky Podcast on Facebook (and giving us a Like), Instagram, or wherever you listen to podcasts and subscribing. Music by Emby Alexander Recorded October 8, 2021 #CatchTheSky #Podcast #China #Taiwan #DrChung #Mao #Spies #Uyghur #Camps #Japan #BeltAndRoad #SilkRoad #Expansion #Communism #Democracy #USA #War #AlwaysBeComing #TrashRocket #EmbyAlexander

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies
How China Escaped Shock Therapy, with Isabella Weber

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 84:38


Speaker: Isabella Weber, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst China has become deeply integrated into the world economy. Yet, gradual marketization has facilitated the country's rise without leading to its wholesale assimilation to global neoliberalism. This book uncovers the fierce contest about economic reforms that shaped China's path. In the first post-Mao decade, China's reformers were sharply divided. They agreed that China had to reform its economic system and move toward more marketization – but struggled over how to go about it. Should China destroy the core of the socialist system through shock therapy, or should it use the institutions of the planned economy as market creators? With hindsight, the historical record proves the high stakes behind the question: China embarked on an economic expansion commonly described as unprecedented in scope and pace, whereas Russia's economy collapsed under shock therapy. Based on extensive research, including interviews with key Chinese and international participants and World Bank officials as well as insights gleaned from unpublished documents, the book charts the debate that ultimately enabled China to follow a path to gradual reindustrialization. Beyond shedding light on the crossroads of the 1980s, it reveals the intellectual foundations of state-market relations in reform-era China through a longue durée lens. Overall, the book delivers an original perspective on China's economic model and its continuing contestations from within and from without. Isabella M. Weber is a political economist working on China, global trade and the history of economic thought. She is an Assistant Professor of Economics and the Research Leader for China of the Asian Political Economy Program at the Political Economy Research Institute at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST: 10.14 - Ashli Babbitt Update

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 36:17


Hour 3 -  Nick Reed talks about a variety of topics in the news, including: More than 500 pages of internal documents from DC Metropolitan Police concerning the fatal shooting of Ashli Babbitt in the Capitol on Jan. 6 reveal witness accounts stating she was not holding a weapon at the time of her death and how "upset" the officer was after shooting her.  A Virginia mom who endured Mao's Cultural Revolution before immigrating to the U.S. said the National School Boards Association and the Justice Department are using tactics similar to ones she saw Communist China use to stop parents from speaking out. The Biden administration ignored an explicit warning from the Pentagon about “cybersecurity concerns” tied to Chinese-made drones and drone parts, proceeding with the purchase of such materials from a top Chinese company that the Trump administration blacklisted for national security reasons.

Jack Riccardi Show
JACK RICCARDI ON DEMAND AIRED 10/13/2021

Jack Riccardi Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 95:13


It's Wednesday and topics tackled today include...Star Trek actor William Shatner brims with emotion after flying into space and returning to earth after Jeff Bezo's Blue Origin completed second flight mission as Shatner becomes oldest man in space.; A Virginia mom who endured Mao's Cultural revolution before immigrating to the U.S. says DOJ and School board Association use communist tactics.; State Rep, Lyle Larson has announced that he will not run for another term in Texas House in 2022.; The Rolling Stones retired one of their most popular rock songs. The song, "Brown Sugar" blues classic has been removed from their live setlist due to lyrics that depict the dismay of slavery and on the JR poll, "Clayton Perry, Nico LaHood and Elisa Chan are mentiond for Lyle Larson's House seat. Any preference?

Money
Money News You'll Really Use: Mid-October 2021

Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 34:57


Nearly every day, there's news that affects you and your money. From politics and taxes to markets and interest rates, things are happening that affect your savings and your future -- so many things, in fact, it's hard to keep up with them all. Problem solved. We track everything that's happening every day. And every couple of weeks, we condense it all and report everything you need to know in a special edition of the "Money!" podcast. In addition to recapping the news, we check in on our personal investments, and discuss ideas and suggestions to make you smarter and richer, all without boring you to death in the process. As usual, my co-host is financial journalist Miranda Marquit. Listening in and sometimes contributing is producer and novice investor Aaron Freeman. Want more information? Check out these resources: Wall Street Journal: Covid-19 Deaths in U.S. Level Off as Delta Variant Surge Eases New York Times: Inflation Warning Signs Flash Red, Posing Challenge for Washington Bloomberg: Silicon's 300% Surge Throws Another Price Shock at the World Wall Street Journal: Xi Jinping Aims to Rein In Chinese Capitalism, Hew to Mao's Socialist Vision Wall Street Journal: Mortgage Payments Are Getting More and More Unaffordable Bloomberg:  Christmas at Risk as Supply Chain ‘Disaster' Only Gets Worse Wall Street Journal: Is the Stock Market Open at 3 a.m.? This Startup Says It Should Be New York Times: Stock, Bond and Real Estate Prices Are All Uncomfortably High CNBC: Strong wage gains cast doubt that inflation is going away anytime soon Wall Street Journal: Sharp Rise Brings Treasury Yields Near Spring Highs Barron's: The Dollar Is Rising. Here's How to Play It. New York Times: Global Deal to End Tax Havens Moves Ahead as Nations Back 15% Rate New York Times: There Is Shadow Inflation Taking Place All Around Us The Balance: Survey: Stock Market Poised for More Declines This Year CNBC: IMF cuts its global growth forecast, citing supply disruptions and the pandemic To see Stacy's stocks, click here Subscribe to the Money Talks News newsletter Take our course The Only Retirement Guide You'll Ever Need Take our course Money Made Simple Miranda Marquit's website Become a member: https://www.moneytalksnews.com/members/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ASIAN AMERICA: THE KEN FONG PODCAST

Claire and her aging mother Isabel begin their journey together by visiting the once-beautiful mansion in Shanghai where the young Isabel had grown up. Much more than a trip down Memory Lane, "Remembering Shanghai" reveals the triumphs and tragedies going back five generations that mirror China's own challenges. Chao has layered the bones of this country's history with the flesh of her own family. 

That LARRY SHOW
Episode 330: Spotlight On Scum

That LARRY SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 24:24


What are KIDULTS / how are they destroying the world? ▲ Who is Dan Andrews and why is he a punk / asshole?▲ What does Dan Andrews have in common with Hitler, Stalin and Mao? ▲ How did Australia become an island prison?▲ U.S. Secretary of HHS has NO medical background - why is he in charge of your health?▲ What is "The Mussolini Treatment," and why is it the hope of the world?

The David McWilliams Podcast
177 - Is China the new Japan?

The David McWilliams Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 39:28


We examine the similarities between China in 2022 and Japan in 1990. The trajectory of huge export-led growth, dragging Japan in the 1950s, 60s, 70s out of the post-WW2 morass, and China in the 1990s, Noughties and Teens out of the post-Mao torpor, leading to an internal domestic bubble, fuelled by property, real estate speculation and excessive bank lending. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Baltsheviks
Bird Dumb

Baltsheviks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 90:34


Fashion Nova, but with a little more Mao ******************** recorded 9-28-21 www.baltsheviks.com

The Journal.
Xi Jinping is Rewriting the Rules of China's Economy

The Journal.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 21:37


The Chinese government is cracking down on big private corporations and reining in their power. WSJ's Lingling Wei shares her analysis which suggests this recent development is coming from China's President Xi Jinping's personal ideological shift from capitalism towards a Mao-style socialism.

Hey Human Podcast
Dr. Mao: The Natural Way

Hey Human Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 52:39


E280 Human Dr. Mao is a 38th generation practitioner of Chinese medicine and is co-founder of Tao of Wellness and Yo San University, both award winning centers for health and Traditional Chinese Medicine graduate education, respectively. He's the author of over a dozen books about health and anti-aging. For more information and links, please visit: […]

ChinaTalk
Mao and the Monkey King

ChinaTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 38:02


Julia Lovell, author of Maoism: A Global History and The Opium War: Drugs, Dreams and the Making of China, discusses translating Journey to the West (https://www.amazon.com/Monkey-King-Journey-Classics-Hardcover/dp/0143107186), for English audiences.Joined by translator Brendan O'Kane as co-host, on this episode we discuss:The origins of Journey to the West and the exploits of its primate protagonist Sun Wukong.Mao's relationship to the novel and how he saw himself in the Monkey King.Why performances of the story in the Mao era cut out more than 90% of the storyOuttro music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvA78U8sWn0 Great Sage Equal to Heaven by Hua ChenyuWant to meet up in the bay Oct 5-10th? Hit me up on twitter or at jorschneider @ gmailOuttro music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvA78U8sWn0 Great Sage Equal to Heaven by Hua Chenyu Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.