Podcasts about Eastern Europe

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Eastern part of the European continent

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  • Nov 30, 2021LATEST
Eastern Europe

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Best podcasts about Eastern Europe

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Latest podcast episodes about Eastern Europe

A Better Peace: The War Room Podcast
DEFENDING THE HOMELAND IN THE CYBER AGE

A Better Peace: The War Room Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 38:49


Since its birth, the United States has benefited from the protection of two vast oceans to the east and west. The events of 9/11, of course, brought new attention to the defense of the homeland and recent cyber attacks redefined thoughts of secure borders. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Matt Cavanaugh, Franky Matisek and Bert Tussing to the virtual studio to discuss their part in the Homeland Defense Institute. They join podcast editor Ron Granieri to examine how information is being used to divide and attack the civilian population. They look at examples of cyber attacks and the use of misinformation in Eastern Europe and discuss how Information as a part of DIME has come to the forefront in the cyber age.

Glenn Davis Soccer
11/29/2021 Former What's The Score Host Bogdan Pasat joins Soccer Matters

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 23:53


Former What's The Score Host Bogdan Pasat joined Glenn to talk all about his upbringing in the beautiful game growing up in Eastern Europe, what he makes of the current state of a few European national teams, and much more!

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.29.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 58:46


Yoga improves quality of life in men with new diagnosis of prostate cancer University of Texas at San Antonio, November 23, 2021 An estimated 1.4 million men were diagnosed with prostate cancer worldwide in 2020, according to the American Cancer Society and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. With a new diagnosis of prostate cancer, these men have approximately a 30% incidence of depression and anxiety, a fourfold higher risk of heart attack and a twofold higher risk of committing suicide. Yoga, a set of specific body postures combined with breathing techniques and mindfulness, may be an easy-to-implement answer in this stressful situation, according to a study published Nov. 23 in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. A pilot randomized clinical trial by urology researchers at the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, enrolled 29 men who were awaiting prostatectomy. Fourteen were randomized to participate in yoga and 15 were assigned to the standard of care, which was just waiting for surgery. “We gave the active intervention group six weeks of yoga, at least twice a week, for 60 to 75 minutes,” said lead author Dharam Kaushik, MD, associate professor of urology in UT Health San Antonio's Joe R. and Teresa Lozano School of Medicine and cancer surgeon with the Mays Cancer Center. Via questionnaires, the team documented the men's perceived quality of life at the start of yoga, at the time of surgery and after surgery. Men who did not do yoga completed the same questionnaires at study enrollment and at the other two junctures. The team drew blood samples before the men began yoga and after all sessions were completed. Samples were also taken from men who did not do yoga. Sense of well-being  “What we found was very interesting,” Dr. Kaushik said. “Yoga improved quality of life in men compared to the standard of care, specifically on the fatigue scale, meaning they were less tired; on sexual function; and on their functional, physical and social well-being.” A more robust immune response and lower levels of inflammation were observed in the yoga group, he added. “This is positive data and further large-scale studies are needed, for which this pilot study can be a model,” Dr. Kaushik said. Biomarkers and yoga The primary study outcome was self-reported quality of life assessed by the questionnaires. Changes in immune cell status and inflammatory markers with yoga were secondary outcomes. The yoga group showed increased numbers of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which are important contributors to immune health. Among other markers, the yoga group also exhibited a reduction in inflammatory markers called cytokines. The median age of participants was 56 years in the yoga group and 60 years in the standard of care group. Yoga has been studied in breast cancer, but not at the level of detail of this study, matching self-reported quality of life data with markers of immune response and inflammation, Dr. Kaushik said. “If we are able to encourage patients to do a small, inexpensive and easy-to-implement intervention that can have a big impact, then why not?” he said.     Researchers Discover How Antibiotic Power of Garlic Fights Chronic Infections Washington State University, November 28, 2021   Garlic is probably nature's most potent food. It is one of the reasons people who eat the Mediterranean diet live such long healthy lives. An active sulphurous compound found in garlic can be used to fight robust bacteria in patients with chronic infections, a new study from the University of Copenhagen indicates.   A previous finding from Washington State University showed that garlic is 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics at fighting disease causing bacteria commonly responsible for foodborne illness.  Here the researchers show that the garlic compound is able to destroy important components in the bacteria's communication systems, which involve regulatory RNA molecules. 'We really believe this method can lead to treatment of patients, who otherwise have poor prospects. Because chronic infections like cystic fibrosis can be very robust. But now we, together with a private company, have enough knowledge to further develop the garlic drug and test it on patients', says Assistant Professor Tim Holm Jakobsen from the Costerton Biofilm Center at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology. The study is the latest addition from a research group headed by Professor Michael Givskov, which since 2005 has focussed on garlic's effect on bacteria. At the time they learned that garlic extract is able to inhibit bacteria, and in 2012 they showed that the sulphurous compound ajoene found in garlic is responsible for the effect. The new study, which has been published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports, takes an even closer look and documents ajoene's ability to inhibit small regulatory RNA molecules in two types of bacteria. 'The two types of bacteria we have studied are very important. They are called Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. They actually belong to two very different bacteria families and are normally fought using different methods. But the garlic compound is able to fight both at once and therefore may prove an effective drug when used together with antibiotics', says Tim Holm Jakobsen. Previous studies have shown that garlic appears to offer the most powerful, naturally occurring resistance to bacteria. In addition to inhibiting the bacteria's RNA molecules, the active garlic compound also damages the protective slimy matrix surrounding the bacteria, the so-called biofilm. When the biofilm is destroyed or weakened, both antibiotics and the body's own immune system are able to attack the bacteria more directly and thus remove the infection. In 2012 the researchers took out a patent on the use of ajoene to fight bacterial infections. Similar patents have been taken out for compounds in allicin -- which gives garlic its aroma and flavour -- and is known as one of the world's most powerful antioxidants.     Calorie restriction cycles could help cancer patients Fondazione Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori (Italy), November 22 2021.  Findings from a trial reported on November 17, 2021 in Cancer Discovery revealed that five days of a diet that mimics fasting is safe for people with cancer and could improve factors that affect prognosis. The trial included 101 patients with different cancers treated with standard therapies. Participants were assigned to a five-day low protein, low carbohydrate, plant-based diet that provided up to 600 calories on the first day and up to 300 calories per day during the remaining days. The regimen was repeated every three or four weeks for up to eight cycles. Each period of calorie restriction was followed by a period in which patients were instructed to adhere to healthy diet and lifestyle guidelines. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of each calorie restricted period. Severe adverse events related to the diet were reported by 12.9% of the participants, which was significantly lower than the 20% figure hypothesized by the researchers prior to the study. Median plasma glucose, serum insulin and serum IGF-1 were decreased by 18.6%, 50.7% and 30.3% after each cycle. In an evaluation conducted among a subgroup of participants after the first calorie restricted cycle, a reduction in peripheral blood immunosuppressive cells and an increase of immune cells known as activated CD8+ T cells was observed. To explore the effects of the diet on immunity within cancer patients' tumors, the researchers performed an analysis of findings from an ongoing trial that administered the fasting-mimicking diet prior to tumor removal in breast cancer patients. Tumor microenvironments revealed enhanced tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells and additional favorable immune factors when compared to biopsy samples obtained before the diet was initiated.  “Cyclic fasting-mimicking diet is a safe, feasible and inexpensive dietary intervention that modulates systemic metabolism and boosts antitumor immunity in cancer patients,” the authors concluded.     Morning exposure to deep red light improves declining eyesight University College London, November 24, 2021       Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a pioneering new study by UCL researchers. Published in Scientific Reports, the study builds on the team's previous work*, which showed daily three-minute exposure to longwave deep red light ‘switched on' energy producing mitochondria cells in the human retina, helping boost naturally declining vision.   For this latest study, scientists wanted to establish what effect a single three-minute exposure would have, while also using much lower energy levels than their previous studies. Furthermore, building on separate UCL research in flies** that found mitochondria display ‘shifting workloads' depending on the time of day, the team compared morning exposure to afternoon exposure. In summary, researchers found there was, on average, a 17% improvement in participants' colour contrast vision when exposed to three minutes of 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light in the morning and the effects of this single exposure lasted for at least a week. However, when the same test was conducted in the afternoon, no improvement was seen. Scientists say the benefits of deep red light, highlighted by the findings, mark a breakthrough for eye health and should lead to affordable home-based eye therapies, helping the millions of people globally with naturally declining vision. Lead author, Professor Glen Jeffery (UCL Institute of Ophthalmology), said: “We demonstrate that one single exposure to long wave deep red light in the morning can significantly improve declining vision, which is a major health and wellbeing issue, affecting millions of people globally. “This simple intervention applied at the population level would significantly impact on quality of life as people age and would likely result in reduced social costs that arise from problems associated with reduced vision.” Naturally declining vision and mitochondria In humans around 40 years old, cells in the eye's retina begin to age, and the pace of this ageing is caused, in part, when the cell's mitochondria, whose role is to produce energy (known as ATP) and boost cell function, also start to decline. Mitochondrial density is greatest in the retina's photoreceptor cells, which have high energy demands. As a result, the retina ages faster than other organs, with a 70% ATP reduction over life, causing a significant decline in photoreceptor function as they lack the energy to perform their normal role. In studying the effects of deep red light in humans, researchers built on their previous findings in mice, bumblebees and fruit flies, which all found significant improvements in the function of the retina's photoreceptors when their eyes were exposed to 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light. “Mitochondria have specific sensitivities to long wavelength light influencing their performance: longer wavelengths spanning 650 to 900nm improve mitochondrial performance to increase energy production,” said Professor Jeffery. Morning and afternoon studies The retina's photoreceptor population is formed of cones, which mediate colour vision, and rods, which adapt vision in low/dim light. This study focused on cones*** and observed colour contrast sensitivity, along the protan axis (measuring red-green contrast) and the tritan axis (blue-yellow). All the participants were aged between 34 and 70, had no ocular disease, completed a questionnaire regarding eye health prior to testing, and had normal colour vision (cone function). This was assessed using a ‘Chroma Test': identifying coloured letters that had very low contrast and appeared increasingly blurred, a process called colour contrast.    Using a provided LED device all 20 participants (13 female and 7 male) were exposed to three minutes of 670nm deep red light in the morning between 8am and 9am. Their colour vision was then tested again three hours post exposure and 10 of the participants were also tested one week post exposure.  On average there was a ‘significant' 17% improvement in colour vision, which lasted a week in tested participants; in some older participants there was a 20% improvement, also lasting a week. A few months on from the first test (ensuring any positive effects of the deep red light had been ‘washed out') six (three female, three male) of the 20 participants, carried out the same test in the afternoon, between 12pm to 1pm.  When participants then had their colour vision tested again, it showed zero improvement. Professor Jeffery said: “Using a simple LED device once a week, recharges the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery. “And morning exposure is absolutely key to achieving improvements in declining vision: as we have previously seen in flies, mitochondria have shifting work patterns and do not respond in the same way to light in the afternoon – this study confirms this.” For this study the light energy emitted by the LED torch was just 8mW/cm2, rather than 40mW/cm2, which they had previously used. This has the effect of dimming the light but does not affect the wavelength. While both energy levels are perfectly safe for the human eye, reducing the energy further is an additional benefit. Home-based affordable eye therapies With a paucity of affordable deep red-light eye-therapies available, Professor Jeffery has been working for no commercial gain with Planet Lighting UK, a small company in Wales and others, with the aim of producing 670nm infra-red eye ware at an affordable cost, in contrast to some other LED devices designed to improve vision available in the US for over $20,000. “The technology is simple and very safe; the energy delivered by 670nm long wave light is not that much greater than that found in natural environmental light,” Professor Jeffery said. “Given its simplicity, I am confident an easy-to-use device can be made available at an affordable cost to the general public. “In the near future, a once a week three-minute exposure to deep red light could be done while making a coffee, or on the commute listening to a podcast, and such a simple addition could transform eye care and vision around the world.” Study limitations Despite the clarity of the results, researchers say some of the data are “noisy”. While positive effects are clear for individuals following 670nm exposure, the magnitude of improvements can vary markedly between those of similar ages. Therefore, some caution is needed in interpretating the data. It is possible that there are other variables between individuals that influence the degree of improvement that the researchers have not identified so far and would require a larger sample size. This research was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, and Sight Research UK.   Global rise in red/processed meat trade linked to sharp increase in diet-related illness Michigan State University & University of California at Merced, November 22, 2021   The global rise in the red and processed meat trade over the past 30 years is linked to a sharp increase in diet related ill health, with the impact greatest in Northern and Eastern Europe and the island nations of the Caribbean and Oceania, finds an analysis published in the open access journal BMJ Global Health. Health policies should be integrated with agricultural and trade policies among importing and exporting nations as a matter of urgency, to stave off further personal and societal costs, say the researchers. Among continuous urbanisation and income growth, the global red and processed meat trade has risen exponentially to meet demand. This trend has implications for the environment because of the impact it has on land use and biodiversity loss.  And high red and processed meat consumption is linked to a heightened risk of non-communicable diseases, particularly bowel cancer, diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease. The researchers wanted to find out what impact the red and processed meat trade might be having on diet-related non-communicable disease trends and which countries might be particularly vulnerable.  They drew on data on meat production and trade from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) from 1993 to 2018 for 154 countries, focusing on 14 red meat items derived from beef, pork, lamb and goat, and six processed primarily beef and pork items, preserved by smoking, salting, curing, or chemicals. They then calculated the proportions of deaths and years of life lived with disability (DALYs) attributable to diet as a result of bowel cancer, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease among those aged 25 and over in each country. The global red and processed meat trade increased by more than 148% from 10 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 25 metric tonnes in 2016–18. While the number of net exporting countries fell from 33 in 1993–5 to 26 in 2016–18, net importing countries rose from 121 to 128.  Developed countries in Europe accounted for half of total red and processed meat exports in 1993–95 and 2016–18.  But developing countries in South America, such as Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay made up nearly 10% in 2016–18, up from around 5% in 1993–5.  Developing countries also increased their meat imports by 342.5% from 2 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 9 metric tonnes in 2016–18; developed countries doubled theirs from 8 metric tonnes to 16. Diet related attributable death and DALY rates associated with the global meat trade rose in three quarters of the 154 countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18. Worldwide, the researchers calculated that increases in red and processed meat consumption, aligned to increases in trade, accounted for 10,898 attributable deaths in 2016–18, an increase of nearly 75% on the figures for 1993-5.  The global meat trade contributed to increases of 55% and 71%, respectively, in attributable deaths and DALYs in developed countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18.  The equivalent figures in developing countries were significantly higher: 137% and 140%, respectively, largely as a result of increased demand for meat, prompted by rapid urbanisation and income growth, suggest the researchers. Between 1993– 2018, island nations in the Caribbean and Oceania and  countries in Northern and Eastern Europe became particularly vulnerable to diet-related disease and deaths associated with large meat imports.  The island nations have limited land for meat production, so depend heavily on meat imports, while many of the European countries, such as Slovakia, Lithuania and Latvia, benefited from regional trade agreements and tariff exemptions after joining the European Union in 2003-4, which accelerated meat imports, explain the researchers. In 1993–5, the top 10 countries with the highest proportion of deaths attributable to red meat consumption included Tonga, United Arab Emirates, Barbados, Fiji, Gabon, Bahamas, Greece, Malta, Brunei and Saint Lucia.  In 2016–2018, the top 10 included The Netherlands, Bahamas, Tonga, Denmark, Antigua and Barbuda, Seychelles, United Arab Emirates, Singapore, Croatia and Greece. The meat trade in these countries accounted for more than 7% of all deaths attributable to diets high in both red and processed meat in 2016-18. The trends in attributable DALYs more or less mirrored those for attributable deaths. Attributable death and DALY rates associated with global meat trade fell in 34 countries between 1993–5 and 2016–18. But this was partly due to population growth exceeding increases in meat imports in 24 countries, while domestic meat production increased in 19.  In more than a half of these countries (20) the absolute number of diet-related deaths and DALYs rose in tandem with increased meat consumption between 1993-5 and 2016-18. And some countries, including Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina and Germany increasingly acted as net meat exporters, changing their land use, with consequent biodiversity loss. This is an observational study, and as such, can't establish cause. And the researchers acknowledge that many countries import and process red meat items for export, which may have skewed their findings. Nevertheless, they conclude: “This study shows that global increases in red and processed meat trade contribute to the abrupt increase of diet-related [non-communicable diseases]... Future interventions need to urgently integrate health policies with agricultural and trade policies by cooperating between responsible exporting and importing countries.”     Glyphosate levels sharply increase by 1,208% within the human body University of California San Diego The environmental dangers of glyphosate in Roundup and other weed killer products have been well documented. Now new research, from a team led by Paul Mills of the University of California San Diego, has found it could be negatively affecting human health – especially in lower-income communities, as illustrated by the 1,208 percent increase in human glyphosate levels. The study tracked people in southern California over age 50 from the years 1993 to 1996 as well as from 2014 to 2016. Urine samples were collected from these persons (periodically) during that time. Number of persons testing positive for glyphosate in their urine went up by 500 percent within 20 years The researchers determined the percentage of persons testing positive for glyphosate went up an alarming 500 percent during that time period.  And, for some, glyphosate levels surged by a frightening 1,208 percent. A past UK trial of rats fed low doses of glyphosate – over their lifetimes – were found to have a higher risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Research out of King's College in London found this toxic herbicide ingredient can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats at just 4 nanograms/kg. By the way, this amount is 437,000 times below levels that are allowed in the United States. In more recent research, the levels of glyphosate in the humans studied were proportionately 100-fold higher. Further research regarding the connection between glyphosate and liver disease are being planned.  But, what we already know has been published in JAMA. Important to note: people who live in rural areas near farms that use Roundup are at the highest risk for exposure.  Yet, traces of this herbicide ingredient – left on fruits and vegetables – can easily make its way into the bloodstream of anyone who consumes these foods. Glyphosate weed killer in Roundup considered “probable carcinogen” by World Health Organization While Roundup was developed to kill weeds, many weed types have actually become resistant to the herbicide. This is causing some farmers to use even more Roundup. Glyphosate has been listed as a “probable human carcinogen” by WHO (the World Health Organization). It has also been linked with birth defects, ADHD and autism. Studies on humans have shown Roundup causes liver damage even when found in “permissible amounts” in tap water. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease currently affects 90 million Americans and is on the verge of becoming a global epidemic. Associated disorders such as diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome are also soaring. Glyphosate in Roundup weed killer INCREASES the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease While the known causes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease include overeating, sugary foods and a sedentary lifestyle, some health professionals are beginning to wonder if glyphosate exposure is exacerbating this trend. NAFLD symptoms include chronic fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain and/or swelling, weight loss, jaundice, itching, confusion and swelling of the legs. Untreated, NAFLD can lead to liver cancer and liver failure. Unfortunately, glyphosate residue has been showing up in increasing amounts in our food supply. It has even been detected in wine, table salt and vaccines. So, it really isn't a wonder how glyphosate levels in the human bloodstream have increased by 1,208 percent. If you're outraged by this, take the time to voice your opinion to your state representatives. And, at the very least, eat organic fruits and vegetables – as often as possible to avoid this cancer-causing substance.   Study finds psychedelic microdosing improves mental health University of British Columbia, November 23, 2021 An international study led by UBC Okanagan researchers suggests repeated use of small doses of psychedelics such as psilocybin or LSD can be a valuable tool for those struggling with anxiety and depression. The study, recently published in Nature: Scientific Reports, demonstrated fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and greater feelings of wellbeing among individuals who reported consuming psychedelics in small quantities, or microdosing, compared to those who did not. Microdosing involves regular self-administration of psychedelic substances in amounts small enough to not impair normal cognitive functioning. Considering this is the largest psychedelic microdosing study published to date, the results are encouraging, says UBCO doctoral student and lead author Joseph Rootman. "In total, we followed more than 8,500 people from 75 countries using an anonymous self-reporting system—about half were following a microdosing regimen and half were not," Rootman explains. "In comparing microdosers and non-microdosers, there was a clear association between microdosing and fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress—which is important given the high prevalence of these conditions and the substantial suffering they cause." The study is also the first to systematically examine the practice of stacking, or combining microdoses of psychedelics with other substances like niacin, lions mane mushrooms and cacao, which some believe work in conjunction to maximize benefit. Rootman works with Dr. Zach Walsh, a psychology professor in UBCO's Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dr. Walsh says it's an exciting time for research in this area. "These findings highlight adults who are microdosing to treat their mental health conditions and enhance their wellbeing—rather than simply to get high," says Dr. Walsh. "We have an epidemic of mental health problems, with existing treatments that don't work for everyone. We need to follow the lead of patients who are taking these initiatives to improve their wellbeing and reduce suffering." Study co-author Kalin Harvey is the chief technology officer of Quantified Citizen, a mobile health research platform. He says this study highlights the potential of citizen science. "The use of citizen science allows us to examine the effects of behaviors that are difficult to study in the lab due to regulatory challenges and stigma associated with the now discredited 'war on drugs.'" According to the Canadian Mental Health Association, one in five Canadians personally experience a mental health problem or illness each year. This is one of the many reasons Dr. Walsh says conducting innovative psychological research is imperative. "These cross-sectional findings are promising and highlight the need for further investigation to better determine the impacts of factors like dosage and stacking," explains Dr. Walsh. "While the data is growing to support the use of psychedelics like psilocybin in large doses to treat depression and addiction—our data also helps to expand our understanding of how psychedelics may also help in smaller doses."

New Books in Jewish Studies
Hadassah Lieberman, "Hadassah: An American Story" (Brandeis UP, 2021)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 61:20


Born in Prague to Holocaust survivors, Hadassah Lieberman and her family immigrated in 1949 to the United States. She went on to earn a BA from Boston University in government and dramatics and an MA in international relations and American government from Northeastern University. She built a career devoted largely to public health that has included positions at Lehman Brothers, Pfizer, and the National Research Council. After her first marriage ended in divorce, she married Joe Lieberman, a US senator from Connecticut who was the Democratic nominee for vice president with Al Gore and would go on to run for president. In Hadassah: An American Story (Brandeis UP, 2021), Lieberman pens the compelling story of her extraordinary life: from her family's experience in Eastern Europe to their move to Gardner, Massachusetts; forging her career; experiencing divorce; and, following her remarriage, her life on the national political stage. By offering insight into her identity as an immigrant, an American Jew, a working woman, and a wife, mother, and grandmother, Lieberman's moving memoir speaks to many of the major issues of our time, from immigration to gender politics. Featuring an introduction by Joe Lieberman and an afterword by Megan McCain, it is a true American story. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books Network
Hadassah Lieberman, "Hadassah: An American Story" (Brandeis UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 61:20


Born in Prague to Holocaust survivors, Hadassah Lieberman and her family immigrated in 1949 to the United States. She went on to earn a BA from Boston University in government and dramatics and an MA in international relations and American government from Northeastern University. She built a career devoted largely to public health that has included positions at Lehman Brothers, Pfizer, and the National Research Council. After her first marriage ended in divorce, she married Joe Lieberman, a US senator from Connecticut who was the Democratic nominee for vice president with Al Gore and would go on to run for president. In Hadassah: An American Story (Brandeis UP, 2021), Lieberman pens the compelling story of her extraordinary life: from her family's experience in Eastern Europe to their move to Gardner, Massachusetts; forging her career; experiencing divorce; and, following her remarriage, her life on the national political stage. By offering insight into her identity as an immigrant, an American Jew, a working woman, and a wife, mother, and grandmother, Lieberman's moving memoir speaks to many of the major issues of our time, from immigration to gender politics. Featuring an introduction by Joe Lieberman and an afterword by Megan McCain, it is a true American story. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Hadassah Lieberman, "Hadassah: An American Story" (Brandeis UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 61:20


Born in Prague to Holocaust survivors, Hadassah Lieberman and her family immigrated in 1949 to the United States. She went on to earn a BA from Boston University in government and dramatics and an MA in international relations and American government from Northeastern University. She built a career devoted largely to public health that has included positions at Lehman Brothers, Pfizer, and the National Research Council. After her first marriage ended in divorce, she married Joe Lieberman, a US senator from Connecticut who was the Democratic nominee for vice president with Al Gore and would go on to run for president. In Hadassah: An American Story (Brandeis UP, 2021), Lieberman pens the compelling story of her extraordinary life: from her family's experience in Eastern Europe to their move to Gardner, Massachusetts; forging her career; experiencing divorce; and, following her remarriage, her life on the national political stage. By offering insight into her identity as an immigrant, an American Jew, a working woman, and a wife, mother, and grandmother, Lieberman's moving memoir speaks to many of the major issues of our time, from immigration to gender politics. Featuring an introduction by Joe Lieberman and an afterword by Megan McCain, it is a true American story. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Biography
Hadassah Lieberman, "Hadassah: An American Story" (Brandeis UP, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 61:20


Born in Prague to Holocaust survivors, Hadassah Lieberman and her family immigrated in 1949 to the United States. She went on to earn a BA from Boston University in government and dramatics and an MA in international relations and American government from Northeastern University. She built a career devoted largely to public health that has included positions at Lehman Brothers, Pfizer, and the National Research Council. After her first marriage ended in divorce, she married Joe Lieberman, a US senator from Connecticut who was the Democratic nominee for vice president with Al Gore and would go on to run for president. In Hadassah: An American Story (Brandeis UP, 2021), Lieberman pens the compelling story of her extraordinary life: from her family's experience in Eastern Europe to their move to Gardner, Massachusetts; forging her career; experiencing divorce; and, following her remarriage, her life on the national political stage. By offering insight into her identity as an immigrant, an American Jew, a working woman, and a wife, mother, and grandmother, Lieberman's moving memoir speaks to many of the major issues of our time, from immigration to gender politics. Featuring an introduction by Joe Lieberman and an afterword by Megan McCain, it is a true American story. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in History
Hadassah Lieberman, "Hadassah: An American Story" (Brandeis UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 61:20


Born in Prague to Holocaust survivors, Hadassah Lieberman and her family immigrated in 1949 to the United States. She went on to earn a BA from Boston University in government and dramatics and an MA in international relations and American government from Northeastern University. She built a career devoted largely to public health that has included positions at Lehman Brothers, Pfizer, and the National Research Council. After her first marriage ended in divorce, she married Joe Lieberman, a US senator from Connecticut who was the Democratic nominee for vice president with Al Gore and would go on to run for president. In Hadassah: An American Story (Brandeis UP, 2021), Lieberman pens the compelling story of her extraordinary life: from her family's experience in Eastern Europe to their move to Gardner, Massachusetts; forging her career; experiencing divorce; and, following her remarriage, her life on the national political stage. By offering insight into her identity as an immigrant, an American Jew, a working woman, and a wife, mother, and grandmother, Lieberman's moving memoir speaks to many of the major issues of our time, from immigration to gender politics. Featuring an introduction by Joe Lieberman and an afterword by Megan McCain, it is a true American story. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI #194: US Threatens Russia Over Non-Ally Ukraine

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 76:48


On COI #194, Kyle Anzalone breaks down the growing tensions in Eastern Europe. The US is simulating nuclear war with Russia, conducting war games in Latvia, and deploying warships to the Black Sea. Meanwhile, Ukraine is engaging in military build-ups/drills on its borders with Belarus and the separatist Donbas region. NATO head Jens Stoltenberg said Russia building up forces within Russia was unexplained and unprovoked and Biden warned Russia about violating Ukrainian sovereignty.  Kyle discusses CIA Director William Burns' recent trip to Russia. Burns confronted Russia over the fictional 'Havana Syndrome.' While Burns' visit to Moscow sparked hope for diplomacy, threatening Russia the fake illness suggests his visit was less than successful. Kyle updates Julian Assane's imprisonment. Assange has been held in a UK maximum security prison for over a year. He has experienced psychological torture from the prison authorities.   Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Conflicts of Interest
US Threatens Russia Over Non-Ally Ukraine

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 76:49


On COI #194, Kyle Anzalone breaks down the growing tensions in Eastern Europe. The US is simulating nuclear war with Russia, conducting war games in Latvia, and deploying warships to the Black Sea. Meanwhile, Ukraine is engaging in military build-ups/drills on its borders with Belarus and the separatist Donbas region. NATO head Jens Stoltenberg said Russia building up forces within Russia was unexplained and unprovoked and Biden warned Russia about violating Ukrainian sovereignty.  Kyle discusses CIA Director William Burns' recent trip to Russia. Burns confronted Russia over the fictional 'Havana Syndrome.' While Burns' visit to Moscow sparked hope for diplomacy, threatening Russia the fake illness suggests his visit was less than successful. Kyle updates Julian Assane's imprisonment. Assange has been held in a UK maximum security prison for over a year. He has experienced psychological torture from the prison authorities.   Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Nymphet Alumni
Ep. 17: Russian Bimbocore

Nymphet Alumni

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 83:11


This week's episode is dedicated to the Russian Bimbocore aesthetic. We talk spicy white mob wives, hypergamous living dolls, the eternal multiplicity of ushanka hats, and the wintery liminality of Eastern Europe in the Western imagination..・。.・゜✭・.・✫・゜・。..・。.・゜✭・.・✫・゜・。..・。.・゜✭・.・✫・゜・。..・。.・゜✭・.・✫・゜・。..・。.・゜✭・.・Links: https://www.pinterest.com/nymphetalumni/ep-17-russian-bimbocore/https://www.miumiu.com/ww/en/miumiu-club/fashion-shows/fw21-fashion-show.htmlhttps://wwd.com/runway/pre-fall-2010/milan/miu-miu/review/

John Solomon Reports
Jack Posobiec: Trouble in Eastern Europe, How ‘retraction of American power on the world stage has led to new instability'

John Solomon Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 57:41


Jack Posobiec, Senior Editor of Human Events, discusses how a war is brewing in Eastern Europe between Belarus and Poland. Posobiec describes how historically ‘territorial disputes over Poland have a way of spilling out and creating larger wars'. He comments that this is similar to what is happening between China and Taiwan, saying he does not think 'American leadership is going to stand by their allies'. Ultimately, leading to the decline of stability across the world.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Jewish Ancestral Healing Podcast
Episode 2.5: Ashkenazi Herbalism with Deatra Cohen and Adam Siegel

Jewish Ancestral Healing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 61:05


Deatra Cohen & Adam Siegel, authors of the acclaimed book Ashkenazi Herbalism, bring us on a journey into Eastern European plant remedies and the world of traditional Ashkenazi Jewish healers. They offer wisdom on building relationships with ancestral plants, and share candidly about the gifts and challenges of their journey into rediscovering the herbal medicines of their people.

Eric on the World
Episode 56: Berlin, Lisbon, or Bust?

Eric on the World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 11:34


This will likely be my last few days in Berlin, at least for the foreseeable future. I am so conflicted about what to do next and how to do it. I was accepted into an Erasmus program in Lisbon, but I don't have the funds to make it happen, unless making money in Lisbon is somehow a much easier thing to do. But, at least for the next few weeks, I'll be going through Eastern Europe, hitting up Prague (where I have 3 shows at the Czech Inn, November 27, 28, 30 - come see me!), Brno, Bratislava, Budapest, Krakow, and then either flying back to live at home, trying again for Berlin, or perhaps going to Lisbon. I don't know what the hell to do, someone please give me your thoughts. ericontheworldpodcast@gmail.com Also, the movie Vanilla Sky made me cry. That sound track.

Arts & Ideas
Romanian history and literature

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 45:22


The Fall of Ceaușescu in 1989 ended 42 years of Communist rule in Romania. How did the experience of living through that make its way into fiction? Georgina Harding published In Another Europe: A Journey To Romania in 1990 and followed that with a novel The Painter of Silence, set in Romania of the 1950s. Mircea Cărtărescu was born in 1956 and has published novels, poems and essays. In the novel Nostalgia published in 1989, he looks at communist Bucharist in the 80's, in a dreamlike narrative seen in part through the eyes of children and young adults. Philippe Sands has chronicled Jewish histories in Eastern Europe in his books and podcast series The Ratline. He recommends Mihail Sebastian's book For Two Thousand Years. Producer: Ruth Watts You can find a playlist called Prose and Poetry on the Free Thinking website which contains other conversations organised in partnership with the Royal Society of Literature. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p047v6vh

The Slavic Connexion
Nord Stream 2 and You: More Than A European Problem

The Slavic Connexion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 27:27


Mark Temnycky, a Ukrainian-American journalist, breaks down the Nord Stream 2 issue, its timeline, and its relation to the energy situation in Europe. He expounds on the Biden administration's reversal on its position concerning the pipeline, and explains the security concerns that a working Nord Stream 2 that bypasses Belarus and Ukraine creates for America, NATO, and Europe in general. Thanks for listening! ABOUT THE GUEST https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1298811942015045632/s4KAE6n__400x400.jpg Mark Temnycky is an accredited freelance journalist covering Eastern Europe, and has been published widely. Mark also guest lectures on Eastern European affairs to various U.S. universities. He was a recipient of the Ukrainian World Congress' inaugural "Ukrainian Diaspora 30 Under 30" award. His full portfolio can be found on his website https://wakelet.com/@MTemnycky or Twitter page https://twitter.com/MTemnycky. Mark has a Master's Degree in Public Administration and a Master of Arts Degree in International Relations from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in History, with Departmental Honors, from Le Moyne College. Mark works and resides in Washington, DC. PRODUCER'S NOTE: This episode was recorded on October 8th, 2021 via Zoom. To reach us via email, send a message to slavxradio@utexas.edu if you have questions, suggestions, or would like to be a guest on the show! CREDITS Co-Producer/Host: Lera Toropin (@earlportion) Assistant Producer/Host: Katherine Birch Associate Producer: Zach Johnson Assistant Producer: Sergio Glajar Assistant Producer: Misha Simanovskyy Associate Producer/Administrator: Kathryn Yegorov-Crate Executive Assistant: Katherine Birch Recording, Editing, and Sound Design: Michelle Daniel Music Producer: Charlie Harper (Connect: facebook.com/charlie.harper.1485 Instagram: @charlieharpermusic) www.charlieharpermusic.com (Main Theme by Charlie Harper and additional background music by Charlie Harper, Ketsa, Scott Holmes, Kevin MacLeod, Anthem of Rain) Executive Producer & Creator: Michelle Daniel (Connect: facebook.com/mdanielgeraci Instagram: @michelledaniel86) www.msdaniel.com DISCLAIMER: Texas Podcast Network is brought to you by The University of Texas at Austin. Podcasts are produced by faculty members and staffers at UT Austin who work with University Communications to craft content that adheres to journalistic best practices. The University of Texas at Austin offers these podcasts at no charge. Podcasts appearing on the network and this webpage represent the views of the hosts, not of The University of Texas at Austin. https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/9/9a59b135-7876-4254-b600-3839b3aa3ab1/P1EKcswq.png Special Guest: Mark Temnycky.

The Critical Hour
NATO War Games Near Russian Border; Maduro's Party Wins Big In Venezuela

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 117:25


Mark Sleboda, Moscow-based international relations security analyst, joins us to discuss Eastern Europe. Tensions are mounting as NATO forces increase their provocations on the Russian border. Also, the Pentagon is asking Russia to explain the movements of troops on Russian soil, and fearful experts are calling for dialogue to avoid an accidental war with Russia.Wyatt Reed, Sputnik News analyst, joins us to discuss Venezuela. Opposition parties participated in the latest round of elections in Venezuela as President Maduro's popular ruling party appears headed for another sweeping victory. Also, Nicaragua is leaving the OAS due to countless instances of election interference and US-sponsored regime change attacks in the Global South.Dr. Linwood Tauheed, associate professor of economics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, joins us to discuss unemployment. Bruce Bossardy has written an interesting article in which he argues that the metrics used to calculate employment statistics in the United States are flawed and intentionally misleading. He also posits that the issue of job quality is ignored, even though it is critical to understand the problems experienced by the working class.Max Rameau, Haitian-born political theorist, author and organizer with Pan-African Community Action, joins us to discuss Haiti. We discuss the resignation of the US envoy to Haiti, Daniel Foote. On its face, Foote's resignation and subsequent statements about US interference appear to be positive acts that move the impoverished nation closer to independence. However, our guest's deeper dive reveals a more sinister version of this seemingly positive event. Dr. Linwood Tauheed, associate professor of economics at the University of Missouri- Kansas City, joins us to discuss the Middle East. In his latest round of boisterous and aggressive speeches, US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin continued with the debunked claim that Iran is seeking nuclear weapons and that the US will stop them at all costs. Indicating that military action is possible, Austin stated that “if Iran isn't willing to engage seriously, then we will look at all of the options necessary to keep the United States secure.”Marjorie Cohn, Professor Emerita of Law at the Thomas Jefferson School of Law in San Diego, joins us to discuss the Ahmaud Arbery case. She has a new article in which she discusses the Arbery murder case in detail. Marjorie argues that the defendants are using arguments that hearken back to the legacy of slave patrols in pre-Civil War America.Jim Kavanagh, writer at thepolemicist.net and CounterPunch and author of "Danger in Society: Against Vaccine Passports,” joins us to discuss Julian Assange. The Grayzone has exposed new files that demonstrate the Australian government's knowledge and complicity in the persecution of Julian Assange. The files show that Canberra was aware of the CIA plot to kidnap and kill Assange. Caleb Maupin, journalist and political analyst, joins us to discuss censorship. Rainer Shea has written a brilliant article in which he argues that the US's supposed war against "foreign meddling and misinformation" is really a thinly veiled attempt to quell the inevitable uprisings by the ever-growing groups of marginalized people inside of its borders.

The Closet Conservative Podcast
Where is Christ among Challenges

The Closet Conservative Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 13:37


On March 10, 1943, under the orders of Adolf Eichmann, one of Hitler's architects of the Final Solution to the Jewish Question, railcars began rolling into the country of Belarus. The purpose? To transport all of the Jews of Bulgaria to the Death Camps of Treblinka located in German Occupied Poland. Bulgarian police began to round up Jews - going door-to-door as early as 3 in the morning. They were taken at gunpoint. Jewish collection centers were located in schools and other community centers. There was one problem, though - The Bulgarian People. You see, when the train cars began to arrive, the Bulgarian people united to save the Jews of their country. Although they did not know the Bulgarian Jews' final destination was to the death camps and gas chambers, some rumors had circulated the cities and towns. The Bulgarian Church led the opposition to the deportation of the Bulgarian Jews. If the Church allowed the Jews to be deported, they would have violated their obligations, the Rev. Boris Halapia stated. The word, WE MUST HELP. The whole Orthodox Church of Bulgaria came together - and sent a letter to the King, begging mercy for the Jews of the country. The Church also told the Chief of Police that they would not accept the mandate to deport the Jews from the country and would do anything possible to hinder the deportation efforts. Church followers began to arrive at the centers, and they told the frightened Jews that they would not let anything happen to them. Crowds protested across the country; the Church printed thousands of forged Baptismal certificates for Jews, risking their own lives. The falsification of faith - saved lives! It would take several months before Jews would return from hiding to their homes - much to the dismay of the Nazis. Hitler was furious. In a meeting with King Boris, he demanded the deportation of the Jews - Hitler went into a rage, King Boris recalled. Screaming; and going into a tirade, King Boris described - but Boris didn't surrender, not one inch. Boris told Hitler that Bulgaria needed the Jews for labor projects. Hitler did not believe the King, but he didn't want to lose an ally. He finally bought what Boris was selling and agreed, but only if all the Jewish men were relocated from the cities to labor camps. Some 20,000 Jews were indeed moved from the cities to the countryside - but not one of them outside the borders of Bulgaria. The deportation of the Jews of Bulgaria never took place. As a result, Bulgaria was the only country in Eastern Europe whose Jewish population remained the same throughout the Holocaust. It was known as The Miracle of the Jewish People Among the Jews of Bulgaria. This miracle was never made public immediately following World War II because the Soviet Government suppressed it - sound familiar? And Why? Because Communist Soviet Regime didn't want the credit of the rescue of these Jews given to a monarchy and The Church - both of which are enemies of The Soviet Union and communism. It would take the fall of The Iron Curtain in 1989 for this to finally become known. Folks, why do I tell this story? Is it because I am indeed a history nerd? Perhaps. But more to the point, I want to share that people can do many things when they come together for a common purpose. We are those people. As conservatives and challengers to our country's communistic push and pull, we are charged to protect what so many before us died to preserve. Granted, we are not coming together to save a race or population from mass murder and extinction. Instead, we are here to preserve the American way of life - that has been being attacked from within our borders. We now live in a society where we allow hundreds and thousands of tyrants in Washington DC to tell us how they think, believe, and parent. We sit back and buy into a system that government, not God, knows best. Music courtesy of Greg Shields Music. http://www.reverbnation.com/GregShields  

Brad and Britt Cast
Killing Snoopy

Brad and Britt Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 45:56


Support us by shopping at our Amazon store: Shop.BradandBritt.com Kyle Rittenhouse proves that White Privilege is alive-and-well, Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) is a gigantic asshole, gets ready for THE PARENT'S BILL OF RIGHTS, Eastern Europe portends bad things ahead for America (maybe), NFL WR gets a fake vaxx card (allegedly), China and the NBA Donate via PayPal: @bradandbritt Venmo: @BBCast Cash App: $bdub336

Unverified Claims
Beauty Water and Death S4E2

Unverified Claims

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 22:05


No, it's not Sarah's obituary, this is the fighting tale of the Ruslaka, a feminnie spirit that haunts the forest of Eastern Europe. Grabe a bottle of Rock Angel Rose, pop that cork and relax, thinking of the beautiful forest and lakes that span from Poland to Russia along with this tale of femme fatale revenge.Disclaimer: Listener Discretion is AdvisedDrink: Rock Angle RoseCover Art: Kendra BoblettMusic: Shaun FrearsonInstagram: @unverifiedclaimsGmail: unverifiedclaimsthepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @UVClaimsBlog: https://unverifiedclaimsthepodcast.blogspot.com/

American Prestige
E20 - The Tigray Conflict w/ Terje Østebø

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 83:32


Danny and Derek open with an update on Danny's COVID and then segue into a discussion of the border conflict in the Caucasus, the migrant crisis in Eastern Europe, and this week's big Biden-Xi summit. Derek is then joined by the University of Florida's Terje Østebø, who takes us through the roots of Ethiopia's year-long civil war and assesses where things stand now. Check out Terje's book: https://bit.ly/3kRZrbK Become a patron today! www.patreon.com/americanprestige

Brussels Sprouts
Russia's Escalating Pressure on Ukraine and Europe, with Michael Kofman and Kadri Liik

Brussels Sprouts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 49:06


How should the United States and Europe interpret and respond to Russia's various efforts to exert pressure on its neighbors, including its military buildup on the border with Ukraine? Michael Kofman and Kadri Liik join Andrea Kendall-Taylor and Jim Townsend to discuss the implications of the Kremlin's actions for the transatlantic community. Michael Kofman serves as Research Program Director in the Russia Studies Program at CNA and as a Fellow at the Kennan Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, DC. His research focuses on Russia and the former Soviet Union, specializing in Russian armed forces, military thought, capabilities, and strategy. Kadri Liikis a senior policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations. Her research focuses on Russia, Eastern Europe, and the Baltic region. Before joining ECFR, she was the director of the International Centre for Defence Studies in Estonia, where she also worked as a senior researcher and director of the Centre's Lennart Meri Conference.

The Daily
How Belarus Manufactured a Border Crisis

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 27:52


For three decades, President Aleksandr Lukashenko of Belarus, a former Soviet nation in Eastern Europe, ruled with an iron fist. But pressure has mounted on him in the past year and a half. After a contested election in 2020, the European Union enacted sanctions and refused to recognize his leadership.In the hopes of bringing the bloc to the negotiating table, Mr. Lukashenko has engineered a migrant crisis on the Poland-Belarus border, where thousands from the Middle East, Africa and Asia have converged.What are the conditions like for those at the border, and will Mr. Lukashenko's political gamble reap his desired results? Guests: Monika Pronczuk, a reporter covering the European Union for The New York Times; and Anton Troianovski, the Moscow bureau chief for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: Poland massed thousands of troops on its border with Belarus to keep out Middle Eastern migrants who have set up camp there, as Western officials accuse Belarus's leader of intentionally trying to create a new migrant crisis in Europe.Belarusian authorities on Thursday cleared the encampments at the main border crossing into Poland, removing for the moment a major flashpoint that has raised tensions across the continent.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

The Critical Hour
Dems Blame Racism & Sexism on VP's Ratings Collapse; Will Germany Freeze Over Nordstream 2 Rejection?

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 115:12


Steve Poikonen, national organizer for Action4Assange, joins us to discuss the horrific polling numbers for the leaders of the Democratic Party. Presidential spokesperson Jen Psaki is getting backlash after she blamed sexism and racism on the precipitous drop in polling numbers for embattled Vice President Kamala Harris. Also, the Democratic Party is struggling to find competent popular leadership as upcoming elections look bleaker by the day.John Burris, civil rights attorney, joins us to discuss legal cases in the US. A defendant who fatally shot Ahmaud Arbery argues that he feared for his life after he and several other men chased Arbery and cornered him with a loaded shotgun. Also, the prosecution in the Kyle Rittenhouse case is in deep and serious trouble after holding back high-definition drone footage.Martin Sieff, senior fellow at the American University in Moscow, joins us to discuss Eastern Europe. Russia has released diplomatic cables showing that France and Germany rejected a peace plan for the Donbass region in Eastern Ukraine. Also, John Bolton argues for overt regime change in Belarus.Gerald Horne, professor of history at the University of Houston, author, historian, and researcher, joins us to discuss Africa. There is a danger of US military intervention in Ethiopia as the US state department warns pilots of surface-to-air fire in the war-torn nation. Observers are concerned that the African nation may be the latest target for regime change as neocons begin their usual regiment of propaganda against the sitting government.Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, joins us to discuss the Middle East. The US has floated a temporary nuclear deal to Israeli officials for approval before presenting it to an Iranian diplomatic corp that is sure to reject the hapless plan. Also, the Yemen war may be coming to an end as Saudi mercenaries are forced to withdraw from areas that have been seized by Houthi fighters.George Koo, journalist, social activist, and international business consultant, joins us to discuss China. International security observers are concerned that the US TV show "60 Minutes" operates as a mouthpiece for the Washington neocons by pushing absurd propaganda about a potential Chinese invasion of Australia. Wyatt Reed, Sputnik News analyst, joins us to discuss Nicaragua. The US and its regime change proxy, the Organization of American States, are pushing another coup attempt against Nicaragua by refusing to recognize its elections. Also, a bipartisan sanctions regime levied against the people of the Central American nation is designed to cause misery and starvation.Dan Lazare, author, investigative journalist and author of "America's Undeclared War," joins us to discuss fuel problems in Europe. Germany's failure to quickly certify the Nordstream 2 pipeline could guarantee a long and brutal winter for its citizens. In a self-defeating move, the fuel-starved European power is prolonging the certification of its fuel lifeline to Russia, and the people and industries of Germany are likely to pay a dear price throughout the cold season.

The Edition
Toil and trouble: Europe faces a new form of warfare

The Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 37:31


In this week's episode: Are migrants the new munitions?  In our cover story this week, our political editor James Forsyth looks at the growing troubles in Eastern Europe and how this small part of the world stage could end up splintering the scaffolding of global peace. He is joined on the podcast by Mary Dejevsky, a columnist for the Independent. (00:42) Also this week: Will the monarchy survive past Elizabeth II? The royal family is not in a good way, with the Queen missing multiple appearances due to ill health, a prince under investigation, and the continuing cold war between William and Harry, will the monarchy survive past Elizabeth II? That's the question Freddy Gray asks in this week's Spectator. He joins the podcast along with Patrick Jephson a former private secretary to Princess Diana, who also covers the royals in this week's issue. (17:21)    And finally: Why is the mullet making a comeback?  Mullets. A hairstyle made popular in the 70s, but more recently the butt of many a joke is making something of a fashionable comeback. Hannah Moore writes about the return of the mullet in this week's Spectator. She joins talks on the podcast with Mike Lawson of Beardbrand who has also noticed this retro return. (29:09) Hosted by Lara Prendergast Produced by Sam Holmes Subscribe to The Spectator today and get a £20 Amazon gift voucher: www.spectator.co.uk/voucher  Listen to Lara's food-based interview show, Table Talk: https://www.spectator.co.uk/tabletalk 

Spectator Radio
The Edition: Toil and trouble

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 37:31


In this week's episode: Are migrants the new munitions?  In our cover story this week, our political editor James Forsyth looks at the growing troubles in Eastern Europe and how this small part of the world stage could end up splintering the scaffolding of global peace. He is joined on the podcast by Mary Dejevsky, a columnist for the Independent. (00:42) Also this week: Will the monarchy survive past Elizabeth II? The royal family is not in a good way, with the Queen missing multiple appearances due to ill health, a prince under investigation, and the continuing cold war between William and Harry, will the monarchy survive past Elizabeth II? That's the question Freddy Gray asks in this week's Spectator. He joins the podcast along with Patrick Jephson a former private secretary to Princess Diana, who also covers the royals in this week's issue. (17:21)    And finally: Why is the mullet making a comeback?  Mullets. A hairstyle made popular in the 70s, but more recently the butt of many a joke is making something of a fashionable comeback. Hannah Moore writes about the return of the mullet in this week's Spectator. She joins talks on the podcast with Mike Lawson of Beardbrand who has also noticed this retro return. (29:09) Hosted by Lara Prendergast Produced by Sam Holmes Subscribe to The Spectator today and get a £20 Amazon gift voucher: www.spectator.co.uk/voucher  Listen to Lara's food-based interview show, Table Talk: https://www.spectator.co.uk/tabletalk 

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency
Season II, Episode VII: The Berlin Wall & The Soviet Fall

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 56:29


This week's crisis could have ended with the world in a giant blaze of nuclear flame, but it didn't. In fact, it's an example of how a crisis can be handled so effectively, that most people don't even remember it as a crisis. This week, we are talking about the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of the Cold War. It's November, 1989. Reagan famously delivered his "tear down this wall" speech in 1987, but West and East Berlin are as divided as ever. In the summer of 1989, Chinese military forces had mowed down peaceful protesters in Tiananmen Square. Horrified by the images of violence, American leaders, and George H. W. Bush in particular, were eager to avoid provoking a similar crackdown in Eastern Europe. The stakes couldn't have been higher. Both sides were armed with enough nuclear weapons to destroy the world many times over, and they had itchy trigger fingers.Then, unexpectedly, at a press conference, a mid-level bureaucrat ordered an enormous change in policy. He accidentally announced that residents would be allowed to leave East Germany. Word spread like wildfire. Within hours, thousands of residents were lined up at the gates to cross into West Berlin.Why didn't this moment turn into one of violence and bloodshed? What were the repercussions of the collapse of a global superpower and its economic system? How might things have gone differently? To answer these questions, we have two dynamite guests. First, we have a voice that you will probably recognize. Our podcast host, Dr. Jeffrey Engle. When he's not hosting The Past, The Promise, The Presidency, Jeff works as the founding director of the Center for Presidential History. He has also written or edited twelve books on US foreign policy, including The China Diary of George H.W. Bush: The Making of a Global President and The Fall of the Berlin Wall: The Revolutionary Legacy of 1989.We then spoke to Dr. Mary E. Sarotte, who is the Kravis Professor of Historical Studies at Johns Hopkins University and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She is also the expert on the expansion of NATO in Germany at the end of the Cold War and the author of Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate, The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall, and 1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe.

Trent Loos Podcast
Rural Route Radio Nov 17, 2021 JC Cole with more history on Russia/Soviet Union and how significate the date of Nov 18 is throughout recent history.

Trent Loos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 47:59


JC Cole who spent 18 years in Latvia brings us real accounts of the history of Russia and Eastern Europe. And why exactly is Australia the source of so much tyranny at the moment? The nation was founded by convicts for crying out loud.

Battlegrounds: International Perspectives
Ukraine: Perspectives On Democracy In Eastern Europe

Battlegrounds: International Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 57:57


Wednesday, November 17, 2021 Hoover Institution, Stanford University   In this episode of Battlegrounds, H.R. McMaster and former Prime Minister Oleksiy Honcharuk discuss the U.S.-Ukraine relationship, the Russian threat to security, and priorities for reform and strengthening governance in Ukraine. H.R. McMaster in conversation with Oleksiy Honcharuk on Wednesday, November 17 at 9:00am PT. ABOUT THE SPEAKERS Oleksiy Honcharuk was Ukraine's 17th Prime Minister (August 2019 – March 2020). He also served as a Deputy Head of the Presidential Office of Ukraine, member of the National Reforms Council, and as an external advisor to the First Deputy Prime Minister - Minister of Economic Development and Trade of Ukraine. Prime Minister Honcharuk also headed Better Regulation Delivery Office (BRDO) a non-governmental organization. Previously he worked in law where he was as an arbitration manager and managing partner at Constructive Lawyers, a law firm he had founded and a lawyer at PRIOR-Invest investment company. H. R. McMaster is the Fouad and Michelle Ajami Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University and the Japan Chair at the Hudson Institute.  He is also the Bernard and Susan Liautaud Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute and lecturer at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business.  He was the 26th assistant to the president for National Security Affairs. Upon graduation from the United States Military Academy in 1984, McMaster served as a commissioned officer in the United States Army for thirty-four years before retiring as a Lieutenant General in June 2018. Battlegrounds provides a needed forum with leaders from key countries to share their assessment of problem sets and opportunities that have implications for U.S. foreign policy and national security strategy. Each episode features H.R. McMaster in a one-on-one conversation with a senior foreign government leader to allow Americans and partners abroad to understand how the past produced the present and how we might work together to secure a peaceful and prosperous future. “Listening and learning from those who have deep knowledge of our most crucial challenges is the first step in crafting the policies we need to secure peace and prosperity for future generations.”

Axios Today
Migrants trapped at the Poland-Belarus border

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 11:41


Tensions are rising in Eastern Europe, on the border between Belarus and Poland. Yesterday, Polish police began using water cannons and tear gas against people trying to cross into the country. For weeks now, thousands of migrants from Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan have been waiting at the border in an attempt to enter the European Union, in what EU leaders are calling a manufactured crisis. Plus, the latest on treating COVID with a pill. And, the International Olympic Committee takes on gender identity. Guests: Axios' Zach Basu, Tina Reed, and Ina Fried. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Julia Redpath, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Alex Sugiura, Sabeena Singhani, Lydia McMullen-Laird, David Toledo and Jayk Cherry. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
Conflicts of Interest #189: The Pentagon Manufactures Crises It Cannot Control

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 71:54


On COI #189, Kyle Anzalone and Connor Freeman – writer at the Libertarian Institute – talk about increasing tensions in Eastern Europe and the Persian Gulf. Kyle covers the refugee crisis on the border shared by Poland and Belarus. Washington and their European allies have accused Minsk of “orchestrating” the dire humanitarian situation. But the refugees are attempting to reach Europe, fleeing countries such as Yemen, Iraq, and Syria which have been largely destroyed by America's post 9/11 wars. Kyle breaks down the news on the refugees' mistreatment. He also reports on the European Union preparing new sanctions on Belarus. Poland is buying more American arms as well, including 300 used MRAPs and 250 Abrams tanks. Connor details the hawks' plans for regime change in Minsk, including the National Endowment for Democracy's involvement in Belarus. Kyle further reports on escalations in the Black Sea region. The U.S. has accused Moscow of a massive troop buildup in western Russia aimed at Ukraine. Moscow denies the accusations, pointing to the increasing U.S./NATO presence in the region as the source of instability. NATO is hyping the alleged Russian threat, saying they “stand” with Ukraine. A German regulator has temporarily suspended the license for Nord Stream 2 and Kiev is pushing for more U.S. sanctions to block the pipeline Connor then covers the latest news on the soon to resume JCPOA talks, including the Iranians' potential economic benefits that could result from significant sanctions relief. Connor argues U.S., Israel, and their allied Gulf dictatorships are fomenting instability, including openly preparing for war. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD  

Conflicts of Interest
The Pentagon Manufactures Crises It Cannot Control

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 71:55


On COI #189, Kyle Anzalone and Connor Freeman – writer at the Libertarian Institute – talk about increasing tensions in Eastern Europe and the Persian Gulf. Kyle covers the refugee crisis on the border shared by Poland and Belarus. Washington and their European allies have accused Minsk of “orchestrating” the dire humanitarian situation. But the refugees are attempting to reach Europe, fleeing countries such as Yemen, Iraq, and Syria which have been largely destroyed by America's post 9/11 wars. Kyle breaks down the news on the refugees' mistreatment. He also reports on the European Union preparing new sanctions on Belarus. Poland is buying more American arms as well, including 300 used MRAPs and 250 Abrams tanks. Connor details the hawks' plans for regime change in Minsk, including the National Endowment for Democracy's involvement in Belarus. Kyle further reports on escalations in the Black Sea region. The U.S. has accused Moscow of a massive troop buildup in western Russia aimed at Ukraine. Moscow denies the accusations, pointing to the increasing U.S./NATO presence in the region as the source of instability. NATO is hyping the alleged Russian threat, saying they “stand” with Ukraine. A German regulator has temporarily suspended the license for Nord Stream 2 and Kiev is pushing for more U.S. sanctions to block the pipeline Connor then covers the latest news on the soon to resume JCPOA talks, including the Iranians' potential economic benefits that could result from significant sanctions relief. Connor argues U.S., Israel, and their allied Gulf dictatorships are fomenting instability, including openly preparing for war. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD  

Lead Sell Grow - The Human Experience
How to Create an Amazing Customer Experience with Anastasia Vladychynska

Lead Sell Grow - The Human Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 30:36


Anastasia is a Certified Brand Experience Consultant helping businesses and entrepreneurs to keep their customers and get referrals instead of spending money on attracting new customers all the time.She has helped brands like McDonald's, KENZO, BNP Paribas, Jabil and others to reinvent their customer experience so that they can increase their bottom line. Now she teaches entrepreneurs in NYC, London, Brussels and Eastern Europe the secrets top global companies like Starbucks, Disney, Lexus, Amazon and others are using to keep their customers and employees. Eric and Anastasia discuss how she helps transform organizational culture, even in countries like Ukraine, where the word "Serve" only exists when speaking about serving in the military or in the church. Anastasia's experience with helping large organizations and entrepreneurs helps her clients value their customers and become magnets for retaining business. Anastasia shares how she left the corporate world and did was not able to get a new client until she decided to write an article for Forbes Magazine. After landing her very first client, she went on to write for Forbes every other week and became a professor at a business school, teaching principles of customer service, customer satisfaction, creating a customer centric brand, and how to lead people successfully.Be sure to connect with us in our Lead Sell Grow – The Human Experience Tribe Facebook group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/leadsellgrowDownload the FREE ebook that will help you connect with, and understand your buyers faster! Learn more about our services: www.TheGoalGuide.comImprove your sales and stay connected – Free Gifts Here https://shor.by/TheGoalGuidePodcast Intro and outroArtist: DisfigureTrack: BlankMusic Provided by: NoCopyrightSoundsWatch: https://youtu.be/p7ZsBPK656sFree Download / Stream: http://ncs.io/blank 

Kentucky Politics Weekly
...And Now, We Turn to our Foreign Correspondant.

Kentucky Politics Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 74:47


Former YRNF Chairman Jason Emert joins the show to offer his take on events in Eastern Europe. Tres and Jason also grouse about the role of Government, the role of political party organizations, and how no one understands them anymore.

ROI’s Into the Corner Office Podcast: Powerhouse Middle Market CEOs Telling it Real—Unexpected Career Conversations

Peter Greer is the president and CEO of HOPE International, a global Christ-centered economic development organization serving throughout Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Eastern Europe. Prior to joining HOPE, Peter worked internationally as a microfinance adviser in Cambodia and Zimbabwe and as managing director for Urwego Bank in Rwanda. He received a B.S. in international business from Messiah University and an MPP in political and economic development from Harvard's Kennedy School. Peter's favorite part of his job is spending time with the entrepreneurs HOPE serves—whether harvesting coffee with farmers in Rwanda, dancing alongside savings groups in Haiti, or visiting the greenhouses of entrepreneurs in Ukraine. As an advocate for the Church's role in missions and alleviating extreme poverty, Peter has co-authored over 10 books, including Mission Drift (selected as a 2015 Book Award Winner from Christianity Today), Rooting for Rivals (selected as a 2019 Leadership Resource of the Year in Outreach magazine), The Spiritual Danger of Doing Good (selected as one of the top 40 books on poverty by WORLD magazine) and Created to Flourish (which his mom reviewed with five stars and a smiley face emoji). More important than his role at HOPE is his role as husband to Laurel and dad to Keith, Liliana, Myles, and London. While his sports loyalties remain in New England, Peter and his family live in Lancaster, PA.

The Critical Hour
Inflation Up and Biden's Approval Ratings Down; Russia Ready to Help Resolve Belarus Border Crisis

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 114:08


Dr. Linwood Tauheed, associate professor of economics at the University of Missouri- Kansas City, joins us to discuss domestic politics. A record 4.4 million Americans quit their jobs in September as inflation skyrockets and investors turn to gold. Also, some businesses are taking advantage of inflation to increase profits.Mark Sleboda, Moscow-based international relations security analyst, joins us to discuss Eastern Europe. Despite absurd accusations of fueling the Belarusian border crisis, the Russian government is working to help resolve the issue. Also, NATO's aggressive military actions near Russia's border are fueling a potential crisis with the US client state of Ukraine. Finian Cunningham has written a piece in which he outlines a number of non-military options that the Eurasian power could choose to retaliate.Yolian Ogdu, member of the Black Alliance for Peace and Horn of Africa Pan-Africans for Liberation and Solidarity, joins us to discuss Ethiopia. There is significant speculation that the US empire pushed the TPLF to launch their latest attack in Ethiopia. It is believed that US/EU operatives are pushing this war to overthrow the democratically elected government of Abiy Ahmed.Dan Lazare, author and investigative journalist and author of "America's Undeclared War," joins us to discuss President Biden and Vice President Harris's polling data. President Biden's infrastructure bill success seems to have done little to counteract the inflation crisis as his approval ratings continue on a swift downward trajectory. Also, Vice President Kamala Harris continues to burden the administration with historically low approval ratings.Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, joins us to discuss the Middle East. A US airstrike in Syria is creating a considerable buzz as information surfaces that the military worked to cover up the deaths of over 60 women and children at their hands. Also, Houthi fighters are enjoying more success as the critical port city of Hodeida falls under their control. John Burris, civil rights attorney, joins us to discuss the Kyle Rittenhouse trial. Nerves are on edge, and the National Guard stands by for possible unrest in Minnesota as closing arguments of the case are made.K. J. Noh, peace activist, writer, and teacher, joins us to discuss China. US Secretary of State Antony Blinken recently spoke with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi in anticipation of a scheduled virtual meeting between the leaders of the two world powers. Also, China has some interesting options for addressing climate change that may be valuable for Western powers to consider joining or imitating.Margaret Kimberly, editor and senior columnist at Black Agenda Report, joins us to discuss Cuba. The latest ham-handed US regime change plan for Cuba is scheduled to commence today, as CIA-sponsored protests have been pushed by deep state operatives in the tech giants of social media.

The Story Box
Dr Edith Eger Unboxing special | Finding Hope And Forgiveness In A Nazi Death Camp

The Story Box

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 62:37


A native of Hungary, Edith Eva Eger was just a teenager in 1944 when she experienced one of the worst evils the human race has ever known. As a Jew living in Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe, she and her family were sent to Auschwitz, the heinous death camp. Her parents were sent to the gas chambers but Edith's bravery kept her and her sister alive. Toward the end of the war Edith and other prisoners had been moved to Austria. On May 4, 1945 a young American soldier noticed her hand moving slightly amongst a number of dead bodies. He quickly summoned medical help and brought her back from the brink of death.After the war Edith moved to Czechoslovakia where she met the man she would marry. In 1949 they moved to the United States. In 1969 she received her degree in Psychology from the University of Texas, El Paso. She then pursued her doctoral internship at the William Beaumont Army Medical Center at Fort Bliss, Texas.Dr. Eger is a prolific author and a member of several professional associations. She has a clinical practice in La Jolla, California and holds a faculty appointment at the University of California, San Diego. She has appeared on numerous television programs including CNN and the Oprah Winfrey Show; and was the primary subject of a holocaust documentary that appeared on Dutch National Television. She is frequently invited to speaking engagements throughout the United States and abroad.Follow The Story Box on Social Media► INSTAGRAM ► TWITTER ► FACEBOOK ► WEBSITE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE! ► Apple Podcast ► Spotify WATCH HERE:► YouTube If you enjoyed this episode please subscribe to YouTube & Apple Podcasts, and leave a 5-star positive rating and review over on Apple Podcasts. Share it around with your friends and family.Support The Show Here:Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/thestorybox. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Conversations with Loulou
TikTok's Shant Oknayan on leadership and building a winning culture

Conversations with Loulou

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 49:44


Shant Oknayan is the Head of Global Business Solutions at ByteDance (TikTok) across Eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa. He joins us to discuss his role in shaping a startup that is growing at hyper speed! Having worked at the world's top firms like Google, Facebook and now TikTok, Shant has witnessed the evolution of our digital lives and brings a lot of depth and expertise to the conversation. In this episode we zoom in on challenges of leading in a pandemic and we focus on culture. We close with a deeply personal reflection from Shant and its implication on leadership. You can find Shant on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shant-oknayan/ For more on the show visit: www.conversationswithloulou.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

FIVE MINUTE NEWS
White House says pandemic, not policies fuel inflation.

FIVE MINUTE NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 7:13


White House says pandemic, not policies fuel inflation. Virus surges in Eastern Europe, but leaders slow to act. COP26 climate agreement agreed after late decision over coal. You can subscribe to Five Minute News with Anthony Davis on YouTube, with your preferred podcast app, ask your smart speaker, or enable Five Minute News as your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing skill.  Subscribe, rate and review at www.fiveminute.news  Five Minute News is an Evergreen Podcast, covering politics, inequality, health and climate - delivering independent, unbiased and essential world news, daily. 

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Episode 199: Wire Taps—Underrepresented in Eastern Europe, How to Pitch a Pivot, First-Gen GPA Blues

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 36:06


This week Graham and Alex make some must-see TV recommendations, before diving into discussion about MBA interviews, Real Humans b-school student stories, and Clear Admit's fall applicant survey. Speaking of the survey, you can take it here, and win one of twenty-five $25 Amazon gift cards we are giving away: https://bit.ly/cafall2021survey . As to the Wire Taps candidates this week, Graham and Alex deliver some critical advice on the power of geography and how it can help candidates stand out - albeit with some limitations. They also review a candidate with somewhat limited work experience who's goals could be perceived as a bit of a stretch for admissions readers. And finally, our hosts look at a first-generation-to-college applicant who is facing a GPA hurdle, but may have enough elsewhere in her profile to be competitive for top-16 programs. This episode was recorded in the City of Light and the Land of King Arthur. It was produced in the City of Brotherly Love by Dennis Crowley. Thanks for telling all of your friends and family about the podcast, and for rating and reviewing wherever you may listen!

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience
Five Free Countries with Second Residence

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 9:32


Wondering what countries are easiest to immigrate to? In this video, Andrew shares five free countries with the second residence that you can move to at any time. 00:00 Start 1:05 Mexico - How to move to Mexico - Is It Safe To Travel To Mexico? - How to get a residence permit in Mexico 2:52 Albania - Apartments for sale in Saranda - How to Move to Albania 4:20 Colombia - How to move to Colombia - How to get a Colombia resident visa in 2021 - Colombia Real Estate 5:46 Serbia - How to Move to Serbia - Agriculture in Eastern Europe - How Much Does it Cost to Live in Eastern Europe? 7:29 Nicaragua - San Juan Del Sur Real Estate - Invest Nicaragua Real Estate - Move to Nicaragua https://nomadcapitalist.com/ Andrew Henderson and the Nomad Capitalist team are the world's most sought-after experts on legal offshore tax strategies, investment immigration, and global citizenship. We work exclusively with seven- and eight-figure entrepreneurs and investors who want to "go where they're treated best". Work with Andrew: https://nomadcapitalist.com/apply/ Andrew has started offshore companies, opened dozens of offshore bank accounts, obtained multiple second passports, and purchased real estate on four continents. He has spent the last 12 years studying and personally implementing the Nomad Capitalist lifestyle. Our growing team of researchers, strategies, and implementers add to our ever-growing knowledge base of the best options available. In addition, we've spent years studying the behavior of hundreds of clients in order to help people get the results they want faster and with less effort. About Andrew: https://nomadcapitalist.com/about/ Our Website: http://www.nomadcapitalist.com Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nomadcapitalist Buy Andrew's Book: https://amzn.to/2QKQqR0 DISCLAIMER: The information in this video should not be considered tax, financial, investment, or any kind of professional advice. Only a professional diagnosis of your specific situation can determine which strategies are appropriate for your needs. Nomad Capitalist can and does not provide advice unless/until engaged by you.

Lyndeurozone Euro Simplified
#215 Unit 4 - Enlightened Absolutism

Lyndeurozone Euro Simplified

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 32:35


In this episode we look at how various monarchs in Eastern Europe will embrace the enlightenment while trying to maintain the institution of absolutist monarchy. Lyndeurozone.com If you use this podcast regularly would you please consider supporting us on Patreon for as little as a dollar a month?  We also have subscription tiers at our Patreon that allow you to access the Lyndeurozone study files, slides that correspond to the podcast episodes, and video tutorials to help you prepare for your essay exams.  Head on over to our Patreon and check out what we have to offer our subscribers. Remember, Robert Lynde offers tutoring services to help you master the skills required to succeed in AP Euro and tutoring sessions can be offered online and in person. You can get more information at Lyndeurozone.com. Would you please consider giving the show a rating on Apple Podcasts and leaving a comment on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds and it really makes a difference helping to get the word out about the podcast. Episodes will be released on the following schedule: Unit 1 and Unit 2 - August/September Unit 3: October Unit 4: November Unit 5: November and December Unit 6: January Unit 7: February Unit 8 : March Unit 9: April   If you have any questions you can contact Robert Lynde at Lyndeurozone.com.   Instagram: @Lyndeurozone

Morning Wire
Saturday | November 13, 2021

Morning Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 14:45


The Department of Energy warns of skyrocketing energy bills, more fallout from the Alec Baldwin and Travis Scott tragedies, and a migrant crisis escalates in Eastern Europe. Get the facts first on Morning Wire. 

The CyberWire
Tension in Eastern Europe. A Hong Kong watering hole. US, EU join the Paris Call. Cybermercenaries. CISA's plans for countering disinformation, and for forming a white-hat hacker advisory group.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 26:18


Notes on rising international tension in Eastern Europe. A watering-hole campaign in Hong Kong. The US and the EU have joined the Paris Call. NSO Group's prospective CEO resigns his position before formally assuming it. Void Balaur, a cybermercenary group, is active in the Russophone cyber underground. Johannes Ullrich on leaked vaccination cards and Covid tests. Our guest is Carolyn Crandall of Attivo Networks on what organizations should be focused on to protect Active Directory. CISA intends to increase its capacity to work against misinformation and disinformation. CISA also intends to recruit white hat hackers to an advisory board. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/218

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI #187: The Biden Administration’s War on Immigration

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 50:53


On COI #187, Kyle Anzalone breaks down the increasing tensions in Eastern Europe. Thousands of migrants from the Middle East and North Africa are seeking to enter the EU through Belarus. The refugees are currently living in freezing conditions near the border with Poland. Rather than supporting the migrants, Biden - along with the EU - has slammed the migrants as part of a nefarious plot by Belarus and Russia.  Kyle updates the fight in Afghanistan between ISIS-K and the Taliban. The Islamic State's ranks may be growing as former members of the US-backed Afghan National Army join ISKP.  Kyle discusses the Army's desire to grow its presence in space and Boeing's new contract to build helicopters. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Marketplace Morning Report
A brewing humanitarian crisis in Eastern Europe could have major economic implications

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 9:43


From the BBC World Service: Turkey is stopping citizens from Iraq, Syria and Yemen from flying out of the country to Belarus because of what it called the problem of “illegal border crossings” into the European Union. Many migrants face sub-zero temperatures close to the border. Plus, the Japanese industrial conglomerate Toshiba will split itself into three publicly-listed companies focused on infrastructure, devices, and memory chips. And, Cape Town’s unusual ways to cope with severe water shortages.

Marketplace All-in-One
A brewing humanitarian crisis in Eastern Europe could have major economic implications

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 9:43


From the BBC World Service: Turkey is stopping citizens from Iraq, Syria and Yemen from flying out of the country to Belarus because of what it called the problem of “illegal border crossings” into the European Union. Many migrants face sub-zero temperatures close to the border. Plus, the Japanese industrial conglomerate Toshiba will split itself into three publicly-listed companies focused on infrastructure, devices, and memory chips. And, Cape Town’s unusual ways to cope with severe water shortages.

Bookey App 30 mins Book Summaries Knowledge Notes and More
The Vanquished: Why the First World War Failed to End by Robert Gerwarth

Bookey App 30 mins Book Summaries Knowledge Notes and More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 12:00


The author, Robert Gerwarth, argues that the end of World War One failed to bring about lasting peace. After the First World War, new regimes and wars sprung up throughout Central and Eastern Europe. Conflicts arouse amidst the turbulent political environment between nation-states and competing ideologies of the time. Radical fascist ideas found fertile ground that soon permeated throughout Europe. As a German, Gerwarth is well versed in German history. He is keenly aware of the suffering and harsh sanctions imposed on the defeated states after the conclusion of World War One. Rather than ensuring peace, these severe sanctions compounded the turmoil, stirred up national sentiment for revenge, and gave root to extreme ideologies such as fascism and Nazism. This cocktail of volatile elements ultimately accelerated the outbreak of World War Two. The Vanquished gives us a glimpse of the turbulent history of Europe between the two World Wars and analyzes the legacy of the First World War. It helps us to perceive with the benefit of hindsight, the problems of the world today.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Death toll from Astroworld festival crowd surge rises to 9

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 4:30


In our news wrap Thursday, a ninth person has died of injuries suffered after a crowd surge at the Astroworld music festival in Houston on Friday. Fears are growing that a migrant crisis in Eastern Europe may erupt into a military confrontation. China's President Xi Jinping is warning against creating a new Cold War in the Indo-Pacific. The U.S. State Department is urging Americans to leave Haiti. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Fútbol with Grant Wahl
ESPN's Sebastian Salazar; Witty on the Weekend & USMNT

Fútbol with Grant Wahl

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 80:23


Grant is finally back from Eastern Europe, which means we have a full podcast experience for listeners again. Ahead of Friday’s USMNT-Mexico World Cup qualifying showdown, Grant interviews ESPN’s Sebastian Salazar (22:15) about his thoughts on the game from both sides’ perspectives, how ESPN will approach its broadcast from Cincinnati, his ESPN+ show Fútbol Américas, his story in the business and much more. In Segment 1, Grant and Chris Wittyngham break down the USMNT roster and European games, including what’s next for Manchester United after a brutal loss to Man City, West Ham’s statement-making win over Liverpool and whether new manager Xavi can get things right on the field at Barcelona. In Segment 3 (64:17), the boys discuss a wild MLS Decision Day that saw Salt Lake get into the playoffs and the LA Galaxy be eliminated in the final moments, as well as Colorado making a huge jump from third to first in the West. Then they finish with talk on the two NWSL playoff quarterfinals, won by Chicago (1-0 over Gotham) and Washington (1-0 over North Carolina).Music: Get full access to Fútbol with Grant Wahl at grantwahl.substack.com/subscribe