Podcasts about Eastern Europe

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Eastern part of the European continent

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  • May 27, 2022LATEST
Eastern Europe

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    Best podcasts about Eastern Europe

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    Latest podcast episodes about Eastern Europe

    New Books in Jewish Studies
    Chiara Camarda et al., "The Venice Ghetto: A Memory Space That Travels" (U Massachusetts Press, 2022)

    New Books in Jewish Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 31:11


    The Venice Ghetto was founded in 1516 by the Venetian government as a segregated area of the city in which Jews were compelled to live. The world's first ghetto and the origin of the English word, the term simultaneously works to mark specific places and their histories, and as a global symbol that evokes themes of identity, exile, marginalization, and segregation. To capture these multiple meanings, the editors of this volume conceptualize the ghetto as a "memory space that travels" through both time and space. This interdisciplinary collection engages with questions about the history, conditions, and lived experience of the Venice Ghetto, including its legacy as a compulsory, segregated, and enclosed space. Contributors also consider the ghetto's influence on the figure of the Renaissance moneylender, the material culture of the ghetto archive, the urban form of North Africa's mellah and hara, and the ghetto's impact on the writings of Primo Levi and Marjorie Agosín. In addition to the volume editors, The Venice Ghetto: A Memory Space That Travels (U Massachusetts Press, 2022) features a foreword from James E. Young and contributions from Shaul Bassi, Murray Baumgarten, Margaux Fitoussi, Dario Miccoli, Andrea Yaakov Lattes, Federica Ruspio, Michael Shapiro, Clive Sinclair, and Emanuela Trevisan Semi. Amber Nickell is Associate Professor of History at Fort Hays State University, Editor at H-Ukraine, and Host at NBN Jewish Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Eastern Europe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

    New Books in Jewish Studies
    Yechiel Weizman, "Unsettled Heritage: Living Next to Poland's Material Jewish Traces After the Holocaust" (Cornell UP, 2022)

    New Books in Jewish Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 39:56


    In Unsettled Heritage: Living Next to Poland's Material Jewish Traces After the Holocaust (Cornell UP, 2022), Yechiel Weizman explores what happened to the thousands of abandoned Jewish cemeteries and places of worship that remained in Poland after the Holocaust, asking how postwar society in small, provincial towns perceived, experienced, and interacted with the physical traces of former Jewish neighbors. After the war, with few if any Jews remaining, numerous deserted graveyards and dilapidated synagogues became mute witnesses to the Jewish tragedy, leaving Poles with the complicated task of contending with these ruins and deciding on their future upkeep. Combining archival research into hitherto unexamined sources, anthropological field work, and cultural and linguistic analysis, Weizman uncovers the concrete and symbolic fate of sacral Jewish sites in Poland's provincial towns, from the end of the Second World War until the fall of the communist regime. His book weaves a complex tale whose main protagonists are the municipal officials, local activists, and ordinary Polish citizens who lived alongside the material reminders of their murdered fellow nationals. Unsettled Heritage shows the extent to which debating the status and future of the material Jewish remains was never a neutral undertaking for Poles—nor was interacting with their disturbing and haunting presence. Indeed, it became one of the most urgent municipal concerns of the communist era, and the main vehicle through which Polish society was confronted with the memory of the Jews and their annihilation. Amber Nickell is Associate Professor of History at Fort Hays State University, Editor at H-Ukraine, and Host at NBN Jewish Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Eastern Europe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

    New Books in Jewish Studies
    Maksim Goldenshteyn, "So They Remember: A Jewish Family's Story of Surviving the Holocaust in Soviet Ukraine" (U Oklahoma Press, 2022)

    New Books in Jewish Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 47:11


    When we think of Nazi camps, names such as Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen, and Dachau come instantly to mind. Yet the history of the Holocaust extends beyond those notorious sites. In the former territory of Transnistria, located in occupied Soviet Ukraine and governed by Nazi Germany's Romanian allies, many Jews perished due to disease, starvation, and other horrific conditions. Through an intimate blending of memoir, history, and reportage, So They Remember: A Jewish Family's Story of Surviving the Holocaust in Soviet Ukraine (U Oklahoma Press, 2022) illuminates this oft-overlooked chapter of the Holocaust. In December 1941, with the German-led invasion of the Soviet Union in its sixth month, a twelve-year-old Jewish boy named Motl Braverman, along with family members, was uprooted from his Ukrainian hometown and herded to the remote village of Pechera, the site of a Romanian death camp. Author Maksim Goldenshteyn, the grandson of Motl, first learned of his family's wartime experiences in 2012. Through tireless research, Goldenshteyn spent years unraveling the story of Motl, his family members, and their fellow prisoners. The author here renders their story through the eyes of Motl and other children, who decades later would bear witness to the traumas they suffered. Until now, Romanian historians and survivors have served as almost the only chroniclers of the Holocaust in Transnistria. Goldenshteyn's account, based on interviews with Soviet-born relatives and other survivors, archival documents, and memoirs, is among the first full-length books to spotlight the Pechera camp, ominously known by its prisoners as Mertvaya Petlya, or the “Death Noose.” Unfortunately, as the author explains, the Pechera camp was only one of some two hundred concentration sites spread across Transnistria, where local Ukrainian policemen often conspired with Romanian guards to brutalize the prisoners. In March 1944, the Red Army liberated Motl's family and fellow captives. Yet for decades, according to the author, they were silenced by Soviet policies enacted to erase all memory of Jewish wartime suffering. So They Remember gives voice to this long-repressed history and documents how the events at Pechera and other surrounding camps and ghettos would continue to shape remaining survivors and their descendants. Amber Nickell is Associate Professor of History at Fort Hays State University, Editor at H-Ukraine, and Host at NBN Jewish Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Eastern Europe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

    Talk Eastern Europe
    Episode 101: EU Candidate status for Ukraine, Moldova and Georgia?

    Talk Eastern Europe

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 58:06


    *** Please support us to keep bringing you in-depth coverage. Become a Patron: www.patreon.com/talkeasterneurope.eu ***Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine has led to huge geopolitical shifts in the region of Eastern Europe. One major development has been the application for membership in the European Union submitted by Ukraine, Moldova and Georgia. What are the chances that these three countries can get EU candidate status? And what does this mean for the EU's Eastern Partnership initiative? And what about an alternative, as proposed by French President Emmanuel Macron?To get some insight into these questions, Adam and Aga sat down Tania Marocchi, manager of the EaP Index at the Eastern Partnership Civil Society Forum (Brussels) and Sergiy Gerasymchuk, Deputy Executive Director at the Foreign Policy Council "Ukrainian Prism" (Kyiv). Resources and Notes:Episode 89: Eastern Partnership looks to the future: https://talkeasterneurope.eu/episode/episode-89-eastern-partnership-looks-to-the-future-448Episode 84: Ahead of the Eastern Partnership Summit: https://talkeasterneurope.eu/episode/episode-84-ahead-of-the-eastern-partnership-summit-840“The promise of the Eastern Partnership is not dead yet”, James Sherr, New Eastern Europe Issue 1-2 2022: https://neweasterneurope.eu/2022/02/15/the-promise-of-the-eastern-partnership-is-not-dead-yet/ “Czech presidency can revive the faltering Eastern Partnership”, Pavel Havlicek, New Eastern Europe, 27 December 2021: https://neweasterneurope.eu/2021/12/27/czech-presidency-can-revive-the-faltering-eastern-partnership/“Failed Expectations? Belarus and the Eastern Partnership”, Veranika Laputska, New Eastern Europe Issue 5 2020: https://neweasterneurope.eu/2020/09/04/failed-expectations-belarus-and-the-eastern-partnership/New Eastern Europe Issue 3-4/2019: Eastern Partnership turns 10: https://neweasterneurope.eu/2019/05/02/issue-3-4-2019-eastern-partnership-turns-10/Visit us online: www.talkeasterneurope.eu

    Intel on AI
    AI, Social Media, and Political Influence – Intel on AI Season 3, Episode 11

    Intel on AI

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 33:38


    In this episode of Intel on AI host Amir Khosrowshahi talks with Joshua Tucker about using artificial intelligence to study the influence social media has on politics. Joshua is professor of politics at New York University with affiliated appointments in the department of Russian and Slavic Studies and the Center for Data Science. He is also the director of the Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia and co-director of the Center for Social Media and Politics. He was a co-author and editor of an award-winning policy blog at The Washington Post and has published several books, including his latest, where he is co-editor, titled Social Media and Democracy: The State of the Field, Prospects for Reform from Cambridge University Press. In the podcast episode, Joshua discusses his background in researching mass political behavior, including Colored Revolutions in Eastern Europe. He talks about how his field of study changed after working with his then PhD student Pablo Barberá (now a professor at the University of Southern California), who proposed a method whereby researchers could estimate people's partisanship based on the social networks in which they had enmeshed themselves. Joshua describes the limitations researchers often have when trying to study data on various platforms, the challenges of big data, utilizing NYU's Greene HPC Cluster, and the impact that the leak of the Facebook Papers had on the field. He also describes findings regarding people who are more prone to share material from fraudulent media organizations masquerading as news outlets and how researchers like Rebekah Tromble (Director of the Institute for Data, Democracy and Politics at George Washington University) are working with government entities like the European Union on balancing public research with data privacy. The episode closes with Amir and Joshua discussing disinformation campaigns in the context of the Russo-Ukrainian War. Academic research discussed in the podcast episode: Birds of the Same Feather Tweet Together: Bayesian Ideal Point Estimation Using Twitter Data. Tweeting From Left to Right: Is Online Political Communication More Than an Echo Chamber?

    MRO Network Podcast
    The State Of Eastern Europe's MRO Segment In 2022

    MRO Network Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 10:38


    A look at how the commercial aftermarket of Eastern Europe is faring so far this year.

    New Books in Jewish Studies
    K. Friedla and M. Nesselrodt, "Polish Jews in the Soviet Union (1939-1959): History and Memory of Deportation, Exile, and Survival" (Academic Studies Press, 2021)

    New Books in Jewish Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 45:42


    The majority of Poland's prewar Jewish population who fled to the interior of the Soviet Union managed to survive World War II and the Holocaust. Polish Jews in the Soviet Union (1939-1959): History and Memory of Deportation, Exile, and Survival (Academic Studies Press, 2021) tells the story of more than 200,000 Polish Jews who came to a foreign country as war refugees, forced laborers, or political prisoners. This diverse set of experiences is covered by historians, literary and memory scholars, and sociologists who specialize in the field of East European Jewish history and culture. Amber Nickell is Associate Professor of History at Fort Hays State University, Editor at H-Ukraine, and Host at NBN Jewish Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Eastern Europe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

    The Lance Wallnau Show
    Signs of the Times: Prophetic Perspectives on the Coming Great Awakening

    The Lance Wallnau Show

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 28:46


    We're living in a moment when certain events are coalescing, but what's fascinating is the signs on the earth. Russia put the spike into the globalist agenda of the World Economic Forum and Davos when Putin decided to disrupt the balance of power in Eastern Europe. China is experiencing an unexpected and self-inflicted economic setback - so what is God doing with China that is tapping the brakes of the great dragon? North Korea is locking down their country in panic mode; something is happening, and the scales are tipping. God is hearing the prayers of His people; we've got this coming up in today's broadcast and more!

    Welcome to TheInquisitor Podcast
    The Rise of China Is Inevitable, How You Respond Is Not

    Welcome to TheInquisitor Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 63:23


    "In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." Confucius If the short, medium and long term economic trends are to be believed, the USA's empire and economic hegemony are on the decline, whilst simultaneously China's stars are on the rise. That terrifies many in the West. But China needs strong global markets to continue its remarkable economic achievement. 60 years ago 96% of China was below the poverty line; today, fewer than 2% are below the poverty line. Whatever your views on their human rights and politics, there is no denying that is a breathtaking accomplishment. My feeling is we can fight the trend and lose a costly uphill battle. or we can accept the change and embrace the possibilities.  I'd love to hear what you think and how you see ways we can take advantage of this change rather than fearing it and letting it consume our time and energy in a lost cause. Contact Kathryn if you are planning to export to Eastern Europe, Middle East or China. Her LinkedIn profile is at linkedin.com/in/kathrynread WeChat: KathrynRead  Website: https://kathrynread.com/blog -- Contact me if you are looking for innovative, proven ways to 10x your sales revenues without losing control or the wheels coming off via marcus@laughs-last.com If you are the bees knees in your field and you want a steady stream of new business and established , stable accounts, and ask me how you can be part of our RevOps ecosystem -- And remember, "Before you embark on a journey of revenge, dig two graves."

    Coronavirus Daily
    The first war crimes trial in Ukraine concludes, with many, many more likely to come -- How are China, Taiwan and the U.S. all viewing the Russia-Ukraine conflict through the lens of a future war in Asia?

    Coronavirus Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 14:52


    The first war crimes trial out of the Russia-Ukraine war is over. A captured Russian tank commander pleaded guilty to killing a Ukrainian civilian and today inside of a Kyiv courtroom was sentenced to life in prison. But Russian officials today hinted that they'll be conducting their own trials of Ukrainian soldiers, with the recently surrendered defenders from Mariupol the primary targets for tribunals. Will this be the first of many war crimes trials to come out of this conflict?  Then we're going to briefly turn away from Ukraine and look toward another potential conflict that could closely mirror what's been playing out in Eastern Europe since February ... and that's China and Taiwan. During his trip through Asia, President Biden said the U-S will defend Taiwan against a Chinese invasion. We'll take a closer look at what that does to relations with China.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Cleared Hot
    Episode 234 - Lindsay Moran

    Cleared Hot

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 158:53


    Lindsay Moran is a former clandestine officer for the Central Intelligence Agency. She is a freelance writer whose articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and USA Today. In 2005, she published her memoir Blowing My Cover, My Life As A Spy, in which she wrote about her experiences as a case officer from 1998 to 2003. After graduating from Harvard and submitting an application that included her language skills and her time living in Eastern Europe as a Fulbright scholar, Moran was recruited to work for the CIA. She began her orientation in the Directorate of Operations (DO), the clandestine branch of the Agency, after which she was sent to "The Farm", the field academy for clandestine officers. at a base Her year of training included paramilitary exercises, mock ambushes, parachute jumps, car crashes, and driving powerboats.  She completed the training course in December 1999, a year after the CIA's director George Tenet declared war on Al-Qaeda.  After graduating from "The Farm", Moran was deployed under the official cover of a foreign diplomat. As a case officer for the CIA, Moran's primary job was to spot, assess, develop, and recruit foreigners willing to sell secrets, as well as maintaining the agents who were already under her control. Her interest in spy work gradually diminished because of the pressure her career had put on her personal life, and her growing disillusionment with the CIA's bureaucracy, especially after the September 11th attacks.  She was also disappointed with the agency itself since she felt that her career advancement as a case officer, in general, depended not so much on the quality of agents that she recruited, but rather on the quantity. The more recruits they had, the better. Disapproving of the war in Iraq, she worked on the Iraq desk at headquarters during the Iraq invasion and resigned from the CIA after five years there.

    Short Term Rental Secrets Podcast
    Ep 102 - How to Guarantee Five-Star Reviews with Sean McGregor

    Short Term Rental Secrets Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 37:26


    Sean McGregor literally found hosting through love. When he first started dating Lindsey in 2015, she was renting out the 2nd bedroom in her Austin, Texas apartment which covered her entire rent then when she would travel, she would rent out the entire home and it would pay her rent and travel expenses! At the same time, she was also starting up a CoLiving/CoWorking business for Digital Nomads and Solo Travelers called The SWAP Loft (SWAP = Stay Work And Play). Sean quickly became involved and was eventually the only person messaging up to 35 guests at a time across 3 Austin locations. All of this while Lindsey, Sean, & their son Jackson were thousands of miles away traveling through Eastern Europe. When Covid made hosting people in shared rooms a pretty terrible idea, Sean pivoted to CoHosting homes he had never been to, in places he had never visited before by viewing things from a traveler's mindset. How did it go? SWAP CoHosting now has over 2,400 Airbnb Reviews, are SuperHosts w/ a 4.96★ Rating since 2018, and SWAP is so confident in the experience provided to guests that it offers a “5★ Guarantee” where no commission is owed if a guest leaves anything other than a 5★ Review. https://stayworkandplay.com/ https://www.instagram.com/swapcohosting/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/seanmcgregor/

    RADIKAAL
    64. Lenka Bustikova on Radical Right Parties in Eastern Europe

    RADIKAAL

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 24:58


    My guest today is Lenka Bustikova, currently an Associate Professor of Political Science at Arizona State University who will soon join St. Anthony's College at the Oxford University, as Associate Professor in European Union and Comparative East European Politics. Her research focuses on party politics, democratic decay, ethnicity, and clientelism, with special reference to Eastern Europe. She is the author of the awards-winning book Extreme Reactions: Radical Right Mobilization in Eastern Europe, published by Cambridge University Press in 2019. Lenka is currently working on a new book project about the social origins of illiberalism, exploring the relationship between ‘uncivil society' and political radicalization in Eastern Europe. You can follow Lenka Bustikova on Twitter at @LBustikova.

    Beyond The Horizon
    The Impossible Task Of Tracking Weapons That Are Sent To Ukraine (5/22/22)

    Beyond The Horizon

    Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 21:21


    As the western world continues to pour weapons into Ukraine to help the people of the nation defend their sovereignty American intelligence officials are admitting that they have no idea where the weapons end up once they enter the theater. With the high level of technology that is being deployed, it is inevitable that criminal groups will be vying to get their hands on some of it to cause maximum damage to their enemies and anyone else who stands in their way. (commercial at 14:27)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://edition.cnn.com/2022/04/19/politics/us-weapons-ukraine-intelligence/index.html

    My Steps to Sobriety
    262 Lori Adams-Brown : How Inclusion is the Key to Solving Our World's Most Complex Challenges

    My Steps to Sobriety

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 89:18


    Lori Adams-Brown is a Business Leader, Podcast Host & Executive Producer of the A World of Difference podcast. Lori is a woman on a mission to bring systemic changes on a global scale by creating belonging and increasing inclusion where she pulls up a chair for new voices at the table. She worked in Indonesian tsunami relief in 2004, and learned that making a difference means listening, empathizing and rolling up our sleeves to make a significant impact together. She believes our stories are powerful to help us heal from trauma, and that our challenges are what motivate us to bring a much-needed change in our societies around the globe. Lori Adams-Brown works in Client Relations in a Silicon Valley startup. She grew up in Valencia, Venezuela where she learned to love city life, island life and merengue and salsa music. She worked for 20 years in international relief and development in Singapore and Indonesia. She has been a pastor at a large multi-site church in the San Francisco Bay Area, and Development Director of a nonprofit in the Silicon Valley. Lori speaks 6 languages. She holds an M.A. in Intercultural Studies from Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary and has B.A.s in Sociology and Spanish from Samford University. Her happy place is sipping a flat white coffee while having a deep conversation and enjoying either a beach or mountain vacation with the love of her life, Jason, their urbanite Third Culture Kids, and their Singaporean rescue dog. In Lori's words: Our world is polarized, sorted, and siloed in evho chambers that pit us against each other. The war in Eastern Europe is the culmination of what happens when we fail to listen, to see, and to include each other in solving our world's problems together. Learning to listen, crossing the street, crossing the aisle, and linking arms together in celebration of our differences will help us change the broken systems in our world. We need each other. 3 Top Tips 1. Listen to understand, and listen some more 2. Pro-actively seek out diverse voices to teach you 3. Link arms with people different from you to solve issues in your community, nation and world Social Media  loriadamsbrown.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/loriadamsbrown http://twitter.com/loriadbr https://www.instagram.com/aworldof.difference/ https://www.facebook.com/A-World-of-Difference-613933132591673/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7bPQfzq7kOZOk09QZWX7WA

    Soul Anchor Podcast
    182 Dr Petrovich interview part 5

    Soul Anchor Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 18:30


    In this special "postscript" episode, Dr. Petrovich shares his thoughts on the Ukraine-Russia Conflict. Dr. Petrovich's family come from Eastern Europe and she spent years working in a Seminary in Russia.

    Talk Eastern Europe
    Russian war against Ukraine: Special coverage ep. 5

    Talk Eastern Europe

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 42:03


    It has been now over 80 days since the Russian unprovoked invasion of Ukraine. In this special episode dedicated to the war in Ukraine, Adam sits down with Vira Konstantynova, a Ukrainian political scientist, expert in international relations and commentator in Ukrainian media. They discuss life in war time Kyiv, the developing situation in the south of the country, the ongoing negotiation process as well as the importance of Ukraine's victory in Eurovision.If you enjoy listening to our podcasts, please consider supporting us by becoming a patron: www.patreon.com/talkeasterneurope.Make sure to check out New Eastern Europe's latest issue titled: “The Pain of War” now available online at: https://bit.ly/3EITrLlWant to listen to more podcasts about Eastern Europe? Visit: www.talkeasterneurope.eu

    Berkeley Talks
    Scholars on Roman Vishniac's photos of Jewish life before the Holocaust

    Berkeley Talks

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 96:25


    In Berkeley Talks episode 141, a panel of scholars discuss the work of Roman Vishniac, a renowned Russian American photographer who took thousands of photos over seven decades and across three continents. Although Vishniac's genres were diverse, he's best known for images that he took of Jewish life in Central and Eastern Europe before the Holocaust.“These photographs are distinguished by their epiphenomena, the life circumstances of their subjects and the narratives that have surrounded these images,” said Jeffrey Shandler, professor of Jewish studies at Rutgers University, at a two-day event in May presented by The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life in collaboration with Berkeley's Center for Jewish Studies. “Shortly after these photographs were taken, most of the Jews they depict met a terrible fate during World War II. Those few who survived the Holocaust had to start their lives over in radically different circumstances."Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.Follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts.Music by Blue Dot Sessions.Photo of Rabbi Baruch Rabinowitz by Roman Vishniac, Mukacevo, ca. 1937-38. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Take as Directed
    Yana Panfilova: “We Are so Young, but a Lot of People Have This Belief That We Can Change Our Country”

    Take as Directed

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 21:33


    Yana Panfilova, a 24-year-old Ukrainian woman born with HIV, fled Kyiv shortly after Russia's invasion and is currently based in Berlin with her mother, grandmother and cat. Eight years ago, she helped found Teenergizer, an organization supported by UNAIDS that seeks to end discrimination against youth in Ukraine living with HIV. Over time, its scope widened to include other youth groups and its services expanded into mental health counselling and sexual health training. Affiliates arose across Eastern Europe and Central Asia. In the face of Covid-19 and, most recently, the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Teenergizer greatly enlarged its network in Ukraine from 20 to over 120 counsellors. Using her experience living with HIV, Panfilova has reached more than 5 million teens living with HIV and those facing other forms of discrimination, providing them with the support she wished she had as an adolescent.

    Philosophical Weightlifting Podcast
    Ep. 157: The War in the Ukraine | Sergei Putsov, PhD

    Philosophical Weightlifting Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 60:13


    We interrupt your regularly scheduled podcasts about programming and technique, to shed light on such an unfortunate situation taking place in Eastern Europe.Sergei Putsov is Ukrainian through and through, having trained on the Ukrainian national team and completed his PhD at the National University of Ukraine. In the episode of the podcast, we explore the war in the Ukraine, including why it started in the first place, what that looks like from the inside out, and how this will change Eastern Europe's landscape forever. Support the cause:https://torokhtiy.com/blogs/warm-body-cold-mind/help-ukraine

    POMEPS Conversations
    Seventh Member State, Lebanese Elections, Succession of Mohamed bin Zayed (S. 11, Ep. 32)

    POMEPS Conversations

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 68:55


    Megan Brown of Swarthmore College joins Marc Lynch on this week's podcast to discuss her new book, The Seventh Member State: Algeria, France, and the European Community. The book combats understandings of Europe's “natural” borders by emphasizing the extracontinental contours of the early union. The unification vision was never spatially limited, suggesting that contemporary arguments for geographic boundaries excluding Turkey and areas of Eastern Europe from the European Union must be seen as ahistorical. (Starts at 0:44). Sami Atallah of The Policy Initiative and Christiana Parreira of Princeton University discuss the results of recent elections in Lebanon (Starts at 33:27). Cinzia Bianco of the European Council on Foreign Relations discusses the succession of Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan in the United Arab Emirates. (Starts at 53:31). Music for this season's podcast was created by Bashir Saade (playing Ney) and Farah Kaddour (on Buzuq). You can find more of Bashir's work on his YouTube Channel.

    Explaining Ukraine
    Ep. № 99: Culture and imperialism in Eastern Europe – with Olesya Ostrovska

    Explaining Ukraine

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 45:52


    How can we rethink cultural imperialism and colonialism today? How can Russian imperialism be described? Is the Ukrainian culture part of the European heritage? Volodymyr Yermolenko, chief editor of UkraineWorld.org, spoke to Olesya Ostrovska, director of Mystetskyi Arsenal (Art Arsenal), one of the most reputable Ukrainian cultural institutions. This episode is made with support of the Delegation of the European Union to Ukraine. UkraineWorld.org is brought to you by Internews Ukraine. Support us at patreon.com/ukraineworld

    Amateur Hour
    The College Baseball Effect

    Amateur Hour

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 52:34


    Oregon State's LHP Cooper Hjerpe and Coastal Carolina's SS Eric Brown play thousands of miles apart but they both knew college baseball was the best path for them out of high school. For Hjerpe, Oregon State felt like home and his dad Carl's been a major influence in his development. For Brown, timing was on his side when Coastal came calling, his journey's incredible. Both are now projected to potentially be first and second round draft picks. Plus, PG's Senior Director of Scouting Operations Jered Goodwin shares about his trip to Eastern Europe and as always, PG College Baseball and Hunter Pence round out the podcast with Andrew Walters. Hosted by Daron Sutton and Dani Wexelman.

    Thoughts on the Market
    Mid-Year Economic Outlook: Slowing or Stopping?

    Thoughts on the Market

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 10:22


    As we forecast the remainder of an already uncertain 2022, new questions have emerged around economic data, inflation and the potential for a recession. Chief Cross Asset Strategist Andrew Sheets and Chief Global Economist Seth Carpenter discuss.-----Transcript-----Andrew Sheets: Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Andrew Sheets. Morgan Stanley's Chief Cross-Asset Strategist. Seth Carpenter: And I'm Seth Carpenter, Morgan Stanley's Chief Global Economist. Andrew Sheets: And today on the podcast, we'll be talking about our outlook for strategy and markets and the challenges they may face over the coming months. It's Tuesday, May 17th, at 4 p.m. in London. Seth Carpenter: And it's 11 a.m. in New York. Andrew Sheets: So Seth, the global Morgan Stanley Economic and Strategy Team have just completed our mid-year outlook process. And, you know, this is a big collaborative effort where the economists think about what the global economy will look like over the next 12 months, and the strategists think about what that could mean for markets. So as we talk about that outlook, I think the economy is the right place to start. As you're looking across the global economy and thinking about the insights from across your team, how do you think the global economy will look over the next 12 months and how is that going to be different from what we've been seeing? Seth Carpenter: So I will say, Andrew, that we titled our piece, the economics piece, slowing or stopping with a question mark, because I think there is a great deal of uncertainty out there about where the economy is going to go over the next six months, over the next 12 months. So what are we looking at as a baseline? Sharp deceleration, but no recession. And I say that with a little bit of trepidation because we also try to put out alternative scenarios, the way things could be better, the way things could be worse. And I have to say, from where I'm sitting right now, I see more ways for the global economy to be worse than the global economy to be better than our baseline scenario. Andrew Sheets: So Seth, I want to dig into that a little bit more because we're seeing, you know, more and more people in the market talk about the risk of a slowdown and talk about the risk of a recession. And yet, you know, it's also hard to ignore the fact that a lot of the economic data looks very good. You know, we have one of the lowest unemployment rates that we've seen in the U.S. in some time. Wage growth is high, spending activity all looks quite high and robust. So, what would drive growth to slow enough where people could really start to think that a recession is getting more likely?Seth Carpenter: So here's how I think about it. We've been coming into this year with a fair amount of momentum, but not a perfectly pristine outlook on the economy. If you take the United States, Q1, GDP was actually negative quarter on quarter. Now, there are a lot of special exceptions there, inventories were a big drag, net exports were a big drag. Underlying domestic spending in the U.S. held up reasonably solidly. But the fact that we had a big drag in the U.S. from net exports tells you a little bit about what's going on around the rest of the world. If you think about what's going on in Europe, we feel that the economy in the eurozone is actually quite precarious. The Russian invasion of Ukraine presents a clear and critical risk to the European economy. I mean, already we've seen a huge jump in energy prices, we've seen a huge jump in food prices and all of that has got to weigh on consumer spending, especially for consumers at the bottom end of the income distribution. And what we see in China is these wave after wave of COVID against the policy of COVID zero means that we're going to have both a hit to demand from China and some disruption to supply. Now, for the moment, we think the disruption to supply is smaller than the hit to demand because there is this closed loop approach to manufacturing. But nevertheless, that shock to China is going to hurt the global economy. Andrew Sheets: So Seth, the other major economic question that's out there is inflation, and you know where it's headed and what's driving it. So I was hoping you could talk a little bit about what our forecasts for inflation look like going forward. Seth Carpenter: Our view right now is that inflation is peaking or will be peaking soon. I say that again with a fair amount of caution because that's been our view for quite some time, and then we get these additional surprises. It's clear that in many, many economies, a huge amount of the inflation that we are seeing is coming from energy and from food. Now energy prices and food prices are not likely to fall noticeably any time soon. But after prices peak, if they go sideways from there, the inflationary impulse ends up starting to fade away and so we think that's important. We also think, the COVID zero policy in China notwithstanding, that there will be some grudging easing of supply chain frictions globally, and that's going to help bring down goods inflation as well over time. So we think inflation is high, we think inflation will stay high, but we think that it's roughly peaked and over the balance of this year and into next year it should be coming down.Andrew Sheets: As you think about central bank policy going forward, what do you think it will look like and do you think it can get back to, quote, normal? Seth Carpenter: I will say, when it comes to monetary policy, that's a question we want to ask globally. Right now, central banks globally are generically either tight or tightening policy. What do I mean by that? Well, we had a lot of EM central banks in Latin America and Eastern Europe that had already started to hike policy a lot last year, got to restrictive territory. And for those central banks, we actually see them starting to ease policy perhaps sometimes next year. For the rest of EM Asia, they're on the steady grind higher because even though inflation had started out being lower in the rest of EM Asia than in the developed market world, we are starting to see those inflationary pressures now and they're starting to normalize policy. And then we get to the developed market economies. There's hiking going on, there's tightening of policy led by the Fed who's out front. What does that mean about getting back to an economy like we had before COVID? One of the charts that we put in the Outlook document has the path for the level of GDP globally. And you can clearly see the huge drop off in the COVID recession, the rapid rebound that got us most of the way, but not all the way back to where we were before COVID hit. And then the question is, how does that growth look as we get past the worst of the COVID cycle? Six months ago, when we did the same exercise, we thought growth would be able to be strong enough that we would get our way back to that pre-COVID trend. But now, because supply has clearly been constrained because of commodity prices, because of labor market frictions, monetary policy is trying to slow aggregate demand down to align itself with this restricted supply. And so what that means is, in our forecast at least, we just never get back to that pre-COVID trend line. Seth Carpenter: All right, Andrew, but I've got a question to throw back at you. So the interplay between economics and markets is really uncertain right now. Where do you think we could be wrong? Could it be that the 3%, ten-year rate that we forecast is too low, is too high? Where do you think the risks are to our asset price forecasts? Andrew Sheets: Yeah, let me try to answer your question directly and talk about the interest rate outlook, because we are counting on interest rates consolidating in the U.S. around current levels. And our thinking is partly based on that economic outlook. You know, I think where we could be wrong is there's a lot of uncertainty around, you know, what level of interest rate will slow the economy enough to balance demand and supply, as you just mentioned. And I think a path where U.S. interest rates for, say, ten year treasuries are 4% rather than 3% like they are today, I think that's an environment where actually the economy is a little bit stronger than we expect and the consumer is less impacted by that higher rate. And it's going to take a higher rate for people to keep more money in savings rather than spending it in the economy and potentially driving that inflation. So I think the path to higher rates and in our view does flow through a more resilient consumer. And those higher rates could mean the economy holds up for longer but markets still struggle somewhat, because those higher discount rates that you can get from safe government bonds mean people will expect, mean people will expect a higher interest rate on a lot of other asset classes. In short, we think the risk reward here for bonds is more balanced. But I think the yield move so far this year has been surprising, it's been historically extreme, and we have to watch out for scenarios where it continues. Seth Carpenter: Okay. That's super helpful. But another channel of transmission of monetary policy comes through exchange rates. So the Fed has clearly been hiking, they've already done 75 basis points, they've lined themselves up to do 50 basis points at at least the next two meetings. Whereas the ECB hasn't even finished their QE program, they haven't started to raise interest rates yet. The Bank of Japan, for example, still at a really accommodative level, and we've seen both of those currencies against the dollar move pretty dramatically. Are we in one of those normal cycles where the dollar starts to rally as the Fed begins to hike, but eventually peaks and starts to come off? Or could we be seeing a broader divergence here? Andrew Sheets: Yeah. So I think this is to your point about a really interesting interplay between markets and Federal Reserve policy, because what the Fed is trying to do is it's trying to slow demand to bring it back in line with what the supply of things in the economy can provide at at current prices rather than it at higher prices, which would mean more inflation. And there's certainly an important interest rate part to that slowing of demand story. There's a stock market part of the story where if somebody's stock portfolio is lower, maybe they're, again, a little bit less inclined to spend money and that could slow the economy. But the currency is also a really important element of it, because that's another way that financial markets can feed back into the real economy and slow growth. And if you know you're an American company that is an exporter and the dollar is stronger, you likely face tougher competition against overseas sellers. And that acts as another headwind to the economy. So we think the dollar strengthens a little bit, you know, over the next month or two, but ultimately does weaken as the market starts to think enough is priced into the Fed. We're not going to get more Federal Reserve interest rates than are already implied by the market, and that helps tamp down some of the dollar strength that we've been seeing. Andrew Sheets: And Seth thanks for taking the time to talk. Seth Carpenter: Andrew, it's been great talking to you. Andrew Sheets: And thanks for listening. If you enjoy Thoughts on the Market, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts and share the podcast with a friend or colleague today.

    Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies
    How Will the War in Ukraine Impact China's Engagement in Eastern Europe?

    Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 82:41


    Over the past three decades, China has become a major trade partner and investor for Belarus, Moldova, and Ukraine. The region is also an important component of the BRI New Eurasian Land Bridge, providing alternative access to Western Europe. Russia's invasion of Ukraine is shaking up China's plans and prospects in this part of Eurasia. With the closing of borders between Russia and the EU, China's long-term interests are arguably at risk. The war is also resulting in geopolitical shifts and hardening divisions between the West on the one hand, and China and Russia on the other. This panel discusses China's response to Russia's war in Ukraine and the impact that today's dramatic developments will have on China's presence in Eastern Europe and its BRI plans. Panelists: Jinghan Zeng Professor of China and International Studies at Lancaster University and Academic Director of China Engagement and Director of Lancaster University Confucius Institute Una Aleksandra Bērziņa-Čerenkova Head, China Studies Centre, Riga Stradins University; Head, Asia Program, Latvian Institute of International Affairs Jeremy Garlick Director of the J. Masaryk Centre of International Studies and Associate Professor of International Relations and China Studies at Prague University of Economics and Business Arseny Sivitsky Co-Founder and Director of Minsk-based Center for Strategic and Foreign Policy Studies Moderators: Nargis Kassenova Senior Fellow, Program on Central Asia, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies James Gethyn Evans Communications Officer, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies; Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, Harvard University This event is sponsored by the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University, and the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
    May One Instruct a Non-Jew to Perform a Torah Violation of Shabbat in an Unusual Manner?

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 6:52


    The Halacha permits instructing a non-Jew to perform a Melacha for the sake of a Misva only in a case of "Shvut D'shvut"- a double Rabbinic prohibition. Asking the non-Jew in itself is a Rabbinic prohibition, but the Melacha he is being asked to perform must also be only a Rabbinic violation. The double leniency of two Rabbinic prohibitions allows instructing the non-Jew. Therefore, asking a non-Jew to turn on a light, even for a Misva such as learning Torah, is prohibited, since turning on lights, according to most authorities, is a Torah prohibition.However, the Pri Megadim (R. Yosef Ben Meir Teomim, 1727-1792, Poland-Germany) has a Hidush (novel Halachic approach) and permits instructing a non-Jew to perform a Torah prohibition with a Shinui (in an unusual fashion). He applies this to telling a non-Jew to pick an Etrog off the tree (A Torah violation) with his teeth (a Shinui) to perform the Misva of Lulav and Etrog. The Shach (R. Shabtai b. Meir HaKohen, 1621–1662, Eastern Europe) in his Nekudot HaKasef (198:18) deals with a case of a woman who needs to immerse in the Mikveh on Friday night forgot to cut her nails before Shabbat. He permits her to instruct a non-Jew to cut her nails with a Shinui. A practical example would be telling a non-Jew to turn on the lights by flicking the switch with his elbow in order for the Jew to learn Torah.All these cases are permitted since a Melacha is only a Torah prohibition if performed in the standard method. Even if a Jew would turn on the light switch with his elbow, it would only be a Rabbinic prohibition. Therefore, performing an act classified as a Torah prohibition in an unusual fashion constitutes a "Shvut D'shvut."The Mishna Berura (Rav Yisrael Meir Kagan of Radin, 1839-1933), concur with this ruling, whereas the Melahayich Omnayich cites Rav Elyashiv as being stringent. Hacham Ovadia (in Hazon Ovadia) and Hazon David rules in accordance with the lenient opinion. This leniency is a solution for the elderly who live on high floors in a building and are unable to walk down all the stairs to attend Bet Knesset. While it is prohibited to instruct a non-Jew to operate the elevator on their behalf, it would be permitted to tell the non-Jew to press the button with a Shinui, such as with their elbow. The elderly person would also be permitted to ascend in the elevator after Tefila in the same manner. Even though he has already completed the Misva of Tefila, remaining in the lobby for the rest of Shabbat is considered Sa'ar (suffering) which is tantamount to a Misva. When applying leniencies such as this, Hacham David recommends instructing the non-Jew before Shabbat.It should be emphasized the leniency only applies to cases of Misva or Sa'ar (suffering), but not to someone who wants a light to read secular books and magazines!SUMMARYIt is permitted to instruct a non-Jew on Shabbat to turn on a light with his elbow to enable someone to learn Torah or pray.

    Basketball History 101
    Episode 93 - Lithuania, 1992: Uniting a Nation

    Basketball History 101

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 23:14


    When the Soviet Union collapsed on December 26, 1991, the many individual republics hurried to create their new governments. One of these new nations was Lithuania, home to some of the greatest European basketball players of the time -- and the 1992 Olympics were fast approaching. Its government was so preoccupied with just trying to exist that it nearly was unable to register itself as an official basketball country with FIBA in time, but in a last-minute scramble, the Lithuanian basketball team secured their spot in those famous Barcelona Olympics. This is the underdog story of that 1992 team from somewhere in Eastern Europe that gave their tiny, brand-new nation its hope for a bright future. CREDITS Rick Loayza: Head researcher, writer, and voice Jacob Loayza: Editor, producer, and publisher   MUSIC "Korobeiniki" by The Osipov State Russian Folk Orchestra, Vera Nikolaevna Gorodovskaya, Vitaly Gnutov, and Rudolf Belov "Horizons" by Roa   SPORTS HISTORY NETWORK https://sportshistorynetwork.com/ (sportshistorynetwork.com) https://sportshistorynetwork.com/podcasts/basketball-history-101/ (sportshistorynetwork.com/podcasts/basketball-history-101/)   FACEBOOK https://m.facebook.com/Basketball-History-101-103801581493027/ (m.facebook.com/Basketball-History-101-103801581493027/)   BUSINESS CONTACT bballhistory101@gmail.com

    KZYX Public Affairs
    Pride Nation 101: Interview with Diane Patterson

    KZYX Public Affairs

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 58:13


    May 6, 2022--Cohosts Chad Swimmer and Roland Cory Medina interview Northern California Queer Folk Goddess, singer-songwriter Diane Patterson from Poland, near the Ukrainian border, where she is on tour taking her activist and poignant music on the road through Northern and Eastern Europe. They talk about her life, her music, and what she is seeing now on the ground on the edge of a war zone.

    The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
    5/13/22 John Quigley on the Russian Enclaves of Eastern Europe

    The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:58


    Download Episode. Scott talks with John Quigley about Crimea, the Donbas and other regions in Eastern Europe with heavy ties to Russia. In the mid-90s, Quigley was tasked with leading talks between the new Ukrainian government and the people of Crimea and the Donbas who saw themselves as Russian. Scott and Quigley go through the history of these regions and examine the issues with today's Eastern European borders.   Discussed on the show: “I led talks on Donbas and Crimea in the 90s. Here's how the war should end” (Responsible Statecraft) John Quigley was CSCE expert on Crimea 1994-95. A specialist in international law, he is Professor Emeritus at the Moritz College of Law, The Ohio State University. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

    Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
    5/13/22 John Quigley on the Russian Enclaves of Eastern Europe

    Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 32:27


    Scott talks with John Quigley about Crimea, the Donbas and other regions in Eastern Europe with heavy ties to Russia. In the mid-90s, Quigley was tasked with leading talks between the new Ukrainian government and the people of Crimea and the Donbas who saw themselves as Russian. Scott and Quigley go through the history of these regions and examine the issues with today's Eastern Eruopean borders.   Discussed on the show: “I led talks on Donbas and Crimea in the 90s. Here's how the war should end” (Responsible Statecraft) John Quigley was CSCE expert on Crimea 1994-95. A specialist in international law, he is Professor Emeritus at the Moritz College of Law, The Ohio State University. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Roundtable
    Congressional Corner with Sean Patrick Maloney

    The Roundtable

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 9:21


    All eyes remain on Eastern Europe. In today's Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a Democrat from the 18th district, speaks with WAMC's Ian Pickus.

    Women Entrepreneurs Radio
    "Taking A Leap of Faith" with Bronwyn Jane Psychic Medium, Teacher & Soul Coach

    Women Entrepreneurs Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 59:49


    In this episode, Bronwyn Jane shares how she took her leap of faith going from a successful retailer business owner to full time medium.   Bronwyn Jane has been aware of her connection to the spirit world since she was eight years old. In 2017, after over ten years of training with some of Australia's leading metaphysical teachers and world-renowned Psychic Mediums, Bronwyn embraced her ability professionally.   Prior to starting her own successful online perfume business she had a successful career in banking and finance. A few years later, as a young mother she started her online perfume business with $100. In the first year she turned over $500,000. Over the following 8 years it grew with customers in Australia, USA, India, UK, Europe, Eastern Europe and USA. This was her passion until she decided to step towards the world of being a psychic medium.    Bronwyn received the international credentials of Certified Spiritual Advisor (Psychic, Medium & Healer), LWISSD, and Advanced Lightworker from Tony Stockwell Soul Space in 2021.   Her wealth of knowledge and experience, and her grounded, compassionate style catch the attention of people worldwide. Bronwyn is frequently invited to speak on her fields of expertise, internationally FB: bronwynjanemedium IG: bronwynjanemedium  www.bronwynjanemedium.com   Deborah Bailey is a writer and host of Women Entrepreneurs Radio podcast. Learn more about her and her books and writing courses at: https://DBaileycoach.com For Deborah's romantic fantasy, science fiction and paranormal romance novels, visit: https://dbaileycoach.com/brightbooks

    CounterVortex Podcast
    CounterVortex Episode 123: Whither Khazaria?

    CounterVortex Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 36:26


    In Episode 123 of the CounterVortex podcast, Bill Weinberg discusses the history of Khazaria, the medieval Turko-Jewish empire in what is now southern Russia and eastern Ukraine. While the fate of the mysterious Khazars has won much attention from scholars—and controversy—because of what it may reveal about the origin of the Jews of Eastern Europe, this question also touches on the origins of the Ukrainian people and state. Whatever the validity of the "Khazar Thesis" about the ethnogenesis of the Ashkenazim, it is the Ukrainian Jews—such as President Volodymyr Zelensky—who are the most likely to trace a lineage of the Khazars. In 2021, Zelenksy and the Ukrainian parliament passed a law recognizing the cultural and autonomous rights of three indigenous peoples of the Russian-annexed Crimean Peninsula: the Muslim Tatars and the Jewish Krymchaks and Karaites. Of any Jews on Earth, it is these last two groups that have the best claim to the Khazar inheritance—and are now a part of the struggle for a free and multicultural Ukraine, in repudiation of the Russian neo-imperialist project. Listen on SoundCloud or via Patreon. https://www.patreon.com/countervortex Books discussed: The Jews of Khazaria by Kevin Alan Brook; The Thirteenth Tribe: The Khazar Empire and its Heritage by Arthur Koestler; The Kuzari: In Defense of the Despised Faith by Rabbi Yehuda HaLevi Research assistance: David Bloom Production by Chris Rywalt We ask listeners to donate just $1 per weekly podcast via Patreon -- or $2 for our new special offer! We now have 36 subscribers. If you appreciate our work, please become Number 37!

    The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
    5/13/22 David Stockman on Washington's Military Keynesianism

    The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 31:15


     Download Episode. Scott interviews David Stockman about the war in Ukraine and the American economy. They begin by discussing the war in Ukraine. Stockman argues that the irrational motivator behind Washington's actions is Trump-Derangement Syndrome — that Putin is a surrogate for Trump and you need to demonstrate blind hatred for him to be accepted. Next, they turn to the economy. Stockman recounts the trouble the American economy was in before the pandemic and war in Eastern Europe came about to make everything worse. Scott and Stockman end by discussing the painful path ahead. Discussed on the show: Mearsheimer's short debate on PBS Secrets of the Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country by William Greider David Stockman is the ultimate Washington insider turned iconoclast. He began his career in Washington as a young man and quickly rose through the ranks of the Republican Party to become the Director of the Office of Management and Budget under President Ronald Reagan. After leaving the White House, Stockman had a 20-year career on Wall Street. He is the author of Trumped!, The Triumph of Politics, and his history of the financial crisis, The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

    Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
    5/13/22 David Stockman on Washinton's Military Keynesianism

    Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

    Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 32:44


    Scott interviews David Stockman about the war in Ukraine and the American economy. They begin by discussing the war in Ukraine. Stockman argues that the irrational motivator behind Washington's actions is Trump-Derangement Syndrome — that Putin is a surrogate for Trump and you need to demonstrate blind hatred for him to be accepted. Next, they turn to the economy. Stockman recounts the trouble the American economy was in before the pandemic and war in Eastern Europe came about to make everything worse. Scott and Stockman end by discussing the painful path ahead. Discussed on the show: Mearsheimer's short debate on PBS Secrets of the Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country by William Greider David Stockman is the ultimate Washington insider turned iconoclast. He began his career in Washington as a young man and quickly rose through the ranks of the Republican Party to become the Director of the Office of Management and Budget under President Ronald Reagan. After leaving the White House, Stockman had a 20-year career on Wall Street. He is the author of Trumped!, The Triumph of Politics, and his history of the financial crisis, The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices