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Best podcasts about Suez

Latest podcast episodes about Suez

Casus Belli Podcast
CBP #233 Duelo en el Desierto - Campaña del Norte de África

Casus Belli Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 137:06


El control del Mediterráneo pasaba por controlar la costa africana, y sus dos entradas: Suez y Gibraltar. Después de la debacle italiana a principios del 41, Hitler envía un cuerpo de ejército comandado por Erwin Rommel que tratará de encontrar su lugar en la estrategia global alemana... si es que eso existió en algún momento para ese teatro de operaciones. Aprovechando el lanzamiento del Segundo Volumen de Duelo en el Desierto, su autor y colaborador habitual de CAsus Belli 🎙️ Antonio Muñoz Lorente, hará un recorrido por la guerra en este enorme teatro de operaciones, incluyendo las tramas políticas, los planes de gran envergadura, los personajes más allá de Rommel y Montgomery, la entrada de los Estados Unidos, la Francia de Vichy, o las consecuencias a medio plazo de la derrota del Eje. Por supuesto sin dejar atrás las batallas más importantes. Le acompaña 🦕 Antonio Gómez y 🎙️ Dani CarAn Tienes el libro ya en librerías, o en la tienda de Salamina https://tienda.edicionesplatea.com/epages/edicionesplatea.sf/es_ES/?ObjectPath=/Shops/edicionesplatea/Products/72 Produce 👨‍🚀 Dani CarAn. Edita PodFactory 🛠️ Pod Factory http://podfactory.es . Puedes encontrar EL EJÉRCITO DEL AIRE ESPAÑOL 1939-1989 ISBN 9788490912546 en: https://publicaciones.defensa.gob.es/el-ej-rcito-del-aire-espa-ol-1939-1989-libros-ebook.html ⭐ Casus Belli Podcast forma parte de 📀 Ivoox Originals. ⭐ Casus Belli Podcast pertenece a 🏭 Factoría Casus Belli. 👉https://podcastcasusbelli.com 👉En Facebook, nuestra página es @casusbellipodcast https://www.facebook.com/CasusBelliPodcast 👉En Instagram estamos como @casusbellipodcast https://www.instagram.com/casusbellipodcast 👉En Twitter estamos como @casusbellipod @CasusBelliPod 👉Telegram, nuestro canal es @casusbellipodcast https://t.me/casusbellipodcast 👨‍💻Nuestro chat del canal es https://t.me/aviones10 La música aparecida en este episodio lo hacen bajo la licencia privada de Jamendo Music, Epidemic Sound, o licencia global contratada y gestionada por IVOOX (SGAE RRDD/4/1074/1012), para el uso de "música comercial" del repertorio de la Sociedad de Gestión. El resto de música es bajo licencia Creative Commons 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/ ⚛️ El logotipo de Carros 10 y de la Factoría Casus Belli están diseñados por Publicidad Fabián publicidadfabian@yahoo.es 📧¿Queréis contarnos algo? También puedes escribirnos a casus.belli.pod@gmail.com Si te ha gustado, y crees que nos lo merecemos, nos sirve mucho que nos des un like, ya que nos da mucha visibilidad. Muchas gracias por escucharnos, y hasta la próxima. Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

Ten Cent Takes
Issue 19: The Sandman Book Club (part 3)

Ten Cent Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 77:52


Once again, we're walking the moonlit path of dreams and discussing The Sandman. In this episode, we're talking about the fifth and sixth volumes: A Game of You and Fables & Reflections.  ----more---- Mike: I don't think I'm getting a birthday present. I am relatively certain that they want to fire me out of a cannon into the sun Jessika: Hello. And welcome to Ten cent takes the podcast where we cause whiplash from rapid time leaps, one issue at a time. My name is Jessica Frasier and I'm joined by my cohost, the curious collector, Mike Thompson. Mike: Man, my collection has been growing by leaps And bounds lately. Yeah. COVID has not been kind to my closet free space.  Jessika: Oh, well, and you recently gave me my first short box, So  thing. So  Mike: I'm not sorry.  Jessika: no, don't be, I needed a place for the, my, I looked over at my, at my bookshelf one day and went, oh no, I have a lot of single issues that are just kind of sitting on a shelf. Mike: you know, you're a collector when you just have the random piles of single issues hanging out,  Jessika: I just have random piles of trade paperbacks. And just like, my counter is literally covered. Not only do I have every one of the Sandman series, just like chilling on my counter. I got, um, moon girl and, uh,  um, devil devil dinosaur, and that's just chilling. So I've just got all this stuff, like all over. Mike: Yeah, it's a, it's insidious. It takes over. your life. One issue at a time.  Jessika: Well, what better way to fill a tiny house shaped like a pirate ship than with comics. Mike: Hm. Fair.  Jessika: If you haven't listened before the purpose of our podcast is to study comic books in ways that are both fun and informative. We want to look at their coolest weirdness and silliest moments, as well as examine how they're woven into the larger fabric of pop culture and history. This episode, we are returning to our book club and we will be looking at volumes five and six of the Sandman series. If you haven't checked out the first couple episodes of the series, I highly recommend you go back and take a lesson. It's episodes 15 and 17. Mike: Yeah. And we're covering two volumes at a time.  Jessika: Yes, we are. So 15 was one and two and 17 was three and four. So you're joining us for five and six. So welcome aboard. Mike: Welcome to the deep end of the pool children. you don't get an inner tube and we don't have any water wings. Sorry.  Jessika: There's absolutely no lifeguard on duty. We are not responsible Dulce at this time. Mike: If You are enjoying our podcast, please go ahead and rate and review on whatever platform you're listening on. If that's an option it's especially helpful. If you can rate us on apple podcasts, there's a lot of discoverability, , or if you have overcast, you can always do a star for the episode and that'll push promotion as well. Or if you're a comic fan and you're liking what we're talking about, and you've got some friends who you think would actually enjoy it? as Well, please let them know any little bit helps. We really appreciate all of you who are spending your time with us. Jessika Audio: We also want to support other podcasts that we really like in this space. So this week spotlight is on the last comic shop podcast. Here's a quick review of what to expect from them. If you want us to feature your show, go ahead and drop us off.   Jessika:  before we leave into our main main topic, Mike, what is one cool thing you've read or watched? Mike: I was on hooplah the other day and I came across a new series by Jeff Lemire, who is the guy who wrote Sweet Tooth along with a bunch of other excellent. But it's called Gideon Falls and they have the first five volumes on there. it's a really interesting series. It starts off feeling kind of like a horror supernatural thriller involving a Catholic priest who comes to this town and he's very quickly wrapped up in nefarious things going on and it's really creepy. And then there's a B- story involving a guy who is in this kind of weird dystopian, urban environment, far away from the small town of Gideon falls. as the story continues, it morphs from being a, , supernatural horror murder mystery into a bit more science fiction and mad science while still keeping those original vibes. , and also there's a lot of personal tragedy involved with the main characters. That's really cool to read too, which I mean, that's what Jeff Lemire does is he writes these things that just, they make you a lot of times feel like you need to watch Schindler's list for a pick me up. They're excellent, but they are brutal at times. so after I read that, I then proceeded to read through the, what if omnibus that they had on hooplah and I needed something a little bit lighter to cleanse by.  Jessika: That's very relatable. Definitely been in that situation myself. Mike: but what about you?  Jessika: Well, I have, I recently purchased the book herding cats, which is a black and white anthology comic by Sarah Anderson Mike: like this is the woman who did hyperbole and a half, right?  Jessika: yes. Yeah. And also the one that I've spoken about before fangs. Mike: Yeah. The love story between the vampire and the werewolf.  Jessika: Aha. Aha.  Mike: Yes, I listen.  Jessika: you do, you're very good, probably multiple times because we record and then edit and relisten relisten. And this style of comic is definitely way different than the fangs one. , it's more of a simple design and it's just, it's a really fun time to begin with. I highly recommend her stuff to begin with. So hurting is a part of her Sarah scribbles collection. And if you've seen some of those strips floating around online, they're pretty cute. each page of the book is showing like a small relatable instance about daily. And it's definitely a mood booster. If you're looking for a different palette cleanser, this is definitely it, it kept me giggling the whole way through. And despite it's title, it's definitely not a whole book of cat Comics. I promise. Cause I'm not necessarily a cat person per se. I mean, they're fine, but I'm, I'm not a cat person,  but you will see some in there.  Mike: I'm more of a cat person  than you are  Jessika: You've truly are you are with your little dog  cat.  Mike: the Duchess Sprocket fonts adipose.  Jessika: Oh goodness. The names we give our pets. I swear. I think the most fun part about this book though, is that there's also a section at the back. , and it has advice to young artists and it's complete with Comics to go with the advice, which is super cute.  Mike: Oh, that's awesome. That's really cute.  Jessika: Yeah. That's really sweet. All right. Now onto the meat of our episode, this one's going to be a chunker buckle up everyone. So volume five of the Sandman series is titled a game of you and was published in 1991 and 92 it's composed of issues. 32 through 37 of the Sandman series and was written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Sean McManus. Colleen Duran, Brian Talbot and Stan.  We begin our tail in somewhere called the land and voices stadium may needed to find help and that the lane was in great peril and that they were waiting for the person, destined, to save them. Ultimately, one of the voices states their decision to go find the person that is supposed to save them. Meanwhile, Barbie, which was a surprise for me to see her again, is a woken by her neighbor, Wanda. And it's revealed that even though she sleeps, Barbie is unable to dream.  Mike: And we should note who Barbie and Wanda are, because the last time that we saw them was in the doll's house and Barbie at the time had been married to a yuppie named Ken who, when the dream, the vortex, was that what it was the dream for techs.  Jessika: Yeah, it was the dream vortex caused by Rosewall. Mike: Yeah. So when the dream vortex hit and. Ripping everybody's dreams into one another. There's this weird kind of overlap. Ken and Barbie had some sort of a fight. We don't know exactly what about, but it was basically, I think it was tied to the fact that Ken was, he was an eighties, yuppy, Wallstreet, wannabe, and his fantasies involved, things that Barbie found kind of testable. And then Wanda was the landlord, right?  Jessika: No, actually that was a different person,  but, um, Wanda. Yeah, Wanda's a new, person and she's in the new place. The Barbie moves to, Mike: Okay. Like I totally read that wrong. I have spent, I've spent decades thinking that Wanda was the same person as,  Jessika: I  Mike: uh,  Jessika: name now,  Mike: yeah.  Jessika: but he was, he was queer in the sense that he was like cross-dressing, but not necessarily like, he wasn't necessarily trans from my understanding. Mike: Yeah. but the other thing is that on the back of the book, I think they sit there and they refer to the drag queen. for, for this volume,  Jessika: oh, well that's just rude.  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: That's just transphobic. Mike: yeah. Hold on. Let's, let's take a look at this now.  Jessika: Well, I am going to yell about the transphobia, so we'll , just wrap it up now. We'll get started here. Mike: Yeah, so it's literally the promo text on the back is taken apartment house, add in a drag queen, a lesbian couple, some talking animals, talking severed, head, a confused heroine and a deadly Kuku. So I don't think that's on Neil Gaiman. I think that's more DC comics than anything else,  Jessika: I agree. That was whoever was writing the cover script. Mike: but that is something that, because I read that description, I thought it was the landlord Hal from doll's house, because Hal was someone who clearly was like tight with Barbie and also had a drag persona?  Jessika: there was a one-off statement about how pal gave her be addressed to the landlord for this place where she moved to New York.  Mike: I missed that. Okay.  Jessika: It's again, one of those, you know, I'm glad I could catch something you didn't. Cause it's usually the other way round. Mike: Yeah. No,, but honestly between that and, the, uh, the promo text on the back, I thought that one had moved on from her assigned gender and was now living in her actual identity. But that was clearly not the case. And that was a little confusing to me. But the other thing is that, you know, the art style had changed. And so I wasn't sure if it was just a new artist rendering an old character. So on me.  Jessika: that's caught me a few times though, where I'm like, wait, the art's a little bit different.  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: Am I like, is this the same character? And I had to kind of suss out who the character was , which is fine. It was easy enough,  Mike: That's kind of shocking that they sit there and still identify Wanda as a drag queen. Like these days  Jessika: yeah.  Mike: anniversary book.  Jessika: Yeah. That was very disappointing to me. didn't realize that. And that just Mike: Not great.  Jessika: Neil, that one probably wasn't Neal.  Awesome. It was God dammit.  Mike: I doubt it was like, I don't, that, reeks of marketing .  Jessika: Well, there are absolutely people who write the, the covers and whatevers. Mike: yeah.  Jessika: So Barbie is living once again, an eclectic type living situation, but has moved to New York. Like we were saying beside Wanda, her neighbors include a lesbian couple named Hazel and Foxglove and a seemingly square bear of a young woman named Thessaly and a middle-aged man named George, who seems to keep to himself for the most part. Barbie also gets very creative with her makeup for the day, painting a black and white checkerboard onto half of her face. And Wanda has decided that spite their lack of money, they should go shopping and at Tiffany's even, Mike: Yeah, I really liked Arby's makeup because it felt very much like what you see on Tech-Talk these days, which is all optical illusions and cool stuff like that. So, Neil Gaiman, oddly prescient, or the 1990s. Jessika: He's doing us good right now. So we quickly cut to the dream realm where Dream is talking with Matthew, the Raven and his son, something happening in a far part of the dream realm, that there was some sort of transition. We zip back to Barbie and Wanda who are on the subway. A woman approaches them for change and Wanda brushes her off. While Barbie throws a of quarters in her cup, the woman becomes very upset when she sees that she is sharing the subway car with a puppy and starts yelling and panicking saying that she doesn't like dogs. The dogs scare her and she exits the car. The first available stop then up the stairs and out of the subway onto the main road, still yelling about not liking dogs. She is immediately face to face with what looks like a giant yellow dog with a large mustache that had to be bigger than a bus. This thing was huge. Mike: Yes,  Jessika: And it didn't even really look like a dog, but that was probably the closest approximation to what you could call it,  Mike: it's kind of this weird amalgamation between a Saint Bernard and a lion.  Jessika: Yeah. Yeah. That's a good way to say it.  Mike: as we learn we have seen him before in Barbie's very kind of like Alison Wonderland meets Lord of the rings dreams that she was having before the events of adult's house.  Jessika: Yes. And we will definitely be talking about those  Mike: No.  Jessika: and the woman upon seeing this huge dog what's herself and then faints meanwhile, Wanda and Barbie have made it to their stop and go forward breakfast prior to their shopping spree. After being asked about the subject, Barbie explains that she hasn't been able to dream after a weird night back where she used to live. And after that point, things fell apart with her relationship with Ken, she said she stopped communicating with him anymore and they weren't really being intimate. And then Ken found another woman and was like bringing the other woman over, even though Barbie was there. It was super wack. Mike: Yeah, And I mean, I dunno, good for her for, knowing right out of that situation. Jessika: Yeah, exactly. She didn't deserve that.  Mike: No,  Jessika: So pan back to giant dog thing who is looking super rough, it. Mike: uh,  Jessika: He's still trying to complete his quest, even though he's limping along, the police are trying to cordon off the area and Barbie and Wanda are passing along that same way. Barbie recognizes her friend calls him by name Martin. And as he's trying to make his way towards her, the police fire on him from multiple angles, he falls in a heap to Barbie's feet and tells her that she needs to go back. The land needs her and gives her the serpentine, which appears to be a large pink stone in an ornate fitting on a necklace, one a pulls away as Martin dies from his injuries. She gets Barbie home and helps her into her apartment. And Barbie realizes that the necklace was from her dreams. And then her whole room fills with blackbirds who turn white, which was, that was a wild thing. And outside the door, George seems very interested in the situation and tries to ask Wanda, but she just brushes him off.  Mike: Right. And it's , kind of creepy, like his demeanor is that he seems like that weird sorta infatuated in cell who's uncomfortably interested in one of his neighbors.  Jessika: yeah, he's like at the door with his head down. He's like post Barbie.  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: I wish you could see me, everyone. Cause I'm just like girl. then he goes and grabs a whole ass Raven and puts it in his mouth and swallows it whole and grinning the whole time and mentioned the. Mike: Yeah, by that point in time, it's not surprising that he is off in a creepy, supernatural way. there've been enough weird little hints about them throughout the issue.  Jessika: Yeah. He's just kind of a lurking most of the time, which is very strange.  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: There's a whole lot of other apartment drama, of course. And , Hazel was taken advantage of while drunk and is now pregnant, but hasn't told her partner Fox glove. she's also pretty naive about how reproduction works in the first place, which is super depressing. Like she didn't know basic things. Mike: It felt like she was written to be unbelievably dumb about this one topic, even though she's in a queer relationship in New York, she works as a chef. And when we're first introduced to her, she seems very no bullshit because when we first meet her, it's Wanda trying to get milked for Barbie and Hazel is like, kind of. Antagonistic towards Wanda. And you're not sure if it's because she's possibly transphobic or if she's just not a morning person, because they let Wanda come in and grab some milk and it just seems like they're kind of cranky people who are not thrilled to be woken up in the morning.  Jessika: Yeah.  Yeah.  Mike: But then like later on, she has these moments that are just, literally unbelievably naive and I don't think her character was written like she should have been. I don't know. I, I'm curious if, when they do an audio book of this, if they ever get around to it, how Gaiman's going to rewrite her.  Jessika: Yeah. Same as I, I just think, yeah, there was a lot missing from this character. Just didn't feel like you said believable as a character, just in all of these different pieces to her. So Barbie is still waking out a bit about her experience and with the birds and everything else, and Martin 10 bones, all that stuff, and tries to decompress while watching TV. And she starts drifting in and out of sleep. And by extension in and out of the dream realm, Nuala actually does show up again. I know we had said prior that we weren't sure if she does, but she does, Mike: yeah. And new Allah was the ferry who had been given to Dream as a gift in volume four without her consent, by the way, it was kind of like surprise you now serve the dream Lord,  Jessika: Yeah. You're not coming home with me. Sorry. This is now your problem.  Ugh.  Mike: which, I mean like, admittedly, we all kind of wish that we could do that with our siblings at one point or another,  Jessika: well, Mike: I mean,  Jessika: my brother doesn't listen to this anymore, so it's fine. Oh goodness. So Nuala does show up and she tries to warn Barbie. That shit is about to get complicated at which point Barbie does fall asleep and passes into the dream. cut to creepy George, who is cutting himself open. He pulls open his chest, exposing his ribs, where a bunch of blackbirds had evidently been waiting and subsequently fly out of him. The other members of the apartment complex start having weird and awful dreams and the birds visit each sleeping individually individual thusly catches the bird, trying to harass her and with a glance at ignites in her hand, which affects George. This is the first real glimpse of the idea that thusly may not be the quiet innocuous individual that she first seemed to be. And she then goes to see George at his apartment wielding a kitchen knife. Mike: Yeah, I thought that was really cool. And the thing is, is that that's actually a really good example of kind of game and doing , some misdirection because he doesn't drop any hints about her. All you get the idea of is that she's extremely straight-laced and kind of nebbish for lack of a better term. Jessika: Yeah,  Mike: yeah, and then she just busts out powers and she's really not featured much before this either, which was kinda.  Jessika: yeah, And back in the. Barbie is having to reacclimate herself to her own dream character as she has only the fleeting memories of the night she spent there. And everybody in the building starts to awaken and the birds disappear. They're all shaken after their nightmares. And one by one thusly visits, the apartments of the other residents starting with Hazel and Fox glove followed by Wanda. Leslie already knew the Barbie was in trouble and Wanda used her spare key to get into Barbie's apartment at Besley's urging and Barbie was out hold still in the dream room. Leslie asked Wanda to carry Barbie to George's apartment since Wanda was quote unquote the strongest and then Hazel who I'm sorry, is just dumber than a rock points to Wanda's genitals and says, Hey, you have a thingy, which firstly, take a step back, captain obvious. And secondly, so the fuck what? Mike: Yeah. And it goes back to that thing that we were talking about with Hazelwood. It's like, she is suddenly this very, almost childlike person, even though she is a grown ass adult and a queer relationship in New York city. Like, I dunno, it's, it's not great. It feels. Very clumsy. Jessika: It sure did. And I think childlike is, is probably the best way to put it because it did feel that way. Like she was seeing something for the first time and it's like, girl, Mike: it's like you're pregnant. This isn't the first time you seen one  Jessika: seriously,  Mike: anyway.  Jessika: goodness. The party, Firenze, Georges gross poster size picture of Barbie that he has framed up on his wall  Mike: Yup.  Jessika: and is informed that Thessaly has killed George and he is in the bathtub. So Wanda's freaked out by all of this. Of course, I would also be very freaked out at this. not going to lie to you. Mike: Also we need to, we need to Go back. for a second and it's not that George is dead and in the bathtub it's oh no. George is in the bathtub and they go, oh, is he taking a shower? It's weird that he's taking a shower at 2:00 AM. And she's like, no, no, no, no. I killed him. And his body is in the bathtub and that's when the freaking out happens. Jessika: Yeah,  Mike: I thought that was great. I loved it. Jessika: I did too. Cause definitely left the door open to George's house and everyone's like, George. Hello. Mike: Yeah. No.  Jessika: Oh, of course one is freaked out and she says that she's going to leave and she physically cannot. As if by magic, Leslie also says that she is going to get George to talk and starts the disgusting process of doing so she has to remove his eyes, his face skin, and his tongue, this, she actually bid out, which was fucking as fuck. Mike: Yeah, after it looks like she's kissing his skinless face.  Jessika: Uh, yeah, was horrifying and nails these to the wall and then tells George that it's time to come back and horrifyingly. He does come back and WordStar coming from the face nail to the wall and it's gross. So thusly starts to interrogate him about his plans and he begins to tell the group the CU. Wanda is disgusted and runs to the bathroom where she vomits and the rest of the group seemingly is surprisingly calm about the whole thing. I don't know that I would be personally, so Thessaly who is now out for revenge against the cuckoo for, you know, trying to fuck with her in her sleep states that she needs some menstrual blood and asks Fox glove. And when she asks, why she has to with Besley reveals that she has not been straight in a long time, And that Hazel is pregnant, which they definitely do not have time to deal with at the moment. But hill was obviously shocked and upset by the news. And Wanda is told that she can't go onto the next part of their journey because she needs to watch Barbie. But there seems to be an underlying reason after conversing with a being that seemed to be made of light stating that she needs to seek entry into the dream realm. Mike: Oh so it's actually, um, it's the threefold goddess who the fates basically who keep on showing up throughout. So it's, it's that, mother maiden crone, who normally, when we see them, it's, they're different phases, but they're all kind of part of the same amorphous black shape. So , depending on the artist, it's like, one being, but with like, you know, the three different identities at the same time, but it's also the.  Jessika: Yeah. And I didn't get that. It was those three again, so thank you for, Mike: That's something I caught, like on my second or third read through  Jessika: Okay. Well, I feel better about a thumb. Mike: it's. I mean, it's a fleeting moment. They only show up for like a page maybe.  Jessika: Yeah, yeah. Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: meanwhile, on the street, our friend, the I don't like dogs, lady is pointing out to a passer-by that the moon is acting strange, that it had disappeared from the sky. He states that it must be an eclipse, but she says that it just left. It was not like it gradually blacked out like normal eclipse. So Wanda watches us the three women walk into the light and disappear out of the room and the moon reappears in the sky for our friend on the street, Wanda starts questioning her womanhood because she vomited during the interrogation that somehow has makes her less of a woman. But I would argue that I would do the same. That whole situation was so gnarly. Mike: Yeah. it's very pagan ritually. it feels like, old school kind of like druidic, I'm sure that someone's going to get mad at me for saying this, but , it's very pagan, a cult. I don't know the rituals, but it feels like a lot of those things that you read about and fantasy novels that are set in, like our theory and times.  Jessika: Totally. So the head then starts talking to. back in the dream realm, RB and company are making their way to their destination and have some near misses and find some other dead friends along the way the land has suffered since she has been gone, they talk about the cuckoo and how the bird lays its eggs and the nest of others. And once hatch, the young cuckoos push out the other eggs or young of the bird who initially built the nest while also fesses up to Morpheus about having warned Barbie. But he agrees that she did the right thing, princess, Barbara, and party, get to their destination, the sea and send, lose the parrot to get help. Mike: Yeah. And at this point there's only one other companion left. Who's like a, like an aardvark or an anteater.  Oh, is it okay? That was some  Jessika: It's a rat. It's like a, yeah, some rodent where it like  Mike: and a trench  Jessika: a order. Yeah.  It looks like a reporter of a pie. Mike: Yeah. And, as their journey has been going on, it's kind of like, , the group of friends in the horror movie who are slowly getting picked off one by one. and the one That always gets me is the monkey. And I can't remember his name. But he would scout ahead and then he didn't come back and Barbie at one point asks if they think that he's okay and one of them just goes no, and then they go and find his body and it's like, Hmm. Hmm. Jessika: Yeah. That was really. And back at the apartment, this was a very web flashy, one where it's very back and forth. Uh, back at the apartment, Wanda is talking to George's face and she asks him why she was left behind. He says it's because she's a man stating that the moon Magic that was used can only be used by biological women, which yikes. No, no, no, no, I don't. I don't like that one bed. And George also offhandedly states that they should be concerned about the weather. So back in the dream realm, Luiz has betrayed Barbie and brings armed guards to their hiding place on the lift. And they also killed the last remaining member of the party. So Barbie is dragged away by the guards and then is paraded through the town into a small pink house. Mike: Which is the house that she grew up.  Jessika: It is, yeah. It turns out to be a replica of her childhood home. she is also confronted by someone who appears to be her as a child, which is strange. child Barbie starts explaining that she had basically possessed her dreams and was taking over. Barbie becomes more and more visibly weak from being , in the house and around the young doppelganger. Ann Young Barbie leaves the house with her entourage of large dark plaid guards. Mike: While dragging older Barbie with her.  Jessika: Yeah. So back in New York things have started to get wild. A hurricane that had just left, turned around and heads back into town. The women walk a path of Moonlight to the dream realm where thusly fesses up that she's been around a pretty long time and starts in on her plan for revenge. I would not want to cross this lady. It did not take much for her to get pissed off enough to want to kill people. Mike: I mean, I found it pretty relatable.  Jessika: So they run across one of Barbie's failed companions who tells them that the cuckoo Barbie  Mike: Well, they come across the body and then facily resurrects them in a similar manager that she did to George.  Jessika: Correct. Mike: Yeah. And that's how they're able to get him to talk.  Jessika: So during the walk Fox glove and Hazel discuss their future and Fox glove decides to raise the child as theirs and they make up in a sense. in New York, the storm is raging. George is making terrible transphobic jokes from the wall and the woman outside has been caught in the storm. So one helps a woman get inside out of the storm, in the dream realm, young Barbie, as an acting and plan, and has gone out to the most ancient point of the land. The higher gram that's land her two companions start making their way over, but are met by young Barbie who points them over to the threat quote, unquote, stating that lose is the cuckoo and loses a parrot. I might add. So the fact that she's saying the para did it is actually kind of a good assumption to make a Kuku. Fastly goes over confirms with the bird that she is in fact, the cuckoo and strangles her and snaps her neck. when Hazel asks why she did it, she says that the bird had to be taught a lesson. The lesson was that you don't get a second chance, which yeah. Mike: Yeah, Nestle is, uh, the epitome of don't fuck around.  Jessika: yeah. found out. then young Barbie explains to Barbie and the others that the time has come to do what she had been brought here for. Back in New York are I don't like dogs. Friend is named Maisie and she is rightfully creeped out by George's face on the wall siding, bad vibes, which agreed more transphobic questions on some stories from Maisie about another trans family member she had, . It was just bad news bears. Barbie does a, she is told by young Barbie back in the dream realm and slams the porpoise teen into the large stone HIRA gram. And there's a great explosion at which point it's revealed the young Barbie is actually the cuckoo and that her goal, the whole time had been to get Barbie, to destroy the Portland teen and the high program. And then the cuckoo wouldn't be held in the land any longer breaking the spell and the land would subsequently be destroyed. So the necklace also disappears right off of Barbie's sleeping chest back in. Morphine's appears and Stacy, he created the land and puts Barbie back in control of her own mind as she had been Bewitched by the cuckoo and all of the characters of the land start filing past, ending with one dark haired and scarred woman in white, who clearly had history with dream, like every other fucking woman in here. So vessel, he tries to claim the life of the cuckoo. But dream is like, Nope. And states that he's displeased, that she's caused some major shit. Mike: Yeah, he was. If I remember, right. Dream was upset that she had trespassed into the dream realm without his permission.  Jessika: Correct? Yeah. Mike: And it's also implied that her getting the goddess to grant her and foxglove and Hazel passage to the dream realm resulted in the hurricane.  Jessika: Oh no, that was absolutely implied. Yeah. The implication was that if you pull the moon out of the sky,  you're going to fuck with the tides. Yeah. Yeah. so we turn again to New York where that storm is even fiercer than before. And then there is an explosion of weather from outside and the world starts to. In the dream realm, dream states that he owes Barbie a boon and also reveals that Rose Walker, from , our doll's house volume had partially caused this mess. During that fateful night of converging dreams. Barbie asks that she and the other three women get back safe and sound, and they are sent back and we end volume five with a funeral Wanda's funeral. Barbie was pulled from the wreckage and was able to recover, but Wanda amazi did not make it. The funeral was similarly depressing and not just because Wanda had passed away, but because they were using Wanda's dead name and it cut her hair and had put her in men's clothing. And she was buried by her family who clearly had no idea who she really was nor cared to listen to find out. And even the headstone had her dead name listed. So Barbie took out a bright shade of lipstick and wrote Wanda on the headstone Barbie dreams that she sees Wanda with a smiling pale woman wearing black. And she finally seems happy. Mike: do we ever find out where the funeral is being held? It's just, it's implied that it's vaguely south Midwest.  Jessika: She had to travel.  And it did kind of seem in the south. I don't know that we got an exact location.  Mike: Yeah. It was, it. was somewhere, very God-fearing and intolerance of people that are the least bit different.  Jessika: Yeah. Well, what were your overall impressions of this story and who are your favorite least very characters or events of the fifth? Mike: Uh, you know, this volume is a really, it's an interesting change of pace because up until now, we've gotten stories where even if dream wasn't the main character, he played a really prominent role in the narrative, even if he was sitting in the background and this time around, he really doesn't show up a lot. And when he does, it's kind of just a bookend, the story. It's funny because whenever I talk about something that Neil Gaiman wrote and I'm like, oh, it's not my favorite thing. It's still better than 95% of things that I've read. this is not one of my favorite Sandman stories. Part of it is just because it's, it does provide that, that whiplash that you get where we're pivoting back and forth between the dream realm and New York. And there is a clumsiness too, to a lot of the characters, like we've already talked about Hazel. I feel like new Haven was trying to provide a narrative where someone who is trans is human, because he has several scenes with Wanda where Wanda talks about it and is very adamant that she is a woman and the story, the narrative doesn't judge or mocker for that. But , as you said, George is gross and transphobic, which makes sense. And, Maisie that the homeless lady is kinder. but you know, there, there is still that moment of are you a man or a woman? and then she relates the story about her grandson. it's not explained if he was just very femininely gay or if he was trans. Um, but she sounds like she was supportive of him, but then , he got killed during some sort of hotel hookup, which, I mean, that was a real risk with gay culture. Like, you know, especially during that time. I think it's one of the Columbia, your stories of the overall Sandman series. I don't think it's bad, but viewed through a 20, 21 lens, I think he could stand some revision. I don't know. I, my, my opinion is pretty much my opinion, I think, has the least value in, in any conversation about gender identity, because I'm a CIS white guy.  Back on track, uh, did it, did it, uh, you know, I, I did actually really enjoy how we got to see some of the characters from the doll's house return, especially Barbie. it's really frustrating that I kept on thinking that we had seen Wanda in the doll's house. And it turns out that that was some misleading copy. That kind of made me think that like, oh, sorry. I liked how we got to see more of a strange fairies hill of a dream from that book and how it was spun out into a larger story that had a bunch of twists and turns. I don't know if I had a least favorite character, honestly, like, yeah, the Kuku is a hateful character, but I also thought it was kind of interesting that, that she was trying to kill Barbie so that she could exist. And then I don't think the cuckoo shows up again. I think the cuckoo just like bounces after this, when she flies off. I for some reason, like, I remember when I thought the KUKA was going to come back and be an even bigger batter nastier villain, but I don't think that happens. I could be wrong. It's been awhile, but I don't think it does. I thought was a really great character. Like we already talked about how, the way that they actually reveal that there's a lot more to where character and also how she is just straight out of Fox all the way through the story. and then, I guess, I guess my least favorite character is Hazel's character and it's not because of anything that was really wrong with her role in the story. It was just, she was very clumsily writ.  Jessika: Yeah, Mike: like I said, I think she just comes across as dumb at the most convenient and unbelievable times. It's just, it's too coincidental where at one point she's asking about like, oh, well, don't, you have to kill a rabbit to like, what, what was it like she was asking about like to perform an abortion or,  or  Jessika: see if you're pregnant. Cause that  Mike: yeah. Like, come on, okay.  Jessika: Yeah, actual most ridiculous thing. I know. Mike: , I don't know. Like, do you agree to disagree? Like, I feel like I might be reading too much into this just with my own thoughts, but  Jessika: Oh no I was, I was pretty disappointed in how this whole thing was written. I'm not gonna lie to you. I was disappointed in the transphobia. Let's start there.  Mike: yeah.  Jessika: It just felt like the entire volume, it may have been done with the intention of bringing to light some of the challenges that trans women face like deadnaming or of constantly being told that genitalia is what makes one, a woman or the idea that to do trans correctly, you need to get surgery or the blatant violence against trans people. But I don't think enough was done to highlight someone doing the right thing and giving example of allowing someone to just live their life genuinely. And Barbie is a good example of a somewhat decent advocate, but I wish that the lesbians in the building had done more to be open or even just not completely stupid about the situation. It just felt really TERF-y  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: Which, you know, to, to explain for any of you who don't know a turf as it's trans exclusionary, radical feminist, which is just a way to say you don't want trans women in your fucking woman club for some fucking odd reason. Mike: Yeah, And I mean, back in 1991, when this was written, that wasn't really a thing like, gender queerness, wasn't really a known thing. It was your transsexual  like, did you ever see the movie soap dish with Sally field and Whoopi Goldberg and Elizabeth shoe and Kevin Klein?  Jessika: No.  Mike: It's a really funny movie up until the last 10 minutes, uh, where it's, it's about the cast of a soap opera and how the behind the scenes stuff is even more ridiculous than what's going on in the soap opera. It's great. But then the last 10 minutes or so it's revealed that the villain who's been pulling everyone's puppet strings, , she's , publicly humiliated by being outed on live television as a trans woman. And that's the punchline. in, 1991, This was considered wildly funny. this is an example of how our views have changed in the past 30 years. for the better where we can look at this and say, this is, this is not great.  Jessika: Yeah. I mean, it's still happening though. And that's it, it's still a very real problem within the, you know, the LGBTQ plus community.  Mike: a hundred percent.  Jessika: Yeah. It's just in the end, I felt like there were no lessons learned by the people who had been the most transphobic. Mike: Yeah, I mean, cause George, we knew was going to be terrible. , and then Hazel and Fox glove, there was no. resolution on that because by the time that they get back, Wanda's dead.  Jessika: Yeah. Yup. And which that also felt refrigerators. Like you're going to kill off the one trans person, like okay. Mike: Yeah. And there's the, the happy ending of, we see Wanda perfect. And in this amazing dress with death, waving goodbye to say farewell to Barbie, which is it's. I mean it's  Jessika: But she, but my problem with that is she looks a little bit different. Like she looks more feminine and  she looks more in it's. That's not necessarily what, and I mean, I'm not trans, so I can't speak to this experience, but to me ha, having known people and talk to their experience, that's not necessarily what they want. They don't want to be a totally different person. They just want to be them genuinely. Mike: Yeah. I mean, I certainly can't speak for people who are trans or gender fluid, or, or anything in that realm. Like that is well outside my wheelhouse. I can just say, I agree with you. It feels achy.  Jessika: Yeah. Yeah. Well, and yeah, since, no real lessons , were learned. I mean, maybe that's the real message that people don't fucking learn. And if so, thank you. That's goddamn. Depressing. Mike: Yeah. The one nice moment was when Barbie wrote Wanda's name on her tombstone and the bright lipstick, that was nice because you know, it was loud and it was flamboyant and it was very much everything about Wanda's personality, but it was really dissatisfying as an ending.  Jessika: Yeah. Yeah. I agree. Did you have a favorite art moment in this volume? Mike: I'm not sure that I had a favorite art moment, but I was really affected every time one of Barbie's friends died or where she found their bodies. like it, it genuinely made me sad. You know, I've already talked about how, when they found per natto, the monkeys corpse and how it was really sad, but Martin 10 bones and his expression right before the cop shot him, because he just looked, it was that look of, oh, I found my friend , and I've got the message, but like, it, uh, it reminded me of the time that I'd take my dog into the vet to put them down.  Jessika: Mm. Hmm. Mike: you know, and that's, it's, it's that moment where you, uh, when you're holding the dog and it's like, oh, everything's okay. And then they give him the shot and he gives you this look just fucking rips you apart every time. So not really, uh, not really a favorite moment, but definitely in effecting one.  Jessika: Oh, you're trying to get me go on to, Mike: Yeah. Um, I dunno. What about you?  Jessika: well, I really enjoyed how they did the color and line work and the moon.  Mike: Yeah, those were cool. Jessika: Yeah, it was neat to see how they use the negative space and implied shapes using lions. And it also made me feel like I was a part of the scene. There was almost like I had to shield my own eyes from the full white pages. Mike: Yeah. that was, that was neat. Jessika: any final thoughts about this volume before we move on? Mike: like I said, it's not really my favorite. I keep thinking about Hazel and Fox glove. And it's interesting because like Fox glove was, , the girlfriend of the woman who put out her own eyes with the forks or , the, the skewers and the diner,  Jessika: Yeah. Yeah. I figured you were going to bring that up. I was, I was like, how can I condense this  crazy story? Mike: Yeah. And so that, I, that was kind of a neat throwback because I remember Fox glove is like a very, it's like a throwaway name or something like that. And then I think her name is Julie shows up in the jacket that she was wearing and her eyes , are not visible during the nightmares when everyone's being plagued by the Cuckoo's Binion's. I will say that moment where Hazel and Fox glove are first in the dreaming and Fox lava sitting there and basically screaming at Hazel about getting pregnant and it feels like it's going to get real ugly. And she's like, when we get back, I'm gonna , call you all sorts of names and tell you how dumb you are and do you know how much it's going to cost for us to raise a baby. and she's like, we're going to have to buy one of those stupid expensive books to name the kid. And I was like, oh, Okay. , and then they're holding hands by the end of that page. And it's, it's sweet. that story continues actually in a couple of mini series about death, that, that game in road. And they're really good. they've got their own sense of tragedy and everything, but they're, they're solid, I don't know, it's not my favorite , but it does a lot of things that are really interesting. And I also think that it leads to some really cool stuff down the road.  Jessika: Let's move on to volume six, Mike: Okay.  Jessika: titled fables . And flections. This was originally published in single magazine form as the Sandman 29 through 31 38 through 40 50 Sandman special one and vertigo preview one between 1991 and 1993. So very much a true compilation written by Neil Gaiman illustrated by Brian Talbot, Stan wool, Craig Russell, Sean McManus, Jon Watkiss, Jill Thompson, Duncan Eagleson and Kent Williams. And this was very much a, an anthology of a bunch of different stories that didn't necessarily tie together as a, an overarching plot like previous volume did. Mike: Yeah. it's very much like dream country just with about double the cost.  Jessika: Yeah, Yeah, exactly. The first story is fear of falling. A musical theater writer and director who is wanting to give up right before his show. While sleeping. He is visited by Morpheus who ends up inspiring him to take the leap of courage. It took to finish his project to completion. Next up was destined mirrors, three Septembers and a January the story of the emperor of the United States. Here's the scene. San Francisco, 1859. Dream is drawn into a contest with his siblings, desire to spare and delirium, to see who could push a man to his death, each trying different tactics to try to lure him into one of those emotions. When Morpheus entered the scene, he basically just gave the man his exact dream. He wanted to be king and Morpheus stated that he was the emperor of the USA. He starts making proclamations about his claim to the throne and starts gaining popularity and the charity of the town around him. And he actually becomes famous for being the emperor and is even sought after, by tourists, visiting San Francisco. He has called crazy at times, but does not fall prey to madness desires, unable to tempt him as he already has everything he dreams of and despair was never in the picture. After his dreams came true. He was truly content and dream had won the contest death swoops in looking stylish as ever and leads. Mike: Yeah. And emperor Norton is actually someone who really existed in San Francisco. Like he's a part of our local history and  Jessika: I  didn't know that. Mike: yeah, no he's emperor, Joshua Norton, the imaginary emperor. he's a really cool part of San Francisco lore and I highly recommend, , reading up on him if he ever get the chance. he's one of my favorite stories about the city that. I grew up in.  Jessika: Oh, I'm definitely gonna look into that now. Cause I mean, I love just a Stone's throw away and I can't believe I've never heard that before. Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: The next story is mirrors Thermador said in England in 1794 with Morpheus, just swooping into the home of Johanna Constantine. And I'm sure that name sounds familiar in the middle of the nights and I'm not going to lie. It was really creepy when he was just like Nabu, all your people are asleep, just you and I. Sugar was like big. Nope. Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: And then he's like, Hey, I have this super dangerous mission. UN she's all, but what's in it for me. And apparently she just believes in vague promises and agrees to help with him and with his family matter that he needs a mortal to intercede in. And it. Then it is post the French revolution. The reign of terror is in full swing and Johannah gets caught sneaking through the town late at night with a decapitated head in a bag, you know, casual Mike: who hasn't been out on a Saturday night with a human head and their satchel come on.  Jessika: Mr. Al of late God. Once you got my bag, nothing you'd be interested in. So She ultimately gets picked up by the law sands head and as kept as a prisoner under a further threat, if she does not tell them where the head is, this whole thing about like her spreading superstitions or some bullshit. Mike: , Yeah, because robes Pierre was all about reason and eliminating superstition and religion. If I remember my high school history,  Jessika: you are correct. Is that whole logic piece, which he was just going off about. So she dreams a little dream and visits, Morpheus and reveals that the head is Morpheus, a son Orpheus,  so Joe had a basically says, this is your fight, but I'm in the ring little hope over here, Hugh the extra creep factor where the law rightfully figures out that she probably hit the head with all the other heads and go tell her to fetch the one they're looking for. Johanna gets the head, props it up, covers her ears. And tells Orpheus to sing. It drives the map, puts them in a trance unclear, but she is able to get away and get Orpheus to a little island paradise where he has previously been. We also come to find out that Morpheus is quite the absentee parent. , it was so sad. There was this part where Orpheus asks Johannah basically does this mean he cares about me and she's like, dunno. Mike: Yeah, it's a, anyone that's grown up with with strained relationships to their parents, like can just feel that gut.  Jessika: Yeah. The fourth story is convergence. The hunt. So we find ourselves this time in a story within a story. Uh, grandfather tells his begrudging granddaughter, a tale about a man named Vaseline who becomes obsessed with finding a Duke's daughter based on a measure painting that was given to him by a Romani peddler, as he goes off in search of this woman, he has never met. He first encounters, the Romani peddler that had given him the miniature she is dead on the forest path, that he just swoops her bag of items and moves off through the forest. He meets several characters along the way, including Baba Yaga and a tall slender librarian, each particularly interested in one of the stolen items. He was peddling one night while hunting a dearest his target is taken out by a woman of the forest who factors into the story a little bit later upon reaching the Duke's mansion. He is led to a dungeon to rot, but is saved by the tall librarian who really, really, really wanted that book because it turns out the book is from the dream realm and Morpheus would be  very, very,  displeased. Should it not be returned? Mike: We've met the librarian before in passing, he's Lucy in the librarian of the dream realm. Like he's the first one that Morpheus basically reintroduces himself to once he gets back to the dream realm preludes and Nocturnes, but like he doesn't show up a lot. , it's one of those things where he's kind of like a central figure to the dreaming, but he doesn't show up a lot in the stories. , I don't remember. I think he may have appeared in passing in season of the mists. I can't remember, but anyway, sorry. His name is Lucien. Like that's, That's all I was trying to,  right?  Jessika: So in exchange for the book, Morpheus takes Vasily to the woman's room, but when he gets there, vastly simply looks at her and gives her the necklace back saying this belongs to you later on in his life. He runs back into the woman who took down the deer while there are both in Wolf form. And at the end of the story, the granddaughter assumes that her grandfather has made up the story to assuage her from dating her current boyfriend. But an ending comment, lets the reader know that the story may have some truth after all. Mike: that was one of my favorite closing modes. I I'm not gonna lie.  Jessika: It was sweet. So our next tale distant mirrors. focuses on Julius. Caesar's next of Ken Augustus, who after a dream decides that he must live one day in the life of a beggar. So he calls upon an actor who happens to be a , little person to assist him in getting into the role for the day and show him the ropes. They start by making artificial boils on their faces and arms. They dress and rags and take to the streets in a dream, he was approached by Morpheus who knew about his troubled past being brutalized by the man. He looked up to the man, a whole empire looked up to, there was also this whole situation with there being two different futures. Augustus had read the prophecies, edited some destroyed others so that that overall people wouldn't know what was truly predicted. And so that he could make his own course of choosing by being a baker one day a year, he was not being watched by Julius and the other gods and therefore could plan without them watching after Augustus's death, the actor who had accompanied him that day wrote the story of his day with the emperor. However, the harsh details of Augustus's life remained a mystery that he himself took to. Next up. We once again, go back in time with convergence. Soft places. If you don't have whiplash yet, just wait. You will get it by the end of this episode. But this time we go to see Marco polo who was lost in the desert and having the most odd dream. He runs into a person who says his cellmate is named Marco polo and they that run into our buddy Fiddler's green or Gilbert, who we saw in the doll's house who tries to impart a lesson on Marco polo. Marco thinks that he is going to be stuck in the dreaming, but when he emerges, he is back with his father and was only a few hundred feet away from the party upon waking Marco forgets the dream. He was just a part of the Seventh story is the song of Orpheus we again, meet Orpheus this time, his head is still firmly attached to his neck and he is going to be married that day. His friend, is also at the wedding along with Morpheus and all of Morpheus as sibling. The bride reminds, era status of his long dead wife. And during the wedding, he requests a private meeting with Eurydice fading, a need for assistance. He states his intention to rape her and goes to grab her, but she needs him and runs off where she steps on and is bitten by a poisonous snake and dies right there. Orpheus realizes that she is no longer around and panics asking if something has happened to her grieving, the loss of his bride Orpheus seeks help from berserk his father than his aunt death, demanding that she bring her back death states that she cannot, that Euridice is any underworld now, and that he is unable to go and come back as he is a mortal after more prompting, she does state that she is able to just not collect him basically. And he would survive coming back from the underworld, but she also tells him that this is not what he wants and that he should go home. Or if he is however, it does the exact opposite and begins his journey to the gate death had described. So he makes his way to the underworld where he's buried across the river sticks and makes his way past Cerberus the three headed dog and through the endless amount of people in the underworld, he gets to Hades and Persephone who asked him for a song. And he asks for his wife back and plays a haunting melody that brings the underworld to a halt. Hades states that he could have his wife back, but that she will follow him as a shadow up and out of the underworld. The one rule was that he could not look behind him before he reached the exit of the underworld, or she would go back down. He made it almost all the way there, but started doubting thinking that he was the butt of Hades, this joke. But when he turned around, he saw Eurydice just before she was dragged back into the other world. Orpheus broke the surface alone and screamed understanding that he had just bought his only chance to have his bride back. Time-lapse Orpheus as many years older and living in solitude, he is visited by his mother, Kelly OB, who had a falling out with Morpheus after he would not assist Orpheus with his quest to bring back your IDC is not interested in talking with her, but she wants him. The picante are on their way and that he should leave as soon as possible. So she disappears and soon after the forest breaks out and cries, a crowd of naked women covered in wine and blood are running right towards him and ask that he take part in their rituals of sex, wine, and eating raw flesh. He states that he cannot participate as his heart belongs to someone else. And they basically say, yeah, we weren't asking. And they literally rip him apart. And eventually decapitate him, sending his head, flying into a river. He, of course can't die. So he's just stuck, literally rolling on a river. Mike: Yeah. It's very much the stories that Orpheus is known for. Everybody knows him from the story of him and URI dicey, but, surprise. There is actually a major part of Greek mythology where he gets ripped apart by boxes, insane followers  and yeah. You're I find you don't want to take part in the ritual. we're going to turn you into one of the ritual supplies and just eat. Yeah,  Jessika: Yeah, pretty much. So Orpheus the head washes a shore and Morpheus comes to see him. He wants to say, goodbye has arranged for Orpheus to be taken care of, but says the he'll never see Orpheus again. His life is his own next is convergence parliament of Rooks.. We visit Daniel and Hippolyta again, she puts Daniel down to nap and he wanders into the dream realm where he goes to the house of secrets and is with Matthew Eve and Abel Eve tells the story of Adam's three wives and Abel after Kane interrupts of course tells a very optimistic and happy version of their story, where everybody got along after all. And after all was said and done, Hippolyta has no idea that Daniel has gone anywhere while he was napping. Mike: we keep getting hints dropped about Daniel and it's gonna play out in a very big way later on.  Jessika: I'm excited. So our last story distant mirrors, Ramadan is about the king of Baghdad, who has everything. Anyone could want ruling over a prosperous city. However, something still feels wrong to him. So he goes down into the secret depths of the palace where numerous wonders were kept. You procures a ball, which holds multitudes of basically like bad vibe entities. He summons Morpheus stating that he would break the ball, therefore releasing all of the bad vibes if Morpheus didn't appear. And when he actually follows through and drops the ball, Morpheus catches, it takes it and asks, why have you summoned me in, what the fuck do you want? The king wanted to trade control of his city in order to ensure that it was going to last forever. Morpheus agreed, but in true Morpheus fashion, he put the city in a jar and left the man to be the king of a city in shambles. So Mike overall impressions of a story, favorite characters or. Mike: Yeah. like I said, this one is a lot like dream country and there's one more volume later on where we get the one-shot stories to provide us with breathers, , , from the overall narrative. They were printed, as they were in, in various orders, but then DC collected them into the different volumes in ways. That makes more sense. but it's interesting because in this case we got a collection of stories without another prolonged round of like soul crushing horror and dark fantasy. I think the anthology volumes actually do a lot to move Sandman from the realm of horror and more into the realm of fantasy, because a lot of the times the individual stories aren't as dark or, as, as brutal. like a lot of times they're a little bit more philosophical or meditative, but I liked them a lot, but I mean, I only own, two issues of Sandman like individual. and one of them is issue number eight, which is the first appearance of death. And the other one is issue 31, which is the one that features three Septembers in a January. The story about . I love that story about Norden. I think that one's great. We already talked about how he was a real person and, he is this really interesting character out of history who is both the epitome , of kind of the magic of a dream and also what you can achieve even when you're faced with a ton of tragedy, because he was actually almost, I think he was basically completely wiped out due to a bad rice shipment and he did die penniless. And at the same time, San Francisco fucking loved him. Like they kept standing, box tickets for him at the symphony on opening night He was arrested once by an officer and the judge actually did immediately dismiss him when he was brought before him. And basically said like, , as an emperor, he is never declared war. He's never tried to invade anyone. He hasn't done terrible things. Other emperors should be like him. And I loved, how desire tried to tempt him with the ghost of a, dead snake oil salesman and the other bit where it turns out he had, like a Chinese information network, , where it turns out that the Chinese populace of San Francisco, which was hugely prevalent at the time, because of the gold rush and. Other things. , I loved the idea that he actually did have , this amazing fantastical life that was already fantastical, but then there were even more elements of fantasy woven into it. and then the other one is, , the parliament of ropes. It's , the story of Cain and Abel and Eve, you know, the purlin or Rooks hits me in a personal way because the bit we're able tells the story about him and Kane and, it's what this person who, who just idolized his brother wanted from the relationship, even though they do have their own strange in certain ways loving relationship, but also Cain murders able on a regular basis throughout the series. And it made me think about, how I stopped talking to my brother a number of years ago, but I still think about him a lot. And I wish that things were different between us, like. I often wonder what things would have been like if we had wound up being slightly different people and I construct those fantasies in my head still sometimes, but yeah. honestly I like this a lot better than I like that. I like the previous volume, because it gives me a lot more to think about, um, I don't know. How do you feel about it?  Jessika: Yeah, I, you know, it's funny as I actually really liked the story of Joshua, the emperor of the United States,  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: I really like how they kept the narrative bag, leaving the reader wavering between believing that he really had been successful in his reign as the legitimate emperor of the U S or if he was just some sweet old man who was really well-liked well-respected and generally taken care of by this town of other really eccentric. Mike: Yeah. And it turns out the truth is a little bit of both.  Jessika: Yeah, Yeah, I guess so. I mean, he did get out of, out of a core thing, huh? Mike: Well, and when he died, basically, he was going to be put in a Popper's grave. And I believe like the merchants association basically paid for a really Swank funeral and of people  came to the viewing like, you know, but thousands of people turned out for.  Jessika: what I'm going to research this  so sweet.  Mike: Hmm,  Jessika: Yeah. I thought it was really wholesome that he was just so content to have the title of emperor. He didn't have some weird power trip about colonizing or being otherwise oppressive. I would say that that was genuinely refreshing to see him just so content to be valued and validated. Oh shit. That's all I want, Mike: that's all, any of us want. Also, I liked that he hung out with mark Twain and the story, and I don't know if he and mark Twain were friends in real life, but mark Twain was a reporter in San Francisco. after he got run out of the state of Nevada,  Jessika: maybe we'll have to specifically look at up. Well, did you have a favorite art moment in this volume? Mike: I had to, I really liked the art of the hunt, which is the story of the grandfather. Cause it felt really like, it felt really scratchy and you're kind of reminded me of those old European crosshatched wood prints. And then that actually makes sense because I realized it was inked by this guy named Vince Locke. And he's this guy who he actually illustrated a bunch of tabletop role-playing games for white Wolf games in the 1990s. And then he also created the comic that the movie, a history of violence was based off of. If you remember that. Jessika: I do. Mike: but like, I always really liked his style. Like I thought it was really cool and really unique. He's done a lot of other cool stuff as well. He had a comic series called dead world that was a zombie apocalypse kind of comic. If I remember right , well, before the walking dead ever came along like, you know, 30 years. , and then there's the whole issue of Ramadan, which is the story set in Baghdad. so Ramadan was illustrated by P Craig Russell and Russell was a, the first openly gay comic creator. and he's still working today in his art style. It's just, it's one of the most fucking beautiful things you'll ever see. And it's really adaptable into a bunch o

Argus Media
Inside Fertilizer Analytics: Processed Phosphates, November 2021

Argus Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 26:58


The processed phosphates market has continued its year of surprises and price rallying since our last processed phosphates podcast episode and it's the imposition of restrictions on Chinese phosphate exports which have spurred on the most recent wave of concerns and price support.  Claira Lloyd – Phosphate and Phosphate Rock Research Manager joins Tim Cheyne, VP Fertilizers to take a deep dive on the Chinese export cuts and what it means for consuming markets both east and west of Suez, and even how it will cause some difficulties for those markets which are not reliant on Chinese supply. India, Australia, Brazil, Pakistan and the US will be their areas of focus as they explore what the removal of China means for our market.  They will then discuss new supply projects which have been added to the Argus Processed Phosphates Analytics base-case and what environmental restrictions and concerns could mean for their future. Finally, they review pricing expectations for the rest of this year and in to the medium-term, particularly as market dynamics have changed swiftly with the confirmation of Chinese export limitations.

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Intel despierta, AMD ruge / Cárcel contra las filtraciones de datos personales / Más expansión de coches autónomos / Exposición de cohete en Madrid / Nómina en Bitcoin para alcalde de NYC / Fotos del Ever Given Patrocinador: Kärcher presenta su nueva colección de hardware de limpieza para tu hogar. En su web https://www.kaercher.com/es/ encontrarás una potente fregona eléctrica sin cables https://www.kaercher.com/es/home-garden/fregonas-electricas/fc-7-sin-cable-10557300.html, una limpiadora de vapor https://www.kaercher.com/es/home-garden/limpiadoras-de-vapor/sc-4-easyfix-15124500.html para eliminar el 99,999% de bacterias, o sus aspiradoras multi-uso https://www.kaercher.com/es/home-garden/aspiradores-multifuncionales/aspiradores-multiuso/wd-6-p-premium-13482710.html para limpiar garajes, sótanos y mucho más. — Si los compras antes del 15 de noviembre te llevas gratis su escoba eléctrica KB-5 https://www.kaercher.com/es/home-garden/escoba-electrica/kb-5-12580000.html. Intel despierta, AMD ruge / Cárcel contra las filtraciones de datos personales / Más expansión de coches autónomos / Exposición de cohete en Madrid / Nómina en Bitcoin para alcalde de NYC / Fotos del Ever Given

Today In Jewish History
28 Marcheshvan – The Suez War – 1956

Today In Jewish History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021


Good Morning Business
Le Journal de l'économie - 01/11

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 9:25


Ce lundi 1er novembre, Audrey Maubert a présenté le Journal de l'économie dont voici les premiers sujets : Climat, Pékin s'engage... un peu, prime inflation, tout n'est pas réglé, OPA de Veolia sur Suez, une enquête du PNF. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

(don't) Waste Water!
BREAKING NEWS: Is the VEOLIA/SUEZ Merger at Risk?

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 3:24


SUEZ and VEOLIA shall merge by the end of this year (at least partially), after a long battle... that's apparently still not over! Let's review the previous steps. VEOLIA acquired 29.9% of SUEZ from ENGIE and tendered the remaining 70.1% last July. Everything fine? Well, on Friday 29/10, the French Justice announced, that they were investigating the role that the French Presidency played in this very first step.  Did the Elysée Palast (and especially General Secretary Alexis Kohler) collude with ENGIE, VEOLIA, and MERIDIAM to agree on cutting SUEZ apart? And if yes, can it still slow down the process, or is it just another episode of a long drama? Let's quickly review while it's hot!

ARTICOLI di Rino Cammilleri
La crisi del canale di Suez e l'ascesa dell'islamismo nazionalista e socialista

ARTICOLI di Rino Cammilleri

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 5:49


TESTO DELL'ARTICOLO ➜ http://www.bastabugie.it/it/articoli.php?id=6645LA CRISI DEL CANALE DI SUEZ E L'ASCESA DELL'ISLAMISMO NAZIONALISTA E SOCIALISTAIl concreto rischio di una terza guerra mondiale, la decolonizzazione, il socialismo e il nazionalismo arabodi Rino CammilleriUn primo «rinascimento islamico» si ebbe dopo la spedizione napoleonica in Egitto. Il pascià, solo formalmente dipendente da Costantinopoli, si chiese come mai poche migliaia di soldati francesi avessero potuto sbaragliare il suo intero esercito. Così, selezionò i giovani migliori e li mandò a studiare a Parigi, dove questi appresero concetti come il nazionalismo e la cattiveria dei Crociati. Queste le radici del nazionalismo arabo che il britannico Lawrence sfruttò contro i turchi nella Grande Guerra.Francesi e inglesi proclamarono i loro protettorati e tracciarono i nuovi confini del Medioriente col righello. Ma ormai i semi dei nazionalismi erano stati gettati. Dopo l'ultima guerra mondiale, la decolonizzazione si arricchì dell'ultima ideologia imparata nelle università occidentali, il socialismo. Ma quel che determinò l'affermarsi del social-nazionalismo nei Paesi islamici via via decolonizzati fu l'ascesa di Nasser in Egitto tramite detronizzazione del re Faruq (all'incoronazione del predecessore Feysal nel 1932 la banda reale, tanto per chiarire, aveva intonato l'inno britannico).Quattro anni prima erano nati i Fratelli Musulmani, che subito crebbero tra un popolo su cui, alla vecchia maniera feudale, pochissimi ricchi sfondati insistevano su una larghissima maggioranza pressoché indigente (situazione comune nel mondo arabo). Nel 1952 il golpe militare (così acquistarono l'indipendenza anche Algeria, Libia, Sudan, Siria, Irak, Turchia, Tunisia, Iran) proclamò la repubblica in Egitto, il Paese islamico più esteso.Tra gli ufficiali golpisti presto si impose Nasser, che eliminò i capi dei Fratelli Musulmani e inaugurò un sistema durato fino ad oggi: a parte la breve parentesi di Morsi, Fratello Musulmano, tutti i presidenti erano militari: Neghib, Nasser, Sadat, Mubarak, al-Sisi. Ma quel che consacrò Nasser quale stella polare del mondo islamico fu la crisi di Suez del 1956, dettagliatamente narrata da Massimo Campanini e Marco Di Donato in Il canale delle spie. Storia della crisi di Suez (Salerno, pp. 150, €. 14).Nasser intendeva sottrarre il Canale di Suez al dominio di fatto inglese e assicurarne l'importante rendita agli egiziani. Così, da una parte favoriva nascostamente i sabotaggi e dall'altra cercava di modernizzare l'esercito, le cui deficienze conosceva bene. Cercò dunque di comprare armi in Occidente, ma nessuno voleva vendergliene. Allora si rivolse all'Urss tramite il dittatore jugoslavo Tito, che a quel tempo era leader dei cosiddetti Paesi Non Allineati. La triangolazione fornì all'Egitto armamenti cecoslovacchi. Solo che i Fratelli Musulmani, per vendetta, erano ormai diventati i principali informatori degli inglesi. Questi ultimi allora si accordarono coi francesi (Nasser sosteneva segretamente l'insurrezione algerina). E con gli israeliani, preoccupati dai successi di Nasser: nel 1954, «Operazione Susannah: agenti segreti israeliani, travestiti da arabi, effettuarono attentati dinamitardi al Cairo e ad Alessandria e danneggiarono le infrastrutture britanniche sul canale di Suez, con lo scopo di far ricadere le colpe sui nazionalisti egiziani».A quel punto Nasser giocò la sua carta e nel 1956 nazionalizzò il canale. Subito truppe inglesi, francesi e israeliane entrarono in Egitto e occuparono il Canale di Suez. Senza preavvertire l'alleato americano. Ma era anche l'anno dell'invasione sovietica dell'Ungheria e «l'iniziativa anglo-francese in Egitto aveva irrimediabilmente compromesso ogni possibilità di intervento occidentale a supporto degli insorti ungheresi». Eisenhower andò su tutte le furie. Infatti, dato che l'Urss appoggiava Nasser, c'era il concreto rischio di una terza guerra mondiale. Minacciò di bloccare le forniture di petrolio a Gran Bretagna e Francia e queste, impoverite dalla recente guerra con la Germania, dovettero ritirarsi. Per Nasser fu il trionfo nel mondo islamico. Ma con un'altra conseguenza: «Fu solo dopo il 1956 che gli arabi furono determinati a distruggere Israele».Il colpo finale al panarabismo venne dal solito Israele con la guerra del 1967, che fu per l'Egitto una disfatta. Il successore, Sadat, dovette riappoggiarsi ai Fratelli Musulmani e da allora il declamatorio slogan «l'Islam è la soluzione» divenne, in crescendo, quel che abbiamo sotto i nostri occhi.

ICIS - chemical podcasts
Episode 697: European ACN feedstocks update costs vs supply/demand dynamics

ICIS - chemical podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 9:23


Ammonia and propylene markets are being closely followed by acrylonitrile (ACN) players in Europe and while both are balanced to healthy supply wise and demand is still good, energy costs are spiralling.Listen in as ICIS pricing editors Jane Massingham asks Richard Ewing and Nel Weddle about the latest developments and what to expect in the short term    Spiking energy costs squeezing margins    Ammonia prices almost tripled in past year West of Suez   Costs to dominate propylene contract talks for Nov

Urban Warfare Project
The Man in The Tank Wins: IDF Armor, Part 2

Urban Warfare Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 27:29


In this episode, the second in a two-part series, John Spencer continues his conversation with retired Brig. Gen. Yom Tov Tamir. In the previous episode, he reflected on his long career as an armor officer in the Israel Defense Forces, in which he held positions from tank commander to division commander. Part two picks up with a description of his experiences during the 1973 Yom Kippur War, including the last battle of the war, the Battle of Suez, which ended disastrously. Based on his experiences, he shares his his thoughts on the role of armor in urban warfare and complex layered defenses. The conversation ends with an explanation of two popular IDF Armored Corps mottos: “The tank is iron but the man is steel,” and “The man in the tank wins.”

Storie di Geopolitica
Perché chiudere il Canale di Suez è una pessima idea (Geopolitica degli Stretti)

Storie di Geopolitica

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:45


Approfitta dell'offerta di NordVPN qui: https://nordvpn.com/NovaGeoApplica il coupon NOVAGEO per ottenere il 73% di sconto con 4 mesi aggiuntivi gratuiti. La promozione è a tempo limitato ed è senza rischi o vincoli grazie ai 30 giorni di prova soddisfatti o rimborsati.--Parliamo di Geopolitica degli stretti commerciali, di spazi marittimi e dell'importanza vitale - per le economie e la stabilità politica dei paesi operanti - del mantenimento delle rotte che passano lungo gli snodi più importanti al mondo: Suez, Bab el Mandeb, Panama, Malacca. Partiamo dalla ricostruzione di quanto avvenuto nel marzo 2021 con il blocco della portacontainer Evergiven nel canale di Suez in Egitto. Fonti utilizzate: https://www.ispionline.it/it/pubblicazione/suez-e-colli-di-bottiglia-29761https://www.ispionline.it/it/pubblicazione/il-canale-di-suez-compie-150-anni-ed-e-ancora-fondamentale-anche-litalia-24414https://www.limesonline.com/cartaceo/la-seconda-vita-di-suez?prv=truehttps://www.eia.gov/international/analysis/special-topics/World_Oil_Transit_Chokepointshttps://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=41073https://www.srm-maritimeconomy.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/srm_alexbank_suez_2018.pdfhttps://jamestown.org/program/strategic-consequences-of-russias-economic-presence-in-the-suez-canal-zone/https://www.eni.com/en-IT/global-energy-scenarios/strait-hormuz.htmlhttps://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/11/how-trade-chokepoints-pose-a-growing-threat-to-global-food-security/--Un grazie a Sebastiano Benatti in arte Jouzu Music, per la realizzazione della colonna sonora della sigla: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jouzumusic/ email: jouzumusic@gmail.comUn grazie a Luca Orlando, in arte Shudew, per la realizzazione dello speakeraggio della sigla: Spotify: bit.ly/SpotyShudewInstagram: bit.ly/InstaShudew

Revue de presse Afrique
Revue de presse Afrique - À la Une: nouveau tour de vis autoritaire en Algérie

Revue de presse Afrique

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 4:16


« Encore un tour de vis autoritaire contre le monde associatif, s'exclame Le Matin d'Algérie. Le tribunal administratif d'Alger a prononcé hier la dissolution du Rassemblement actions jeunesse (le RAJ), association qui avait été aux premiers rangs du Hirak. (…) Cette décision montre encore une fois le visage despotique du régime en place », fulmine encore le média algérien. « Les autorités reprochaient à l'ONG, rappelle Le Monde Afrique, d'"agir en violation de la loi sur les associations et en contradiction avec les objectifs énumérés dans les statuts". » Un coup porté aux droits humains « Dans un communiqué publié fin septembre, le RAJ avait rejeté ces accusations,  " [fondées] essentiellement sur les activités publiques de l'association durant le Hirak". L'ONG avait qualifié ses actions de "compatibles" avec "son mandat d'association œuvrant à la promotion de l'implication des jeunes dans la gestion de la cité". »  « Ce verdict ne va pas nous affaiblir, n'effacera pas les vingt-huit ans d'existence, de résistance et de lutte pour la citoyenneté, la liberté et la démocratie », a réagi le RAJ dans un communiqué, annonçant que ses avocats allaient faire appel. Commentaire d'Amna Guellali, directrice adjointe du programme Moyen-Orient et Afrique du Nord à Amnesty International, cité par Le Matin d'Algérie : « La décision de dissoudre le RAJ est un coup porté aux droits humains en Algérie. C'est aussi une indication inquiétante de la détermination des autorités à réprimer l'activisme indépendant et les droits à la liberté d'expression, d'association ou d'association et de réunion pacifique. » La liberté de la presse écornée Pour ce qui est de la liberté de la presse en Algérie, la situation est mitigée. Le quotidien Liberté  fait remarquer que 350 journalistes sont actuellement emprisonnés dans le monde. « Dont… deux en Algérie, Rabah Karèche et Mohamed Mouloudj ! Dans le classement mondial de la liberté de la presse, l'Algérie occupe le peu enviable 146e rang, loin derrière le Niger (59e) et la Tunisie (73e), et derrière aussi… l'Afghanistan, et entre… les Philippines et la Russie. » Commentaire de Liberté : « dans une dictature qui s'assume, la liberté de presse et la liberté d'expression en général sont bannies ; dans les impostures démocratiques, dictatures parées d'habits de la démocratie, la liberté d'expression est proclamée et réprimée à la fois. Les autres droits et libertés subissent le même traitement. Et, en complément, les institutions "démocratiques" sont dénaturées dans leurs fonctions : le multipartisme est encadré, les "élections" sont truquées, la justice et les instances "électives" sont soumises à l'ordre politique… » Brouille entre Paris et Alger : « les vraies raisons » Par ailleurs, toujours à propos de l'Algérie, Le Point Afrique revient sur la brouille entre Paris et Alger et « au-delà des enjeux mémoriels », en expose, selon lui, « les vraies raisons » : « sur le terrain, tous les acteurs de la relation bilatérale s'accordent à dire que le contentieux autour de la mémoire n'est pas au cœur des tensions des derniers mois. » Pour Le Point Afrique, « il y a d'abord les freins mis aux investisseurs français. (…) Total, Renault, Peugeot ont vu leurs ambitieux projets malmenés, et, plus récemment aussi, Suez et la RATP, dont les contrats n'ont pas été renouvelés dans la gestion de l'eau et du métro d'Alger. "L'idée accompagnant ce French bashing est que la France aurait "trop" profité des réseaux du président Bouteflika", s'insurge-t-on côté français. » Et puis, il y a l'affaire des visas, relève également Le Point Afrique. « Fin septembre, le gouvernement français a annoncé une réduction de moitié des visas accordés aux Algériens en guise de représailles face au refus d'Alger d'accueillir les immigrés clandestins expulsés de France. » Enfin, « les différends s'étendent désormais également à la coopération culturelle (comme sur l'extension du réseau d'enseignement du français) et à la coopération militaire (le Mali et la forme de l'engagement post-Barkhane). » En tout cas, les opérateurs économiques des deux bords voudraient bien crever l'abcès, à l'instar de ce patron algérien, cité par Le Point Afrique, qui déclare : « Le vrai enjeu est qu'on parle de ce qui va se passer dans dix ans ici en Algérie et non pas de ce qui s'est passé depuis 192 ans. »

Aujourd'hui l'économie
Aujourd'hui l'économie - La crise de l'approvisionnement s'aggrave

Aujourd'hui l'économie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 3:51


Des conteneurs qui s'entassent dans les ports des États-Unis - ceux de Los Angeles ou Long Beach par exemple - dans l'attente d'être déchargés. Dans la première puissance mondiale, et ailleurs, la consommation repart à la hausse mais sans doute trop vite. Alors que les fêtes de fin d'année approchent, l'administration américaine appelle les entreprises de transports et de logistiques à travailler jour et nuit pour désengorger les ports. Les problèmes d'approvisionnement touchent le monde entier et ça pourrait durer jusqu'à l'année prochaine. Il vous faudra peut-être commander vos cadeaux de Noël beaucoup plus tôt que prévu tant les délais ont été revus à la hausse. Certaines entreprises de transports les ont multiplié par trois. Les causes sont nombreuses et une crise en alimente une autre. Alors que les usines en Europe ou aux États-Unis ont hâte de repartir comme avant la pandémie, plusieurs pays asiatiques qui leur fournissent habituellement les matières premières ou les composants peinent à retrouver leur cadence d'avant la pandémie. Les contaminations dues aux variants du Covid-19 ont freiné la pleine reprise. Ajouter à cela une météo catastrophique. En Chine, ces dernières semaines, des biens manufacturés ont été bloqués dans les ports les plus importants comme le terminal de Yangshan à Shanghaï, à cause du typhon « In-Fa ». Deux jours de blocage dans un port pour des raisons de météo ou de cas de Covid-19, et le voyage du containeur peut être rallongé de deux semaines. Et des coûts de transports explosent, forcément Ces coûts ont été multipliés par dix en un an pour le transport maritime. De loin, le mode de transport le plus important. On se rend compte de cette importance d'ailleurs quand il y a une crise. Que ce soit les blocages du printemps dernier dans le Canal de Suez ou aujourd'hui dans les ports américains et asiatiques. Certaines entreprises prennent les devants, elles exigent des suppléments à leurs clients pour garantir une livraison dans des délais raisonnables. D'autres, des géants de la distribution comme Ikea ou Walmart ont acheté leurs propres conteneurs et navires pour assurer leurs livraisons. L'autre crise, c'est celle d'une main d'œuvre manquante Aux États-Unis, comme en Europe, si la demande repart à la hausse, les bras manquent pour transporter les marchandises. Postes essentiels dans la chaîne d'approvisionnement, les manutentionnaires ou encore les chauffeurs-routiers ne sont pas assez nombreux. On a beaucoup parlé du cas du Royaume-Uni, qui à cause du Brexit est privé d'au moins 100 000 chauffeurs qui viennent habituellement d'Europe. Les États-Unis ont aussi un gros problème de main d'œuvre. Les candidats ne se bousculent pas pour ces postes jugés difficiles. Et cela aggrave le casse-tête du  désengorgement des ports. Pendant ce temps, en Europe, les usines dépourvues de composants, ralentissent la cadence Le retour aux niveaux de production industrielle d'avant la crise était espéré cette année. Mais les prévisions du FMI ont été revues à la baisse. Dernier exemple en date, l'italo-américain CNH industrial a suspendu sa fabrication d'engins agricoles et de voitures...faute de semi-conducteurs. En Allemagne, la production automobile a chuté à son niveau de 1975. La situation redonne l'occasion aux gouvernements du G7 de se positionner en faveur de l'indépendance vis-à-vis des matières premières et composants issus d'Asie. Un vœu pieux pour l'instant. Ce qui guette, pour l'heure, c'est  la rupture de stock ou une hausse des prix de plusieurs produits affectés par les retards d'acheminement. A commencer peut-être par votre futur cadeau de Noël… EN BREF ► Une autre entrave à la production, la hausse des coûts de l'énergie. Elle est historique en Chine. Les ateliers chinois n'avaient pas vu ça depuis 25 ans. Les centrales électriques chinoises tournent encore au charbon dont les cours s'envolent mais elles ne peuvent répercuter cette hausse sur leurs clients car les autorités encadrent les tarifs du courant. Conséquence, les centrales produisent moins alors que dans le même temps, la demande des usines est forte. Les coûts explosent donc pour les entreprises. +10,7% en un an...du jamais vu depuis 1996. Malgré un assouplissement du rationnement la semaine dernier, l'ampleur de la hausse des couts a contraint des usines à fermer totalement ou partiellement leurs portes. À lire aussi : Chine: forte hausse des prix à la production en raison du coût de l'énergie

RNZ: Nine To Noon
How the Ever Given sparked another Little Yellow Digger adventure

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 16:10


It was a story that brought the world to a near standstill - well, in shipping anyway - and sparked many a meme. It was the unfortunate grounding of the massive container ship Ever Given in the Suez canal back in March, after it was buffeted by a sand storm and got stuck.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
How the Ever Given sparked another Little Yellow Digger adventure

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 16:10


It was a story that brought the world to a near standstill - well, in shipping anyway - and sparked many a meme. It was the unfortunate grounding of the massive container ship Ever Given in the Suez canal back in March, after it was buffeted by a sand storm and got stuck.

How Not To Think
How Not to Think about...business communication

How Not To Think

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 47:36


As a writer and former nonprofit executive, Sophie Wadsworth collaborates with leaders to create unique presentations for their community stakeholders, clients, funders, and keynote audiences. She brings to her executive coaching a passion for helping leaders craft and deliver compelling, mission-centered stories, while nurturing a culture of storytelling throughout their organizations. Sophie is the author of an award-winning collection of poetry and a selected storyteller for WGBH's Stories from the Stage on World Channel. Her clients include executives, authors, scientists, and leaders at companies including SUEZ, Fidelity, Greater Lowell Community Foundation, and Bristol-Meyers Squibb. She lives with her family near Boston, Massachusetts. https://www.linkedin.com/in/sophie-wadsworth-99368073/ Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/hownottothink)

Good Morning Business
Le Journal de l'économie - 07/10

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 8:00


Ce jeudi 7 ocotbre, Sandra Gandoin a présenté le Journal de l'économie dont voici les premiers sujets : Gaz européen, Moscou à la manœuvre, un accord possible sur le plafond de la dette, et Suez, un rachat très politique. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

End Hype: Product Entrepreneurship For Impact
How to Start Manufacturing in America

End Hype: Product Entrepreneurship For Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 28:14


The era is over. The era of easy, cheap supply chains reaching across the globe seems to have come to an end. The Suez canal blockage was a freak incident. The rolling blackouts in China, rising container prices, delays in shipping, backlog at port entry, aging infrastructure, worker shortages, trucker shortages, and other issues have hit product businesses with a wall of problems.... and thats OK.What do we do about supply chain challenges?We are going to start manufacturing in America. (or should I say restart)Why is it not that simple?America lacks the skilled labor and business infrastructure to manufacture at the right level and scale. No enough people with the knowledge and drive exist. Not enough companies exist. The honest truth hurts. Decades of buying garbage has created demand for products not economically made in the US. If your business sells trash, it is highly probably you can't pay a living wage making that trash in the US.How do we move forward?Stop making trash. Make high quality products. If you are an entrepreneur with limited money, find the highest value application and version for your idea. I have sold products for 2X, 10X, and even 100X the normal price by making a high-quality version.www.redbluecollective.com

Archives d'Afrique
Archives d'Afrique - Au Caire, Moubarak balayé par le Printemps arabe (7&8)

Archives d'Afrique

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 49:00


Après la Tunisie, l'Égypte ? La chute de Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali va donner des ailes aux Égyptiens qui n'imaginaient pas un tel scénario possible. Aussitôt, l'opposition s'organise. Les manifestations prennent de l'ampleur au Caire, à Suez et à Alexandrie. Les moyens de communication, comme Internet et les lignes téléphoniques, sont suspendus et un couvre-feu est instauré. La place Tahrir ne désemplit pas, de jour comme de nuit. Les amis traditionnels du président Moubarak commencent à le lâcher…

MRPeasy Manufacturing Podcast
How to Manage Supply Chain Disruptions?

MRPeasy Manufacturing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 13:01


The world has experienced historic supply chain disruptions during the last years. From trade wars and COVID-19 to semiconductor shortages and the Suez canal blockage – there are few industries that have not been affected. The lesson learned is to be better prepared and to remain flexible. You can learn more about it from this episode or read the article here.

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged
#741 - The Perfect Storm Making Everything You Need More Expensive

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 25:32


A giant ship wedged across the Suez canal, record-breaking shipping rates, armadas of vessels waiting outside ports, covid-induced shutdowns: container shipping has rarely been as dramatic as it has in 2021. The average cost of shipping a standard large container (a 40-foot-equivalent unit, or feu) has surpassed $10,000, some four times higher than a year ago (see chart). The spot price for sending such a box from Shanghai to New York, which in 2019 would have been around $2,500, is now nearer $15,000. Securing a late booking on the busiest route, from China to the west coast of America, could cost $20,000. Join your host Sean Reynolds, owner of Summit Properties NW, and Reynolds & Kline Appraisal as he takes a look at this developing topic.https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/a-perfect-storm-for-container-shipping/21804500Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/seattlerealestatepodcast)

Deeper Look At The Parsha
SUKKOT - FROM SUEZ TO AFGHANISTAN

Deeper Look At The Parsha

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 10:05


What does the recent U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan have in common with the Suez Crisis of 1956? And why is this overlap so worrying for the peace and security of the Western world. Rabbi Dunner explains, offering a pertinent lesson from the festival of Sukkot.

FreightCasts
Driving automation EP355 WHAT THE TRUCK?!?

FreightCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 59:00


On today's episode Dooner and The Dude are talking to Locomation driver DJ Hoff about what autonomous convoys mean for drivers.With eCommerce Week back in Los Angeles, HawkeMedia founder and CEO Erik Huberman gets us up-to-date on the inner workings of e-comm.Vets2Trucking owner Ivan Hernandez celebrates National Driver Appreciation Week and discusses veterans in trucking and how the industry can show it cares.H.D. White Logistics LLC CEO Hope White is moving reefer in reefers and connecting the ports in the Southeast.Plus, container ships named after New England Patriots; a BMW drives under a semi; bad math sinks the Golden Ray; and the Suez versus the largest ship in the world. Visit our sponsorSubscribe to the WTT newsletterApple PodcastsSpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

What The Truck?!?
Driving automation

What The Truck?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 59:00


On today's episode Dooner and The Dude are talking to Locomation driver DJ Hoff about what autonomous convoys mean for drivers.With eCommerce Week back in Los Angeles, HawkeMedia founder and CEO Erik Huberman gets us up-to-date on the inner workings of e-comm.Vets2Trucking owner Ivan Hernandez celebrates National Driver Appreciation Week and discusses veterans in trucking and how the industry can show it cares.H.D. White Logistics LLC CEO Hope White is moving reefer in reefers and connecting the ports in the Southeast.Plus, container ships named after New England Patriots; a BMW drives under a semi; bad math sinks the Golden Ray; and the Suez versus the largest ship in the world. Visit our sponsorSubscribe to the WTT newsletterApple PodcastsSpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

FreightCasts
Biden's mandate and trucking; how autonomous vehicle insurance works EP353 WHAT THE TRUCK?!?

FreightCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 59:55


On today's episode Dooner and The Dude are talking to Koop Technologies co-founder and Chief Commercial Officer Kamron Khodjaev about next-gen data-driven autonomous vehicle insurance.LuckyTruck CEO and founder Devin Bostik gets us up to date on the world of InsurTech.Slync.io founder, Chairman and CEO Chris Kirchner shares his company's new booking and allocation management solution for logistics service providers.Terry Douglas, CEO of Express Courier, talks about the business of regional carriers.Ron Lentz, managing partner at Logisyn Advisors, wants you to know your logistics company's worth.Plus, CMA CGM caps rates, Deja Su as another ship gets stuck in Suez, Biden mandates vax and more.Visit our sponsorSubscribe to the WTT newsletterApple PodcastsSpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

What The Truck?!?
Biden's mandate and trucking; how autonomous vehicle insurance works

What The Truck?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 59:55


On today's episode Dooner and The Dude are talking to Koop Technologies co-founder and Chief Commercial Officer Kamron Khodjaev about next-gen data-driven autonomous vehicle insurance.LuckyTruck CEO and founder Devin Bostik gets us up to date on the world of InsurTech.Slync.io founder, Chairman and CEO Chris Kirchner shares his company's new booking and allocation management solution for logistics service providers.Terry Douglas, CEO of Express Courier, talks about the business of regional carriers.Ron Lentz, managing partner at Logisyn Advisors, wants you to know your logistics company's worth.Plus, CMA CGM caps rates, Deja Su as another ship gets stuck in Suez, Biden mandates vax and more.Visit our sponsorSubscribe to the WTT newsletterApple PodcastsSpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

Radio Bullets
10 settembre 2021 - Notiziario

Radio Bullets

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 10:12


Afghanistan: talebani a caccia di giornalisti locali. Palestina: oggi in piazza nella giornata della collera. Marocco: i liberali sconfiggono i filo islamisti al potere. Questo e molto altro nel notiziario di Radio Bullets, a cura di Barbara Schiavulli. Musiche di Walter Sguazzin

Archives d'Afrique
Archives d'Afrique - Égypte : Hosni Moubarak, dauphin du président Anouar el-Sadate (1&2)

Archives d'Afrique

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 49:00


6 octobre 1973. Le président Anouar el-Sadate lance son armée à travers le canal de Suez. L'armée égyptienne s'impose dans un premier temps sur les Israéliens dans le Sinaï. Au poste de commandant en chef de l'aviation égyptienne, un certain Hosni Moubarak dirige les opérations aériennes offensives qui permettent à l'infanterie égyptienne de traverser le canal de Suez. Rassemblant tout ce qui vole, il lance une attaque surprise contre les positions israéliennes, un acte qualifié d'« épique, héroïque et glorieux » par Anouar el-Sadate. Mais rapidement les forces israéliennes se réorganisent et passent à la contre-offensive.

Trade Finance Talks
The freight crisis: HGV driver shortage, shipping blockages and the digital future of freight

Trade Finance Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 31:11


Global supply chains have been and continue to be deeply impacted by the changes that have taken place in the last 12 months. From the Suez canal debacle which showed just how interconnected global supply chains truly are, to the current shortage of HGV drivers in the UK which poses a serious threat to supply lines to schools and hospitals, it is fair to say that the industry is, currently, facing significant challenges.  Is the industry at a breaking point? And what can we learn from these challenges? To help me explore these questions I have Sam Greenhalgh, UK Sales Director at Zencargo! Full transcript: https://www.tradefinanceglobal.com/posts/podcast-s1-ep68-freight-crisis-hgv-driver-shortage-shipping-blockages-and-the-digital-future-of-freight/

Two Dates and a Dash Podcast
Two Dates and a Dash Podcast Episode 120: Storyteller, Executive Leader and Author, Sophie Wadsworth

Two Dates and a Dash Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 84:01


Sophie Wadsworth brings to her coaching practice a passion for helping leaders craft and deliver personal, mission-centered stories, while nurturing a culture of storytelling throughout their organizations. She draws on her experience as a writer and executive leader to collaborate with leaders in creating their unique presentations for community stakeholders, investors or clients, and keynote audiences . Sophie is the author of an award-winning collection of poetry and a selected storyteller for GBH's Stories from the Stage on World Channel. Her clients include executives, authors, scientists, and leaders at companies including SUEZ, Fidelity, and Bristol-Meyers Squibb. She lives with her family and one very animated cat outside of Boston, Massachusetts. For more information about Sophie, please visit www.sophiewadsworth.com.

Keen On Democracy
Philip Stephens on Not-So-Great Britain

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 38:27


In this episode of “Keen On”, Andrew is joined by Philip Stephens, the author of “Britain Alone: The Path from Suez to Brexit”, to tell the story of a nation struggling to reconcile its waning power with past glory. Philip Stephens is associate editor of the Financial Times and director of the editorial board. As chief political commentator he writes on global and British affairs. He joined the Financial Times in 1983 after working as a correspondent for Reuters in Brussels and has been the FT's economics editor, political editor and editor of the UK edition. He was educated at Wimbledon College and at Oxford university. He won the David Watt Prize for Outstanding Political Journalism; Political Journalist of the Year by the UK Political Studies Association; and Political Journalist of the Year in the British Press Awards. Visit our website: https://lithub.com/story-type/keen-on/ Email Andrew: a.keen@me.com Watch the show live on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajkeen Watch the show live on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankeen/ Watch the show live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lithub Watch the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LiteraryHub/videos Subscribe to Andrew's newsletter: https://andrew2ec.substack.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

eGPlearning Podblast
Blood bottle shortage NHS

eGPlearning Podblast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 12:45


There is a shortage of blood bottles in the NHS. Here is why.There is a shortage of blood bottles across the entire at the UK. The company Becton Dickinson supply the blood bottles that we used to test patients' blood across the entire of the UK and in most places across the world.  Unfortunately, due to increased testing because of Covid and because of the backlog of patient activity now there's a shortage of his blood bottles which is causing a strain on the NHS. Why has this happened?This is in part due to changes with resources, increasing demand, and problems with international distribution like the Suez canal incident and in the UK. It is made worse due to port changes, lorry driver shortages, and other aspects caused in part by Brexit. As a result, NHS England has announced that there should be a reduction and rationing of the types of blood tests that are done across the entirety of the UK.There was previous guidance issued on 10th August about checking stock, maximising the use of existing supplies, and looking at alternative supplies and options. Alternative supplies has been hampered by the worldwide use and distribution issues. On 26th August NHS England has recommended a rationing of blood tests to survive this crisis. This relates to: 1. 5mls Yellow top – SST 2 – clotted sample (e.g. U&E, LFTs etc) 2. Purple top – EDTA (e.g. FBC, HbA1c) This shortage is an immediate issue likely to continue till mid-September but may continue to occur in the next few months. Changes include (taken from the document)All primary care and community testing must be halted until 17 September 2021, except for clinically urgent testing. Examples of clinically urgent testing include: • Bloods that are required to facilitate a two-week wait cancer referral • Bloods that are extremely overdue and/or essential for safe prescribing of medication or monitoring of conditions• Bloods that if taken could avoid a hospital admission or prevent an onward referral • Those with suspected sepsis or conditions with a risk of death or disabilityIn hospitals, each area is asked to make a 25% reduction in blood testing using add-on policies and local laboratory guidance. There will be monitoring on activity in the hospital especially UE and FBC testing. Testing for routine things like wellness checks, vitamin D*, fertility testing* allergy testing* with some minor exceptions for these recommendations. The guidance accepts this may cause harm. There is an ask to support other local areas, and routes to do this if shortages are expected within 48 hours. The guidance also states that regulators have been informed including CQC and NHS resolutions and that any complaints as a result of the shortages will be captured in the Clinical negligence scheme for GPs and trusts, respectively. This unfortunately is not the directive many practices would hope for as it doesn't help manage the complaints directly sent to the practice.Possible implications Risk to patient health of delay in diagnosis and possible inability to test for vital issues if the shortages are worse. Risk of increase complaints to practices and NHS services due to delays in blood testingFurther compounding the back log of work that is building due to COVID and now a blood bottle shortageFurther delay in referrals where they are required ‘mandatory blood tests'. Noting these have been recommended to stop due to the shortagJoin the Medics Money New To GP partnership course for the leaders in finance, wellbeing, workload management, and your peers on the same journey to become a safe, effective, healthy GP partner. Join at medicsmoney.co.uk/gpcourse and reference eGPlearning

(don't) Waste Water!
The 3 Most Painful Failed Mergers of VEOLIA and SUEZ!

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 19:23


You may be the world's two largest Water Companies, yet have quite a terrible track record when it comes to Mergers and Acquisitions.

OH GOD, WHAT NOW? Formerly Remainiacs
Worse than Suez: Afghanistan abandoned

OH GOD, WHAT NOW? Formerly Remainiacs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 61:02


The Government's flat-footed and callous response to the collapse of Afghanistan and the resultant refugee crisis has enraged even the House of Commons. What should Britain do to help the people who helped us? And was the whole enterprise for nothing? Also, after the the horrific killings in Plymouth, should we see the incel culture as terrorism?“This is cutting deep into the Tories' idea of who we are… They have woken up to the fact that Biden like Trump is pursuing an America First policy.” – Ian Dunt“The Government has called this wrong… The British public are bloody sympathetic to Afghan refugees and want them helped.” – Naomi Smith“The promise to people who helped us was that we will protect you. That's a promise we have completely broken.” – Ian Dunt“This is not a reformed, humane Taliban… Everyone who disagrees with their interpretation of Islam is in danger of violent, painful death.” – Nina Schickwww.patreon.com/ohgodwhatnowPresented by Dorian Lynskey with Naomi Smith, Nina Schick and Ian Dunt. Produced by Andrew Harrison. Assistant producers: Jacob Archbold and Jelena Sofronijevic. Audio production by Alex Rees. Intern: Nat Amos. OH GOD, WHAT NOW? is a Podmasters production. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Chopper's Politics
My way or the highway

Chopper's Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 37:32


Boris Johnson should sack ministers who don't have green cars. So says one of our guests on this week's podcast, James Frayne, from policy research agency Public First. He joins Christopher Hope to talk about why he thinks ministers need to put their money where their mouth is when it comes to green policies, and why Westminster needs to accept that the car is here to stay.Also on the show: Conservative MP Owen Paterson on why the Taliban takeover is the UK's biggest source of shame since Suez and the US' since Saigon, and why he's more concerned than ever for veterans' mental health. Plus Tim Pitt, policy adviser to two former Tory Chancellors, on the age-old battle between Numbers 10 and 11, and why he thinks Rishi Sunak does not need to raise vast amounts in new taxes this Autumn after all. Read 'Boris must sack hypocrite ministers who refuse to buy an electric car' by James Frayne: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2021/08/14/boris-must-sack-hypocrite-ministers-refuse-buy-electric-car/ |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/chopper |Listen to Hong Kong Silenced: www.playpodca.st/hongkong |Email: chopperspolitics@telegraph.co.uk |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Orientering
Orientering: Den fjerde industrielle revolution og arbejdsmarkedet - 3. aug 2021

Orientering

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 110:01


Den Afrikanske Union fordømmer Danmarks idé om at behandle asylsager i tredjelande. De mener, at Danmark ikke lever op til sine internationale forpligtelser. Vi undersøger, hvad det går ud på. Endnu en patientforening stiller krav om at sundhedspersonale, der arbejder med sårbare skal vaccineres mod corona. Hidtil har det været anbefalet, men frivilligt. Vi taler med Alzheimerforeningen, der gerne vil gå et skridt længere for at stoppe den mere smitsomme delta-variant. Først lukkede havne, fabrikker og flytrafik på grund af corona, så lukkede et strandet containerskib Suez-kanalen og senest har oversvømmelser i Kina og Europa lukket mange vigtige vandveje. Det ændrer økonomiens infrastruktur og betyder prisstigninger for forbrugerne, er en vurdering vi ser nærmere på. Den fjerde industrielle bølge bliver den næste transformation af vores samfund. Udviklingen er i gang. Det betyder nye jobmuligheder for mange, men der er også tabere. Dagens tema ser nærmere på, hvordan den fjerde industrielle bølge vil udvikle sig i Danmark og dens konsekvenser for arbejdsmarkedet. Solveig Bjørnestad er vært, Orhan Gökcen redigerer. www.dr.dk/orientering

Good Morning Business
L'intégrale de Good Morning Business du jeudi 29 juillet

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 156:39


Ce jeudi 29 juillet, Stéphane Pedrazzi a reçu François-Xavier Leduc, directeur général de Kili Technology, Virginie Morgon, présidente du directoire d'Eurazeo, Bertrand Camus, directeur général de Suez, Aiman Ezzat, directeur général de Capgemini, dans l'émission Good Morning Business sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Good Morning Business
Bertrand Camus, directeur général de Suez - 29/07

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 6:01


Bertrand Camus, directeur général de Suez, était l'invité de Stephane Pedrazzi dans Good Morning Business, ce jeudi 29 juillet. Il est revenu sur les performances de Suez, notamment le bénéfice semestriel de 298 millions d'euros au premier semestre, une hausse de 40 %, sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Software Social
It's Happening!

Software Social

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 40:40


Buy Michele's book! Paperback and Kindle: https://www.amazon.com/dp/173744660X (or search Deploy Empathy on Amazon)PDF/ePub: deployempathy.com/pdfMichele Hansen  0:00  This episode of Software Social is sponsored by Orbit. Orbit is mission control for your community, grow and measure your community across any platform with Orbit. Find out more at orbit.love.Colleen Schnettler  0:14  Good morning, Michele. Hey,Michele Hansen  0:17  Hey, how are you?Colleen Schnettler  0:19  Great. So I hear that you have some new book updates.Michele Hansen  0:24  Yeah. So we finalized the cover this week. And I just saw, like just today just submitted it to Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing and Ingram Spark, which is another self publishing print on demand platform and filed for the copyright. So things are happening.Colleen Schnettler  0:47  That's exciting.Michele Hansen  0:51  Yeah, you know, I was thinking about our conversation last week, and how you were talking about how you felt like you weren't getting anything getting anything done? And I was like, man, I feel the same way.Colleen Schnettler  1:03  Really? Has it just felt like for weeks,Michele Hansen  1:07  yeah, like, I feel it? Well, you know, it's kind of it's like this weird in between liminal space where like, the copy has basically been final for a month now. And it's just sort of been kind of waiting on other things. And, and then there's also the, there's sort of the fact that it's summer here. And like summer camps aren't really as much of a thing here as they are in the US. Which, you know, I guess if like, most people who work for other people get four weeks of vacation, and they have kids, it's not really a big deal. But if you're self employed, it kind of is sure. Um, and so I, you know, I'm just sort of working at night and whatever. Or maybe I wake up early and get a couple hours in and like, man, I don't I don't know how parents in Europe who are self employed, do it. Like, I really, I really don't know. And like, just for weeks now I've been I mean, like, yeah, like, today's the day, I'm going to start recording the audio book, private podcast, I'm super excited about doing that. Now that the copy is finalized, I'm, like, ready to go. And it just like that time just keeps not happening. And I feel like I'm not making any progress. Um, but this morning, I did submit it and then not now it has to be reviewed. And I wanted to get a proof copy. But I think I might have done something wrong when I configured that option. And it just says your book might be published in 72 hours.Colleen Schnettler  2:44  That's fast. Okay.Michele Hansen  2:45  I haven't even like I wanted to, like, look at it and make sure the, you know, the cover looked right. And like, you know, the pages aren't upside down and whatnot. So okay, so I'm alone? I don't know. So maybe if you search on Amazon next week, you'll actually find it even though I'm not gonna tell anybody.Colleen Schnettler  3:01  But it won't be a physical copy yet. That's justMichele Hansen  3:04  so that'll be that the physical copy? Yeah, who would be a physical copy on Amazon, Amazon printed like, book to Amazon. I know, they could upload a book to Amazon. And then they print it whenever somebody buys it. Really? I know I was going, I was like, they let just anybody do this, like this? Wait, this is soColleen Schnettler  3:25  easy. This is crazy. I had no idea. So so you submit to them your cover art and your book. And then when someone buys it, they print it on demand?Michele Hansen  3:34  There's some other stuff that happens. But basically, yes, that's cool. So I don't have to like go out and you know, buy, like, basically pay for a printer to print 500 copies or whatever, then mail them out myself, which I think is what you had to do before. Things like kind of KDP or Kindle on demand or Kindle on it was what they call it? Or, you know, sort of like Do you remember like cafe press in the 90s? Like, yes, people could make t shirts and then printed it whenever you bought one. It's basically like that for books. And then there's also in Ingram Spark, which is also print on demand. But I guess there's a lot of countries that Amazon doesn't serve. And also, I guess bookstores are more willing to work with Ingram spark than they are with Amazon because they can return books to Ingram spark because Ingram spark distributes a lot of non self published books to I'm learning all about this. So So yeah, so I uploaded it to them, and then they have to review it and like, I guess, make sure it looks good. Before it'll actually, I don't know, I don't know what's gonna happen next. So we're just, we're all going to find out together. I didn't really publish the ebook. I like, you know, Barnes and Noble and whatnot, like ebook platforms. I don't know. We will find out.Colleen Schnettler  4:58  That's exciting. So you are telling me in a matter of maybe five days, maybe less people will be able to purchase a physical copy of your book. I don't know, theoretically, probably, maybe we're gonna find out cheaper than this before. SoMichele Hansen  5:15  I, originally I was like trying to give people estimates. And I was like, Yeah, it looks to me, like end of June. And then I just realized, I have no idea what I'm doing. Well, I knew that all along. But I realized that I have no idea what I'm doing. And therefore I should not try to predict what is going to happen next. Because that is just an exercise in folly to try to predict a process that I have no past experience with.Colleen Schnettler  5:41  Sure. So does that mean from you will come out when it comes out? Does that mean from your perspective that it's finished? Like you're done?Unknown Speaker  5:51  Ah,Michele Hansen  5:52  I mean, yeah, like, like yesterday Mateus looks at me, he goes, you know, this is just the beginning. Right? What does that mean? It's like Kunkle in his IColleen Schnettler  6:01  started,Michele Hansen  6:02  because, I mean, after the book is like officially out, then there's there's the, the audio book to record, right. Like, I'm super excited about doing that as a podcast and recording it myself. You know, because then I can really make sure that the, the tone of voice is coming through and everything. And I just, you know, right. Yeah.Colleen Schnettler  6:25  Can I just say I'm super disappointed when authors don't read their own books.Unknown Speaker  6:30  Yeah,Colleen Schnettler  6:30  yeah. Like, that makes me sad. Like, there's a prominent bootstrapping book, which was great. But it was not read by the author. And I was sad. I don't know why. Like, I understand why people don't want to read their own books. Maybe they don't like to talk that much. Maybe they have an accent. And then yeah, me with it. I don't know.Michele Hansen  6:45  Yeah, exactly. I think people have different reasons for not recording their own book. But I am personally really excited to do it. And to do it as a podcast, too. Because, again, I feel like I never would have gotten the book out had I not written it as a newsletter, because for me, writing an email is a lot lower pressure and stress and just mentally, like cognitively easier than like sitting down staring at a blank cursor or thinking about writing a book. And I feel the same way about recording a podcast. Like it's like, oh, it's just a podcast. And actually, I don't even have to come up with anything to say I just read something like, great, versus the idea of sitting down to record an audio book for a 320 page book that feels daunting. But yeah, a bunch of podcast episodes for each chapter that feels easy. Feels written. They just have to be concatenated.Colleen Schnettler  7:35  Yeah, yeah. Yeah. So how is this been for you? You've been working on this four to six months.Michele Hansen  7:42  Since end of February, middle, middle end of February is when I started the new Okay,Colleen Schnettler  7:47  so four months. So how do you feel to me? Yeah, right. You just knock out a book and four months? Can I just say how ridiculous that is? By the way. That's not normal.Michele Hansen  7:59  I feel like it was all in my head already. I don't really do any original research.Colleen Schnettler  8:04  It's just funny because I feel like the arc of our podcast, like your story, and the arc of our podcast is we're chatting, we're chatting. I'm like, you should write a book.Unknown Speaker  8:12  You're like, Man,Colleen Schnettler  8:13  I'm like, you should write a book. You're like, yeah, and then you wrote it. And it's done. like four months later. It's like, wait, what happens?Michele Hansen  8:21  When I commit to doing something, I do it. And usually very quickly, so but it might take me a while to actually get around to doing it.Colleen Schnettler  8:31  How is this? Ben? Are you excited to have some time back? Do you feel like I mean, has it been quite stressful these past four to five months trying to work your full time job and write this book has been overwhelming.Michele Hansen  8:45  No, it's been funColleen Schnettler  8:46  because you love it. You love the material? Fine.Michele Hansen  8:48  Like it's a little it's a little side project. And I need a little side projects. It's, you know, it's, I mean, I guess this podcast started out as a side project. And then this podcast kind of spawned the book. So like, you know, just side projects beget side projects. But no, I mean, it's been good. It's been a really good outlet for me, like most of that newsletter, writing time was actually at night, like, you know, after, put our daughter to bed and just kind of sitting in bed with my laptop and just sort of enjoying writing things out. And as I said, sort of mentally cleaning out my closet and just hauling out all of these things that mentally felt like old pieces of furniture from my head that were collecting dust or, you know, where were things I was referencing often, but didn't really have a good place to send people to. So it was it was a relief in a way to write it. And then I had so much fun interviewing people who read the early drafts. I think a really pivotal moment was when I got it into a draft and then I put it on health this book, which is Rob Fitzpatrick, the author of the mom test his new platform for launching books, and he also wrote a book that sort of goes with the the platform called write helpful books. That is, I think it's coming out now. But I was given a link to that on his help this book. Page. And that helped, that was hugely helpful for me. And then, and then, but actually getting the draft in front of people and then, and then talking to them about how they're using it and, and what kinds of books they find useful. And like, you know, it was just, it was, it was so fun. Like, I love talking to people about talking to people. And that was really fun. And then it was a little frustrating, I think, towards the end, like, I felt like I did a read like a major whole book rewrite of the book every week, in May in June, like, just like, that was probably when I did the most work. Like I was probably like, 7525 book versus giuoco do which was not super great. Um, but that was kind of what what I needed at the time. But yeah, I think I guess from like, now going forward, it's going to be lower lift things, like, promoting it. And yeah, we're podcast podcast. Yeah, the audio book and whatnot.Colleen Schnettler  11:15  Well, that's super exciting. Congratulations.Michele Hansen  11:19  It's not out yet. So I'm not gonna like,Colleen Schnettler  11:21  have you have you sent it out? Or they hatch? I think your chickens have hatched? Yeah, whateverMichele Hansen  11:27  it's for, it's getting reviewed. It's it's things are happening, things are moving, you know.Colleen Schnettler  11:33  So very exciting. Yeah,Michele Hansen  11:35  I think you're a lot more excited than I,Colleen Schnettler  11:38  I'm just really impressed. And to your point, you had this stuff in your head already. So it wasn't like you had to spawn content for the book, you had all the content. But you turned out a book fast like you, when you started doing those newsletters. I mean, you were sending a lot of newsletters. This is a lot of information.Michele Hansen  12:01  When I get really into something I like I go all in to the point where it can be a bit of a firehose, you know, like, so yeah, Marie Marie poulan. and I were talking about this a couple of weeks ago, where like, we sink our teeth into something, and then we just don't give up until we're done. Even if we wanted to. Um, I definitely I definitely feel like this has been an exerciseUnknown Speaker  12:34  in that.Colleen Schnettler  12:35  Yeah. Well, I think it's really cool. I think you should be really proud of yourself for all the work you've put in, especially during the summer, that's hard. And you're working, you know, your normal job. And you wrote a book, super cool.Michele Hansen  12:48  You're so supportive, Colleen.Colleen Schnettler  12:51  That's what I'm here for.Michele Hansen  12:53  I need you in my voice. You know, that voice in my head being like, you should be proud of this. You've come a long way, when I'm like, sort of knee deep and like filing copyright applications and stuff like that, and sort of not really able to see over the wall.Colleen Schnettler  13:07  Yeah. Yeah.Michele Hansen  13:10  Should I do a little numbers updates? Well, I don't think I've done one andColleen Schnettler  13:15  we haven't done one in a while. Go ahead.Michele Hansen  13:18  So as of right now, I have sold 93 copies for the pre order nice. Which by the way, people can pre order the it's the you get the PDF, the notion and Google Drive script templates and access to the private forthcoming private podcast with the audiobook, the boy empathy.com. So 93 people have pre ordered it right now I know a bunch of people have said they want the print copy and like I'm there with you. I don't really buy a lot of ebooks, especially for something I might want to reference later. And I don't seem to be able to do a pre order for the print book. So Oh, but anyway, so 93 people have ordered and so just looking at sort of the overall revenue for that not including expenses or you know, processing fees or whatever. That is $2,697 and I added it up with expenses a couple days ago. And I believe that puts me around sort of 12 $100 in net revenue from that so my Sunday expensesColleen Schnettler  14:32  that's great for a book you can't that's not even available yet. I mean, I know it's available yeah order but that's pretty impressive considering it's not on Amazon yet.Michele Hansen  14:43  It's kind of I mean, so I've like you know, I've heard about building in public for a long time and of course you know, I'm a big advocate of including your your customers in the in the process, but I've never really like built from scratch in public. And like just kind of outlined every step of what I was doing, you know, the, the highs and the lows. Yeah. And the massive amount of confusion in between. And so it's been a really, really interesting, like, I don't think I would have gotten to this point had I not started it as a newsletter and had that level of just motivation, you know, even from the, you know, the first five people who subscribed and would reply and say, Hey, this was great. Thank you for writing that, like that kept me going. In a way that, that I just would not have, like, actually, I think I started the book, right around the time of when, when that container ship was stuck in the Suez.Colleen Schnettler  15:45  Yes, I remember,Michele Hansen  15:47  little, that little part that nobody had on their 2021 bingo card.Unknown Speaker  15:53  And I was reading a book.Michele Hansen  15:56  Or there's a book I picked up off my shelf that I had been meant to read for years, I finally did, because of that called the box, which is a history of container shipping, which is a really interesting book, by the way. Hey, Peter shipping, revolutionize the world. And it's pretty new to like, since the 60s anyway, okay. Not what this podcast is about. So, but so I opened that book, and like the beginning of the book is The acknowledgments from the author. And it like starts out with the author talking about how lonely the process for writing a book is, and especially on a very niche topic. Yeah. And I think I had had some little like Inklings in my head of like, whether I should write a book at that point. And I remember reading that and being like, Oh, God, like that sounds really awful. Like, and I felt really bad for the author as I was reading this, because you've I've heard writers talk about how lonely of a process it is. And I like, and I think that turned me off from it for such a long time. But then it kind of like, occurred to me later that like, I can write a book, but I can do it my way. I don't have to do it the lonely way. Right. Like I could write it in public, I could include readers in the process and make it a social process from the beginning. So I didn't feel like I was just, you know, closed off in a windowless room for six months, because I think that's why I really never wrote a book before, like I was wanted to, but I was like, I don't think I could deal with that amount of loneliness that writers talk about. So yeah, it's been good.Colleen Schnettler  17:37  That's awesome.Michele Hansen  17:38  How are you doing?Colleen Schnettler  17:39  I'm good. I'm good. Yeah. So in the spirit of our podcast last week, I'm, I took some notes, and I think I'm gonna break it up every week into like, what I did this week, what I'm struggling with and what I want to do next week, to keep myself focused and keep myself moving forward. Okay, my tangent is I listen to a podcast with Angela Duckworth. Do you know who she is? She's okay. So for those who don't know who she is, she's the MacArthur Genius Grant winner. She liked her coined the term grit. So I have this podcast I really like with her. And it's her and Stephen Dubner. And it's called no stupid questions. Anyway, this week, they were talking about the difference between urgency and importance. And they were talking about how, basically, that the summation was people don't do things that they don't consider urgent. So you can have these things on your to do list, like go to the gym, which is important. We all know, that's important. But without a sense of urgency. Like, I have to be at the gym at 6pm for my weightlifting class. Instead of instead of that, instead of being like, I'll go whenever I want. There's no urgency to it. So people just don't go, oh, that explainsMichele Hansen  18:55  so much.Colleen Schnettler  18:56  It's so good. Like, I'm gonna send you this episode. It was so good. But yeah, so it was this concept. So I started thinking about it. In terms of my business, because I have all these things that I feel are really important. But I have no urgency behind them, right. There's no timeline for me, I can just sit here and this thing makes me money. And yeah, the ones setting the deadlines, right. And they're fake. I mean, and I'm not really even setting up. I'm like, oh, if I get to it if it's convenient for me today. So I just really liked this whole concept of something being urgent versus important, and how will we'll even do the less important things if we feel that they are urgent. And I say that because I'm now every week until I get to a place that I'm pretty happy with. I'm going to share with you kind of my goals. And so to make them feel a little more urgent, so I feel like I actually will do that.Michele Hansen  19:48  So I like that.Colleen Schnettler  19:51  Yeah, let's try it. It was really good. So one of the things I'm really excited about is this week, I finally got my app on rails 6.1. That's improved. To me, because I was patching in all of the CDN stuff for images because rails 6.0 didn't include that. So basically what happened is I had my app on 6.0, all the stuff was pushed on the rails master to handle CDN. And so I cherry picked it off of rails master onto my stuff, but I incorporated it as a patch to my app, which doesn't make me very happy, because it just feels brittle. So I got up to rails 6.1. So that's like a huge deal. And all of the things I have been telling you, I wanted to do, I wanted to do this first. Like, I feel like this is now going to set the stage for me to actually move forward to do other useful things. So IMichele Hansen  20:42  feel good about that. It sounds like it's gonna help your development velocity,Colleen Schnettler  20:46  it will. And I feel like some of these development blockers are really frustrating for me, like there's a really simple one, which won't take that long to do API access, but I didn't want to, I could have added new features, and then gone back and got it on 6.1. But it's smarter, in my opinion, since I have the time to get it on 6.1 before, you know, adding all the API stuff. So I feel like now that that's done, development stuff will go faster. So I'm pumped about that. And that was something that's like really kind of boring to do. I don't know if boring is the right word. But you know, like, upgrading is always kind of likeMichele Hansen  21:26  it's not shiny, right? Like developer happiness and infrastructure stuff. And, like, security kind of falls in this category to have like, stuff that's like really important. But it's not shiny, there's no, you know, revenue number, like floating over your head if you do it, right. It's more of a like, it's more of like a cost thing. It's like last time, you know, lost energy, like, it could be lost revenue, if it's security issues. Like, I think when we went full time actually, like the first thing we prioritized was like, What can we do for infrastructure and developer happiness stuff so that when we are working on stuff, it's more enjoyable to work on, more resilient, less brittle?Colleen Schnettler  22:10  That's exactly that's exactly how I feel about it. So I said, it's transparent to my customers. But it feels really good to me. For exactly those reasons. My development time now going forward will go faster. I won't have to worry about writing something I'm later gonna have to rip out when I upgrade. It's good. So I was pumped about that. Something I'm struggling with this week. This is kind of funny. So you remember like a month ago, I told you, I hired my sister to help me do marketing. That's just been kind of an interesting challenge for us, because neither of us know what to do. And so I'm like trying to do my development stuff. She's asking me questions. I'm like, I don't know. So we're both kind of spinning around. Not quite sure what to do. Hmm. So what we did is we ended up having a call with one of our mutual friends who has his own podcast, his name is Josh Oh, and his podcast is searching for SAS. And he helped us lay out a SEO content, Google Search their Google Search Console strategy. Oh, yeah. So we are kind of excited to go down that path. What I originally had asked her to do was more traditional sales Safari. And it wasn't working. Hmm. Remember how Shawn came on the podcast? And he told us he spent 80 hours like doing sales Safari?Michele Hansen  23:44  Yeah,Colleen Schnettler  23:45  yes. So my sister was trying to do that for my product. And we just weren't really, we just weren't really getting anywhere. It felt like we just weren't getting any useful information. So we are going to starting this week try to tackle this more from a content SEO perspective.Michele Hansen  24:03  Hmm. You feel like the sales Safari kind of approach was?Colleen Schnettler  24:10  I don't know I guess you you kind of already built something that's that's what Josh said. He was like, you're already you're already paying for it.Michele Hansen  24:17  So it seems like you know, I mean, Salesforce is useful at many different stages. But it sounds like you need to get eyebrow eyeballs in front of this thing. And because there are people are willing to pay for it. There's clear there's a need a huge competitors went into the space, which tells you all the more that there's need for this. You just need to tell people you exist.Colleen Schnettler  24:40  Yeah, that was his point as well. And I think that's a better use of our time is to kind of lay out a content strategy. So we're gonna try to do that I'm such a bottleneck in this process, though. It's hard to find developers to write content technical. Here's a business idea. technical content rating is really hard. I have a mutual friend who has a business way more successful than mine. And he hired a technical content agency to write some articles. They're not very good. So I'm just saying, I think that this is like a real bottleneck is like really good technical content. I'm gonna go on a limb here and say, technical content for developers has to be written by developersMichele Hansen  25:27  or by technical writers, I know that we have at least two technical writers who listen to this podcast, okay, reading my book, and like they focus on writing documentation and for develop them to do the whole job. Yeah, to dm Colleen. Colleen. And actually, I mean, they get, you know, a lot of the work, they were telling me that they get frustrated, because, like, in big companies, they get really insulated from the customers, which inhibits their ability to write dry, good documentation. Yeah. Right. Because, you know, as you're talking about the challenges with getting your sister up to speed, like, it makes me wonder, like, has she gotten to sit in on any interviews with customers? Has she gotten to do any? Like? Has she got to hear from the customers directly about what you're solving and why it's important to them?Colleen Schnettler  26:26  No, we haven't done any new customer interviews yet.Michele Hansen  26:30  Get her in those? Yeah, I think that'll really help. And you might still be the person who's kind of guiding, you know, API documentation and whatnot. But if there's a difference between hearing about what something does, from somebody who built it, and hearing about what it does, from somebody who bought it, and is excited about it,Colleen Schnettler  26:53  yeah, those areMichele Hansen  26:54  two really different things. And for marketing, what she needs to communicate is, why you should buy it and why you should be excited about it. And the technical documentation is part of that. But she needs to be able to speak to what will get someone excited about it. Yes. And who better to hear that from than someone who is excited about that themselves, ie, a customer of yours?Colleen Schnettler  27:19  Yeah, we have a whole bunch of new customers. So I think in a couple, probably starting next week, once my life's a little more organized. We're going to start trying to do more customer interviews and get back on that bandwagon because I haven't done any since I did them with you, almost three months ago. So that is definitely a priority to get that to get that going. Yes, so content is challenging, because I would love to just churn out some content. But I am struggling to find the time myself or find people that are making the kind of content that I need. So that is challenging, but I did I don't know if I told you so Drew, who we interviewed together, who was a simple file upload customer is a developer and so I paid him to write a piece for me. Oh, no. I need Yeah, do this. I was like, Drew knows how this works. Maybe he will do? Yeah, so that's it's not Yeah,Michele Hansen  28:18  dude. Like hiring your own customers is really smart. Like, I think we talked about Chris from from webflow, our mutual friend we didn't realize was a mutual friend, a couple months ago. And his first support hire is one of his customers. And it worked out like amazingly well because like the person already understands the product. Yes, he knows how it works. He knows where it might go wrong. Like, that's like that is been in the back of my mind of you know, when we need to hire for something even just you know, for something on a contract. Like, who in our customer base could do that for us?Colleen Schnettler  28:58  Yeah, I thought like, I was so pumped. So I threw you know, he said he could do it. I was like, Yes. I mean, that's the best. That's the best of both worlds. Someone who knows what they're doing as a writer. And as technical it was, it was great. So I haven't actually published it yet. Because see all these other things I've been trying to do with my life. But it's it's a guide on how to use simple file upload with react. And that has been on my to do list for four months. So let me tell you how great it felt to give it to someone who could do it better than me. It felt great. And he just got it done in like three to four days. I was like, Oh, you're you're amazing. So that was really yeah, it felt really good because you know all those things you're supposed to do. They they kind of like weigh on you and your subconscious like the things you haven't done and that is literally been on my list for four months only I have to kind of learn react before I can write about how like I kind of sorta know react but this this partnership I feel worked out really well. So that really He inspired me, it went so well with Drew, it inspired me to hire more people to write for me. But I'm definitely having a bottleneck, like finding the right kind of people, especially for the rail stuff, because I feel like I can do that better than most people. So it's a trade off.Michele Hansen  30:18  Well, so. So first, I wonder if you could create some sort of pipeline where you create one piece of content, and it can be recycled in many different ways. And I wonder if even just that one piece of content from drew like if your sister can take that and with some understanding of what the customers are trying to solve, and where they're coming from and what the product does, and recycle that into many other pieces of content? What does that mean, risk can be used in other places to further improve your SEO?Colleen Schnettler  30:49  I literally don't know what you mean. Like you mean, put it on? Like, like, yeah, so like, heMichele Hansen  30:55  wrote up this, like, long guide? Yeah. Right. Yeah. So but then you can also have landing pages that are how to do this with react. And it's like taking like bits and pieces out of that. Like if she can read that and understand it, and then be like, Oh, we can use it in these other places. You can put bits and pieces of that on your homepage on other pages like, right and use that. You're probably trying to do this, like, Look, read that article, and then look at everything in Google Search Console and say, Okay, what are the similarities in terms here? What is the actual term that people are using per Google Search Console? What is the word we're using in this piece of content? Let's change that to the word that people are typing in? Are there five variations of it? Let's make sure in this article, we have headlines that use each one of those five different variations, like, use that on other parts of our site, like, so on and so forth.Colleen Schnettler  31:44  This is the stuff we don't understand. Like I hear the words coming out of your mouth. Okay, but I'm a little confused. I mean, like, okay, so I set up okay, Search Console. So go me, I get that. So you've got keywords, right? Yeah, yes. Yes, it did. Keywords?Michele Hansen  32:04  Yes. Okay. That is the most useful part about that for me, okay. Like before, until we started using h refs, that was what I used all the time. Okay. And so that tells you all of the different keywords that are leading people to your site, okay. It's very, it's very basic, but it's like, it's, it's enough. And I think you can sort it by volume, and you know, the number of clicks and stuff that you're getting right. And then basically taking that and so so in, like in that long article that drew wrote. So I was just, you know, publishing that as a web page, not as a PDF or anything. And then search engines pick up on the headlines. So if someone is typing in, you know how to do image upload, or file upload with react, for example, then your headlines need to be like step one, like, determine which files you want people to be able to upload with react, like with your react app, like step two, like do this thing with your react app, if you want to be able to have them, you know, import files, or like what like, use different variations of that. But like, use it in the headline. So like, we have a million of these things on our website. It actually if you go to geocoded I o. And then like in the Help menu, there's one that says tutorials, we've all these step by step guides, that are all in this format, which I actually learned from another friend of ours, who is a total SEO, like genius. And then each one is like bullet points of step one, determine which addresses you want to find the congressional district for step two, take the list of addresses that you want the congressional district for, and upload them to geocode, do step three, you know, like, and it's just using those same words over and over and over again, it's kind of like, you know, in the 90s, when you saw like, a huge block of like, tiny font text at the bottom of a web sites,Colleen Schnettler  33:55  yes,Michele Hansen  33:56  that is basically how this is done now, but use different versions of that of that text to because people might be typing in different things. Like we saw, for example, we'll see that people type in lat long to Congressional District, which is something I would not type in personally, like I think of address to congressional district. So we make sure that it says address to congressional district, it also says lat lon to congressional district to GPS coordinates to congressional district, like all of those, many permutations of it, and then having as many things in headlines as possible. So that that is what the you know, search engine picks up on.Colleen Schnettler  34:36  Okay. Okay, cool. Yeah, we can work in that direction. And you're right. I didn't think about that. We already have this piece of content. SoMichele Hansen  34:43  yeah, and then just use it in many other places.Colleen Schnettler  34:46  Okay, great. Awesome. Cool. That's exciting. Yes. That's something to to focus on a little bit. I mean, I think that's what's been challenging for us is we're just what do you do next? I have no idea. I mean, I told her I was like, we're both learning here, right? This is part of the fun. This is why we're doing it like this is part of the fun of the process. But it's definitely can be a little intimidating or confusing, and to what you said aboutMichele Hansen  35:12  important versus urgent. I feel like important projects that are nebulous, get shoved to them.Colleen Schnettler  35:19  Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah, for sure. Like, totally. So we, that's great. We'll work on that. And then what I really want to do this week, is get a test sandbox environment set up on my website. You and I actually talked about this ages ago. And then when I talked to Derek Rhymer a couple weeks ago, he said it again. And I was like, I should really do this. But all this rail 6.1 stuff was the reason I hadn't done it yet. So I'm hoping I'll be able to get something like that up in a week. And basically, that would be kind of test sandbox. Yeah. So you know, if you go on to upload Cara cloudinary website, there's a big button that says try it now. And you can literally just try and like that, you can see exactly what it does before you sign up for an account, and all of that stuff. So that is something I want to go. Okay. Yeah. And I think that would be great. Because that's going to give me higher quality leads. And I think it'll encourage more people to use the service because I think my service offers some things that these other these other services don't offer. SoMichele Hansen  36:21  show them what it does.Colleen Schnettler  36:22  Yeah, exactly. I mean, that's I try I have the video, which shows them what it does. But people like to, especially developers, like at least I do, I like to put my hands on thing, like you make it look easy. Is it actually that easy? So I feel like I think that's a pretty common feeling. Yeah.Michele Hansen  36:37  Don't tell me that it's easy. Let me experience how easy it exactlyColleen Schnettler  36:41  like I want to actually do it. So that's my goal for this week. That's a little ambitious, because there's a lot of moving parts in that. But once I get that set up, I think that's going to be great for marketing, and potential customers and stuff. SoMichele Hansen  36:54  yeah, what are some of those moving parts? Because maybe if there's five steps involved, if you get three out of five, by next week, that's still pretty good.Colleen Schnettler  37:02  Yeah. So the thing I have to do to do this, my plan, at least, first of all, if I have an open file uploader open to the world, I have to be really careful with security. And so I want to write a script that automatically deletes these uploaded files, like every 10 minutes. I don't know how to do that. I mean, I'm sure I can figure it out. But like, I've never done that before. So I have no idea. I don't just know how to do that. I, again, theoretically, it's easy, but I don't know. So I want to do that. And I guess I don't need a script, I can just do it in my app, but whatever. I also want to make sure those files go to a completely separate domain, like completely separate domain, then the files I'm serving for our production customers. Because if someone says it's open to the world, if someone were to upload an inappropriate file that could be that can be bad, right?Michele Hansen  37:58  I mean, it's files. I'm vaguely remember remembering somebody's like, warning you about like that. Yeah, it was like I think on Hacker News or something like this. It happened to somebody it happened to someone else app. And yeah,Colleen Schnettler  38:10  so there was, yeah, someone sent it to me on Twitter. And it was a there's this big Hacker News thread about it. Someone else who has a similar product didn't separate his domain. So he had everyone on the same domain. And so his whole site got blacklisted. Like he didn't even separate. I'm not saying he did, he didn't know. But he didn't even separate his app from his serving domain, like mine are already separate. So that's already good. But he had literally everything on the same domain. So when his site got blacklisted by Google, like, everything went down. Oh, yeah. And he said it. You know, the interesting thing, I read the Hacker News thread, and they didn't have problems for years. I mean, they had their file uploader open to the world for like, I think was like three years. And they didn't have any issues. And then one day, bam, everything, everything was shut down. So I've already taken many security steps. I have a wireless firewall, I have separate domains for my app and my serving domain. But if I'm going to open this to the world, I want a third domain for test files. So that's I already have that. I'm actually deleting the files.Michele Hansen  39:14  Yeah. is smart, too. I don't know if that other person did that. But that disincentivizes people from using it for malicious?Colleen Schnettler  39:21  Yeah, file. I mean, one of the good things is he wrote a really detailed what I learned I could just take all of that he's and that was one of the things is he was deleting the files, I think every 36 hours and he's like, that's not enough. Like you need to be deleting the files like every 20 minutes. Okay,Michele Hansen  39:38  that's a great he's got like a step by step,Colleen Schnettler  39:40  step by step. So what not to do, so. I want to make sure I hit all of those wickets before I open this up on my website. Absolutely. Yeah, but that would be a huge I'm really excited about that. Because I really think once I get that I really think I can I can push a little more and I really think that's going to help with my Yeah, so that's my goal for next week.Michele Hansen  40:06  Alright, so next week we will check in on whether the sandbox is live on your site and maybe possibly my book will be ready. Who knows? Stay tuned.Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Escuchando Documentales
II Guerra Mundial, Infierno Bajo el Mar (T2): 4- Desafiando a Rommel #historia #documental #podcast

Escuchando Documentales

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 43:56


Es 1941 y Erwin Rommel y sus ejércitos esperan tomar Egipto, tomar el control del Canal de Suez e impedir que Gran Bretaña reciba suministros vitales de la colonia de la India y el petroléo de Medio Oriente. La última línea de defensa de los Aliados es una flota de pequeños submarinos británicos de clase U estacionados en la pequeña isla de Malta. A pesar del clima impredecible y un girocompás roto, HMS Upholder y su teniente comandante Malcolm Wanklyn luchan para mantener la línea contra los poderes del Eje y cambiar el rumbo de la Campaña del Norte de África.

Bala Extra
Ikea, Suez y la casa de Ermua

Bala Extra

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 12:16


Los cabeceros de Malm, me dicen en Ikea, están agotados en Europa por el bloqueo que sufrió el Canal de Suez. Por lo demás, ayer fue el penúltimo paso porContinue readingIkea, Suez y la casa de Ermua

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk
Historical series: the Suez crisis

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2021 28:57


In part two of our special historical series this summer, we examine the Suez crisis of 1956. Ever since Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser announced his plans to nationalise the Suez Canal, the UK hasn't looked quite so sure of itself. What does the country think it's doing? What is Israel's long game? And how will this impact the UK's relationship with the United States? Andrew Mueller speaks to Michael Binyon, John Everard, Anshel Pfeffer and Alex von Tunzelmann. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Morning Toast
120: Swimming in The Suez: Thursday, July 8th, 2021

The Morning Toast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 59:45


Brian Austin Green says he, Megan Fox 'get along great' after petty digs (Page Six) 28 Books Being Made Into Movies and TV Series That You Should Read Ahead of Their Release (Variety) Ship that blocked Suez Canal sets sail after deal signed (BBC) Beyond Meat launches new meat-free chicken tenders in U.S. restaurants (CNBC) Tom Girardi Embezzlement Victims Can Collect Payments from Erika Girardi, Judge Rules (PEOPLE) Real Housewives of Beverly Hills Recap Love Island Recap The Morning Toast with Claudia (@girlwithnojob) and Jackie Oshry (@jackieoshry) Merch: https://shopmorningtoast.com/ The Morning Toast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/themorningtoast Girl With No Job by Claudia Oshry: https://www.girlwithnojob.com/book

OTR Detective – The Great Detectives of Old Time Radio
EP3494: The Silent Men: Trouble at Suez

OTR Detective – The Great Detectives of Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2021 32:10


A special agent has got top secret microfilm, but is on his own to figure out how to get them to the U.S. consulate. Become one of our monthly patreon supporters at patreon.greatdetectives.net Support the show on a one-time basis at http://support.greatdetectives.net. Read more ...

Financial Sense(R) Newshour
First Suez, Now Yantian - The Global Supply Chain Is Having a Rough Time (Preview)

Financial Sense(R) Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 0:36


Jun 23 – The global supply chain continues to be plagued by port closures, blockages, and high shipping rates. To discuss all that's going on right now in global trade, we speak with Lori Ann... Subscribe to our premium weekday podcasts: https://www.financialsense.com/subscribe

Science Diction
Serendipity and Syzygy: Fortunate Accidents

Science Diction

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 14:51


How did a country's name end up inside the word, “serendipity"? And what’s a “syzygy"? And, more importantly, why does it have so many y’s?    Over the past year, several listeners have written to us asking about these two words. Now, we answer—with a little help. Eli Chen and Justine Paradis join us for a round of Diction Dash, where Johanna tries (and usually fails) to guess the correct origin or meaning of a word.  If you want us to cover a word on the show, get in touch! Give us a call, leave a message, and we might play it on the show. The number is 929-499-WORD, or 929-499-9673. Or, you can always send an email to podcasts@sciencefriday.com.  Guests:  Justine Paradis is a reporter and producer for Outside/In from New Hampshire Public Radio.  Eli Chen is senior editor of Overheard at National Geographic.  Footnotes & Further Reading:  More on how a syzygy helped free the Suez ship at the Wall Street Journal Read The Three Princes of Serendip Credits:  Science Diction is produced by Johanna Mayer and Senior Producer and Editor Elah Feder. Daniel Peterschmidt composed all our music. Fact checking by Robin Palmer. Nadja Oertelt is our Chief Content Officer.

Citation Needed
The Suez Canal

Citation Needed

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 33:06


The Suez Canal (Arabic: قَنَاةُ السُّوَيْسِ‎, Qanātu s-Suways) is an artificial sea-level waterway in Egypt, connecting the Mediterranean Sea to the Red Sea through the Isthmus of Suez and dividing Africa and Asia. In 1858, Ferdinand de Lesseps formed the Suez Canal Company for the express purpose of building the canal. Construction of the canal lasted from 1859 to 1869 and took place under the regional authority of the Ottoman Empire. The canal officially opened on 17 November 1869. It offers vessels a direct route between the North Atlantic and northern Indian oceans via the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea, avoiding the South Atlantic and southern Indian oceans and reducing the journey distance from the Arabian Sea to London by approximately 8,900 kilometres (5,500 mi), or 10 days at 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) to 8 days at 24 knots (44 km/h; 28 mph).[1] The canal extends from the northern terminus of Port Said to the southern terminus of Port Tewfik at the city of Suez. Its length is 193.30 km (120.11 mi) including its northern and southern access-channels. In 2020, more than 18,500 vessels traversed the canal (an average of 51.5 per day).[2] Our theme song was written and performed by Anna Bosnick. If you’d like to support the show on a per episode basis, you can find our Patreon page here.  Be sure to check our website for more details.

Hard Factor
4/14: Johnson & Johnson Blows it Again, Kristin Smart Cold Case Busted, Egypt Impounds the Evergiven, and Robots are Delivering Pizzas

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 45:52


On today's episode ... (00:07:50) - The Daily Buzz Top 5: #ExposeCNN shows an editor who admitted they run politically biased propaganda, Champions League, Kristin Smart Arrest, Dogecoin Surge, and the Johnson & Johnson vaccine has a weird day with the federal government (00:21:55) - The 1996 killer of Kristin Smart (and his father) have been arrested after interest in the California case was re-ignited by the podcast “Your Own Backyard” (00:27:40) - Egypt is NOT HAPPY with the Evergiven ship that blocked the Suez canal and made them look bad for a week, so they’ve impounded it and are asking Japan to pay up if they want it back (00:31:30) - The AI Corner: Where we chronicle the rise of the machines. First Dominoes has begun using robot delivery drivers in Houston, then Wes tells us about robot dogs who are helping cops bust criminals in New York (also a guy who turned a robot dog into a bartender) (00:43:00) - Wal-Mart suffers yet ANOTHER case of someone accidentally shooting themselves in the changing room… This and much more brought to you by our incredible sponsors: Talkspace offers 24/7 online therapy with a licensed therapist. Taking care of your mental health is important for everyone. As a listener of this podcast, you’ll get $100 off of your first month with Talkspace. To match with a licensed therapist today, go to http://talkspace.com Make sure to use the code HARDFACTOR to get $100 off of your first month and show your support for the show. That’s HARDFACTOR and talkspace.com. Cuts Clothing blends timeless style and comfort so that you look as good as you feel It’s not just a lifestyle. It's not just clothing. It's office-leisure apparel For the Sport of Business™. Get 15% off your first order by going to http://cutsclothing.com/hardfactor for 15% off the Only Shirt Worth Wearing. Follow Hard Factor: Twitter - @HardFactorNews Instagram - @HardFactorNews Youtube - HardFactorNews Voice Mail - 512-270-1480 Hard Factor Mark: Twitter - @HardFactorMark IG - @HardFactorMark Hard Factor Pat: Twitter - @HardFactorPat IG - @Pclassidy Hard Factor Wes: Twitter - @HardFactorWes IG - @HardFactorWes Hard Factor Will: Twitter - @HardFactorWill IG - @HardFactorWill

The New Abnormal
FEVER DREAMS: Why QAnon Is So Bummed to See the Suez Ship Go Free

The New Abnormal

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 39:24


Did you know that everyone’s favorite Suez-Canal-blocking ship is now the subject of a QAnon conspiracy? The Daily Beast’s Asawin Suebsaeng and Will Sommer lay out why the adrenochrome set is convinced that the stuck ship’s cargo is full of trafficked children on the latest episode of our Fever Dreams podcast (Hint: it has to do with Hillary Clinton’s secret service code name—you guessed it, EVERGREEN.) Speaking of Hillary conspiracies, Suebsaeng and Sommer discuss why the right just can’t seem to come up with a good Joe Biden conspiracy to smear the new president; Trump’s base seems more interested in reverting to their old hatreds of Clinton and Barack Obama. (As Suebsaeng points out, Biden quite simply is not Black or a woman, and so doesn’t inspire the same level of vitriol from the hardcore racist, misogynistic Trumpites.)Meanwhile, there’s a tug-of-war going on between those in the Trump administration who want the former president to receive “credit” for the COVID vaccine drive and the rightwing anti-government, anti-vaxx diehards who refuse to believe that their Emperor God actually wants them to get the shot. The tussle is crystallized in Trump’s former HHS staffer Michael Caputo, a “really brash, incredibly Trumpy longtime Republican operative” who has taken it upon himself to prosthelytize about the vaccine in biker bars among the “MAGA Sons of Anarchy”—and who’s running into a lot of resistance.Keep an eye out for the interview with The Daily Beast’s own Kelly Weill, who walks our hosts through the crazy cast of lawyers and faux-lawyers who have sprung up to defend the Capitol Rioters and anti-masker businesses—one of them quotes from Lord of the Rings, another has never actually passed the bar because he thinks it’s a British conspiracy. And most importantly, we learn about Proud Boys founder Gavin McInnes’ supervillain origin story, how Texas National Guard troops faced a hostage situation with Pizzagate overtones, and how Will Sommer is singlehandedly responsible for bringing the phrase “soy boy” out of the Internet swamp into the national spotlight.Listen to Fever Dreams on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pod Save the World
Israel Deadlocked, Suez Unblocked

Pod Save the World

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 83:32


Tommy and Ben walk through the inconclusive results of the latest Israeli election, how Covid and bad political leadership is devastating Brazil, the Suez Canal, news from Biden on Afghanistan, more military violence in Myanmar, plans for a Chinese-Russian moon base, pan-European progressivism, US-Bolivia policy, and whether Prince William is actually the sexiest bald man alive. Then, Ben talks to Ricardo Herrero, head of the Cuba Study Group, about how the Biden administration should reengage with Cuba. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices